xt7pg44hqc1x https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7pg44hqc1x/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19691209  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, December  9, 1969 text The Kentucky Kernel, December  9, 1969 1969 2015 true xt7pg44hqc1x section xt7pg44hqc1x rm

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IE WOTUCKY iiiEMMISL

Tuesday Evening, December 9,

19G9

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON

Vol. LXI, No. 66

Committee Reports

GPSA Wants

Faculty Should Accept
Public Relations Role

Recognition
Equal To SG

By JEANNIE LEEDOM

Programming for Superior StuAssistant Managing Editor
dents.
Concluding a busy calendar
In summary, the committee
year, the University Senate in recommended:
That the number of superior
meetings Monday, Dec. 1, and
Monday, Dec. 8, approved mo- students be increased by developtions to accept reports from the ing a more active recruitment
senate Committee on the Role of program, and that a faculty-studecommittee be appointed to
Faculty in Public Relations and
a committee on attracting and assist in these efforts.
That the University permit
educating superior students.
The report from the commit- more flexible programs for sutee studying the role of faculty perior students, including encourin public relations was presented agement to undertake advanced
by Dr. Malcolm E. Jewell, Po- courses, more liberal drop-ad- d
litical Science Department, and policies, extended pass-fa- il
priv-- ;
included public relations prob- ileges and more independent
lems which were found at UK, study. For certain students some
along with some possible solu- college requirements should be
waived.
tions.
According to the report, 39
Superior students not enreplies were received to a ques- rolled in the Honors Program
tionnaire which was circulated should be identified and accorded
among faculty members by the' similar benefits.
Senate Council and some of the
Honors course offerings, both
major factors "that damage the in the Honors Program and in
image of the University" were the departments, should be exlisted.
panded as the number of superior students warrants. Enrollment
PR Problems Listed
Some of the public relations restrictions on such courses
should remain moderate,
problems mentioned were:
bummer Calendar
A seeming lack of underIn other business, the senstanding about the nature of the
University, the diversity of its ate voted to reschedule the sumresponsibilities and the necessity mer school calendar, since the
of maintaining, in It, ah' atmos- present calendar overlaps with
k
summer school sesphere conducive to free inquiry. the
A communication gap besion which is to be initiated
tween faculty members and the this summer.
The new schedule for the
Lexington community.
An unawareness among the
Continued on Page 5, Col. 1
faculty of the need for public re
lations.
Widespread public feeling BOODV
IS

Dy PAT MATHES
Kernel Staff Writer

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"Tim ""utrell, Student Government resident, wants the
Craduate md Professional Students Assc elation (CPS A) to function under indent Government,"
Jerry Buck' lann, president of the
GPSA, sai' at a Wednesday night
meeting.
"We want the same kind of
relationship with the grad students that the Student Government has with undergraduate students. There is nothing illegal
standing in the way," he added.
"The power lies in Dr. Stuart
Forth's office,", Buckmann explained. Dr. Forth, acting vice
president for student affairs, has
agreed with the proposals of the
GPSA and, according to Buckmann, said he "had the power
to give us what we want."
Obtaining a seat in the University Senate and acquiring a
budget are advantages of CPSA's
proposed equal recognition with
SG , but Buckmann explained that
these are not the most important
objectives of GPSA.
There is a strong feeling within the CPSA and among some
members of the Student Government that the SG is not concerning itself enough with the graduate students problems.
No Solution
SC representative Steve
Bright stated at a Student

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' Kernel Photo by Dick War

n H0100 president of Tau Sigma dano
ing fraternity, displays classic form during
her performance of "Improvisatations
Jue" st the fraternity's fall concert at the
Agriculture Building auditorium Sunday.
Class-OllhOlie-

Gov-Continu- ed

on Pace 3, CoL

4

No Fllll

about the undergraduate, that
he receives little attention and
that the teaching of undergrad
uates has a low priority in the
eyes of faculty and administra
By JAMES W. MILLER
tors.
The impression that the UniTwo weeks
a man born on June 8
versity depends, in considerable was considered ago, different from someone
no
and viewpart, on the attitudes
who was born on, say, Sept. 14.
points of students who are
But with the Dec. 1 lottery determining
Unitending or have attended the
the draft status of about 850,000 men aged
versity.
those two days have become the two
Some faculty members' belief
t
dates since July 4 and
that the University has been dam- most
Dec. 25.
aged in recent years by the acThe two mark the first and last numbers
tivities, behavior and appearance
drawn in the lottery which gave most of
of some of its students.
the nation's
males a good idea
PR Rule Cited
of his chances of being drafted.
In summing up the role of
Most, because it has been decided that
the faculty in public relations, the first
of the 366 birthdates
the report states:
drawn are almost sure to be drafted in 1970
"In general there are two ways or when their deferments
expire. The last
by which faculty members can 122 (from
are likely never to be called
improve the University's public for
military service short of a national emerrelations. First, they can pard
gency, while the middle
may or may
ticipate in programs consciously not be called, depending on their local draft
the Univerdesigned to explain
boards.
sity to its various publics.
But what about those at the extreme
im"Secondly, the faculty can
ends of the scale the comparatively minute
prove the University's public re- number who are
pretty certain of what lies
lations by working more imagahead, militarily.
inatively and effectively to attract
The First And The Fortunate
the best students to the UniverTommy Wat kins, a senior business major,
and give them the best posssity
and Bob Varrone, a journalism junior, both
ible education."
Bruce Langlois of the Animal from Lexington, fall into the opposite groupSciences Department reported ings.
A quick chat with either reveals into which
the finding of the Committee on
the Attraciion of and Academic grouping he falls. Varrone, the "lucky" one
bom June 8, 1949, is likely never to be
drafted, while Wat kins, who was born Sept.
as soon
14, 1943, will face immediate call-uas he graduates in May. Varrone, oddly '
enough, was also last in the alphabet draw.
A second influenza shot will
Let's go back to 1 and let each relate his
be given December 11 and 12 own experience on getting the news.
from 8:30 a.m. until 4:30 p.m.
Varrone: "I was watching television at
in the Student Health Service. a friend's house after the
Virginia)
Shots are SO cents each.
ball game. I don't have to say I was nervous

One, 366 React To Lottery Luck
...
Editor-in-Chi-

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19-2- 6,

talked-abou-

draft-eligib- le

one-thir- d

245-36-

one-thir-

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Flu Booster

(UK-We-

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I was shaking physically. The TV
camera scanned the board through the first
four columns and I didn't see June 8 come
up.
e
8"
"Number
"The camera was at number 220 when I
heard a voice in the background say 'number 366, June 8.' I thought I heard correctly, but by then I was too excited to know
exactly what I'd heard. I asked someone
if that's what the TV had said and I was
assured it was. About that time, they took
the camera directly to the last number and,
sure enough, that's what it said.
"Then I started going crazy. I started
jumping around and hollering. I called my
mother to tell her the news. She asked me
what it all meant. I tried to tell her as best
I could and then she got pretty excited, too.
Last In Alphabet, Too
"Then I was driving home when I heard
the real wallop. They were announcing the
alphabetical drawing which had Just been
completed. The announcer said 'the first
letter is J and the last letter is V . . . that
completely blew my mind."
Watkins wasn't as fortunate: "I was home
listening to the radio. I had missed the first
four numbers when they began repeating
them, so I called down to the radio station
and asked them what the first four numbers
were. It didn't take long to find out.
"The person on the other end said 'number one is Sept. 14' and I said 'Hold it,
that's far enough.' I couldn't believe it. All
of a sudden everything just came down on
me. People now ask me how I did in the
lottery and I tell then I won it. It's not a
good feeling to know you've won the booby
prize, though."
"A Complete CifT
does the drawing mean to Varrone
What
and Watkins now, beside the obvious?
366-Jun-

To Varrone: "It means that when I graduate I can probably get married and immediately get a job without worrying about that
two years that I would have had to serve.
If I have to go now it will be a national
emergency, which means I would have had to
go anyway.
"It may be a morbid thing to say,"
Varrone continued, "but it is just like someone handing you your life . . . it's a complete gift."
To Watkins: "I guess it means that the
second I get my diploma in the Coliseum
next spring, there's going to be a fellow standing outside wearing uniform to grab me when
I leave."
"But, seriously, it puts an unplanned
obligation (military service) before my
planned obligation (Watkins and Brownie
Thorn bury, also a UK student, will marry
Dec. 20). The lottery puts the inevitable
before me.

Won't Run From It
not going to run from it," Watkins
"I'm
said. "I would like to serve my military
obligation in the shortest time possible,"
although he said the chances of joining
a national guard or reserve unit appealed
to him at present. "I have no reservations
about serving; it's Just that I wish my number had come a little lower."
Despite their numbers coming at the different extremes, the two were basically in accord with opinions on military service and
Vietnam.
Varrone said: "I would still fight if the
U.S. were being attacked, but I don't identify
that strongly with keeping Communism out
ofVietnam."
Said Watkins: "In the case of an
national crisis, I would not hesitate a second
in the defense of my country, but I'm not es- pecially fond of rice ruddies."
all-o-

* 2

-- THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tucwlay, Dec 9,

"Wat

19
Cast Avoids

Ovcr-Moralizati-

oii

.

Peyton, Franklin Shine In 'Billy

and arbitrary Justice, the familiar
principle of law and order, can
not deal with the issue of "Good
vs. Evil," and must in the final
reckoning destroy both. Melville
has personified all three of these
attributes; Justice as Edward

L

J&fcJ

the members of the UK Department of Theatre Arts production
of "Billy Budd" made a very
conscious effort to avoid this
tragic deification of the characthese three personifications that ters. The only part that comes
close to being overplayed is that
forms the basis of tfhe plot.
Inherent in a moralistic plot of Claggart, played by Charles
of this sort is the temptation Dickens. Dickens' Claggart is
on the part of the actors to ex- Just a little too leering and vitriolic at times to be entirely believaggerate the characters to the
that they are not men but able.
point
The best performance in this
souless apparitions. Fortunately,
production is given by Bruce
Peyton as Captain Vere. Long
before the fatal confrontation between Billy and Claggart, Vere
has recognized the evil in his
Arms and sought a way
Mast er-within his authority to rid himself of Claggart. When Billy acClaggart,
cidentally murders
Vere must subvert his own emotions, the obvious Justice of the
situation, and the opinions of his
fellow officers and condemn Billy
H i to hang, serving law and order
'
o
i
instead of Justice and equity.
Peyton is able to broadcast
the inner workings of Vere's mind
while still mainting the overriding humanity of the character.
Freshman Jim Barbour also
i
paints a credible, if somewhat
saccharine portrait of the guilelss

Vere, captain of the H.M.S. Indomitable, Cood as Billy Budd,
a naive young sailor, and Evil
as Claggart, the ships Master-a- t
Arms. It is the conflict between

By DAN COSSETT
Arts Editor
The moral message of the play
"Billy Budd," which is an adaptation of a short novel by Herman Melville is that a blind

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Billy.

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The supporting cast of sailors
and officers, on the whole, turned
in magnificent performances.
Most notable of this mob of 22
were Mike Franklin, as Jenkins,
captain of the Maintop, Chuck
Pogue as Sailing Master Wyatt,
Xlay Nixon as First Officer Seymour, Steve Currens as the fop'
Roger Lee Leaser (left) as Squeak tries to tempt shipmate Jenkins, pish adolescent midshipman,
played by Mike Franklin into a mutiny in a scene from the' UK Cardiner, and Mike Fowler, Mike
Department of Theatre Arts production of "Billy Budd" adapted Hamblin, and Barry Corum as
from a novel by Jlerman Melville.
Kernel Photo by Dick Ware sailors.
i

Talent Makes 'Faritast icks' Glicl
"The Fantasticks" is an excellent play and the
International production i of the
play now appearing at the Barn Dinner Theatre
in Winchester more than does justice to the Tom
Jones creation. In most reviews, that information
is all that is necessary so if that is all you're
interested in you can go on to the sports page.
If you would like to know why this is a
production, read on McDuff.
For the first time in over three months, Winchester's Barn Dinner Theatre is offering the most
enjoyable evening of entertainment in the Lexington area and the reason is talent. The eight cast
members leave the omnipresent psychology of
waiting on tables and grubbing for tips somewhere between the scalloped oysters and the boneless breast of chicken and begin doing what their
profession calls for, entertaining. Whether it be
singing or dancing, clowning or miming, each of
the performers puts forth a concerted effort to
bring the audience into the fantasy world that
"The Fantasticks" fabricates.
The story is simple, but the philosophy behind
it is not. Basically it concerns two young lovers in
their quest for love and how the villainous bandit
is able to prevent their fathers from lousing it up.
Music Theatre

Imported from Italy a fisherman knit
beret and scarf set looking for all the
world as though they were hand knitted . . . wool . . . natural.

better-than-avera- ge

$12.00
Perfect gift for your roommate!

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On the face of it, that is a lot of horse crap. It
is how the story is told that's important.
First of all the main prop in the production is
a character known only as the Mute. Although
this is traditionally a man's role,. Rhoda Butler
performs it admirably. At various times, she is a
tree or a wall, or is flitting" around throwing snow
and leaves on people.
The amorous boy, a callow fellow named Matt,
is played by Charles Craig. Inbluejeansand baby
face, he is perfectly suited to his part, and his rich
vibrant baritone voice provides some of the better
musical moments in the performance..
The other half of; this
vryst, Luisa,
played "by Anne Tarpey, doesn't come off quite
as well. Although she has a more than ample
voice, Miss Tarpey may be a trifle old for ingenue
part s such as Luisa.
The best overall performance, although, is
probably given by David Brenton as El Callo
the Bandit. In the dramatic moments, Brenton
is propely greasy and menacing. Although, his
voice is not as projective as Craig's, Brenton' s
rich bass is perfectly suited to songs like "Try
to Rember," and "Round and Round."
.

ill-fat- ed

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* .

THE KENTUCKY

KERNEL, Tuesday, Dec. 9,

1909- -3

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-- THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tuesday, Dec. 9,

'Hurrah ' Is Slick A nd Expensive

Gift Sets
jYARDLEY

Cosmetics
MAX FACTOR
REVLON

19G9

COTY

Nick De Noia and Ken
resident producers for The
New Red Mile Dinner Theatre,
located in the Club House at
the Red Mile Trotting Track,
seem destined to turn out a long
series of slick, professional, musical confections with a lot of spectacle but not too much else involved. The tradition was set
with "Irma La Douce" and is
currently being carried on by
"Hollywood Hurrah" a musical
revue directed and choreographed
by DeNoia and written by Ber-ma- n
and DeNoia.
Ber-ma-

DuBARRY

All can bo found

at

NAVE DRUG STORE
331 SOUTH LIMESTONE

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Advertisement

Let's Get It Straight

"Oil THE BEACH"
In a coffee house where the beat generation congregates,
s
and proudly
a young man came up to a table of
showed a letter from his church disowning him as a member. He was seeking sympathy and justification. He told
of going away to seminary, his tuition paid by the church
back home, only to meet up with a few rebels whose "show-me- "
attitude he found congenial. His arrogant heckling
of his teachers got him into trouble, and the first thing he
knew he was out on his ear, and all his standards had
tumbled around him. Now he was bragging of his plight
with a sickly smile to strangers.
There is no sadder sight
than a former idealist sitting and it failed them. Actually,
in the gutter and pretending they "tried it on," as a
to enjoy it. There is nothing d-hand
suit, but were only
more heartbreaking than to too glad to shrug it off when
see a man or woman who they found their true level
once started out to serve God, among the malcontents.
who now gets a charge out
You can rebel all you want
of defying Him. The beaches to against accepting your
of California are littered with faith secondhand; but when
those who "concerning the you rebel against accepting it
faith have made shipwreck,"
from God, you are
as the Apostle Paul terms it. like a minnow defying the
Greenwich Village is filled ocean. Preferring to live "on
with the "little lost sheep who the beach," you shrivel and
have gone astray . . . doomed die. "Why will you die?"
from here to eternity." If asks God. "How often I
you try to tell them of Jesus would have gathered you unChrist, they become vastly der my wings, and you would
uneasy. They will tell you not . . . Come unto me, and
that they have tried religion live."

"Hurrah" makes no pretensions toward being anything but
a lavish Busby Berkelian extravfemale
aganza full of half-cla- d

sight-seer-

secon-

s

Kernel Photo by Dave Herman

One of the cast members from "Hollywood Hurrah," the Nick
DeNoia-KeHerman musical revue currently appearing at the
New Red Mile Dinner Theatre mimes Mae West in a number
entitled "They Still Come Up and See Me Sometimes."
n

The New Red Mile Dinner Theater
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One such number is "They
Still Come Up and See Me Some
Time," in an obvious caricature
of Mae West. This sequence also
contains some double entendre
lines that are original Mae West.
The best is "Are you carrying a
gun or are you glad to see me"?

ft

The New Red Mile Dinner Theater

Witalten UtaSJ

it

if

PHONE FOR RESERVATIONS NOW! -- 252-524- 0
847 S. BROADWAY, LEXINGTON
RED MILE CLUBHOUSE
Dinner 6:00. ShoV 7:15
Sunday only
Dinner at 7:00v
Performance at 8:15
Cocktails from 6:15
FRI. and SAT. $8.50
NIGHTLY, Except Monday $7.50
All New York Cast
Special Group Rates Available.
SPECIAL STUDENT DISCOUNT
$6.50
Tues., Wed., Thur. and Sun.

1

Leon Odenz.

Probably the best feature of
this production is the tremendous
amount of technical skill and
money that went into the costuming, lighting, and special effects. Each of the six performers
used at least four different costumes, and none of them were
the usual ' make-shi"remade
street clothes that some companies have to use. The feathery
headdresses, provided by Follies
Bergere of Paris; also must have
cost a bundle.

t

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KK

e
roubodies, feathers,
tines and triple helpings of nostalgia. Although it is built around
the theme of music that the
movies has made famous, there
is still room for some character
sketches that require original
songs. These are provided by
Berman, DeNoia, and arranger
soft-sho-

first-han- d

For free booklet, "Apostasy," write to
Box 327. RiDGEnELD, N. J. 07657. Dept.

n,

'Q

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iltro Smut,

jTZ. n JT

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TJIE KENTUCKY KERNEL. Tuesday, Dec. 9,

Study Discloses

ImliWiHHillli'lliillliiliilliiW

Poor Relation s

Continued from Page One
eight-wee- k
session lists registration on June 13, classes beginning on June 16 and classes ending on Aug. 11.
Motions were also made and
carried to change some of the

minor admission requirements to
the University itself and to the
UK Col lege, of Law.
The deadline for applying for
admission to the University for
freshmen applicants
will be April 1, with the dead- non-reside- nt

What will
1970

HKl'S

line for all other undergraduate
applicants being June 15.

1

Another admission
requirement is that all new undergraduates and incoming freshmen
must participate in a one-da- y

16

GLEANERS

V. Maxwell

summer orientation advising conference which will behcldduring
July.
Students applying to law
school will now be required to
have a 2.75 grade point average
and a 550 LSAT (Law School

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"Black men trembled
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frjlW.rtij.w&-;.:.':.-

when white ladies
spoke."

If you think
You have inherited a world
Of war, poverty, injustice and prejudice,
Consider for a moment the world
Your fathers and theirs inherited.
d
Black boots
across Europe,
the bloodiest war known to history.
Bringing
Hunger and despair hung heavy in every home.
Beggars shuffled the streets.
Breadlines and soup kitchens stretched
From New York to Los Angeles.
Little children labored from dawn to dusk in sweat shops.
Miners, striking for minimum safety standards,
Were mowed down by bullets.
Black men trembled when white ladies spoke.
And lynchings were an acceptable form of mass entertainment.
One third of our nation was
This was the world that was dumped on your fathers.
Those who rolled up their sleeves in those days
Had but one thought in mind:
To make something better
For themselves, for you, for the country.
And they made it better.
Not perfect, God knows, but better.
When your sons take over, may it be said
You did as much.
You. Our life insurance.
goose-steppe-

9

ill-fe-

VI

The Kentucky Kernel

The Kentucky Kernel. University
SUUon, University ol Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40508. Second class
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Mailed five times weekly during the
school year except holidays and exam
periods, and once during the summer
Published by the Board of Student
Publications, UK Post Office Box 4iW6.
and
Begun as the Cadet in
published continuously as the Kernel
11S.
since
Advertising published herein la Intended to help the reader buy. Any
false or misleading advertising should
be reported to The Editors.

ulna
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-- THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tuesday, Pec 9, I9f.9

Local M.D. Advocates Legalized Abortion

load

Runner

By DAI ILIA IIAYS
Kernel Staff Writer
Does a woman, with the help
of her physician and her spouse
or consort, have the right to rid
herself of an unwanted pregnancy?
Dr. Phillip Crossen, a Lexington physician, says yes.
Speaking at the December 3

Delivery of Fino

Pizza and Strombo
Sandwiches
090 E. HIG

269-23- 4

meeting of the Women's Libera- sex as the expression of love betion Movement in the Student tween two people and procreation
only when it is'
Center, Dr. Crossen said that he as a
considered the social evils ac- desired," he said. "Whether this
companying continuation of an is right or wrong, we had better
unwanted pregnancy far greater be prepared for it, because with
than the potential wrong of de- this contraceptive society that's
the way it is."
stroying "a
Dr. Crossen upjheld the right
"The new morality has placed of the individual to decide for
ct

non-animat-

con-ceptu-

himself whether

sex

has a

right-

ful place in his love relationship.
"I may have my own ideas
of right and wrong," he continued, "but it is not my place to
sit in judgment of the in-

dividual."

Dr. Crossen condemned all
abortion laws as "tending to sit
in Judgment of the individual."
He also disagreed with those
who say that a woman with an
unwanted pregnancy got herself
into the dilemma and should
have to pay for it.
"This is an utterance of those
he said.
with the
"I. have been unable to speak
to the gods for quite sometime."
Crossen said that he could not
understand physicians who spent
hours giving sermons rather than
telling patients how to prevent
"unwanted pregnancies.
Once such a pregnancy results, Crossen said, it is impossible for a woman to obtain a legal
abortion in Kentucky unless her
own life will be endangered by
the birth.
Thus, despite the dangers involved in unskilled, unsterile
abortions, Crossen estimated that
of some 1,000,000
only
abortions performed in the U.S.
yearly are "legal."
Crossen spoke in some detail
on reasons for various attitudes
toward abortion at different
periods in history.
But, he concluded, "there
should be no doubt in this modern day that all women should
have the right to decide if they
want to become pregnant, or if
already pregnant, if they wish
to continue with it."
In Crossen's opinion, the need
for abortion will be greatly decreased when safe, effective contraceptive methods come within
the economic reach of all.
,"

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Univfjvsity
ESTABLISHED

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of Kentucky

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 9,

1894

19G9

EdiloriaU represent the opinions of the Editors, not of the University.

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James W. Miller, Editor-in-ChiBob Brown, Editorial rape Editor
II. Jepson, Managing Editor
George
Ilolert Duncan, Advertising Manager
Dottie Bean, Associate Editor
Dan Gossett, Arts Editor
Chip Hutchcson, Sports Editor
Don Rosa, Cartoonist
Carolyn Dunnavan, Features Editor
Frank Coots, Mike Ilerndon,
Bill Matthews,
Jeannic Leedom,
Jean Rcnaker
Assistant Managing Editors

Rites, Wrongs Of Finals
rites of finals

The
have brought with them the semiannual wrongs of University professors. Most common among these
shortcomings is the practice which
instructors often embrace under the
guise of "letting the students go
home a little sooner' that is,
rescheduling the final examination
for an earlier date.
semi-annu- al

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CH&lish nNUi-GAILY... M TH

tives of an instructor who insists
on rescheduling a final. Everyone
realizes the difficulties involved
in getting dozens of exams graded
before the deadline imposed by
the registrar's office. By setting the
exam date up a few days, a professor is given that much extra
time to spend on the exams or
other topics of interest. But the
time limit imposed on the instructor is considered a reasonable one
by those who have established it.
It is much more equitable for the
instructor to go through the process of lengthening the intermittent period than for him to ease
his burden at the expense of the
students to whom he is responsi-

This is a practice which should
be forbidden. In the first place,
it defeats the purpose of finals
week. The reason no classes are
held that week is that students
are expected to get in some last
minute cramming before prostituting themselves to the awful experience of finals. When a teacher
reschedules his exam to be held ble.
the final day of classes or earlier
When a class and its instructor
in the week, he is merely deprivdecide to move a final up a few
the students in his class of an
ing
days, often students are placed at
extra opportunity for study.
a disadvantage in that they may
The student is aware of the time have other classes which have done
appropriated for his final exam even the same thing, forcing them to
before he registers for the course. take two or more finals before
A complete schedule of finals is they have a chance to study for
printed in each schedule book. If any of them.
that time is not suitable for him
As finals week approaches, we
he should then consider taking a
different section of the course.
hope professors will reconsider beWe must also question the mo fore rescheduling their final exams.

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Kernel Soapbox
By WAYNE II. DAVIS
Some really exciting new developments
have been coming along now in air pollution. I aon't mean the warning by the
Los Angeles County Medical Society that
people should avoid living in that metro-

Bishop, Blacks, Biases
Saturday evening, with 11:40
remaining in the freshman basketball game with Cincinnati's Frosh,
history was made. Darryl Bishop,
a handsome, slightly pigeon-toe- d
basketball player checked into the
ball game for the Kittens.
Substitutions are common in
basketball, but what earmarks this
substitution as historic is the fact
that Bishop became the first black
student to step onto the Memorial
Coliseum floor representing the
University.
His appearance was met by a
standing ovation from many UK
students and fans. Bishop was applauded more for his play than any
other freshman player throughout
the remainder of the game.
He finished with 16 points, hitting seven of nine shots. He had
done well. He had, for a moment,

made black students and white
students pull together. But it would
not last.
Several Black students in one
section of the Coliseum and at
least one white student in another
section saw to that during the
varsity game.
Some of the Black students were

intent on shouting abusive and
obscene language at white students
who stared at the Blacks as they
cheered for Kansas. Kansas has
four Blacks on its varsity, UK
none. Even when Kansas has all
its Blacks in at once, one UK
Black shouted "get that other white

out and we'll b