xt7pc824f49x https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7pc824f49x/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19640331  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, March 31, 1964 text The Kentucky Kernel, March 31, 1964 1964 2015 true xt7pc824f49x section xt7pc824f49x ttt--

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TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 1901
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University

Vol. LV, No. 94

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University Of Missouri At Kansas City Choir

Missouri Choir
Here Tomorrow
The University Choir of the University of Missouri at
Kansas City will appear in concert at 1 p.m. tomorrow in the
Auditorium of the Taylor Education Building.
Dr. W. Everett Hendricks will
conduct the
choir, on a
tour. They will appear in
the new Senate auditorium in
D. C, during
the
Washington,
tour.
The choir Is one of the most
sought-afte- r
music organizations
in its home territory, where it
has appeared with the Kansas
City Philharmonic Orchestra in
auch major works as Beethoven's
"Choral Fantasy," slates.
The Choir's "beautifully balanced effects" have led critics to
call it "one of the finest choirs
in the country and worthy of
their national recognition." The
University of Missouri at Kansas City ensemble has sung on
ork programs of all major
casting companies, and re- -'
completed 13 television
.ams for the U. S. State De

O

partment and Voice of America.
Dr. Hendricks, who directed the
Blue Jacket Choir of the Great
Lakes Naval Base during World
War II days, is In his 14th year
as conductor of the University
Choir. A sensitive director of "authentic
Dr. Henconviction,"
dricks presents a program that
makes for visual as well as listening satisfaction.
Choral works from the classic
sacred literature, folk songs, and
contemporary works will make up
a varied program here.
Strings, harpsichord, flute, and
organ will be used to accompany
Bach's short cantata No. 106.
Among a cappella selections in
this year's repertoire are
Schreck's "Advent Motet," Block's
"Silent Devotion and Response,"
Chanson by Debussy and Ravel,
and Jean Berger's "Alleluia."

Correction

Deadline for entries for the
All Campus Sing Is Thursday,
not yesterday as incorrectly an
nounced in Friday's Kernel.

Series

Ciardi To Deliver
2 Lectures Today
Jolin Ciardi will deliver two lectures today in the semiannual Student Congress Lecture Series.
Prof. Ciardi, who lias been poetry editor of the Saturday
Review, for seven years, will lecture at 4 and 7:30 p.m. in
Memorial Hall. His 4 p.m. lecture will be "What Good Is
a College?"
years ago for a lecture that

A seminar-generdiscussion
period has been scheduled from
p.m.; however arrangement
difficulties have arisen Carl
chairman of the congress
which is handling
committee
for the lecture
arrangements
said. At press time it is not
certain if the discussion will be
held. Modeckl said it would be
announced at both lectures if
the discussion will be held.
Modeckl said that arrangement difficulties with Prof. Ciardi
and his agent have already
caused the cancellation of a dinner for the professor which was
scheduled for tonight.
"I talked with Mr. Ciardi on
the phone and all arrangements
were verified," Modeckl said, "but
his agent called the next day
and said Mr. Ciardi wished to
btg off from some of the activities."
"Since this is Mr. Ciardi's first
lecture in a month
lecture series, there is a
fear that Prof Ciardi will be
wornout before the tour starts,"
Modeckl said.
officials.
UK Administration
Including President Oswald,
Deans L. L. Martin. Doris Seward, and M. M. White, had been
invited to the dinner. Some 30
students,
mostly English students, had also been invited.
Mr. Ciardi appeared here two

was sponsored by the English
Department.
"Many persons have told me
how fine a lecturer he is. Since
he is a man of top caliber and
is a past president of the National College English Association, I hope a great many students and faculty will attend his
lecture, despite our difficulty in
Modeckl
publicity,"
arranging
said.
Prof. Ciardi has been lecturMed
ing at Tufts t'nlversity,
ford, Mass., as a recipient of the
John Holmes chair.
Mr. Ciardi received his B.A.
from Tufts University in 1938.
His M.A. was granted by the

r

i

.;

LLJU
JOHN CIARDI

Gailbraith Offers
Poverty Relief Plan
By BOB RYANS
Kernel Assistant Daily Editor

The solution of poverty in the United States lies in education Dr. John Kenneth Galbraith, Harvard economist and
former U.S. ambassador to India, said at an informal press
conference yesterday at the Student Center.
Dr. Galbraith added that three
The first step advocated by Dr.
factors characterized
the poor Galbraith is the shifting of fed-erwere
of America.

people
They
first of all without education,
second a member of a racial mi
nority and finally living in the
wrong location to secure a job.
Legislation on civil rights Is
attacking the second characteristic of poverty and the place to
head in on the other two is education, he added.

aid to education
from
blanket coverage for all school
districts to
concentration
on
only the poor districts. He added
that the richer districts could
certainly support their own
schools.
Dr.

Galbraith also favors
Continued on Page

8

University of Michigan, where
he was also given a Hopewood
award In Poetry. At Harvard, he
began as an Instructor in English, and after a short period,
was made a Briggs Copeland assistant professor of English. In
1953 he went from Harvard to
Rutgers where he became Professor of English, resigning in 1961
to become a free lance writer and
lecturer.
Recently Mr. Ciardi appeared
as the host of the CBS television
"Accent."
discussion
program,
Appearing with him on the pro
gram were many personalities of
Importance in today's world.
Dr. Huston Smith, head of the
philosophy department at MIT,
was the first lecturer in the Student Congress Lecture Series.
Aldous Huxley was scheduled to
appear this fall, but he was
forced to cancel his visit due to
an illness which subsequently led
to his death.

Atlanta: From Summerhill To Collier Heights
(Editor's Note: Realizing that the present racial crisis will profoundly affect the lives of all University students, the Kernel felt
that a first-han- d
report on the Negro crusade was appropriate. A
writer was sent to Atlanta as part of the I K YMCA Seminar group,
and the following is the first installment in his report.)
By DAVID V. HAWPE
Kernel Managing Editor

At this juncture in history, Atlanta, Ga., represents the
economic and cultural nerve center of the South.
More important, in a time of racial crisis, Atlanta is the
heart of the Negro Revolution.

'Freedom ! Voir'

She is a city torn between alternatives.
Atlanta, in many respects, is answering the 20th century's challenge to progress. Yet she Is shackled by the traditions of an age
long-sincommitted to history books.
Proud Atlantans, both Negro and white, point to the city's boomal
economy, governmental reforms, and
ing
program.
The other side of the city's personality la a section bounded by
Spring Street on the east and the Chattahoochee River on the west,
an area 10 miles long and two to four miles wide. This is the West
Side: the Negro ghetto.
Within the Negro community itself the contrasts are poignant.
It is only a few minutes' drive from the rambling luxury of wealthy
Negroes' Collier Heights estates to the rows of ramshackle firetrups
pressed close together in Summerhill.
Among affluent Negroes, there are those who control old money,
represented by the businesses lining Auburn Avenue, heart of the

West Side. Many of the "new rich" have established themselves on
Hunter Street, a few blocks away.
Among whites, resistance to integration is least in the highest
levels and greatest in the lowest levels. Yet the
most exclusive private school In Atlanta remains segregated.
Among Negroes, the elite are reluctant to have the
community, the capitalists' lifeblood, rocked strongly. And only 20
percent of Atlanta's Negro students, ostensible leaders of the Black
Revolution, participate actively.
The city's Negro community, as well as Its white population, is
provided with the finest in educational facilities, leadership, and capital. Atlantans say that's the difference between their city and Birmingham, Ala.
Yet 55 percent of all Negro births In Atlanta are Illegitimate.
Negroes were Involved in 3,153 cases of delinquency during 1963.
while whites were Involved in 1.971, although Negroes constitute lest
than half the city's population.
Two weeks ago. the city's aldermen were debating the proposed
site for a multi million dollar stadium. At the same time, 60 percent
of the community's 185.000 Negroes were living In substandard
housing.
Although Atlanta has been publicized as an example of peaceful
racial progress, Negro leaders are quick to assert that much of the
of the Atlanta Summit
progress is only tokenism. The
Conference, the Rev. Sam Williams, said recently, "The basic attituda
has not changed."
Mr. William said that "only about 150 Negroes go to only
Continued on rage

5

* 2 --

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tuesday, March

31, lOfit

f 'lY Personalities

Morris Named Head

,

Of Honors Program

Dr. James G. Morris, assoe iate professor of metallurgical
will become tliree tor of tlie University Honors
Program July 1.
eral professional
OigMiizations.
An industrial research scientist
His research at UK has resulted

before
faculty

joining the University
in 19S9, Dr. Morris lias
as chairman of the Honors Program committee and has
participated in Honors Program
colloquia.
He succeeds Dr. Stephen
professor of plant pathology, who has served as director of the program since Its establishment at the University in
the fall of I960. Dr. Diachun has
requested reassignment to full-titeaching and research.
President John W. Oswald, in
announcing Dr. Morris appointment, said increased emphasis
will be placed on the Cniversity
Honors Program.
'The Honors Program has had
effects thus
very satisfactory
far," Dr. Oswald said. "The Honors Program committee is currently evaluating ways in which
the program can have greater
import.
"The program has advantages
other than developing to the fullest possible extent the minds and
talents of the very bright students," the UK president emphasized. "The thriving intellectual
it tends to create
atmosphere
among the Honors Program students permeates the rest of the
fctudent body."
Dr. Oswald noted that six of
students
the eight Tniversity
who won Wondrow Wilson graduate fellowships this year are
Honors Program students.
Dr. Morris holds the bachelor
of science and doctor of philosophy degrees from Purdue University and is a member of sev

in a number of articles in professional Journals.

(served

Three University students were
honored March 12 for outstanding scholarship in accounting.
Recipients of the annual Price
Waterhouse Co. awards to
accounting students were
Miss Mary Lou Hutchinson, Covington; Paul W. Chellgren, Ashland, and Lawton Ray Allen, Minnie, Ky. All are seniors in the UK
College of Commerce.
The awards were presented at
a meeting of Beta Alpha Psi, national accounting society. The
winners were announced by Wendell E. Beals, professor of accounting at UK.
The honorees were selected by
a committee of accounting professors.
Mark M. Luckens, assistant
professor in the College of Pharmacy, was invited to participate
as a panel member in the National Health Forum, scheduled
at Pittsburgh, March
The forum was sponsored by
the National Health Council, comof 73
posed of representatives
scientific organizations. It meets
annually to discuss various problems related to the nation's
health.
The topic for discussion at this
year's meeting was "Health Needs
and our Changing Environment."
of
About 400 representatives
health-allie- d
fields attend the invitation-only
affair each year.

CLASSIFIED
LOST

FOR SALE 1960 Ljuif convertible, automatic VS, radio and
heater. ExcelUjf condition. Best
2CM5t
offer. Call

LOST Gold Omega watch In
vicinity of Reynolds Building.
Reward. Call Cheyl Kelly at

FOR SALE House TrailW,'8x42,
Zimmer, good condition,
2CM4
$1,500. Call

LOST Ladies' Elpn watch, bWck
cord band, wlufe gold face. Call
Reward.
31Mlt

Afternoon Lender
FOR SALE
route. West Short areS'. One
hour delivery time. $180 monthly
27M4t
niBTlts.
profit.
MISCELLANEOUS.

ALTERATIONS of dresses, skirts
and coats for women. Mildred
Cohen, 215 E. Maxwell. Phone
16J Tu.&Th.

25M3t

'

HELP

WAKTED

HELP' WANTED Banjo 'players'
If you play, sing along type
music, please call Ronnie at
after 9 p.m.
25M4t
Part-tim- e
HELP WANTED
work; choose your own hours at
our office. Call
or
25M3t

SPECIAL LUNCH
For Students and Staff
Opposite
Med
Contor

A

Always under $1.00

Chi Delta Phi

Chi Delta Phi will meet at
7 p.m. tonight in Room 206 of
the Student Center. New members will be introduced and original manuscripts will be discussed.

w".

Troupers Set
Annual Show
This Week
The University Troupers,
campus entertainment organization, will present their annual "big show" on Thursday and Friday in the Alumni
Gym.
The theme for this year's production is "Off Broadway," and
the various acts and numbers
will illustrate the backstage side
of the theater.
Several large production numbers featuring singing and dancing will be done to such popular
show tunes as "Hello, Dolly" and
"That's Entertainment."
Modern Jazz and tap dancing
will be featured in individual
numbers.
Tumbling, adagio work (boy-gand balancing
tumbling),
acts will also be on the agenda.
Othrr Troupers will lend their
talent as folk singers, pantomim-ist- s.
and more specialties to provide an evening of entertainment.
The show is scheduled to begin at 8 p.m., with clown acts
starting at 7:15 p.m.
Admission will be 50 cents for
students, 75 cents for adults,
and 25 cents for children.

KIPA Reorganized
At Saturday Meeting
Plans are underway to reactivate the Kentucky Intercollegiate Tress Association. At a meeting held Saturday in
the School of Journalism, the organization was officially
reestablished.
In addition to the seven schools

Perry J. Ashley, instructor in
Journalism, was named its executive director. Roger Dixon, editor
of the Morehead State College
Trailblazer, was elected chairman
of the temporary executive committee which will plan the first
annual meeting to be held in
the fall.
Representing the University on
the executive committee is David
Hawpe, managing editor of the
Kentucky Kernel.
Delegates from seven Kenturky
colleges attended the meeting.
Included were: Georgetown College, Kentucky Southern ColState
Kentucky
lege, Eastern
College, Western Kentucky State
College,
College, Transylvania
Kentucky State College, and I K.
has been
The organization
dormant since World War II
of its members left
when many
for combat. It is being reorganized to help improve the quality
of Kentucky college publications.

AT

TONITE

FIRST
RUN!

COMPLETE LAUNDRY AND
DRY CLEANING SERVICE

Sandra Dec

Gum Of Texas"

Documentary
Narrated by Peter Ustinov

SEBERG
1M

2

5-

"The Small World
of Sammy Lee"

Op

V-

With Anthony Newlcy
STARTS
C

ADMISSION
7 30
AWARD
ACADEMY

75c

NOMINATION
nXi n

(H

ALBERT

tnm

UnJ 4 iMilftttfMi

(Totijones)

FINNEY

Strand

Serving University of Kentucky
Students For 49 Years

James Stewart

"Young

PLUS

I

"Simply glorious."
Starring PETER SELLERS

TUESDAY ONLY

"Take Her Sht'i Mine"

STARTS TOMORROW
"Women of the World"

7:15 AND 9:25

HEAVENSBWE!

approxiSaturday,
represented
mately 20 others are expected to
participate in the future.
Joe Creasoiii columnist for the
Courier-Journa- l,
was guest speaker for the luncheon held in the
Student Center.
Serving as chairman of the
Kentucky Press Association cominitiated
the
mittee, which
KIPA's revival is Archie Frye,
He will also serve
Georgetown.
as the coordinator between the
KIPA and the KPA.

James Mitchem

DillM

PERKINS PANCAKE HOUSE

v

Bob Adams, Western; standing, Roger Dixon, More-heaCecil Rea representing Kentucky Southern;
David Hawpe, I K; Doug VVhitlock, Eastern, and
Mrs. Annette Mayor represeting Transylvania.

Members of the Executive Committee of the Intercollegiate Press Association selected Saturday are
as follows: seated, from the left. Ken Alexander,
Georgetown Perry Ashley, t'K executive director;

Pro

Rom
At
Lima

"

CI;

BT.tiriT

Served weekdays 11 a.tn. to 2 p.m.
i
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Selection chanAc each day

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rnineerini.

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"KISSIN' COUSINS"

We Now feature

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ONE DAY SERVICE
AT NO EXTRA COST!
In by
. Our by 5:00

9J.

BECKER

DRY CLEANING CO.
LAUNDRY
Corner of South Limestone and Euclid

TODAY

&

WEDNESDAY

It's ELVIS PRESLEY
Sinqin' an' Swingin' in

BEN AL1
NOW! AT

:30,5:O0, 8:30

and CINERAMA

proton

HOW

THE WEST

WASY0N

MM

LOVITHTr.3

NOW SHOWING

Gregory

Pack

Tony

Curtis

in "CAFTAIN

NEWMAN"
ANGII
and

BOBBY

DICKINSON
DARIN

In Color

frrTirO CATCH
1

MG.LLV

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'

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tucvl.iy, M.mli

v

1

fTor,til
"
"""" Wnti,'c
'"--

March

"

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Vnno

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31,

Louiihiiitire

Campus Calendar

31

( wen's, last years, 4 p.m., Keenrland Hall
hristian Science organization (::!() p.m., Koom 109
( enter
NK Newcomers ( lub, 8 p.m.. Airs. Mniiin Voder
Blaer Lecture, J. Huntley Dupre, Student I'enter Theatre,
10 a.m.
Honors Day, Memorial Hall, 3:30 p.m.
Musicule, James Good, Organ! t. Memorial Hall, R:30 p.m.
"As You Like It," Guit;nol Theatre, 8:30 p.m. (also April
(

v.

(

,

--

j'v..

.

's&J ' V

'

.

-

j

April

2

April

3

APIfIL
April 4
April
April
April
April
April

April
April
April
April

April
April
April
April

i

4

Gonna Wash That

The AGR house was the scene of a South Sea
Islands party or maybe it was a Florida party.

J

a.

1

,

'

April
April
April

4

Humanities Conference, Alumni House
"Julius Caesar," Guignol Theatre, 8:30 p m.

(also April

Hinh School Leadership Conference
5 Muslealc, The Heritage Quartet, Memorial Hall, 3:30 p.m.
7
Lecture, Dr. Arthur K. Moore, Distinguished Professor of
the Tear, College of Arts and Sciences, Guignol Theatre,
8 p. m.
9
l inlisli Department Lecture, G. B. Harrison, Guignol Theatre, 8 p.m.
10 Research Conference, Chrmistry-riiysic- s
Building
Cancer Teaching Lecture Scries, Medical Science Bldg.,
8:30 p.m.
Spindletop Hull Dance, 9 to 1
1
Central Kentucky Faculty Conference, Student Center
11
Concert, Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, Memorial Coliseum, 8:15 p.m.
13 Musicale, Norman Chapman, Pianist, Memorial Hall, 8 p.m.
15 Musiea.l I K Choristers, Memorial Hall, 8 p.m.
English Department Movie, "Hamlet," Laboratory Theatre,
4 and 7:30 p.m.
Art Gallery Talk and Iteeeption for Carl Holly, Fine Arts
Bldg., 7:30 p.m.
16 Audubon Film, "Kiwi Commonwealth,"
Memorial Hall,
7:30 p.m.
9 to 1
25 Spindletop Hall Dance, Spring Formal,
28 Classes end at noon
Inauguration of President Oswald 2 p.m.
26 Musicale, Men and Women's Glee Clubs, Memorial Hall,
3:30 p.m.
27 Blazer Lecture, A. Hunter Dupree, Guignol Theatre, 10 a.m.
28 Inauguration,
Dr. Oswald, Memorial Ciloseum, 2:30 p.m.
29 Musicale, Symphonic Band and Chorus, Guignol Theatre,
8 p.m.
4

...

There seems (o be some confusion but this couple
looks like part of a ship wrecked c rew.

TAKE A DONUT BREAK!
We're Open Till 2 a.m.

Election
Links
The following officers have
been elected by Links, Junior
women's honorary, to serve during the coming year; Martha
Clark
Eades,
president Besty
vice president;
Ardis Hoven,
secretary;
Margaret
Gehlback,
treasurer; Claudia Jeffery, social
and Kathy
chairman;
Kelly,
leadership conference chairman.
ZBT
Zebta Beta Tau recently elected
Art Silber president. Other officers are Joe Digieso, vice president; Robert Shapiro, treasurer;
Allen Chlowitz, secretary;
and
Alan Rowitz, historian.
Fiji
The members of Phi Gamma
Delta recently elected Thomas
Jones, president;
Terry Black,
treasurer Bill McDonald, recordJim Canada, coring secretary;
responding secretary; and Allen
Harrison, historian.
'

Triangle
The pledge class of Triangle
recently elected Richard Gravely,
president; Quinton Allen,
Wallace Hampton, secretary; and Bill Russell, special
activities.

Kappa Sijma Awards
The national of

Kappa Sigma
gave two scholarship awards to
members of the UK chapter. The
senior scholarship award went to
Larry Barnutt and the junior
award was given to Glenn Moore.

P innings

Kaye Folkers, a sophomore education major from Minink, 111.
and a member of Delta Zeta, to
Martin Lewis, a Junior accounting
major from Whitesburg and a
member of Lambda Chi Alpha.
Diana Tracy, a home economics
major at Ohio Wetleyan University from Ashland and a member of Delta Gamma, to Bill
Authur, a commerce major from
Ashland and a member of Delta
Tau Delta.

Meetings

Cwens
There will be an important
meeting of last years Cwens at
4 p.m. today in Keeneland
Hall.
If you cannot attend please contact Janet Kington.

Engagements

Patti Mudd, a sophomore

Marsha Kingsley, a senior English major from Ft. Lauderdale,
Fla. and a member of Chi Omega,
to Bob Deitz, a former student
from Lexington and a member
of Sigma Chi.
Moore, a freshman
Carolyn
home economics major
from
to Wayne Wells, a
Lexington,
civil engineering masophomore
jor from Lexington and a member of Triargle.

Masters'

rh.D

$11.50
22.50
27.50
12.50

Specialist in Education
Tlte fees are to be paid at
OITice in the Administration Itiiilding.

the Uursar's

your convenience anytime between
HAYING

in

buyology
read the

every day

ORDERS

Across from Holmes Halt

ASK YOUR FRIENDS

KENTUCKY
TYPEWRITER
SERVICE

WHO THE

STUDENTS''

Olivetti Portable Typewriters
Ribbons
Carbons
and Office Supplies
SALES
SERVICE
7

DRUG STORE IS . . .

nXve
Across the Street

387 Rose St.

44
invites you

y

fo an
Informal

Kernel Want Ads

and pick up at
p.m. and 2 a.m.

Dixie Cream Donut Shop
South Lime and Euclid

Phone

For an education

1

CALL US FOR SPECIAL

A PARTY

AND RENTALS

Graduation Fees

ld.D):
I'ndcrgraduate

com-

merce major from Greensburg, to
Bob Kosid, a senior economics
major from Glenview, 111.

BMWwwt:',it"iawiif'iiiwiiiii,iirMwi;)wtfc

Graduation fees will be due
by May 9, which Is the last day
of the spring semester. Failure
to pay these fees will make a
student ineligible for graduation.
The fees are as follows (note
the correction of degree as
not
in education,
specialist

for fresh hot delicious donuti call

Tea Showing
of

Cotillion Formals
on Friday afternoon, April 3
from 2:0.0 to 5:00 o'clock
on our third floor

* The Kentucky Kernel

LITTLE MAN ON CAMPUS

Tlie South' Outstanding College Daily
University of Kentucky

Enterrrl at thr port office it Lmlnctmi, Krnhirky at wcond clan maim nnAer the Act of March 8, 1879.
hool year except diinnl holidays and cum.
Published lour limn wrek during (he nnular
Subscription rates: $7 a school year; 10 ccnta a copy irom iilea

Sue Endicott, Editor in Chief
David Hawpe, Managing Editor
Carl Modecxi, Campui Editor
Associate and Daily Editors:
Richard Stevenson, Sandra Brock, Wiu.iam Grant, and Elizabeth Ward
Departmental Editors:
Sro Webb, Cartoonist
Nancy Louciiridce, Social
Waily Pagan, Sporti
Tom Finnte, Circulation Manager
Job Ccrry, Advertising Manager
Phone : News, extension 2285 and 2302; Advertising and Circulation, 2306

Court Decision
Strikes A Blow
For Press Freedom
The unanimous decision of the
Supreme Court recently in the libel
suit brought against the New York
Times by the police commissioner of
Montgomery, Ala., is one of the most
important decisions upholding freedom of the press in our time.
The Supreme Court once again
upheld the right of the press to criticize public officials for their actions
sn id enlarged this privilege to include
editorial advertisements.
This is a victory of the first importance in the long and never-endin- g
struggle for the rights of a free
press. But it is more than that. It is
also a vindication of the right of a
free people to have unimpeded access
to the news and to fair comment on
the news.
The case arose from the publication of an advertisement in the New
York Times editions of March 29,
I960. The advertisement was signed
by a number of "friends of civil rights
in the North" and by four southern
Negro ministers. In court the ministers claimed they had no knowledge
that their names had been used. They
bad been named as codefendants.

Pi
The advertisement was critical of
the handling of the racial situation by
the public officials of Montgomery.
No names were mentioned in the
stdvertisement but the Montgomery
police commissioner brought libel action claiming damage to his reputation.
The property of the four ministers
was seized and sold at a sheriffs sale.
Alabama courts awarded the coiuinis-Mone- r
."()(,())() in damages. The verdict vas entered against the ministers and the New York Times jointly.
The decision was carried to the
Supreme Court and in an unanimous
decision the court reversed the Alabama decision. Associate Justice William J. Jirennan, in the court's opinion, puts the court strongly behind

the constitutional principle that a public official may not collect damages
from what he considers to be libel
of his official conduct without a
showing of actual malice. Mr. Justice
Brennan wrote, "The constitution
guarantees require, we think, a federal rule that prohibits a public official from recovering damages for a
defamatory falsehood relating to his
official conduct unless he proves that
the statement was made with 'actual
malice' that is, with knowledge that
it was false or with reckless disregard
of whether it was false or not."
What ilie decision means, in terms
of today's newspaper, is that the court
recognizes that in presenting the news
or additional comment on the news,
the freedom to criticize that is absolutely vital to an unfettered press is
protected, subject only to the limitation that the criticism be made in
good faith and not with malice.
Mr. Justice Brennan points out
that a succession of such suits would
limit the freedoms of the press.
"Whether or not a newspaper can
survive a succession of such judgments, the pall of fear and timidity
imposed upon those who would give
voice to public criticism is an atmosphere in which the First Amendment
freedoms cannot survive," he wrote.
Three members of the court, in
concurring opinions, went even further. Associate Justices Arthur Goldberg, Hugo Black, and William O.
Douglas would have the court uphold a doctrine of unconditional and
absolute freedom of the press to criticizes public conduct.
In his concurring opinion, Mr.
Justice Goldberg wrote, "In my view,
the First and Fourteenth Amendments
to the Constitution afford to the citizen and to the press an absolute, unconditional privilege to criticize official conduct despite the harm which
may flow from excesses and abuses."
In his concurring opinion, Mr.
Justice Black said, "an unconditional
right to say what one pleases aliout
public affairs is what I consider to
be the minimum guarantee of the
First Amendment."
It is an increasingly important
function of a free press in this country and others, to oiler a proper perspective to the complex situations of
the world through enlightened comment and educated interpretation. It
must be the function of the free press,
if it is to live up to its responsibilie
ties, to encourage the
of ideas and, above all, to be free to
express criticism of public officials
and public policies.
In its landmark decision, the Supreme Court has struck a solid blow
for just such a policy.

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The Fine Lines
Of Academic Freedom
The decision by the trustees of the
University of Illinois to let Prof.
Bevillo Oliver off with a reprimand
for his vitriolic attack on the patriotism and character of President Kennedy was not, we are sure, nearly so
easy a thing to do as their
vote would indicate. But
the fact that it was not easy makes
their decision the more commendable.

The university's own role is, by
the same token, to hold seemingly
contradictory forces in delicate balance. It must protect the dignity and
the integrity of its educational reputation and at the same time nurture
the spirit of free inquiry and discussion that makes it a keystone in the
structure of a truly democratic so-

Public revulsion at the professor's
fantastic charges in a John Birch Society publication is akin to public
g
fanatics
resentment against
who spout their dogmas from college
platforms. Reaction to extremism in
both cases may be natural, but it also
fuzzes up the practical application of
academic freedom.

It is noteworthy, therefore, that the
single vote against the Illinois trustees' action was based on this very
quality. The dissenter did not fed
the board failed to go far enough
in punishing Mr. Oliver, but that it
did not go far enough in explaining
the university's devotion to free expression and disassociating the university from the professor's attacks.

So it becomes awfully difficult for
a university to show persuasively the
distinction between a professor's role
as a scholar and his role as a private
citizen; between his duty to be competent in his academic field and his
right to be incompetent when he
strays beyond his ken.

ciety.

It is unfortunate, perhaps, that
liberty must so often be pursued along
such fine lines. But that, in turn, is
what makes its pursuit both worthwhile and courageous.
From The

Bladcgy

Campus Parable
"Et resurrexit tertia die secundum
Scripturas, ct ascendit . . ,"
"Wilkinson's test coining up
and you're singing!
What's the piece?"
"The Credo from the Mass the
Chorus did for Holy Week. I can't
get it out of my bead."
"Well, uhy'd the guy icrite it so
happy? I thought Holy Week was
when Christ was crucified."
"That's the Good Friday part-s- ure
enough, it's sad and slow. But I
was singing about Faster, when Jesus
returned to life after His execution."
"Well, that's just plain preposterous! You know as well as 1 do that
people don't come baik to life. What
good's a k ligion that's based on a
fairy sluiy like that?"
"Hold on a minute; I didn't say
that people return to life I said that
Jesus was resurrected, and Christianity certainly doesn't consider Him
just 'people.' In fact, it's the Resurrec

tion that sets Jesus off from all the
other great martyrs, like Lincoln, or
Gandhi, or Kennedy."
"Well, why in the world should
tjou go to tlie trouble of making such
an unprecedented claim in his case?
What difference does it make any-hoEven if such a miracle happened, it was centuries ago."
"There's a very simple reason for
asserting that He rose: we've got witnesses. Hundreds of people who knew
Him well, saw Him, spoke with Him,
even ate with Him after Easter. Rut
the real point of it is this: He hasn't
died again since then!"
"Just a minute here! Arc you trying to tell me that Jesus Christ is still
ulive today? Why, that's fantastiel"
"That's the point exactly. More
than being alive, He's every bit as
real a personal acquaintance as you
or Dr. Wilkinson."
Al Rlocii
y
Christian Fellowship

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tuesday, Miuli

31, I9f.i- -5

From SummerhillTo Collier Heights

Continued From rage 1
tome of (he schools." He said that Negroes can eat "in only some

restaurants."

The Summit Conference is a coordinating group for the city's
nine civil rights organizations. After its birth last October, the group
published a booklet entitled "Action for Democracy" In which the
organizations' common goals were listtd.
In January of this year, members of the Student
Coordinating Committee (SNCC) began to demand action on the
proposals. Although the students were counseled by many Negro
leaders to avoid demonstrations, SNCC organized picketing and sit-iat downtown restaurants.
When the demonstrators began resisting arrest, by falling limp
n the floors of restaurants and lying down In front of police
Vehicles, police began using rougher tactics.
Summit Conference support was announced for the demonstrations, but some members felt they were not the best course of action.
Many Atlantans' sympathy for the Negro cause was erased when
Violence broke out.
Without strong backing In either the white or Negro communit