xt7pg44hqc0b https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7pg44hqc0b/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19651015  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, October 15, 1965 text The Kentucky Kernel, October 15, 1965 1965 2015 true xt7pg44hqc0b section xt7pg44hqc0b Inside Todays Kernel
Buckminister
Fuller
world: Poge Two.

of Kentucky
University FRIDAY, OCT.
KY.,

Vol. LVII, No. 27

15, 19G5

LEXINGTON,

.JJ
Eight Pages

Hears Solution
For Seating Problem
SC

By TERENCE HUNT

And FRANK BROWNING
complete row of seats 102 in all will be removed from Stoll
Field s student section by Kentucky's next home game to provide
better access aisles, according to Student Congress President Winston Miller.
Miller, in a committee report athletic director Bernie Shively,
to Congress Thursday night, said and himself.
a concrete aisle would replace the
In a discussion of the football
row of seats immediately below seating situation, Carson Porter,
the entrance ramps.
second year SC representative,
The change will speed up the questioned the right of the public
flow of students entering and to sideline seats while students
leaving the stadium, Miller indi- are "shoved into the end zone."
"Why should students be
cated. He explained that the
from meetings with shoved into the end zone when
move came
ticket manager Harvey Hodges, townspeople buy tickets on the
A

sidelines."

a perma-

Congress appointed
nent committee to study seating

Washington said then that Indonesian leaders would not renew
contracts for the program.
Now, Dr. Johnson is concerned with keeping the current
program in operation.
"We have the contract until
June," he said, "but as yet we
have no funds."
Dr. Jansen said he will be
in Washington Wednesday to discuss allocation of funds with
AID officials,
He said he expected no difficulty in getting the monies,
but would have to go through
"the complicated business of government financing."
He explained that the
program runs out in June, but
that an extension had been expected.
"It's remarkable in some ways
that we were allowed to stay
that long. Other American aid
programs were kicked out. We
are still there, but on a somewhat reduced scale.
"Had the political atmosphere
been favorable, we would have
been asked to stay and do other
things," he said.
Dr. Jansen said he is concerned about the lack of con
munications into the country.
He said he was informed Thursday that those Americans in the
two UK programs arc safe.
Dr. Jansen said he had expected about 100 new students
to come to the United States
from Indonesia last summer, but
"Violent Communist demonstrations frightened the government," and the plans did noi
materalize.
In the Indonesian program,
the University provides faculty
members to the country's universities, and brings promising
students to the United States
for advanced training.
AID officials said in March
there were powerful forces to
Communist-attempt- ing
work primarily
to isolate Indonesia
from the West.
One spokesman said "elimination of such programs as the one
handled by Kentucky would be
quite a victory for the Communist

c
events.
Miller added that 400 date
tickets would be available for the
Ceorgia football game.
In another report Registration
Committee chairman Sheryl Snyder said his group "is undertaking a survey of student and faculty" to determine the reasons for
dropping and adding.
"Whatever the reasons may
Niles Spencer's "The Viaduct" oil painting today reap- be, the fact remains that the
procedure is
peared as mysteriously as it dis- present drop-ad- d
burdensome
to
last weekend, and will unnecessarily
appeared
be put on exhibit at the Fine Arts both students and faculty," he
added.
Building this afternoon.
The painting, valued at sevContinued On Page 8
party."
eral thousand dollars, was discovered Thursday afternoon at a
downtown art gallery.
an unidentified
Monday,
young man took the painting,
wrapped up, to the Esplanade
Callery, according to Richard
Freeman, UK Art Department
chairman. The package was adBy NANCY BROCKMAN
dressed to a Mr. Reynierson, the
Kernel Staff Writer
d
gallery owner.
University housing officials were
The canvas remained covered, Thursday concerning recent complaints of coeds
and unidentified, until Thursday, living in Cooperstown Allen House.
Coeds have reported incidents ranging from
when Mr. Reynierson returned
unidentified persons tossing pebbles at their winfrom out of town. He immediateg
dows during
hours to various acts
ly recognized the work, and
of vandalism. Additionally, charges of "peeping-toms- "
called Mr. Freeman.
"The photo that appeared in
being near the housing facility have been
voiced.
the papers smoked it out," Mr.
Mrs. M. J. Caulkins, Allen House head resident,
Freeman said. "The theft was
no longer a Joke, it was serious." refused comment on any incident, passing them
He said the case is closed and off as "rumors." She passed the reports off as
that "I said I wouldn't ask any being of "no facts based only on what girls think
questions. We are Just going to they see."
look more carefully at what's
Campus Security Director Lloyd Mahan, howcarried out from now on."
ever, shed some light on the situation by saying
The painting was removed
Campus Police had received reports of vandalism
in the area, but "we have run into no other actual
from Mr. Freeman's office in the
Fine Arts Building sometime Friincidents."
An Allen House resident adviser, when asked
day or Saturday, he said.

Missing

for

University-Publi-

Painting
Found

Poge Three.

Multirersity protested by students not
wanting 'io b "folded, spindled, or
mutilated": Poge Five.

Food Symposium begins with Dr. Georg
Borgstrom: Poge Seven.
"Faculty Fireside Week" officially
proclaimed: Poge Eiglir.

Julius Schulmon

to lecture Monday:

early-mornin-

Cen-

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Food Symposium Begins
.Dr. Ruth Lever ton, assistant deputy administrator of the U.S.
Department of Agriculture's Research Service, discussed "Food
and Nutrition Coals for the Future" at a banquet Thursday night
featuring new foods. The banquet was part of the People and Foods
Symposium. See story on page seven.

Silver. Lecture
Starts A AUP

The American Association of University Professors Centennial
Conference opened at 3 p.m., here today, with a welcome by UK
Executive Vice President A.D. Albright, in the Student Center

Theatre.

Dr. James Silver, a history
professor at the University of
Mississippi, will be the featured
speaker at 8 p.m. today. He
will speak at the Commerce building auditorium, on "Revolution
in the Closed Society." It will be
open to the public.
"Academic Freedom in the
South" is the overall theme for
the conference, scheduled to end
Saturday with a panel discussion
by conference observers.
Dr. Silver, currently a visiting
professor at the' University of
Notre Dame, has received worldg
wide acclaim for his 1964
book, "Mississippi: The
Closed Society." He received the
Hillman
Foundation
Sidney
best-sellin-

Cooperstown Coeds Complain;
Campus Police Investigate
tight-mouthe-

tditor

discusses reel meaning of
tennial: Poge Four.
"Eve of Destruction" possible in
LSU clash: Page Six.

ImdonesiaiiProgram
Scheduled To End

about continuance of the proByJOHNZEII
Kernel Staff Writer
gram.
The University's Indonesian
"But it's really hard to tell
program is scheduled to end by what's going on there," he said.
June of 19G6, but UK coordinator
"It looks as though an
William Jansen today expressed
group is the formucautious optimism that an ex- lated goverment, but it's too early
tension may be granted.
to say that for sure," he added.
"If what's being reported in
Last March, the Kernel rethe news is accurate, it is pos- ported the UK programs, in agsible that we might get to stay riculture and in engineering,
a little longer," Dr. Jansen said would be terminated because of a
Thursday night.
deteriorating U.S. position in the
Dr. Jansen explained recent southeast Asian country.
news reports out of Indonesia
Agency for International Deindicate
feeling velopment
(AID) officials in

describe! future

special prize, the Anisfleld-Wol- f
award for race relations and
awards from the national organization of B'nai B'rith and the
National Association of Independent Schools for his work.
A graduate of the University
of North Carolina, he received
his M.S. degree from Peabody
College, Nashville, and a doctorate from Vanderbilt University.
Dr. VV. R. Taylor gave the
first lecture at today's Student
Center program, speaking on
"The Making of an Intellectual
Establishment in the Old South."
His speciality is history of the
South, American intellectual history, and the history of American
religion.
Dr. William P. Fidler, AAUP
general secretary, will speak
9 a.m. Saturday on "Academic
Freedom in the South Today."
Dr. Fidler, a graduate of the

University

about the reports, said she could make no
as she had been asked by the Dean of Women's Office to remain silent on the situation.
conv-men-

t

Direct queries with Campus Police have resulted in no verification of the reports. A desk
man, who refused to identify liimself, denied two
UK policemen were assigned to the basement of
Cooperstown's "E" Building last Tuesday and
Wednesday nights.
Five E Building coeds, living on the second
floor, were distrubed by noises at their window at
about 3:30 a.m. Wednesday, and reported the incident to the two policemen whom they had earlier
heard were stationed in the basement's laundry
room, one of the coeds told the Kernel Thursday.
One of the policemen said he and his companion would look into the situation, the coed
added.
Campus Police said Thursday they patrol all
campus areas, but that patrolmen are not ordered
to remain in any one area.

of

Alabama,

Harvard
University, and the
University of Chicago, is the
author of "Augusta Evans Wilson: a Biography," printed in
1951.

Saturday's panel discussion
begins at 10:30 a.m., with Dr.
Cladys M. Kammerer of the University of Florida taking part.
She is a former UK teacher
in arts and sciences, and received
Professor
the Distinguished
Award.
Other panelists will be Prof.
Daniel H. Pollitt, School ofLaw,
University of Virginia, and Dr.
Lionel 11. Newsom, president,
Barber-ScotiConcord, N. C.
A reception is planned for
5 p.m. today at the Helen C.
King Alumni House. A conference
banquet will precede the public
lecture by Dr. Silver.

* 2

frit.

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL,

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MKFOKV.n BULKY
KerrH AIt Wit or

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Work

Fuller Describes Fuhin; World

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Oct- - 15.

In
will

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und
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Li an informal
lr(otnr
Tcfvia). Kullrr i a vtill all hr whir to tfo hack o
at we yo lo tdiool
nyri rrahrriatician, rrjjnff, ulKKl-n- ot
T.!rr. an inventor, tmjy, hut to h am how to makr
e x;jit to do i to a contribution. You must have
5:c vjzetiTiZ
nwl had vmie Kod propaganda to
do it," he tn- - H't ptople to bflirvelnthr virtue
!i b
"Ve
art man to do of work."
rriZi
Fuller connected hit throrirt
gxd. Trethin?
n at individual!."
u to
on the projxrtiet of wealth with
FcIt dijcuved at length hit a theory on xlitict. "The only
c
crjoc7ko L"t the vociety of the reaton wc have political tyttcrnt
f;tre a zixn vocitiy. "A it that there it a theory that there
i crcrKrrrt it pottible. it not enough wealth to go
TLc rrimc tiat we dcei't have around. Automation will solve
ta:ra!j:r it tioi wedoo'tKave thit problem computer! will take
it ovir
titf wcjJiL Wf-iti- i
care of evervthing. Man hat the
atiUfci t deal with
mistaken idea that he hat to
.
run the universe when it hat
If i ir:rr:a.rj:a crrr.; in, we been running itself beautifully
; 1 ?r;i.
:n:r? r ir.t. but if we for cart."
tu:t i ir :rr:jitii:ri the ttarnjard
"The physical universe is

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The names and
places didn't matter...
only when!

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Weekend Delight
Tcsts-Hrnpti-

pancake treats
chicken, jumbo shrimp
steaks, 'Perkins-burge- r'

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H;ciY-dIpp- ed
led

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Rose
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Fuller divcutted a wide
variety of subjects with the students, ranging from the population explosion ("we don't know
if there is a population ttplosior
we haven't got figure?
from far enough back to com
pare") to future air routes tc
Kurope ("New ork will no long
cr be the larger port cf trih
barcation and di bare at ion
she'll be flsurg over the

I'ole"l. T il!a!:ate

Nortli
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he has

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wa to
in j vjti n:ng

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an actual g! ,'.of the geographic
!v.
At the end f the three-hou- r
session. Fuller v.i:!?-- and t .l
the group, "I iw confrontal
sou with a vat number cf new
angles and civ en jh reason to
think everything ou laselxt-taught is wrong."

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Ltc t: wax x rjKi.1".

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WINNER OF 8

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Fuller hat
revolutionary technical invention tlnce 1727 when he
the Diomaxion House.
Hit tpace frame! artd domei have
len held by tome authoritie
at beinjj the greatest advances
in building tince the arch.
"I can make a dome of any
tie," Fuller taid. "I even made
all the calculation! for a dome
over central Manhattan. It's
perfectly featible in tie, but I
don't think Manhattan will ask

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PERKINS PANCAKE HOUSE

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f. errzy unfettered.
I)nry it the part of wealth
The
whlh it
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crpiation for wealth. Intellect it
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univrrte of rrun."
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DOING WHAT

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Kernel. University
of Kentucky.

Lf

Second-cUlitton. Kentucky,
poUie pid at Lexington. Kentucky.
l'ubUheU lour lime weekly during
Uie cbool
er except duiuif holiday

exii periods, and weekly during
I'ubluhed lor the students of the
University of Kentucky by the Board
of Student rubluatioivs, I'rof. 1'aul
Ubertt, chairman and Stephen Palmer,
secretary.
as the Cadet In ISM. became the Kevord In
and U Idea
In 14 I'ubluhed continuously at the
Kernel sine ISIS.
the summer semrkter.

IN

I

SUUon, Univerity

and

TO WHO?

CUFF ROBERTSON JACK HAWKINS
HJ "
MASQUERADE"

The Kentucky Kernel
The

I

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L.

i

SUUSCIUITION HATES
Yearly, by mail 17 00

l'er copy, from files

MARISA WELL

SuL

5-

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Scarum'V
.VT"'

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KKKKEL Tri.EJMIONCS
Editor, Executive Editor, Managing
JMl
Editor
News
Sports, Women's Editor.J320
Sot la l
Advei Using, llusinesa, Circulation JJK

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Friday, Oct.

15, 1965- -3

UK Bulletin Board
Members of Company (M,
iVrsliinn Hiflrs, will hold a formal
retreat (ceremonial lowering of
tlie flan) at 5:30 p.m. Friday. It
will ho the only formal retreat this
semester, and the only time the
Pershing Hille Confederate Sqnad
Cannon is to he fired. The ceremony will he held in front of the
Administration Building.

serving as representatives to faculty committees. Any student
in good standing may apply at
the Student Congress office.

UK Yellow Gold

All persons interested in taking part in the YMCA tutorial
program at Dunbar High School
are urged to attend the orientation meeting to be held at 7 p.m.
Monday, in Boom 245 of the StuThe United CampusChristian dent ('enter.
Fellowship Betreat will he held
The Phi Kappa Tau and Delta
this Saturday. Those interested Zeta pledge classes will hold
are requested to check today's a car wash in the Delta Zeta
UCCFad for further details.
parking lot from 4 p.m. Saturday. Cars w ill be cleaned inThe Symphonic Band w ill pre- side and out for $1.
sent a concert at 2:30 p.m. SunThe Association for Comday in Memorial Hall. Several
selections will he introduced into puting Machinery will meet 8
Kentucky.
p.m. Monday in Boom 245 of
n
the Student Center. Lester
of Bell Labs will discuss
The Foreign Service Officer
examination w ill be given in Lex"Computer Simulation of ComNetworks." The
Dec. 4. Applications must munications
ington
be postmarked no later than Monpublic is invited.
day, and are available from the
The last phase of the InstiPlacement Service, 209 White
tutional Graduate Record ExamiHall.
nation will be held at 8 a.m.
Saturday. The area tests, inThe annual Links sale of
for Homecoming will becluding the social sciences,
gin Monday. Mums may be pur- natural sciences and humanities,
chased during the week from 9 will be administered. Students
a.m. to 5 p.m. in the Student required to take the Institutional
Center, and in Donovan Hall GBE who missed any of the
Cafeteria from 5 to 6 p.m. Mums sessions will have a make-u- p
are $1 each; all proceeds go for opportunity Monday and Tuesday in Boom 309 White Hall.
scholarships.
Such students should report there
at a time when they will be
Members of Eta Chapter of
Delta Sigma Pi will meet at 6:30 able to take the tests missed.
p.m. Monday in front of the Commerce Building. There will be a
Any student or organization
who has failed to obtain a stutour of the airport facilities.
dent directory may do so by
are now being submitting a written request
Applications
accepted for the Student Congress through campus mail, stating
Judicial Board. Students who name and address to: Bich
Student
Bobbins,
have attended UK for two seCongress
mesters and have maintained a Office.
2.5 overall may apply at the Student Congress office or the Student ('enter information desk.

Monogram

Pendant and Chain
Monogram to Order

Cim-pleso-

YAF Elects Officers

Actual

The Young Americans for Freedom elected officers at their last
meeting. Elected were, seated from left to right, Claire Kaempffe,
corresponding secretary, and Sam Spradlin, chairman. Standing are
Clayton Klingcnfus, treasurer, and Hank Davis, vice chairman.
Absent when the picture was taken was Mary Heller.

slii

$13.50

Shulman Lecture Set
Julius Shulman, photographer
of architecture and author of a
book on photography, will present an illustrated lecture at 8
p.m. Monday in Pence Hall.
His exhibition "Environment
U.S.A.," sponsored by the American Institute of Architects, is
on display until Oct. 30
It is part of "The War on
Ugliness" that has been fostered
by President Johnson. The exhibition consists of 30 by 40

inch
some

photographs
illustrating
encouraging results of
creating a more beautiful environment in America.

The photographs stress the
relationship of architecture to
both urba.. and rural

You can give without loving but
you cant love without giving.
Member American Gem Society

Fuller, & Wilder
Mats.: Wed., Sat., Sun., 2:00 p.m.
Nitely at 8:15 (Sunday 8:00)

RODGERS

HAMMERSTEIN'S

Will Dunn Drug
Maxwell
Lime

Applications are now available for students interested in

Corner of

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and

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COLOR
y

The College Store

De

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Reserved Seats

DELIVERY SERVICE
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* Marked Down To $19.95

With a new semester hearing
one pauses to note the
changes on campus. Of course there
arc more students, many more students.
Construction moves along and is
gradually changing the face of the
campus. There arc new mud paths,
sidewalks where last years mud
paths existed, and a football team
that's winning (so far).
Most noticeable, perhaps, is
something that's not new at all.
One can scarcely fail to notice the
profusion of Centennial trinkets.
There are Centennial datebooks,
Centennial key chains and cuff
links, Centennial ash trays and
Centennial tableware. As everyone
is aware, there is a copious amount
of Centennial committees and subcommittees.
Although we applaud these
efforts at recognizing this moment
in history, we are somewhat fearful,
as we have been in the past, that
the real meaning ofthe Centennial
will be missed amidst the zeal
to propagate these various types
of icons.
We hope that the University
acknowledges the fact that its heritage is deeper and greater than a
collection of souvenirs. As we have
been watching activity during the
past year, we are still disturbed
that emphasis still is primarily
directed at the "gimmick:" the
admittedly-hopeles- s
suggestions
that we should have a stamp (and
the rationalization for that one
perhaps was "Princeton has one")
and now a Centennial tree (doubtless with more to follow).
We have noted before that too
many of the programs seemed to
have been planned from the point
of view of just how many goodies
the University can chalk up in its
public relations column rather than
getting the deeper message of the
Centennial across.
To be sure, President Oswald
mid-ter-

has said it a number of times,
Dr. Patterson has said it, others
have said it. All agree that the
Centennial is a time of beginning,
new programs will be developed,
a new challenge offered.
Hut anyone who has attended
a Centennial program, or witnessed
the work of a committee, is doubtless amazed to see the high ideals
of the Centennial reduced to discussions of how many newspapers
will be represented, what size
audience will be guaranteed, or,
most ridiculously of all, whether
hard rolls or soft rolls were served
at such and such a banquet.
We think they all are aware
there is more to the University than
physical ornaments and that the
University is a community of
scholars; not a community of salesmen.
We think they believe this. We're
afraid they don't show it.
Let there be no misunderstanding: we are glad to see the Centennial celebrated, and if all the
Centennial trinkets heighten the
awareness of the citizens of Kentucky to the heritage and greatness
of the University, then all is not
in vain.
However, we feel the Centennial administration has somewhat
more of a responsibility to concentrate on the underlying spirit
and somewhat less on wholesale
prices. We are not convinced that
stamping the Centennial seal on
everything that sits, walks, or
moves (including the big mechanical job used in displays) is precisely the best means of achieving
that end.
The Centennial year has included some excellent programs,
programs that might not have been
otherwise. There is a great deal
more meat to the University, and
its Centennial, than all those
d
plates.
device-stampe-

The Standing Rule
Many moons ago in that enlightened era of protectivism for the
college student, the Faculty set a
special rule designed to foster the
better interests of the impressionistic, dependent college folk.
To guarantee that each student
took his turn at the books each
night, the Faculty made a rule
that no meeting could be schuduled
or could extend past 8 p.m. in the
evening. The rule still stands on the
books and is faithfully obeyed by
program directors, University activities directors, and all other whose
jobs require strict obedience to the
rules.
It is rarely obeyed, however, by

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the Paddock Thursday gang, and
other such astute campus leadership organizations.
Some may claim that this ruling
is obsolete in light of such
deviations, but we admire the
principle behind it. In this shocking world where more students
are getting into bed than out of
it when the rooster crows, we need
the sane voice of purpose, order,
and respect for the System contained in the rule.
For, in the words of Benjamin
Franklin, "Early to bed, early to
rise, makes a man healthy, and
wealthy,. . . and obsolete."

The Kentucky Kernel
ESTABLISHED

The South' Outstanding College Daily
University of Kentucky

1894

FRIDAY, OCT.

Walteh Chant,

Linua Mills, Executive Editor

Sally Stvll, Neus Editor

Kenneth Cheen,

15. 1965

Editor-in-Chi-

Kenneth IIoskins,

Associate Editor

Managing Editor

Judy Chisham, Associate News Editor
IIeahy Rosenthal, Sports Editor
Cay Cish, Women's Page Editor
Mahcaret Bailey, Arts Editor
Business Staff
Tom Finnik, Advertising Managtr

Marvin Huncate, Circulation Manager

"Mr. President, Til Certainly Try To Deliver
It All
And, Oh Yes, The Mail Too"

What After Watts?
After the tragic rioting last August in the Watts area of Los Angeles,
we expressed the view that "special

programs directed toward the Negro
will be required, programs which
deal with poor housing, poor schooling," and so on. We went on to say,
"What is most needed is to give
the Negro a conviction that his
special problems are understood
and are under attack."
What has been happening
during the intervening two months,
and what reassurance has been
given? Some encouraging first steps
have been taken. Much remains
to be done.
Commissions and committees to
study the situation have been established by federal, state, and local
governments, by the churches, by
business organizations, and by residents of Watts themselves. Negro,
white, and biracial groups have set
up task forces to take immediate
measures to alleviate the situation.
All of this is on the positive side.
Unfortunately, there is also a
negative side. Coordination among
those who would help has been
poor. There has been much dupli- -

cation of effort and insufficient
planning.
A State Service Center established in Watts after the rioting
managed to place only 13 of the
1,000 applicants who flooded in
the first week it was open. Processing of those charged with crime
has also creaked along. The first
felony case has yet to be heard.
More important, the Negro community has not been convinced
that things are really going to
change, that the police, the merchants, and the white public generally are willing to change their
attitudes and practices.
Another Watts, either in Los
Angeles or in any of a number
of major American cities, hangs
in the balance. Dr. J. Alfred Cannon, who originated the idea of
a grass-root- s
investigatory commission in Watts, put the matter
squarely when he said, "We can
avoid another Watts by "giving
Negroes and other minority people
the sense of dignity and
they deserve as Americans."
self-respe- ct

The Christian Science Monitor

Letter To The Editor:

YAF Chapter Discussed
To The Fulitor:
The news report in the Kernel
of Oct. 8 may have left the impression with some students that
the State Executive Committee of
Young Americans for Freedom is
dissatisfied with the UK chapter
of YAF.
While we had some minor
hesitations about provisions in the
constitution of UK YAF in regards
to membership and dues, we are
now completely in approval ofthe

constitution of the chapter on the
UK campus. The UK chapter was
granted a charter in May of 19G5,
and in September was granted recognition by the University.

It is the standing policy of
State YAF to make sure all chapter constitutions provide provisions
protecting the rights of minorities,
as well as establishing the responsibilities of majorities. We presently
feel that UK YAF has met these
vital qualifications, and is listed
as a chapter in good standing.
Thank you for allowing me the
opportunity to clear up any doubts
about the situation with UK YAF.
We appreciate
your continued
efforts to provide fair and equal
coverage of campus political organizations, including YAF.
MICHAEL KELLY
State YAF Chairman

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Friday, Oct.

In Education College Suggested

Changes
By JOHN ZE1!
Kernel Slaff Writer
Enrollment in the College of
Education by all students who
plan to teach is the main emphasis of the college's
projection, part of the report on
the University's academic program.
The faculty report also calls
for elimination of the freshman
education course, and avoidance
of repetition that results whm
freshmen take courses too similar

to ones taken in high school.
At the graduate level, the plan
seeks "reorganization and
g
of the program" through
enlargement of staif, stepping-ustren-thenin-

p

10-ye-

This
articles
October
versity

the second in a scries of
rcpardinR ;rnxwj. in the
jwhUcation of "The UniAcademic Program:
rolicics, and Organization."
is

Cur-riexd-

of research, adding more graduate
assistants, and developing new
curricula.

Multiversity Protested
By Colorado Students

Noting that some 7,200 students will take undergraduate
education courses within the next
12 years, the faculty report also
stresses the need for more faculty
members.
Reasons given
incoming student
in the College of
soon as he decides
career are:

for why an
should enroll
Education as
on a teaching

1. The necessity for accurate
advising.
2. The importance of advisers'
having easy access to students'
records.
3. The importance of having
advisers who are "dedicated to
the idea of developing teachers
and who themselves know and
understand curriculum, requirements, and philosophy of teacher

BOULDER, Colo. (CPS) -- The University of Colorado's "bitch-in- "
education."
last week drew 2,800 students who didn't want to be "folded,
spindled, or mutilated."
4. "Identification with the
The planned "Bitch-I- n On the Multiversity," w hich had received profession in which the individadministrative support down to coffee and donuts, directed student ual expects to work will be foscomplaint toward the "proper channels."
tered by enrollment in his proOf the 2,800 students present
in red ribbon with a fessional college."
when the event got under way wrappedher back
sign on
stating "I protest
5. "Reduction to a minimum"
at 10 p.m., only about 200 strag- the red
tape at the University of inconvenience, delay in securremained until 4 a.m. when
glers
ing transcripts, and inadequate
the last "bitcher" had his say. of Colorado."
On the ballroom ceiling hangs and incomplete curricula.
The entire evening was ora 11,000 mobius strip built by
ganized under the guidance of IBM for a
The report allows, however,
special conference they
Howard Higman, a sociology prohad at the university. It is an for enrollment in the Lexington
fessor. Higman, students say,
endless strip, on which light can general college, on the "South
speaks theirlanguage. He attends
never cross itself. This Campus" if that college is estabtheir parties, drinks with them, carry and
caused one observer to remark lished. It suggests that after the
and responds happily when
two years in this college, the
like the unia
students call him at 3 a.m. for that it was little science and student transfer to the College of
versity "built by
a talk.
Education.
running around in a never-endin- g
At certain points throughout
Currently, students may be
circle trying to find itself."
the evening, the affair threatened
to turn into a circus, with effect
measured more