xt7p8c9r4x3c https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7p8c9r4x3c/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19660322  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, March 22, 1966 text The Kentucky Kernel, March 22, 1966 1966 2015 true xt7p8c9r4x3c section xt7p8c9r4x3c Inside Todays Kernel
AAUP says a student's conduct is
hit
own business: toge Two.

Prof. J. I. Reeres predicts passage of
new state constitution: toge Tire.

Notional College Queen contest
gets
underway ot UK: Pogt Three.

basketball gome
to be played here Saturday: toge Sii.

tditor

discusses the Faculty Senate
and freedom of the press: toge Tout.

tast-We-

All-St-

Correspondence courses hare a high
rate: Togo Seven.

drop-o-

1

'

v;r

r

University of Kentucky
MARCH
LEXINGTON, KY.,

Vol. LVII, No. 102

TUESDAY,

By RON HERRON

Kernel Staff Writer

FRANKFORT

V

,

C

-

'I

j

-

Students

should be getting the applications for the qualification test
for the draft soon.
State Selective Service Director Col. Everette S. Stephenson
said today that he hopes to get
the applications to local boards
all over Kentucky by the first
of next week and to college students soon afterwards.
Col. Stephenson said that college students and high school
seniors will be able to pick up
the applications from any local
board in the state at that time.
Col. Stephenson emphasized
that all students should apply
immediately, affixing a stamp to
the
return envelope
and indicating on the application which testing center he will

J;

C

attend.

Kernel Photo By Randy Cochran

0 Banjos And

Books

Interests conflict in spring. With a banjo in one hand and a book in
the other, this couple strolls toward Botanical Gardens a most
appropriate place to spend the first day of spring.

There will be 1,200 testing
centers across the nation, and
14 in Kentucky.
The Kentucky centers include
UK, University of Louisville,
Morehead, Murray, Brescia, Pike-vill- e,

Eastern, Cumberland, and
Paducah Junior College.

The tests will be given May 14
and 21 and June 3. Only ticket- -

O'Brien, Westerfield Form
First Slate For SC Race
ment he made six weeks ago that
he would not seek the top SC slot
but turn his interests to the
upYMCA. He gave three reasons for
coming Student Congress elections was announced today with his return to the race he had long
John O'Brien, current SC vice been expected by Congress specupresident, making a bid for next lators to run.
He says, "there is a lack of
year's presidency and SC Representative Oscar Westerfield as his potential candidates for the top
office who are aware of the probrunning mate.
much less
lems UK students
O'Brien and Westerfield filed know how to face, them."
solve
their applications this afternoon,
O'Brien maintains he is capable.
the second of a ten day period
"I also realized I could handle
for filing.
the duties and still keep up acaAnnouncing their candidancy,
O'Brien said. The
O'Brien and Westerfield pre- demically,"
disappointment from the defeat of
sented a campaign
platform the
proposed Congress-Studestrongly designed to bring about Center Board merger and "the
a merger of Student Congress
it was lost" was O'Brien's
with the Student Center Board. way reason for running.
third
A previous move to combine the
O'Brien and Westerfield said
two was defeated recently by the
the student body was the "real
Student Center Board.
O'Brien's announcement to loser" in the defeat of the prorun for office contradicts a state posed merger. Their platform

TERENCE HUNT
Kernel Managing Editor
The first slate for the
By

outlines a program to "bring
about a merger and the eventual
administration of the student
center by the students."
Their four-pa- rt
plan calls for a
wide referendum on the
campus
merger question to be held in
September. If approved, a petition will be sent to Robert
Johnson, vice president of student
affairs, requesting him "to instruct the Student Center Board
to participate in serious merger
negotiations," the plan says.
The next step, should the
Board refuse to negotiate, would
be to conduct an organized and
professionally conducted boycott
of all Student Center facilities
and programs in October. "If
further sanctions are required,
then a boycott of Student Center
Board elections will be conducted
in the spring of 1967," the statement reads.
Continued On Pace 8

Kingsbury Denies Rumors
ByJOIINZEH
Kernel News Editor
President
Vice
Cilbert W. Kingsbury today
crossed his name off the list of
Northern Kentucky Democrats
mentioned as fourth district congressional candidates.
"I'm happy where I am," he
told the Kernel. "I think I can
make a contribution here."
Mr. Kingsbury serves as assis
Assistant

tant to vice president

for Uni-

Clenwood
Relations
versity
Creech, a public relations post.
The former state representative said he "hasn't talked to a
soul" about running for U.S.
from the new
Representative
fourth district, created by this
year's Ceneral Assembly redisricting. "I'm not Interested,"
he said.
But Northern Kentucky Dem

Eight Pages

Applications For Draft Test
Should Be Available Soon,
Director Stephenson Says

"V1

(

22, 19G6

ocratic

chiets

say

they

overtures for the Washington post.

Democratic

later.

They will have sample questions on their application blanks.
These are divided into four areas
verbal relations, reading comprehension, arithmetic reasoning,

and data interpretation. The entire test has 150 questions and
is expected to take three hours

to complete.
have
Critics
repeatedly
charged that these tests, of the
Korean War type, give unfair
advantage to students of mathematics and sciences. "This is
just not true," Col. Stephenson
said.
"I don't think a chemistry
major or a law major or anyone
else would have any more chance
than other kids in college," he

added.

Recent increases in voluntary

enlistments have raised some
hopes that college students may
not have to be drafted after all.
Col. Stephenson said he could
not yet tell how this would affect
Kentucky, but state voluntary
enlistments had increased along
with the national trend, he noted.
Col. Stephenson reiterated his
feeling that the draft test was
a more vital instrument than
grades for the local board to
judge by.

leader,

Kenton
C.
Rankin.
Otwell
County party chairman, said Mr.
Kingsbury's "name comes up because of interest he has indicated over the years." He did
not elaborate.
d
"I hear through the
7
On Page
grape-Continue-

"I think the student has a
much better chance if he takes
the test than if he relies on
his grades," he asserted. He has
previously asserted that if he were
on a local draft board presented
with two students, one taking
the tests, the other refusing, he
would draft the refuser.
Technically, the local board
is advised to consider both the
test scores and grades in determining deferments. It has been
repeatedly emphasized, however,
that the local board is an "autonomous" body, and Col. Stephenson again affirmed that, "the
local board can use anything it
wants to."
By grades, deferred freshmen
will be required to be in the
upper half of their class, sophomores in the upper
and juniors in the upper
two-third- s,

three-fourth-

s.

Col. Stephenson has said the
Selective Service would have a
much simpler job if the colleges
themselves would decide which
students could stay and which
would be drafted, but they didn't
want to do that. He said he could

understand their reluctance to

decide so many fates.
"I don't really think the colleges really want to do the picking," he said. "It's quite a little
responsibility to say 'take this
kid and leave this kid'."
The test itself is for the
student's benefit, he claimed:
"They can't lose. The only possible thing is that they can gain.
The whole thing is designed for

the student himself."

r'

V

Minerva
irt
I pert i:er.t

ot

t

in

have

"drafted" him because of past
One

holders will be admitted to the
testing room. For most college
students and many high school
seniors, it will be a rerun of the
CQTand College Board examination procedures.
The test registrants will report
to the testing center at 8:30 a.m.
and enter the testing room a half-ho-

l'leftua

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fir

at

ay

Utile

Although it lrtK9 &
up, I Biaply
hert to give
canot in her witn ia ta torX
epriutf
Itiircfcl
.
Jo i fu
fur to ooitnee.

kinerrti,

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Minerva, an orphan mouse, lost
her owner in the mad rush to
Fort Lauderdale over spring
vacation. The tiny black and
white creature was found on the
steps of Kastle Hall by Mrs.
Peggy Mull, administrative assistant in the department of psychology, about 8 a.m., March 11.
g
she had found a
By
n?w home. Minerva, abandoned
for the carefree life, will go with
her cage (a converted plastic shoe
box), a box of hamster food, and a
box of Rice Krispies (which she
loves dearly) and seek a new life
among friends.

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tuesday, March 22, 1966,

2

Somerset College Director Resigns For Federal Post

Dr. Lawrence
Davenport,
director of the University's Community College at Somerset, an-- ,
nounced Thursday that he will
resign his position, effective

Julyl.

Dr. Davenport said he has
accepted a post with the federal
government to teach technical
skills to persons connected with
military programs.
Dr. Ellis F. Hartford, dean of

Journalists To Attend Conference
several journalists nave
cepted invitations to the

ac-

acquainted with

UK

and its

UK various academic programs.
Alumni Association's sponsored
Although, he added, plans had
National Editors Conference here yet to be completed, the Alumni
May
Association guests would probCilbert Kingsbury, assistant ably attend the Association's
vice president for University reSeminar on the Far East.
lations, said today three other
Other journalists who have
journalists are expected to round accepted invitations to the conout the invitation list.
ference include Irwin Knoll, edTwo UK alumni, Don Whiteucation writer for the Newhouse
in Washington;'
head, retired Associated Press Newspapers
war correspondent and a Pulitzer Kermit McFarland, cheif ediPrize winner, and T. George torial writer for Scripps-Howar- d
Harris, senior editor of Look ' in Washington; William Emerson
Magazine, are among those exJr., editor of the Saturday Evenpected for the conference.
ing Post; Edwin Diamond, senior
Mr. Kingsbury said the con- 'editor of Newsweek; and Harry
ference's purpose is to allow naexecutive editor of
Harper,
tionally known editors to become Reader's Digest.
5-- 7.

the community college system,
said that Dr. Davenport has
"made it clear that he will not
return next fall by letting us know
far enough
plans.

in advance of his

"He has worked hard and has
gotten the Somerset Community
College ofT to a good start," he
said.

work at Los Angeles Slate and
Whitticr Colleges, the University
of Redlands, and the University
of California at Los Angeles.
Dr. Davenport has been director of the Somerset college

since its founding last fall.
Dr. Hartford said that he tries
to keep potential directors in
mind, but that he has made no
the
plans regarding
present
Somerset position.

Foresters Set Conference Here

Time was when forestry
neonle cot together they talked
about saving the country's woodDr. Davenport came to the lands from destruction by man,
Somerset College from St. Louis, fire, and floods.
where he was associate dean of
"Not any more," says Dr.
technical education for the St. Richard Mark of the University
Louis-St- .
Louis County Junior
Department of Forestry.
College District.
"Those problems have just
about been solved," Dr. Mark
He is a native of Neosho, Mo.,
World War II," he
who took his undergraduate work says. "Since
adds, "we have been growing
at Southwestern Missouri State
more trees than are being reCollege, the University of Mismovedour forests no longer are
souri, and the University of
being depleted."
Arkansas.
Now the forestry profession
He received the bachelor, is turning to new problems.
"Our people are now oriented
master of science, and doctor of
education degrees at Arkansas. toward wood, and the question
of how to utilize more of a tree
He also has done
post-doctor-

than the 40 percent that now is
being salvaged," says Dr. Mark.
That problem will be the
theme of a Thursday conference
at the University, where the Departments of'Forestry and Botany
are sponsoring the first in a series
on the
of meetings
wood-utilizatio-

problem.

Cuest speaker at the Thursday

meeting, set for 1:15 p.m. in Room
of the Funkhouser Biological
Sciences Building, is Dr. C. P.
Berlyn of Yale University's School
of Forestry, an authority on wood

211

anatomy.
Taking part will be biochemists, botanists, forestry specialists, and other scientists.

AAUP Upholds Rights Of Students
A student's conduct is his
own business and becomes the
school's concern primarily when
academic matters are involved.
This is the opinion of Dr.
Phillip Monypenny, a national
director of the American Association of University Professors
(AAUP).

chapters at Lexington's Transylvania College.
Dr. Monypenny spoke about
a proposed statement of principle
that the AAUP national council
will be asked to endorse.
"If the campus is fulfilling
its highest function, independent

and

dangerous

conceivably

thoughts may arise," he said.
The statement on student freedom, which Dr. Monypenny said
the AAUP hopes to have endorsed
by one or more national groups
dealing with students, involves
several aspects of student life.
One area that Dr. Monypenny

Dr. Monypenny, a political
scientist, is chairman of an
AAUP committee that deals with
for stufaculty responsibility
dent's academic freedom. He outlined college students' rights
Saturday while addressing the
conference of AAUP
. Kentucky

UK Bulletin Board

upholds is a tree student press.
"Student publications ought
to be run by students and they
ought to be free for expressions
of opinions, including, I should
think, some fairly scurrilous opinions about faculty members," he
said.
Dr. Monypenny said no one
criticized in print believes the
criticism is fair. "But then again,
I don't think critics have an
obligation to be fair. They mostly
have an obligation to be opin-

ionated."

activities are also
included in the proposal, and
along these lines, the AAUP formally protested Western Kentucky State College's handling
of the suspension of four students
last December.
Western suspended the students after they had published
an
magazine containing an article on morality that
Off-camp-

Bill Beam, political analyst
ow many persons
determining
for Zimmer, McClaskey, Lewis would be interested in flying or
Advertising, will speak at the learning to fly in an Aero Club
Young Democrats meeting at 7:30 at rates lower than those of comthe college's administration
tonight in Room 110 of the Law mercial operators.
deemed offensive. All four sus- Building. Mr. Beam was an adviser in the campaigns of PresiAll University art students
dents Kennedy and Johnson and have until March 31 to enter
Srarrs 7:30 Adm. $1.00
Combs
and
of Governors
for the Anne Worth-ingto- n
competition
Breathitt.
Callihan Book Award for
ili
outstanding work in art. StuWEDNESDAY
The Peace Corps Banquet will dents
for the award
Made in 43... Discovered in '65!
be at 6:30 p.m. Saturday in tho should competing the art
submit to
departPresident's Room of the Studen? ment examples of their creative
THE GREATEST SERIAL
Center. Reservations should be work and one or two studies
EVER FILMED!
made through the Program Direc- written for art
history or crititor's office in the Student CentPr, cism.
All 15
extension 2256. Banquet tickets
EPBEB
are $3.
COlfTE!
Gamma Chapter of Phi Epsi-lo- n
ALL LIVE- botanical honorary, will
Phi,
All University personnel and
ACTION I
students interested in forming a meet at 7 tonight in Room 211
J"" ""Ar
17
"H?
University Aero Club are to meet of the Funkhouser Building. Dr.
X
R. A. Chapman, Department of
at 5 p.m. Friday in Room 1
in the Medical CenterThis initial Plant Pathology and Botany, will
meeting is for the purpose of speak on "The Friendly Fungi."

pended students later were declared eligible for readmission.
The AAUP conference Saturday adopted five resolutions concerning student freedom, three
of which were directed at
Western.

"We protest the refusal of
the administration of Western
Kentucky State College to meet
with representatives of the Kentucky conference of the AAUP
with respect to the suspension . . . ," one read.

Fundamentally, he concluded, the basis of a student's
enrollment and good standing
at a college or university should
be his academic performance.
Outside the classroom, the student should be as free as any
other citizen to act as he pleases
within bounds set by society
and law, not by arbitrary university administrative decisions.

fl

ill

7

STARTS

WEDNESDAY!
'

TO OUR PATRONS:
'This is a spoof . . . we're not serious! Set it for
77ie

laughs only'.'V

EXCLUSIVE

FIRST RUN!

Manager

ZKa MOtlON PICTURE

With. SOMEthiCUG ID

tUrri

ROBERT
JONATHAN
'
MORSE
WINTERS
ANJANETTE COMER
Mil too Berle Junes Coban John Gielgud
Hunter Margaret
ightoo Libence Roddy McDowaU
Robert Morlej Barbara Nichols- Lionel Stand

Jg0

Tab

jROD STEIGER.,

HUI"I

THE MAN
WHO MADE

r
' 'TOM JONES'
sift

I
Southern tU Christopher Lsherwood
IMl.
..
DmrtW WToot Rkhardsoi
Caller
Hask.ll Wexler
AtraeaRvKTK fit??
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S4NMpU

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Terry

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IUMUVUIM
iUlMMM W pivrunirc AU.IUJII UIMi
THE Mssutat. Mm. II. INS

Kentucky Kernel, University
Station, University of Kentucky, Lex- lngton, Kentucky, 40500. Second-clas- s
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Published five times weekly during
the school year except during holidays
and exam periods, and weekly during
the summer semester.
Published for the students of the
University of Kentucky by the Board
of Student Publications. Prof. Paul
Oberst, chairman and Linda Gassaway,
secretary.
Begun as the Cadet in 18M, became the Record in 1IKX), and the Idea
In 1908. Published continuously as the
Kernel since 1915.

TDe
Loved! CPjine
Puu Andrews

FOLK HEROES

HIGH-CA-

IN A MARATHON

The Kentucky Kernel
The

OFFEND EVERYONE!

'

"TWO

I.,..nl

i

SUBSCRIPTION

RATES

Yearly, by mall $7.00
Per copy, from files t .10
KERNEL

TELEPHONES

Editor, Executive Editor, Managing
Editor
2321
News Desk, Sports, Women's Editor,
Socials
2320
Advertising, Business, Circulation 2319

of practical things . . . like" a good job, a good
salary, and a better share of the good thing in We. You
wouldn't want to do without any of them: But you may
be forced to . . . if you settle f of less than a good education.
Don't kid yourself. A, good education isn't a luxury
today, It'i an absolute necessity. With most employers, a
a
good education is ihtfirtt requirement for a good job
a job with a good future.
good paying job
$o, if you're in school now . . . stay there I Learn all yon
canf or sW lwyr. as you can. If you're out of school, you can
f r jmJpt
f t valuable training outside trAcJarfmcrta. v
.
ao.out about it. Visit the Youth .Counsellor at. your ..
State Employment Service.
.

Just a lot

...

...

.

;

Tocjt a good joby get a good educatian
:ir
fiAttA!

-

,v

as jpoMteBsrviae

O
Im

fooy

tiU with The

'

ATsrtMwg OiseiHr
'

-

'

MHIHHIM'
1

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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tuesday, March 22,

1966- -3

The Next From UK?

National College Queen
Contest Gets Underway
One of the University coeds
could be the next National College Queen.

The annual search is now
underway to select and to honor
"the nation's most outstanding
college girl." All undergraduate
women, from freshmen through
and including seniors, are eligible. A candidate may submit
her name or she can be recommended by her classmates,
friends, sororities, fraternities or
campus club groups.
.'.""

Miss Susan Terry Mallctt, right, is the current reigning National
College Queen. At left is Miss Carole Williamson, University of
Michigan, who was third in the contest. Miss Ruth Henderson,
University pf South Carolina, center, was second runner-up- .

Campus Happenings
Delta Gamma

The contest has been growing
until it has become a tradition at
hundreds of colleges and

Block And Bridle

Gamma
Delta
Sorority's
annual Founders' Day banquet
will be held at the Imperial

s.

Newly elected officers of the
and Bridle Club are L.
Conrad
Martin,
president;
Gregory Mayer, vice president;
Caroline Fargo, secretary; Betty
Schaber, treasurer; Larry Watson,
e
marshall; Warren Wilson,
Bruce Eick, Sam
chairman;
e
Burton,
Susan Newell, scrapbook chairman; Lillian Sanders, Jeannette
Dale, scrapbook
Block

House Saturday. The collegiate
chapter and the Lexington and
Louisville alumni will attend.

Designers

The pageant, now in its 12th
year, is the annual event which
gives recognition to students for
their scholastic ability. It is not
a beauty contest. Judging is based
on academic accomplishment, as
well as attractiveness, charm and
personality. The judges are seeking a typical American college
woman.

The officials of the pageant arc

stressing that this is not a
"bathing beauty contest." The
candidates never appear in swim
suits and aren't judged in this
manner. It is not a "talent contest." The candidates are never
asked to perform.

Instead, during the national
finals, the candidates are tested
on their intelligence, their general
knowledge, their qualities of leadership, their personalities. During the pageant which will be
held in New York City, the college women from the 50 states
will participate in a series of
forums. The judges conduct open
discussions (town meeting style)
and the college women are asked
their opinions on a wide range of
topics.
The candidates discuss education, campus life, current events,
art, literature, fashions, career
goals, and other subjects.
Among judges last year were
Ambassador Franklin II. Williams of the United Nations, Mrs.
Lenore Hershey, senior editor of

ii imiiiiiiiiTdMif

iiim

McCall's Magazine, and Mrs.
Carol Brock, senior editor of Good
Housekeeping Magazine. More
than 40 judges participate in the
pageant personally.

Last year, the national finalists toured the U.N. and were
honored by a reception at the
American

Embassy.

Special

theater parties are arranged also.
In 1965, Miss Susan Terry
Mallett, from Michigan State
University, received the title. She
was invited to appear in "The
Tournament of Roses" on New
Year's Day and was featured on
a float in that parade.
The next National College
Queen will receive more than
$5,000 in prizes, including a trip
to Europe and a new automobile.
She will also be awarded a $500
wardrobe of her favorite styles.
The finals will be held from
10 to June 20. To nominate
a coed, write for full details:
National College Queen Contest
Committee, 1501 Broadway, New
York City, N.Y. 10036.

June

ifrnmii"

bar-b-qu-

New officers of the UK chapter
of the National Society of Interior Designers are Linda Clary,
president; Kathy Binkley, vice
president; Irene Moore, secretary;
Susanne Jolly, treasurer.

FIRST

N ATIO N AL

CITY BAN K

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But if you think all travelers checks are alike,
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* New Member Of The Study

Lock On Freedom
Always the stalwart guardian of
academic freedom and its related
liberties, faculty council groups
seem opposed to a similar freedom
freedom of the press.
Though faculty groups traditionally spring to the aid of the freedom marchers in Selma or the
student dismissed for protest activities, they often deny another
freedom more close to home, the
fight of the press and public to
attend their meetings on an open
basis.
Here at the University, members
of the press student and otherwisemust have special permission
to attend the meetings of the
Faculty Senate. Those same indi- -

Cooperative Plan
Approval by the Board of Trustees to transfer University property on Virginia Avenue to the
Kentucky Authority for Educational
Television i a refreshing move
toward a cooperative plan to improve the state's educational system.
Willingness to transfer properties and information among the
bounds of state agencies is an indication that some of the autonomous departmental barriers plaguing state government in Kentucky
may be breaking down.
At the same time the University may well stand to benefit
itself by having the state ETV
located
network
headquarters
either adjacent or within a few
blocks of the campus so that both
facilities and personnel can work
cooperatively and interchangeably.

viduals who press so vigorously for
free inquiry into matters in other

areas retain the power to bar onlookers from their own proceedings.
The Faculty is one of the major
power bodies within the University.
The actions taken in their meetings
are relevant to the entire University
and its student body. Since faculty
members are employees of a
university, any citizen
should have the right to sit in on
their meetings. "Open records,
open meetings" is a
d
rule in all branches of
organizations and should by
all rights be applied to the Faculty
Senate.
In most cases the Senate has
readily agreed to admit reporters,
however, they retain the official
power to ban the press if they
choose. Such a power, it seems,
contradicts the basic tenets of freedom of inquiry.
The workings within the Faculty
Senate are important parts of the
administration of this University,
and certainly all phases of admind
istration of any
organization should be completely open.
Such openess in administration is a
basic principle expounded by- - the
American Association of University
Professors, an organization to
which many UK faculty members
belong.
The retention of the privacy
provision makes the Senate's supposed dedication to "liberalism"
seem somewhat laughable. Those
who yearn to explore all corners of
knowledge, should at least be
willing to toss away lock and key
for their own closet.
ed

long-establish-

state-linke-

near-disaste-

fat w'

.

i ImmiSM

state-linke-

More Candor In Space
Brilliant triumph and desperate
emergency swiftly succeeded each
other during the flight of Gemini 8,
as was made clear last w ;ek with
the release of tape recordings that
told the story of those frightening
minutes during which the linked
Agena and Gemini vehicles tumbled
violently and uncontrollably. Astronauts Armstrong and Scott survived
their adventures mainly because of
their superb presence of mind and
because of the large margin of
safety built into the Gemini vehicle,
plus some luck.
With Armstrong and Scott safely
back on earth, the immediate necessity, of course, is for an intensive
r.
probing of the causes of the
The docking maneuver
which their difficulties
during
began is absolutely central to the
procedure for sending a man to the
moon and returning him to earth.
Gemini 8 demonstrated that two
spaceships can be joined together
and then disengaged; but it now
remains to be shown that this can
be done repeatedly with complete
security for the vessels and their
occupants.
The possibility that serious difficulties might arise on the way to a
manned lunar landing has always
been prominent in the consciousness of the astronauts and of the
officials directly administering the
nation's space effort. Yet only a few
hours before the sforicmishap of
Gemini 8, President Johnson re

Croup

iterated the goal of landing "the
first man on the surface of the,
moon" before 1970, a timetable that
implicitly assumes no seriously delaying problems in this most complicated project. Moscow has been
more realistic in refusing to announce any timetable for its own
major effort to accomplish the same
feat.
From the time that President
Kennedy first announced the Apollo
program and its target date it has
been evident that public relations
considerations have played a very
large role in the space program.
This Madison Avenue approach was
again evident during the crisis
period of the Gemini 8 flight
Wednesday night, when officials
gave out comparatively little information and held back the absorbing tape recordings in which Armstrong and Scott told of the perils
they had undergone. This behavior
was reminiscent of the Soviet penchant for hiding difficulties and
failures.
The American people are adult
enough to realize that the astronauts are taking great risks and
that some day an unexpected crisis
in space may end tragically rather
than happily. A policy of candor
and full disclosure will serve the
national interest better than the
course NASA officials followed durlast hours of
ing the tension-fille- d
; the
flight ofGemini8.',
'
The New' York' TiMM

Snoops, Fences, And Barricades
and a general
scoundrel requiring close watch
at all times.
We hope such nuisances can be
eliminated in the food serving facilities next year.
a sneak, a food thief,

We hope the organizers and
operators of the University's food
services next year will find it unnecessary to give UK cafeterias
the aura of a maximum security

prison.

Institutional food serving facilities never have been noted for
their exciting and original atmosphere, but the University cafeterias with their fences and gates,
y
inspectors, and
regulations top most. Some of the
"safeguards," as well as being
of little real value, are downright
insulting.
A few of the more offensive
include the corral fence in Blazer
Hall, the "food snoop" at the
end of the line in the Student
Center, the SC barricade which
student from
prevents a meal-tickwith his
eating
friends, the through the blizzard
exit requirement at Blazer Hall,
and other such delights. These
precautions seem to presume, at
least from outward appearances,
that the average UK student is
tight-securit-

et

The Kernel welcomes letters from readers wishing to
.limitations, letters should be limited to 200 words.
t
'Longer manuscripts will be accepted at the editor's discretion
The letters submitted should be signed as
local telephone number; or faculty members, name? department
J
name, hometown and class; for University
readers, name, hometown and hometown telephone numbe? UniSned
sidered for publications. All letters should be typewritten and double
spaced
.Letters should be addressed to: the Editor, the
of Kentucky, or they may be left In the editor', Kentucky
office.

oJit'iMt1
cm?. xanJ?'
h??I run1

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The Kentucky Kernel
The South's Outstanding College
Daily
UNIVERSITY

ESTABLISHED

OF KENTUCKY

1894

MARCH

TUESDAY,

Valteh Grant,

22, 1966

Editor-in-Chi-

Linda Mills, Executive Editor

TFI1P.Nri!,
Hunt, Managing Editor
John Zeh, News Editor
Gkisham, Associate News Editor
Judy
Kenneth Green. Associate News Editor
Henry Rosenthal, Sports Editor
Carolyn Williams, Feature Editor
Margaret Bailey, Arts Editor

WiLLikW KnAp, Advertising Manager

Business Staff

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Mxmis Hunoate,

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