xt7pc824f86c https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7pc824f86c/data/mets.xml Virginia Historical Records Survey of Virginia 1941 Prepared by The Survey of Federal Archives, Division of Community Service Programs, Work Projects Administration; Other contributors include: Survey of Federal Archives (U.S.), United States Work Projects Administration Division of Community Service Programs; vii, 436 pages, 27 cm; Mimeographed; UK holds archival copy for ASERL Collaborative Federal Depository Program libraries; Call number FW 4.14:F 317/ser.9/no.45 books English Richmond, Virginia: Historical Records Survey of Virginia This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed in accordance with U. S. copyright laws. Virginia Works Progress Administration Publications Inventory of Federal Archives in the States, Series IX The Department of Agriculture, Number 45 Virginia text Inventory of Federal Archives in the States, Series IX The Department of Agriculture, Number 45 Virginia 1941 2015 true xt7pc824f86c section xt7pc824f86c , [Tg T,] A Q n A `z ‘   UNWSMQFKEMUCKY I I
fm   IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII/IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII ‘
@4%,,% T 3 ULIE5 LII¤"IBI¤I¤“| J
A &
Mlmlmlmlmlmlmlmlm
 M:<0>R1D>   
I     I   `° K I
A   IIINII U — I
  \  < .I\ I  \  
1 LI J if A? Y
A UNIVERSITY OFX KENTUCKY
A I HISTORICAL RECORDS SURVEY
WORK PROJECTS ADMINISTRATION

  
If
The Historical Records Survey Projects &
QZ
P. M. Hamer, Assistant Director in Charge of
_ the Inventory of Federal Archives ,
Milton W. Blanton, Regional Supervisor
Kathleen Bruce, State Supervisor
Division of Community Service Programs »
 
Florence Kerr, Assistant Commissioner i
Blanche M. Ralston, Cnief Regional Supervisor l
Ella G. Agnew, State Director Q
WORK BPQJLCTS ADMINISTRATION
Howard O. Hunter, Acting Commissioner
Robert L. MacDougall, Regional Director
Russell S. Hummel, Stete Administrator

 {_ iii
g QREFACE.
z This gnventory of Fedggal_g;ghives in the_§tates is one of the
j products of the work of the Survey of Federal Archives, which
A operated as a nation~wide project of the Works Progress Adminis-
tration from January 1, 1936, to June 30, 1937, and has been con-
tinued in Virginia since that date as a state project of that Ad-
ministration and of the Work Projects Administration of the Federal
Works Agency.
The plan for the organization of the Inventory is as follows:
Series I consists of reports on the administration of the Survey,
acknowledgments, and general discussions of the location, condition,
and content of federal archives in the states. Succeeding series
contain the detailed information secured by workers of the Survey,
in inventory form, a separate series number being assigned to each
of the executive departments (except the Department of State) and
other major units of the Federal Government. Within each series No. 1
is a general introduction to the field organization and records of
the governmental agency concerned; the succeeding numbers contain the
inventory proper, separate numbers being assigned to each state in
alphabetical order. Thus, in each series, the inventory for Alabama
is No. 2, that for Arizona No. 3, that for Arkansas No. 4, etc.
For each local office information regarding each series, or unit
V of related records, is presented in the following order: title, in-
t clusive dates ("to date" indicating an open file at the time the
g information was secured), general description of informational content,
, description of the system of filing or indexing (if any), a statement
“ of frequency and purpose of use, form of the record itself (bound
t volumes, sheets in folders, etc.), linear footage, description of the
containers, physical condition of the records (not stated if satis-
· factory), location by room number or other identifying information,
v and finally the number of the Form SBSA on which this information
was originally recorded by a Survey worker and from which it was
abstracted for the Inventory. This form is on file in the National
Archives,
In Virginia the work of the project was under the supervision of
Mr. Terry C. Durham from its inception until September 1936. He was
" then succeeded by Dr. Kathleen Bruce under whose direction the project
was reorganized and a new survey begun. Dr. Bruce has continued in ,
charge of Federal Archives work, although in January 1940 the Survey of
Federal Archives was consolidated with the Historical Records Survey
with Dr. Bruce as supervisor of the combined project. This inventory
of the records of the Department of Agriculture in Virginia was pre-
pared in the Richmond office of the Survey and with the exception of
the introduction to each major subdivision and the brief history of
each local agency was edited before the final typing by Mr. Lewis J.
Q Darter, Jr., of the Washington office.
. / """` I
IK *1/}"" tj; V} Br`}! CE;
Richmond, Va. Kathleen Bruce, State Supervisor
June 30, 1941 Historical Records Survey of Virginia
l

   V
g
  gggmmrs
AGRICULTURAL ADJUSTMENT ADMINISTRATION, THE
  OIOIDOIllll•O•|¤II|••|•\•|I|•|••••|¤•lIl||ll|O•••| 3
Blacksburg,_State Office ..... ...... ......... ........ .... ..... . 5
Richmond, Dairy Market Administrator ... ..... . ................ . 15
AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS, THE BUREAU OF
  |l•\§||OI•iI|I|OlI|l••I•IIO|••••¤•|••|I•iII\•t••|l  
Norfolk, Fruits and Vegetables Inspection Field Headquarters .. 2l
Richmond, Crop and Livestock Estimates Field Headquarters ..... 22
ANIMAL INDUSTRY, THE BUREAU OF
Introduction ..................................... . ........... . 33
Bristol, Meat Inspection Field Station ............. ... .... .... 34
Norfolk, Meat Inspection Field Station ... ........... » ......... 35
Richmond, Meat Inspection Field Station ............ ...... ..... 36
Richmond, Tuberculosis Eradication Field Station .......... .... 37
it Salem, Meat Inspection Field Station ......... ................. 41
N BIOLOGICAL SURVEY, THE BUREAU OF
3   OI|IO|lIl|§I|O|II§OI•I||III•|I|lI|lII|••i|•||II•|•  
p Blacksburg, Cooperative Wildlife Research and Demonstration
Field Station .... .......................................... 46
ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE, THE BUREAU OF
  |l•II••|•l|•IItilIIUIOIIhlndIllllllhllilllllllnitl  
Blacksburg, Barberry Eradication Field Station .... .... . ....... 52
Charlottesville, Blister Rust Control Field Station ........... 54
Newport News, Port Inspection Field Headquarters ......... . .... 62
Norfolk, Port Inspection Field Headquarters .. ................. 63
Norfolk, Japanese Beetle Field Station ........................ 65
Norfolk, Truck Crop Insect Investigation Field Laboratory ..... 67
Richmond, Japanese Beetle Field Station ......... . ............. 69
Richmond, Blister Rust Control Field Headquarters ........... .. 71
Richmond, Stored-Tobacco Insect Investigation Field
  lllhllllllt•III|lI•l•|I•l!l•l•••I••l|•Ill••l·OllO  
EXPERIM NT STATIONS, THE OFFICE OF
  Ill!||•|I•|•••••I|IlOnIIll|l•l•••C•O•l|•II••••IO|I  
Blacksburg, Virginia Agricultural Experiment Station . ......... 83

 vi it
EXTENSION SERVICE, THE U
  l|I••l••l•!•IO|•|•I••t•••••|l•IOO•tlIII•IIIOlOIIi   lg.
Blacksburg, Cooperative Extension State Headquarters ......... 115
. FOREST SERVICE, THE
IntrOductiOn·|O••at•lI••It•I|•I|•I••I••|IIr||•••••¤I|•••\II|II  
Charlottesville, Collaborator ... ........................... .. 149
Harrisonburg, George Washington National Forest Supervisor ... 175
Roanoke, Jefferson National Forest Supervisor .. .............. 208
PLANT INDUSTRY, THE BUREAU OF
  ||•l•II••••••|••l|llultllllttliliIblultlltllltlll  
Arlington, Arlington Experiment Farm Station Headquarters .... 218
PUBLIC ROADS, THE BUREAU OF
  II•i•Il•I•||n•|•••l|•l||||I|•|llI•|••C•••Illlllll  
Richmond, District No. 14 State Office ........ ............... 224 _
Roanoke, National Parks Field Headquarters ........... . ....... 226 Z
RESETTLEMENT ADMINISTRATION, THE l E
  ||I•lb•Q•••||••|•••|•|·l\||\|••••••l••|lIt|t•I•l|    
Abingdon, Rural Rehabilitation County Supervisor ............. 236 Q
Amelia, Rural Rehabilitation County Supervisor ............... 237 ?
Big Stone Gap, Rural Rehabilitation County Supervisor ...... .. 239 ,
Blacksburg, Rural Rehabilitation District Supervisor ......... 240
Blacksburg, State Land Planning Specialist ................... 243
Bowling Green, Rural Rehabilitation County Supervisor ........ 244
Charlotte Court House, Rural Rehabilitation County
Supervisor .......... . ..... ....... .... . .................... 245
Chatham, Rural Rehabilitation County Supervisor .... .......... 246
Christiansburg, Farm Debt Adjustment State Supervisor ........ 248
Glintwood, Rural Rehabilitation County Supervisor . ........... 250
Courtland, Rural Rehabilitation County Supervisor ............ 251
Covington, Rural Rehabilitation County Supervisor ............ 253
Cumberland, Rural Rehabilitation County Supervisor ........... 254
Farmville, Rural Rehabilitation County Supervisor ............ 256
Farmville, Land Utilization Project Manager . ................ . 257
Fincastle, Rural Rehabilitation County Supervisor ........... . 272
Floyd, Rural Rehabilitation County Supervisor ................ 273
Front Royal, Rural Rehabilitation County Supervisor ........ .. 275 r
Halifax, Rural Rehabilitation County Supervisor .... .. ....... . 277 g
Heatneville, Rural Rehabilitation County Supervisor .......... 278
Hillsville, Rural Rehabilitation County Supervisor .......... . 280

 xl vii
Ns;
l i
Q Independence, Rural Rehabilitation County Supervisor ......... 282
E Jonesville, Rural Rehabilitation County Supervisor .... . ..... . 283
Keller, Rural Rehabilitation County Supervisor ............... 285
Kenbridge, Rural Rehabilitation County Supervisor ............ 286
Lebanon, Rural Rehabilitation County Supervisor .... .......... 288
Louisa, Rural Rehabilitation County Supervisor ........ .... ... 289
Manassas, Rural Rehabilitation County Supervisor .. .......... . 291
New Market, Rural Rehabilitation County Supervisor ........... 292
Norfolk, Rural Rehabilitation County Supervisor .............. 294
Prince George, Rural Rehabilitation County Supervisor ........ 296
Providence Forge, Rural Rehabilitation County Supervisor .... . 297
Pulaski, Rural Rehabilitation County Supervisor .............. 299
Richmond, Rural Rehabilitation State Headquarters ............ 300
Rockymount, Rural Rehabilitation County Supervisor ........... 305
Rustburg. Rural Rehabilitation County Supervisor ............. 307
St. Stephens Church, Rural Rehabilitation County Supervisor .. ` 309
Salem, Rural Rehabilitation County Supervisor ................ 311
South Hill, Rural Rehabilitation County Supervisor ........... 311
Staunton, Rural Rehabilitation County Supervisor .......... ... 313
Stuart, Rural Rehabilitation County Supervisor ............... 315
i Suffolk, Rural Rehabilitation County Supervisor .............. 316
A Tosno, Rural Rehabilitation County Supervisor ................ 318
>g Warrenton, Rural Rehabilitation County Supervisor .......... .. 320
& Wytheville, Rural Rehabilitation County Supervisor ........... 321
fl SOIL CONSERVATION SERVICE, THE
V Introduction .......... ..... ............ . .... . ................ 327
” Blacksburg, Southeast Region No. 2 State Headquarters . ....... 329
Charlottesville, Demonstration Projects VA-2 and VA-3 ........ 330
Danville, Demonstration Project VA·l .. ....................... 366
Harrisonburg, Demonstration Project VA-4 ..................... .376
SOLICIFOR, THE OFFICE OF THE
Introduction .... . .... . ............ . .......................... 399
Roanoke, Title District No. l Title Attorney ................. 400
WEATHER BUREAU, THE `
Introduction ..... . ................ . ........................ .. 409
c Cape Henry, Weather Bureau Office ............................ 414
Lynchburg, Weather Bureau Office ........ . ......... . ...... .... 427
» Norfolk, Weather Bureau Office ........ ..... .................. 428
i Richmond, Weather Bureau Office . ..... . ...................... . 432
Wytheville, Weather Bureau Office .......... ................ .. 435

  
ii'?
k i ‘ A
 
Q% wm: AGRICULTURAL ADJUSTMENT A¤r.¤msTnATx0N

 . ,
  n
W
K

 it ·
.\;
U -
INTRODUCTION
Immediately after the Agricultural Adjustment Act was approved by
the President on May 12, 1955, all enployees of the Division of Co-
operative Extension in Virginia were called to help make its adminis-
tration effective. Hence the staff of the Extension Service at the
Virginia Polytechnic Institute began to work out a program, the purpose
of which was to increase the income of the farmers by regulating the
supply of agricultural products to the demand, and by fostering trade
agreements among producers, processors, and distributors of agricultural
products. With the exception of rice, Virginians were growing the basic
agricultural conmodities recognized under the Agricultural Adjustment
Act and in sufficient quantities to justify adjustments in production,
The five commodities affected were cotton, wheat, tobacco, hogs, and
milk and its products. By October l, 1955, five AAA.programs were under
way in the State. As a result 5,000 cotton growers in the Virginia
. cotton counties took 10,000 acres out of production, for which they re-
} ceived $140,000 in benefit payments; 8,000 wheat growers in 42 counties
@ signed wheat reduction contracts covering 250,000 acres, for which they
if received over a half nnllion dollars; f1ue·cured tobacco growers placed
A 10,000 acres under agreement; 8,000 corn-hog contracts were signed; and
milk marketing agreements for Danville, Lynchburg, Newport News, Norfolk,
Richmond, Roanoke, and Washington were formulated. From the inauguration
of the program.in 1955 until its conclusion on January 6, 1956, a total
of 120,571 crop adjustment contracts signed by the Virginia farmers were
accepted by the AAA.· Of these contracts 56,641 were for tobacco, 22,528
were for wheat, 15,631 were for cotton, 7,665 for peanuts, and 17,906
were corn-hog contracts. The benefit payments accruing from these con-
tracts amounted to $7,855,955.45.
In January 1956 the Supreme Court declared the Agricultural Adjust-
ment Act unconstitutional on the ground that it invaded states' rights.
This decision automatically repealed the acts which had been passed in
support of the original act. The provisions of one of them, the Kerr-
Smith Tobacco Act, applied to Virginia. After this the continuance of
the work of agricultural adjustment was made possible by the passage of
the Soil Conservation and Domestic Allotment Act on February 29, 1956.
Under this act, the states administer the program while the Federal
Government serves as a coordinating agency to see that the plans pro-
1 posed are in the interest of agriculture and also of the public. This
made it necessary for the General Assembly of Virginia to pass an act
to enable the Cmmnonwealth to cooperate in carrying out the new program.
The General Assembly passed such an act on March 15, 1956.

 4 t
_ . yi,
The AAA spent a total of $6,126,155.72 on the programs in Virginia for ,$
the year l958 — 1959, allotting the State for the year a total acreage of Q
2,807,559 acres for soil—depletin; crops. The acreage for these crops was gf
distributed as follows; 59,576 acres for cotton, 546,728 acres for wheat, {
150,600 for tobacco, 154,270 for peanuts, and 51,000 for potatoes. Eighty- ;
five thousand Virpinia farmers, whose farms represented 72.5 percent of`
the cropland acreage in the State, cooperated in the 1958 program, for
` which they were paid a total of $4,262,782.44. As the plan operates in
l9e1, benefit payments are made through the AAA for soil conservation in
land-use-planning contracts. Land use planning in Virginia is directed
by a com ittee composed of the chairman of the AAA, the state coordinator
of the Soil Conservation Service, the Land Use Planning specialist of the
Bureau of Agricultural Econotucs, and the state directors of the Exten-
sion Service and the Agricultural Experiment Station at Blacksburg and the
state director of the Farm Security Administration.
The Agricultural Adjustment Administration records in Virginia were
surveyed with the records of the Division of Cooperative Extension at the
Virginia Polytechnic Institute in Blacksburg. No other AAA records were
surveyed with the exception of the records of the Lhlk Market Adminis-
trator, Dairy Section, AAA, in Richmond.
, nf
i

 t
, 5
r it
f gi
as (g
9   .
W" .T2iE,.A§2l£CiJZf~ELU.%’e°~l»..AD.JCU§T1@1T...AE@]1I.$_T¥3.·AEI.9li
Q si4>.K.s.aaEJ‘I‘, CONTRACT, 1954 -
' 1955. Form T.82, Work Sheets for County Control Committees, type of to-
bacco, county, name of producer, number of farms, acres, number of tenants,
production acres (1951 — 1954), production in pounds (1951 - l954),symbol
for bass option chosen, bass acreage, acreage allotment, rental acres, and
initial production allotment. Filed alphabetically by name of county.
(Occasionally, official.) 14 x 17 papers fastened with staples to card-
board sheets, 1 ft. 6 in., on steel filing cass. Dirty, torn, scattered, ”
‘ and worn. R._50l. (540)
9. NESCELLANEOUS RECORDS OF TOBACCO PROGRAM OF AGRICULTURAL ADIUST~
MENT ADMINISTRATION, 1954 - 1955. Register of checks paid to producers,
and record of net second adjustment and deficiency payments approved.
Type of tobacco, lot no., producer's name, nst payment, gross second ad-
justment payment, deficiency payment, administrative expenses, and adjust-
mentsjpamncnts approved. (Rarely, official.) ll x 14 loose forms, 9 ft.
4 in., in pasteboard boxes (2). Dirty, scattered, and worn. R. 501.
($45)
r 10. APPLICATIONS FOR ALLOTRENT AND TAXkE2Il?TION CERTIFICATES, Aug.
E 1954 — Sept. 1955. Form BA»8, Application for Allotment and Tax-Exemp-
,§ tion Certificate Pursuant to the Cotton Act. Name and address of oper-
W ator; basis for determining acreage, yield, and production of cotton;
y oath and signature of operator; community emnnittse's certification of
~ application, committee's certification of application, and summary of
application. Also FOIH.I@r2OB, replacing Form BA-8, but giving practi-
cally same information, Filed alphabetically by name of county. (Raro-
ly, official.) 9 x 14% loose-leaf books, 20 ft., in 10 drawers of stool
filing cases. Soiled and worn, R. 5013. (270)
ll. LESCEELANEOUS RECORDS OF THE PEANUT PROGRAM OF TEE.AGRlCULTURAL
ADJUSHEHU?ADMINISTRATION, 1954 — 1956. Correspondence of local super-
visor of AAA peanut program, with Washington officials ef AAA, county
agricultural extension agents, and individuals relative to different
phases of program; memoranda and circular letters concerning program,
with memoranda on county, memoranda on compliance, and general memoranda;
1   bills of lading; contract adjustment data; program planning procedure;
recommendations; time sheets for employees; transmittal records; pay-
, ment schedules; and Form PH-19, showing total accepted cmitracts for
‘r county, first transmittal from county, first transmittal by agent, to-
i5° tal contracts incomplete, 1954 adjusted production, and 1955 acreage
  allotted; Form PH-EO, Transmittal Sheet for Peanut Production Adjust-
ment Contract. Names and serial nes. of producers cnd record of 1954
production; Form C Peanut 55, Schedule of Payments Approved. Nemo of
producer, total payments, 195i crop production and 1954 crop allotment;
Form ll, Register of Checks Issued, Sept. - Doc. 1955. Form.LRU-EA,
Questionnaire, sont to farmers in peanut—growing sections, recording
various crops raised by farmers and distribution of crops by agents;
also mimeegrnphed circulars of instructions and blank forms used in pro-

 8 Agricultural Adjustment Administration, Blacksburg _?
w
gram. Filed alphabetically. (Occasionally, official.) 9 x 12 folders, F
4 ft. 3 in., in 3 drawers of steel filing case. R. 301A. (265) g
12. TRANSMITTAL SHEETS, M SCELLANEOUS COMPLIANCE FORMS, AND NHS- -
CELLANEOUS CORRESPONDENCE, 1934 - 1936. Carbcns of transmittal sheets, R
originals in Washington AAA office, with tobacco umrketing cards and w
approved tobacco contracts to allow tobacco grower to obtain payment for
` reduced acreage. Type of form, code nc., stats, county, type of tobacco,
how cured, serial no. and name of grower; transmittal sheet recording A
compliance forms returned from Washington with names of tobacco farmers
cooperating in AAA tobacco program; and correspondence of assistant ex-
tension agronomist and assistant agricultural economist with non-Govt.
persons in Vc., county agricultural extension agents, and Extension Ser-
vice staff, relativc to AAA tobacco program. Transmittal sheets for ‘
1934 - 1935 includc all typos of tobacco, while those for 1936 are chiefly
for flu—curcd tobacco. Filed alphabetically. (Frequently, official.)
9 x 12 folders and 8% x ll loose papers, 6 ft., in 3 drawers of stool
filing cmsc. Correspondence scettgrod. R. 210. (363)
13. GENERAL FILES OF FORMS USED IN THE COTTON ADJUSTMENT PROGRAM,
1934 — 1936. Form GR — Cotton 203, Schedule of Contracts Approved for
First 1935 Rcntul Payment. Code nos. for sista, county, and tenant;
t0nnnt‘s name, percentage of purity, adjusted yield, base mcrcs, rented
`mcros, rontal per mcro, farm allotment, acrcs which may bo planted in W
1935, and total rontul pnymnntg Form DC—1 lists 1934 producers not sign- ‘
ing contracts in 1934; Form C-125, Schedule of Payments of Producers T
Rccciptud. Bnnkhamd serial no., name of payee, amount and no. of chock, 4
pcy0c's signature or receipt for chock dclivcrcd, and total payment; ?
Form Cotton 101-A, Pr0duccr's Undortaking and Statement of Supporting Q
Evidence for 1934 - 1935 Cotton Acreage Reduction Contract to bo cntcrod
into in 1935. Extnnt and location of farm, name of producer, land in
cultivation in 1933 - 1934, cotton acrcugo and production, signatures
of producer and committccmcn; Form Cotton 121, Supplementary Rcprcscn-
tation of Producer to County Committoo and Report of Supervisor. Cot-
ton acreage, and outline of fields and of acreage rented to Secretary
of Agriculture; Form Cotton-lll summarizes by county, 1935 supplementary
documents relating to 1934 and 1935 cotton acreage reduction contracts
entered into in 1934. Form Cotton-109 lists 1935 amendments to 1934
and 1935 cotton acreage reduction contracts signed in 1934. Form BA-
306, Record of Individual Pr0ducars' Allotments and of Issues of Tax-
Exemption Certificates. State, county, serial application no., name
and address of producer, all¤tmcnts,1¤¤ucs of tax—sx0mpti0n certificates,
and certification by St¤te Allotment Board of 1934 Rllotmmnt. Form BA-
305, Allotments Approved und Rggistcr of T&x—Exempti0n Certificates
Issued Pursuant to Cotton Act Approved Apr. 21, 1934. State, community,
county, numc and address of producer, serial nos. of certificates issued,
number of certificates issuud, allotments in pounds of tmx·¤xcmpt cotton,
parts (pounds) of certificates canceled, and date and rcccipt of pro-
ducor for certificates issued. Filed alphabetically by name of county.
(Occasionally, official.) 9 x 14% and 12 x 13% loose-loaf books and
9 x 12 folders, 13 ft., 1 in., in 3 drawers of wooden umd 6 drawers of
_ steal filing cases. Soilcd and worn. R. 30lB. (364)
14. GENERAL FILES OF RECORDS RELATIVE TO THE AAA WHEAT PROGRAM,

 1
A, Agricultural Adjustment Administration, Blacksburg 9
 
So ? 1954 - 1956. Form Wheat 201, Application for Wheat Adjustment Contract,
f 1956 — 1959. Identification of applicant, wheat history of farm, 1925 -
1955, plot of wheat tracts, and crop distribution; Form Wheat 214 - A,
Transmittal Sheet. Name of county, 1956 application no., 1955 - 1955
> application no., name of producer, and base acreage; Form Wheat 209,
Wheat Certificate of Compliance, 1956. Name of state and of county, de-
Or scription of farms, operator's certification, certification by allotments
CO, com ittee, report of noncompliance, and photostat copies of county list-
· ing sheets; Form 11, Register of Wheat Checks. Serial no. of producer,
B name of producer, and no. and amount of checks issued; also Applications
` For Wheat Allotment Contract, with acreage of farm and other information
helpful in determining procedure; and listing sheets for communities and
r' producers; wheat check sheets of compliance forms received and sent to
4 Washington by state office with serial no. and check, number of compli-
3flY ance forms mailed, rough draft of nature of consent, name of producer,
section no., and other information; lists of memoranda and data for
1955 — 1955 wheat allotment contracts; and correspondence of co pliance
supvr., with Washington officials of AAA, local members of Extension
Service staff, dist. and county agricultural extension agents, individ-
uals, and county associations composed of prominent citizens and farmers
who aid AAA in many phases of wheat program. Form Wheat 209, sent to
Washington as work is completed; Form wheat 201, returned to county
1 agricultural extension agent as soon as adjustment payments have been
made and chccked.' Form 11, not regarded by this office as of any great
*“ value. Filed alphabetically by name of county. (Frequently, official.)
9 x 12 folders and envelopes and 8% x 12 bundles, 21 ft. 6 in., in 12
ir ( drawers of steel filing cases. Dirty and torn. R. 501A. (265)
15. CORRESPONDENCE, 1954 to date. Of assistant agronomist and
'd assistant economist with officials of JQA, Washington, D. C., local ex-
` tension officials, county agricultural extension agents, and individuals
on types of tobacco affected by provisions of AAA of 1955; air-cured,
flue-cured, fire-cured, and burley. Correspondence segregated according
to type; active and inactive correspondence separated in each group.
Certain production-adjustment measures of AAA declared unconstitutional
Y by Supreme Court, January 6, 1956. This portion of program of AA;
being closed out as rapidly as possible. Filed alphabetically. (Fre-
quently, official.) 9 x 12 folders, 19 ft. 6 in., in 10 drawers of
steel filing cases. R. 210. (281)
16. NESCFLLANEOUS FORMS FOR G1NNERS' COMPENSATION AND OTHER LFETRIAL
S, RELATIVE TO COTTON ADJUSTMENT, 1954 to date. Schedules of disbursements
for cotton ginners' pre-audit difference statements, schedule sheets for
ginners' compensation, letters of transmittal, applications_for tax-
, exemption certificates, applications for employment in local office,
1, blanket court orders, certificates of completion (clearance sheets),
a, 1954 certificates undelivered, receipts from Washington for corrected
contracts, letters of transmittal for tax-exemption certificates, and
ginners’ information returns. F