xt7pc824cc85 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7pc824cc85/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19540716  newspapers sn89058402 English  Copyright is retained by the publisher. http://www.kykernel.com The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, July 16, 1954 text The Kentucky Kernel, July 16, 1954 1954 2013 true xt7pc824cc85 section xt7pc824cc85 n&enationcBlky

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UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON,

VOLUME XLV

University Proposes
Faculty Camp Plan
The University administration has
vacation plan
proposed a low-co- st
for faculty and staff members of
the University.
Announcement of this offer was
made yesterday by the Comptroller's
Office. Under the proposal, staff
and faculty members could use
Camp tn Washfacilities at the
ington County for one week following the close of the Summer Session.
The camp, which has been operated by the University for several
years, is located in a deeply shaded
area of about 15 acres on Chaplin
River, on the site of the old Tatum
Springs Health Resort. This hotel
building has approximately 40 rooms
and sleeping accomodations for
about 150 persons.
Plans for this camp have been
made with the
of J. W.
Whitehouse, state leader of
Club work, and Dean Frank J.
Welch.
A new swimming pool, a gift from
Barry Bingham of Louisville, was
completed and put into use this
summer. Facilities are also included
for Softball, volley ball, horseshoes,
shuffleboard, bridge and hiking.
According to the announcement,
a life guard will be on duty at the
4-- H

4-- H

Coliseum Features
Sicimming Class
The beginner's swimming class at
UK taught by Coach Alfred M.
Reece, Physical Education instructor, is made up of 11 people. Three
of them are faculty wives, Mrs.
Crabb, Mrs. Bills, and Mrs. Gabbard,
plus a few undergraduate and graduate students.
The class seems to have progressed
rapidly since the beginning of summer school. They are doing the
crawl stroke, side stroke, and wing
stroke.
They meet four times a week for
an hour each day. The class is not
as large as the fall and winter
classes which are limited to 30 people.
Also

at the Coliseum this summer

there are classes for YMCA children.
Since the Y has no swimming pool,
they come to the Coliseum on Tuesdays and Thursdays for classes. On
Tuesdays the beginners swim and
on Thursdays the more advanced
classes are present. The University
furnishes the teachers for these
children.
Another feature of the pool which
in this hot weather should be taken
advantage of is the recreational
period from 4:00 to 5:30 every day.
It is open to anyone, including the
faculty-sta- ff
and students.

Helen King Attends
Alumni Council Meet

throughout the day, and a
member of the Physical Education
staff will serve as director of recreation.
Rates for the camp, which will
pay for kitchen and dining room
help and for three meals a day,
pool

follow:

Adults and children, 12 or
$15 a week (7 days) ; children
12, $10 a week (7 days).

older,
under

IEnmfl

Diane Hunt, UK Coed
Named Miss Kentucky
At Louisville Friday
,.:w:-"-

Plans for the affair
tinued only if sufficient interest is
shown. An application is being carried in this week's Staff Bulletin,
distributed today, and further information may be obtained from the
Office of the Comptroller, which
will
the program temporarily.
Actual dates of the proposed camp
are August 14 through August 21.
Club Camp may be
The
reached via Route 52, between
Lawrenceburg and Bardstown, and
it is about an hour's drive from
Lexington.

Lexington Senior
Was UK's 1954

will be con-

May Day Queen
K

Miss Diane Hunt, UK education
senior was chosen "Miss Kentucky"
last Friday night in Louisville.
Diane, a member of Kappa Alpha
Theta sorority, will represent the
Bluegrass State in the "Miss America Contest" to be held at Atlantic
City, N. J. in September.
blond with greenish-The
blue
eyes received a trophy and
the traditional roses from last
year's "Miss Kentucky," Miss Emily
Rucker of Berea. She will also re-

Ji

S

4-- H

UK Student
Is Recovering
After Mishap
Daniel A. Kelly, UK engineering
junior, was in "fair condition" at
Good Samaritan Hospital Thursday
following a near drowning accident
at Castlewood Park swimming pool.
Tuesday.
Kelly and three other companions
had been practicing swimming under water. One of the companions
said that they had been diving with
face masks after breathing deeply.
This enabled them to stay under
water for approximately two minutes.
Kelly was found in the deep end
of the pool, after companions began
to worry about him when he had
been under longer than two minutes.
The student said that he had
started to the surface when he was
knocked unconscious. Jim Crutcher,
one of the three companions, investigated and saw Kelly's still body
lying on the bottom of the pool. He
then brought Kelly to the surface
where lifeguards administered artificial respiration.
An ambulance was dispatched
and arrived after Kelly had regained consciousness.
He was treated at Good Samaritan Hospital for possible chest cavity fractures and possible head injuries. A large bruise was found
on his forehead.

Campus

Calendar

1

All-Sta-

JH
rigors

ft
1

trip to the
ceive an expense-pai- d
Miss America Contest and a commission as a Kentucky Colonel.

In spring of 1954, Diane was
chosen UK May Day Queen. The
contest was sponsored by Suky, University of Kentucky pep organization.
It is especially gratifying to the
Kernel as it should be to the entire
University of Kentucky that one of
be chosen to represent
UK's
the state in the Miss America Contest. Also, one of the University's
Miss Jo Anne Caudill,
future s,
18, of Louisville who recently won
the "Miss Dixie" contest at Datona
Beach, Florida took third place in
the contest.
The Kernel congratulates Diane
on her fine accomplishment and
wishes her the very best of luck in
the Miss America Contest in
co-e- ds

co-ed-

DIANE HUNT

- "MISS KENTUCKY"

Reporter Finds Heat, Work,
Lack Of Girls Main Gripe
By DEE SHINNICK

malice aforethought
this
roved around campus askfollowing question: "What
dislike most about summer
school? No personalities please!"
No student was encountered who
had anything good to say about the
heat, but here are some specific
answers given.
Benedict Thomas. Education senior. "Professors who can't tell time.
I think the people are more friendly
in the summer, though."
Mary Pardne, Graduate student.
"There are so many things I don't
like, but the main one Is the class
length and the time classes start.
It confuses me no end. I also don't
like the heat and commuting. I
guess I've just gotten too old to go
With
reporter
ing the
do you

to

school."

Jim Sutherland, Commerce junior.
The following calendar for special
"
Miss Helen G. King, executive
events is for the week of July 20 "I just don't like school in general.
secretary of the Alumni Association, through July 23. All
Fay Hoicomb, Education senior.
times are Cenattended a national meeting of the tral Standard Time.
"The heat. I think that Neville Hall
American Alumni Council at Edge-watshould buy fans for the classrooms,
Park, Mississippi last Tuesday
Tuesday, July 20
Movie: "Cap- and maybe other buildings should
through Thursday.
too. At least the professors could
tain Blood," Amphitheatre, 7:45.
donate fans."
Wednesday. July 21
Chamber
She participated in two panel disCleon Wright, Graduate student.
cussions. The first was entitled Music Recital by the Music Faculty,
"There's too much work."
"Fortifying Our Outposts." It dealt MH, 7:00.
Charles H. Petras, A & S sophowith the value of good alumni clubs
Thursday, July 22
Outdoor more. "Not enough young girls. I
and how to attain and maintain
can take a lot of punishment, but
them. The second discussion was Folk Dance, Women's Gym, 6:30.
those girls would certainly brighten
"Local Alumni Club Problems."
te
Friday, July 23
UK
those stuffy rooms.
Miss King will return to Lexing- High School Summer Orchestra,
Mrs. Betty Nichol, Graduate stuton on Saturday.
Memorial Coliseum, 7:00.
dent. "The steps to the Education
er

NUMBER 35

KENTUCKY, FRIDAY, JULY 16, 1954

library."

The editorial staff of The
Kernel will be glad to receive
nominations for Colonel of the
Week. Address suggestions to
Editor, The Kernel, Campos
Mail. Please state basis for your
nominations.

Dick Lehman, A & S freshman.
"The heat is the only thing I don't
like. Otherwise I think that the
summer is better than the ordinary
semester because the dorms are
quieter for studying, and you get
more individual attention in the
smaller classes."
Jim Goodin, Engineering sophomore. "I just don't like school peColor reproductions arranged to
riod, but I guess I'd rather do this Illustrate progressive changes in
than work."
painting since the seventeenth cenMrs. Betty B. Latimore, senior in tury are on display on the second
Library Science. "I don't like pro- floor of the Fine Arts building.
fessors who assign too much outside
Arranged in chronological order,
reading."
they depict movement thru ImpresJoyce Stephens, Education senior. sionism to Cezanne's formal struc"Coming in at 11 o'clock on Friday ture and the subjective expressionnight."
ism of Van Gogh, ending in the 1906-1- 5
period of violent Cubism and
So you thought this question was
ridiculous? If you think of a better Fauvism.
The two art patterns continue
one, why not send it to the Kernel
into Formalism, Expressionism and
office. We might even use it.
Surrealism.
Ruben's "Farm", Corot's "Pont de
Narni", Degas' "Ballet Dancers".
's
Monet's "Dock of Argenteuil",
"Choir Boy", David's "Mme.
Hamelin", Seurat's "Un Dimanche
d"Ete . . ." and Picasso's "Girl BeFuneral services for Harold Edwin fore a Mirror" are among the betMay, 32, chief electrician for the
being shown.
University, who was drowned Sun- ter known pictures
All of the paintings are reproducday in a boating accident on the
Kentucky river, were held yester- tions of masterpieces.
The exhibit is changed from time
day at Kerr Brothers Funeral Home. to time to keep the students faBurial was in the Lexington
miliar with the trends, past and
present, of the art world.

Changes In Art
Are On Display
At Fine Arts

Services Held For UK
Chief Electrician

Sou-tine-

* THE

Pace 2

KENTUCKY

KERNEL

Friday, July 16, 1954

Moral And Spiritual Values
Topic Of Education Dean
against "guilt by association" and
maintained that "freedom is from
within." Formal topic of his address
was "The I and You in Teaching
Moral and Spiritual Values."

Several hundred Kentucky teachers and school administrators were
told Monday at the University of
Kentucky that the "strength of this
country is in the minds and morals
of its people."
The speaker was Dr. E. T.
dean of the School of Education at Northwestern University
and the event for which lie spoke
was UK's fourth annual Summer
Conference on Moral and Spiritual
Values in Public Education.

While commenting upon the implications of moral and spiritual
values in education, the speaker explained that "morality is personal."
He continued:
"Would that we as parents, teachers and administrators would so live
that our children would come to see
"The real dangers to this country the value of being moral"
are those which exist under the
skin," the Northwestern educator
The speaker denned the purpose
declared. "Remember also, that the of an educational institution as a
content of language is likewise 'un- place which should "help an individual change himself under the
der the skin.'"
Dr. McSwain warned his audience skin.' "
Mc-Swa- in,

fib

"

"And in conclusion, I would like to welcome to the summer session, Mrs. Snodgrass, my eighth
grade English teacher."

I

The Kentucky Kernel

Completion Date Of Dorm
Threatened By Local Strike
A local strike of plumbers and
steamfitters may affect the completion date of the new men's dorm on
Rose Street.
"The strike has been in effect
since July 1, but hasn't really hurt
production until this week," said
Prank D. Peterson, University of
Kentucky Comptroller. He added
that the union is asking for a 15
cent per hour raise in pay.
The new dorm, which was scheduled to be finished by January of
1955, will house 366 boys. "Generally speaking there will be two
boys to a room," said Peterson.
"The University has a ruling that
all freshmen must live in the dorm,"
he continued, "so the dorm will be
primarily for freshmen."

Of The Week
f4

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
the Post Office at Lexington.
as second class matter under
Act of March 3, 1879.
weekly during school except
holidays and exams.
or
Henry Mayo and Louis Pritchett
News Editor Donna Villesvik
Chief Reporter John Moremen
Roving Reporter Dee Shinnick
Georgene
Special
Assignment
Reporter
Duckworth
Photographer John Mitchell

Entered at
Kentucky,
the
Published

A cafeteria dining room which
will serve 1200 people will be in-

cluded in the new building. "That
means that we could serve meals
for all the men in the four other
dorms." Peterson explained.
Furniture for tne rooms has not
vet been selected, nor has a name
been given to the hall. The four-stor- y
building will have lounging
and recreation rooms, and will have
modern architecture. The architect
is John F. Wilson.
The new dormitory will cost
$1,711,000.
It is being financed
through a $1,400,000 loan from the
federal government and an allocation of $311,000 by the Kentucky
Property and Buildings Commission.
Work was begun on it last April.

)

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YELLOW CAB
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The Stirrup uup, The Kernel, The City of Lexington, and the entire State cf Kentucky take pleasure
this week in saluting Miss Diane Hunt of Lexington.
Diane won the title of "Miss Kentucky" last Friday
night in Louisville, and will represent Kentucky in the
"Miss America Contest" in September.
If our memory serves us correctly, it has been many
moons since a UK d
has taken the spotlight in
the "Miss Kentucky" contest, and we are especially
proud of Diane for bringing the honor to the University of Kentucky.
A senior in the College of Education, and a member of Kappa Alpha Theta sorority, Diane came into
focus just this spring when she was chosen UK's May
Day Queen.
To Diane The Stirrup Cup extends the invitation
to enjoy two of their delicious meals and will be looking forward in September to a Kentucky "Miss
America."
co-e-

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* KERNEL

THE KENTUCKY

Friday, July 16, 1954

Page 3

UK Awarded Business Management Group
Will Hold Meeting July 26
Grant For

Research
The University's Department of
Bacteriology has been awarded a
r,
$28,000 contract by the
U. S. Army to conduct special research in the identification of microorganisms.
Announcement of the contract was
made by Dr. R. H. Weaver, professor of bacteriology and director of
the project, and Dr. Merl Baker,
director of the Kentucky Research
Foundation at UK.
The project will be administered
by the Kentucky Research Foundation through the Department of
Bacteriology. Formal confirmation
of the grant was given by the
Chemical Corps Biological Laboratories at Camp Detrick, Md.
The contract, described by Dr.
Weaver, calls for research on the
following problem.
"Development and Evaluation of
Rapid Biochemical Techniques of
of
Value
in the Identification
two-yea-

The second annual College Busi
ness Management Institute will be
held on the UK campus from July
26 to August 1.
The College Business Management
Institute of the University of Kentucky is open to the business office
personnel of all colleges and universities in the United States. It
will further the education and training of business office personnel, and
will help to standardize the various
functions and procedures in college
business management.

College of Education; Dr. R. W.

Ket-tle-

UK.
Among the lecturers for the in"The meetings are open to sumstitute will be Dr. Cecil C. Carpenter, mer school students who are indean of the College of Commerce;
any phase of college
Dr. Frank D. Peterson, business terested in

manager and comptroller of UK; business management or operation,"
Dr. Frank G. Dickey, dean of the Dr. Peterson said.

Dry Cleaning

Laundry

Micro-Organism-

Dr. Weaver pointed out that, in
terms, this means
that he and his assistants will attempt to develop new and faster
procedures for recognizing organisms of microscopic size. He explained further:
"One important element in diagnostic work is time. Bacteriological
work is of value to the physician
only if organisms can be identified
quickly enough to aid in his diag-

DeBOOR

non-techni-

I didn't have time
"Dear Herb
to fix your lunch today! Here's
Love, Mary."
60c to buy it with

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Maxwell Dial

The UK Dames Club held its first
summer meeting at Maxwell Place,
home of President and Mrs. Donovan, Wednesday evening.
A fashion show of clothing made
and modeled by the members was
the principal feature of Wednesday's program.
The Dames Club is sponsored by
the Woman's Club. Wives of all UK
students are invited to attend the
future meetings, which will be announced by the Kernel.

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According to Dr. Baker, this research grant marks the first contract received by the Kentucky Research Foundation from the Chemical Corps Biological Laboratories at
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* THE KENTUCKY

Page 4

The Campi
By O. H. ELL
SUGGESTIONS FOR COOLING:
Take heated body and lower into a
ice cold bucket or tub of water.
Keep in submerged condition for
about two days and then consult
paper for weather report. If there
is no relief, repeat process for indefinite period . . . another remedy
would be to dismiss classes for several days but this may not meet
with the approval of faculty members . . . hop the flirst plane to
Canada, grow a beard, speak to
know one, denounce communism
every time anybody comes into
view, and drink refreshing
. . . dig a very deep hole
and then cover self up with loose
bluegrass. Be careful not to associate with any china except
French . . . jump out of an airplane
at 20,000 feet and note cooling refreshing breezes. Process can only
be attempted once, so make it a
good one
be sure and tell everybody you see that this is the hottest day of the year or ask "is it
hot enough for you?". As they
start to slug you take notice that
they are very hot under the collar.
It will be a stimulant . . . wear a
large woolen coat which will be insulating like a fur covered dog . . .
go to the movies at noon and stay
until late at night. Take picnic
lunch so that the bad feature can
be ignored after the second or
sit on block
third time around
of ice and surround self with fans.
Bemoan the heat and wish at all
times for winter.
pop-scot- ch

...

...

A workshop has been planned for
next June at the University of Kentucky for the purpose of teaching
teachers their economic AJJ.C.'s.
The Pendennis Club in Louisville
was the meeting place of members
of the newly formed Council on Economic Education. They met to discuss ways to boost education about
economics.

The plan started in some 30 other
states by the Joint Council on Economic Education was adopted by a
group including Kentucky business,
labor, and school leaders.
The joint council is a service
agency organized by the Committee
for Economic Development, a nonpartisan, businessman's research
group. The council is financed by
the C.E.D. and Ford Foundation.
Lexington,
Floyd
L. Fairman,
president of Kentucky Utilities, and
Dr. Philip Davidson, president of
the University of Louisville, are
of the Kentucky Council.
By offering
summer
workshops on the subject, the council idea is to improve the teaching
of economics in public schools.
Businessmen, educators, labor-unio- n
officers, bankers, and merchants will instruct.
Field trips will be taken to business houses. The result hoped for
is that teachers will in turn use
examples in their communities to
teach economics to students.
six-we- ek

named to head a committee to make
arrangements for the workshop next
summer. The University of Louisville, Eastern, and the University of
Kentucky will sponsor it.

Asa

first step, several Kentucky
teachers have recently attended or
The University has made a very are attending workshops in other
unique and original advancement states this summer.
by providing recreation facilities for
Camp permit tired summer instructors to
the faculty at the old
in Washington County. This will relax witK their families and perhaps for the first time in history a
science professor will play golf with
NEED A TYPIST?
a philosopher. Between them they
should be able to figure out the
Or An Editor for
mysteries of the game.
Your Papers?
4-- H

CALL I. WATERS
79

Dennis Book
Store
USED BOOKS

257 North Lime
Phone

Friday, July 16, 1954

Plans Made E. A. Bureau
For Economic Physics Prof.
Meet In 1955 Dies Tuesday

Well, Diane Hunt who was overThe dean of Eastern Kentucky
looked on the campus until this
year has been elected Miss Ken- State College, Dr. W. J. Moore, was

tucky and this proud state has an
excellent representative. We wish
this modest and beautiful girl the
best of luck in the Miss America
contest at Atlantic City in

KERN EL

Funeral services for Prof. Ernest
Bureau, 68, who died Tuesday,
will be held at 2 o'clock this afternoon at the Milward Chapel with
burial to follow in the Lexington
Cemetery. The Rev. Gentry Shelton
and the Rev. Leslie R. Smith will
officiate.
Professor Bureau, a member of
the University faculty since 1918,
died at the Central Baptist hospital
after an illness of a few weeks. He
was head of the Electrical Engineering Department of the College of
Engineering until his retirement on
July 1, 1952.
Born in La Chapelle aux Noux,
France, Professor Bureau was the
son of Florent Joseph and Hor-tenRivry Bureau. He came to
America when he was four years old.
He was graduated with a PhJ3.
degree from Ottawa University,
Kansas, in 1906. He received his
B. S. and E.E. degrees from Purdue
University in 1915. Following his
work at Purdue, he did advanced
work at the California Institute of
Technology.
Before joining the UK faculty, he
taught physics in high schools in
Indiana and Kansas.
Wisconsin.
After coming to UK, he was member of the University's Athletic
Council for a number of years.
Prof. Bureau was a member of
ETA, Kappa Nu, Tau Beta Pi and
Sigma Xi. He was faculty advisor
and a life member of AXE.E. and
was a faculty member of Phi Sigma Kappa. He was listed in Who's
Who in America, Who's Who in
Science and was a faculty member
of the Cosmopolitan club.
Prof. Bureau was a member of
the Central Christian church, was
senior elder of the church and once
served as chairman of the board
of elders. He was a member of
the church choir.
Survivors include two daughters,
Mrs. Garni Moretti. Detroit, Mich.,
and Miss Jeanne Bureau, Lexington; two grandchildren, Haldan
and Maura Moretti, Detroit, and a
niece, Mrs. Earl Warren, Ventura,
Calif.
A.

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The CIRCLE BAR
PRESENTS

"SMOKE" RICHARDSON'S ORCH
SATURDAY Nitet

Fri-Sa-

July

t,

PLAY

Shelly Winters

16-1- 7

INTO LARAMIE
John Payne
Color Cartoon

RAILS

Jury
DIAL M FOR MURDER
Ray Miland Grace Kelly
RACING BLOOD
Bid Williams Jean Porter
Weo-Tn-

e.

Hi

July

21-2-

2

Piano and His Orchestra

Phone
or
For Reservations

GIRL

Barry Sullivan

NOBODY CAN
LAUNDER

SATURDAY
NIGHT

A
SHIRT LIKE

9-- 1

CBS J:

MOGAMBO
Clark Gable Ava Gardner

CLUB HOUSE FOR RENT EVERY

SMALL TOWN GIRL

NIGHT EXCEPT SATURDAY

Tech nicolor
Jane Powell Farley Granger

-

PRESSED

FRIDAY Nites

Continoous Daily From 2 P.M.
WIDE VISION SCREEN

-

CLASSIFIED AD

professor Dr. Cooke, tween Women"! Gym and F.A. Building.
whose
father was a diplomat, Patricia Nipps. 362 Aylesford PI.
crossed the Atlantic 18 times beAdolescence: that stage you are
fore he was sixteen years old. This
must have become as routine as convinced you never went through
sharpening a pencil.
at the same age.

Club and Fraternity
Parties Welcomed1

4-

THE SWIMMING POOL at the new Faculty Camp in Washington County was donated by Barry Bingham.

THE MOON RIVER BOYS

69

1

JeK

!f

se

LOST

English

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