xt7p8c9r3b7t https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7p8c9r3b7t/data/mets.xml Lexington, Kentucky University of Kentucky 1923 course catalogs  English University of Kentucky Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. University of Kentucky course catalogs, 1865- Bulletin, University of Kentucky, Summer Session, Vol. 15, No. 2, 1923 text Bulletin, University of Kentucky, Summer Session, Vol. 15, No. 2, 1923 1923 2013 true xt7p8c9r3b7t section xt7p8c9r3b7t v.·`        V ' ?   ·‘‘’  ,  ·  ~  I  ’  V ; e <   l  V  . z     rp    ·   .  
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  TABLE OF CONTENTS \
  Page
  I Oiiicers and Faculty .........................,....,................................................... 3-7
  General Statement ............,,..........,,....,,.......................,............................ S-12-16
  Registration and Fees .................................................................»............ 12
  Teachers Certincates ...........l`................._.....l.................______.,.,_,,.,.......l,_, 13  
  Graduate Work .....................l......l...,.................................,......................... 9-12 ‘
  Agronomy ...............................,...................................................................... 33 1
  Animal Industry ,_.._._,..______.___......__________,_____.l....____.,,,.._,._..l_........................ 34 Q
  Art .........>.........._.........._................».............._...,..........,....>...................l.......... 19 T
  Bacteriology .,....__.........___.___.....,...._____,_,___,______________________.............................. 19 '
  Botany ..........l..........................,,..........,........,...........................rr.._................. 19 1
  Chemistry ............................................._................................l..,.................... 20 i?
  Economics and Sociology ................................................,,.................... 21  
  Education .....l.......,..l,...................,..............,.......................................,....l.... 21 {
  English .................................,.............l......,...................,u.,..,4............,,....,..... 23 {
  Engineering ,.,.,........... _ .l_.,....l...__....,._.,A__.......,...........,_l____,___,,..____,_ll,,,l_.__,_.. 258-41  
  Farm Engineering ...............,...,.............,,..,.......,,.,.....................,..r...,.r..r... 33 {
ig —~German ..........................,......,.....,........,.....,,.,...,......_r.....r.....4.,_,....,,,,,,,,..l..,.. 23
  History and Political Science .........l........_,..............................,.,,,.,,,l,,.... 24 I
  Home Economics ..........................................,............................................... $26 .`
{T . Horticulture ..................,........ll.................l...................,...,,..,,,,...,..........,rr... 35
  1 Hygiene and Public Health .......................ll...........,............................. 25
  Latin and Greek ........,..................................,......................................,5.... 18
  Law ............................................. . .....................,............»...............,,,,.....,..... 42
  Mathematics .,...,,,.ll.__,,,_.A,______,_________A___________,....,________,_____,___,______..l,._.......... 25
  Music .........................»,.....................................................................,......5l5.... 26 l
  Physical Education and Athletics .......,,................................................. 27 {
  Physics ............................... . ........................`................................,..,............ 28 ‘
  Psychology ..........................,...............................................,..........,.l55..5.5,.... 29 `
ii Romance Languages ............ . ....................,....................,...................,5...... 29  
  Vocational Teacher Training .............................,..............l5.................... 30 ·
L Zoology .............................., . l.,. , ,,..................................,,....l...,.................... 31
  Schedule .i............................,,....i......................................,.............,,.,........... 45-51 1
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Q OFFICERS OF Al)MINlS'l`llA'l`ION
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F1:.xN|< Liclloxnn Ne1·1·;n, B. S. ix Aux., Dean, College of Agriculture.
l Fl{l~)lIl·Zl{l('l{ P.x1‘1. ANIll·Zl{S<)N. M. E., Dean, College of Engineering.
3 Lrxrxx Cll.\l.l(l.l·ZY. H. L., Cliuirnnln of Law Faculty.
`{ (l<)l,l'AIlll`S Rl`llUl.|‘lI Bll·Z|.('lII·Zll. A. l\‘l., Dean of Men.
]GXlXl,\ J. \V ])l·i.\l{, A. l\l., Business Agent.
A`I.\Il(i.\l{}·§'I' Is.x1nu:1·; Kim:. A. li., Libruriun.
'l`1·:1:1·;s.x ll¤‘vriu:x.xx1, A. B., Seerelury to the President.
- (‘1-:11..x 'l`.xr1.<»1:. A. ll., Secretary, Smnmer Session.
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  FACULTY OF THE SUMMER SESSION  
E W1LI.I.\)[ R. A1.1.1;x, A. M., P11. D., {
  Assislant Professor of Zoology  
 A C11A111.1;s CLAU11; AN1>1·;1:s<1x, M. R.,
  Pr0f<·sso1· of YU(‘(L[iO)l(l] Alf/l`i(‘1(H’lLI'(} (
  \V.u.T1;1z S. ANDI·§1(SON, M. A.,  
  Professor of Genetics i
  G1;011<11a Ixzxx B.xnx1·:S, A. B., M. S.,
  State Director of T»'oeo/ionol ]J(Y1L<'(/[{0/1, Loelurcr in V(J('(l[i())I(lZ  
ig Jfduea/ion ,
  JAM; B1·:1.1., B. S., .
  ])lS[I`I(<‘[Ol` in Home ]J('0)I()}lY.7;(‘S `
  R0111;1:*r V. 131..111:, A. M.,
 . ]11slr11<·/or in .1[o/imnzrr/ic·.s·.
  ST.xN1,1·;v A*1·\v<.o1> Bo1.1·;s, M. A., l
 ‘ Director of .11/71Zeli<·s,· II<·1Ax, A. B., E. E.,
4 Assistant Dean, College of Engineeriiig aml Professor of Electrical
Q E12 giinccrioig
l Cr..xm·:xc1·: C;\)ll’1$lCl.I. F1{l·ZI·I1I.\N, A. M.,
( Professor of English Literature, Transylvania College
, WI.l.I.I.\)[ D1·1!.l§I£l{'L‘ FUNI{U()I`Sl·ZI{, M. A., Pu. D.,
’ Professor of Zoology mul Head of Department
NIiI.I.]I·1 A. G.x1m, B. S., M. A.,
Instructor in Home Economics V
1 Emnx S'l`.\N’I`(lN Goon, M. S.,
‘ Professor of Animal Hasluamlrg
Ro1:1·:1<*1* Dmveeox H.\\\`IxlNS. B. M. E., M. E.,
V Assistant ])I'0f`(?SSOl` of J/ervlianieal Engriizeeriizvg
I‘I.\l{\'l·l\' S<'()'l"l` Hrxvxs, A. M.,
l Instructor in English
, Pycucy I{l·1Nl).\l.l. I{()l.XlI·ZS, A. M., M. D.,
Professor of Jlggiieue and Public Health and Head of Department
\ J. B. }I()l.l,()\\'.\Y, A. B.,
l High School Supervisor. Frankfort, 1(entaclcy; Lecturer in
; Etluealion.
i Joxm .I1‘1.1A>. I'I()(>l'|·Zl{, M. S. A.,
I 1‘rof<·ssor of Hairy Ililsliautlry
i Jeux S111·;1m1.xN Homxnc, M. E.,
I Assrislaiit Professor of Mcchaizieal Drazeiing
LICYI JAc1;s0N }I(>l{I..\(‘1IlCR, M. S.,
. Assistant Professor of Animal Hiisbandry
1\Lu Jouxsox. B. M. E.,
° Professor of .·1pplrie1·;1.x., B. A., B. S., A. M.,
Professor of Vocational Teacher Training and Hcad of the
{ Department
{ Dlxvm Nouwox S1No1c1<,
Instructor in Auto Engineering
Atfumrstrcs S1s1<, A. B.,
{ Instructor in lllallzcinalies
D.xv11> N. SNICIIIJPZN, PII. D.,
{ Columbia University, New York City; Lecturer in Education
Asm.1·:Y V. S’1‘<11u1, Pu. D.
{ Professor of Agricultural Education, University of Minnesota;
{ Lecturer in Vocational Education
{ D.xx11·;1. S*1ux1:c11, Pu. D., Hz11·v:11·d University,
{ Lecturer in Education
{ 1\I.x11·;1z Wxcms, M. S.,
Professor of Physics and Head of the Department
El>\\'Al{I) WlI·ZS'1`, A. M., Pu. D.,
Professor of Economics and Head of the Department of Economics
and Sociology
` J. C. VVA1,1.1c1z, A. M.,
Superintendent of Schools, Hopkinsville, Kentucky
EMMA J. Worcuxmz, B. S., M. A.,
{ Acting Dean of Women
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.  GENERAL INFORMATION I
  The Summer Session of the University of Kentucky for 1923 will I
  begin on June 25 and extend for a period of six weeks.
§. A special session will be arranged for a period of Hve weeks fol- ,
ZA lowing the close of the first session. Announcement regarding the (
Q courses to be given in the second session will be made later. 1
Q I
  CLASSES OF COURSES S
  Courses are offered for graduates and undergraduates in the Col- ,
Ei lege of Arts and Sciences, the College of Agriculture, the College of l
  Engineering, and the College of Law. These courses are designed to I
L; meet the needs of teachers in colleges, normal schools, high schools, 1
Qs county and city superintendents, supervisors, and special students as
  lawyers, engineers, chemists, writers, social workers, playground di-
  rectors, farmers, breeders and dairymen. E
  DESIGNATION OF COURSES
  The courses in each department are numbered as in the University
 l` catalog, those primarily for undergraduates, from 1 to 99; those for
  both graduates and undergraduates, from 100 to 199; and those pri-
  marily for graduates from 200 on. All courses are fully described in
  the subsequent pages. ,
 , A LARGER PROGRAM FOR 1923 Q
  The attendance for 1922 was the largest in the history of the Uni- 1
  versity. The interest and enthusiasm manifested have led the Univer- ,
 ` sity to plan a larger program for 1923, and to o1`fer courses especially ‘
  designed to serve the needs of the teaching profession. The program  
  has been enlarged in the field of Education especially, and other de· 7
  partments have been strengthened in their work. An attempt has \
 A been made to provide more satisfactory arrangements for graduate I
  ` work.
  TERMS OF ADMISSION
  In general, students may be admitted to the Summer Session re-
ii  gardless of their advancement, provided they are qualified to carry
  the courses desired. The following general terms of admission are in
  force during the regular sessions and Summer Session students will 1
  do well to arrange for admission under some of the ways provided. `
is The requirements for admission for undergraduates who desire I
  college credit, and who desire to become candidates for degrees, are as e
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 I follows: (1) By passing the examinations for entrance to the Univer-
sity as described in the general catalog; (2) by certificate of gradua-
tion fro1n a standard accredited high school; (3) by certified standing
. from a state normal school, or (4) by presentation of evidence of sat-
isfactory scholarship and cha1·acter l'l'Ol1l an approved college or uni-
versity at which the student has been in attendance. Admission to
I the graduate school is discussed later.
i Students who have not previously entered the University will
| do well to present to the Registrar of the University at or before the
1 beginning of the Summer Session, their scholastic record. When pre-
, senting transcripts of records from other institutions, the student`s
l high school record should accompany them, since the student’s classifi-
cation often depends on the particular subjects taken in high school.
i The record will be formally passed upon by the entrance committee and
, the Registrar, who will issue to the student, on application, a statement
` of standing.
[ Applicants for admission to the College of Law as candidates for
` a degree nmst satisfy the general entrance requirements of the Uni-
` versity, stated above, and in addition, must have thirty credits of col-
lege work, the equivalent of the fieshman year in the College of Arts
` and Sciences.
l Students who do not desire to become candidates for a degree
need not comply with the entrance requirements. They may register
in any course or courses which they are able to carry to advantage. If
1 such students complete the work of a course satisfactorily, the Reg-
{ istrar will, upon application, issue a credit statement noting the
N hours of work carried and the grades earned. Credit toward gradua-
tion at the University of Kentucky, however, will be given only after
Q regular matriculation by one of the methods described above.
t Students who have been dismissed from the University will not
  be admitted to the Summer Session without the approval of the Com-
V mittec on Attendance and Scholarship.
Students who desire to become candidates for degrees should, if
possible, submit their credentials before entering, as it occasionally
takes conside1·able time to settle the various questions which arise.
Ask the Registrar i`or a form on which to submit credits.
GRADUATE WORK
The following brief statement of opportunities for graduate work
E in the Summer Session for 1923 is published for the information of
j those seeeking higher degrees. In the Summer Session in 1922, there
1 was an increased demand on the part of high school teachers, prin-
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l_ cipals and city superintendents for opportunities for graduate work.
_` To meet this increasing demand, the various departments are provid-
j ing facilities for a. large1· program for graduate students.
Q  ADMISSION TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL I
  Graduates of the University of Kentucky are admitted to the
y Graduate School without examination. Graduates of other approved ‘
Q universities and colleges are admitted to the Graduate School upon
i` nling with tl1e Registrar of the University of Kentucky an othcial
  _ transcript of their undergraduate record, This record is considered
  by the Graduate Committee and in some cases it is necessary to pro- {
if scribe undergraduate courses as a further preparation for candidacy J
Q for the degree sought. It is desirable that the student send the tran- ‘
t` script to the Registrar of the University some weeks in advance ot the 5
  opening of the Summer Session. Where the student has a baccalaureate i
  degree from a standard institution, he will be admitted to the graduate  
  school as a candidate tor the particular advanced degree for which 1
  his undergraduate preparation tits him. n
i% Graduate students who do not care to become candidates for a I
  higher degree need not comply with the 1·equirements indicated above. I
 " College graduates who desire to confine their work to undergrad- 1
Q, uate courses and who do not expect to become candidates for a higher
  degree should not register in the graduate school, but with the Dean ;
  of the College in which their courses are listed. ‘
  ` No person is considered a candidate for a higher degree until  
 . he has first satisfied the entrance requirements to the Graduate *
g; School. Work of a graduate character done prior to such registration ~
[  may be counted towards an advanced degree only after formal ap- f
  plication is made to the registrar, which application must be ap- {
  proved by the graduate connnittee. Such credit can not be used to .
  diminish the time requirement for residence. i
ii RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS  
  To obtain the master's degree the student must have been in i
1. pursuit of graduate studies at the University of Kentucky for a per-
  iod ot at least one year, or for four Summer Sessions. Three Summer I
 {_ Sessions of eleven weeks each or twelve weeks each will satisfy the
  residence requirements for the master’s degree. The rules of the Grad-
  uate Committee at present provide that the student is not held to
  any particular number of hours or courses, but must satisfy such
  work as may be required in the held in which he selects his major  
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 or minor. In some cases it is necessary, as a means of further prepara-
tion for graduate work, to assign to the student undergraduate courses
to be completed before the majo1· or minor work can be taken up.
, As stated above, the student is not held to any particular number
of hours or courses, but the following indicates roughly the amount
_ of work generally required for the master’s degree:
Major ........................,........>.................................. 12 credits
Minor .................................................................... G credits
Thesis ......................c...,...........,............................. G credits
{ ln addition, the student must pass a satisfactory oral examination
[ and be prepared to defend his thesis before a committee consisting of
  his major and minor professors. All courses must be selected with the
` advice and consent of the major professor.
  GRAl)1T.»\TE COURSES IN THE SUMMER SESSION
I The following cou1·scs given in the Summer Session for 1923 may
I be taken for graduate credit, for a major or minor, as indicated:
` Ancient Languages 4, minor only.
l Ancient Languages 201:1, 201b, major or minor.
{ Bacteriology 102, minor only.
Bacteriology 103, major or minor.
z Botany 105, minor only.
[ Botany 20(ia, 20Ub, 213la, 21311, major or minor.
I Chemistry 7, S, 0, 12, 1,4, minor only.
l Economics 100, major or minor.
, Education 108, Ta, 7b, minor only.
{ Education 215b, 217a, 220a, major or minor.
Q English 105, 110, 110, 100, 111, minor only.
, English 205, major.
1 llistory 118, minor.
1 Hygiene 102, 104, minor only.
°] l\lat.hematics 105, 106, major or minor.
l Political Science 55, 57, minor only.
Physics 107, 108, major or minor.
Psychology 10S, 110, minor 011ly.
' French 101a, minor only,
Spanish 103a, 104a, minor only.
Vocational 'l`eacher Training 102, 107, 105, 101, 134, minor only.
Zoology 102, 106, minor only.
Agronomy 101, major or minor.
l Animal Industry 203, major or minor.
{ Animal Industry 104, minor only.
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 ZN During the Su1nmer Session it is possible for graduate students
jj  to take majors in the following fields: Ancient Languages, Bacteriology,
 l Botany, Economics, Education, English, Mathematics, Physics, Agro-
ii ` nomy, Animal Industry. Minors may be taken in combination in the Qi
LY fields named for majors or in the following: Political Science, Psy-  
  chology, Romance Languages, Vocational Teacher Training or Zool— I
  ogy. 1
V; High