xt7pk06x0j83 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7pk06x0j83/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19680527  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, May 27, 1968 text The Kentucky Kernel, May 27, 1968 1968 2015 true xt7pk06x0j83 section xt7pk06x0j83 Tie
Thursday Evening, June 27,

Kernel

EC SMTHJCKY

The South's Outstanding College Daily
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON

19G8

r

Union Official
Believes Strike
May End Today

.i j

rj

;

To Appoint New
Athletic Director

"V

By BOB ZWICKER
Naming of a new athletic director to succeed
the late Bemie Shively was postponed by the UK
Board of Tnistees Monday.
Dr. John V. Oswald, acting on a recommendation by the Athletics Board, nominated Dr. William
E. McCubbin for the post. However, a motion to
delay action on the appointment was approved
unanimously by the trustees.
In other action, the trustees approved establishment of a new School of Social Professions at UK
and voted to name the new residential complex
after two former UK deans
Miss Sarah Cibson
Blanding and Dr. Albert D. Kirwan.
The vacancy for athletic director, however,
was the principal issue at the meeting.
Dr. McCubbin, a former UK assistant coach
who now heads the physical education department
at Virginia Polytechnic Institute, was the unanimous choice of a seven-ma- n
screening committee
headed by Robert L. Johnson, vice president of
student affairs.

By LINDA ROBERTS

The ironworkers strike which has been slowing
construction on the University's
office-classroo-

complex could end today, according to one union
official.
If the strike ends, workers will be able to get
lack to full time construction and the large
excavation in front of the Administration Building will probably remain an eyesore and hazard
for a shorter time than previously was expected.
The ironworkers are striking against the Asso-ciate-d
Steel Erectors of Kentucky for higher wages.
The ironworkers are now receiving $5.20 an hour
and are demanding an 80 cent an hour increase.
William G. Cravens, financial secretary and
treasurer of Ironworkers Local 70, said that negotiators are nearing a settlement. He said he feels
that today's meeting will bring an end to the four
week old strike.
Sam Ezelle, head of the Kentucky AFL-CIsaid that if union's demands are met, the iron
workers will be making more than $10,000 a year
based on a 2,000 hour year.
In addition to the wage increase the ironworkers are striking for 12 additional demands.
Included in these demands are better working
conditions, increased pension benefits, and an
clause based on age. Also the
union is asking for the payment of parking fees
on jobs where this is necessary and that specified
holidays be designated on Friday.

......

-

'"

'.lC.Ok

-:-

iti

v

Fifteenth Meeting Today
Today's meeting between the two groups is
the 15th meeting since the strike started at midnight on May 31, when the contract for the iron-

workers expired.
Mr. Cravens stated that he is hopeful that
this meeting will be the last in the series even
though the other side has not come close to
meeting the 80 cent increase demand.
The negotiations are being held in Louisville.
A committee headed by Don Whalen
represents
the company interests while the ironworkers are
represented by a committee headed by Mr. Cravens.
Robert Kerley, vice president for business affairs and treasurer of the University, said that
the delay will not affect the University financially
because a total agreement was reached under
the original contract.
In the past week, work has slowed on the
complex since all trades are eventually affected by the ironworkers strike. Work
centering around the large ditch adjacent to the
Administration Building has been severely hamcould not work
pered since other
until the ironworker's concluded their tasks.
office-classroo- m

fi

T

O,

V

H

Kernel Photo by Schley Cox

Splish

Splash

15:5

TO Board Declines

III

.

Vol. L1X, No.

Three UK coeds didn't think Wednesday's
rain was wet enough so they went for
a dip in one of the new fountains in the
Complex area. A fourth coed went along
for the swim but apparently didn't care
to get too wet as she kept her umbrella
open.

Former UK Official

Leo Chamberlain Dies
Dr. Leo M. Chamberlain, a past vice president of the University,
died Wednesday morning at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.

During his 33 year stay at UK, Dr. Chamberlain served in
numerous capacities.
A native of Chalmers, Ind., he was an alumnus of Indiana
University where he received the bachelor of arts degree in 1926,
his master degree in 1927 and Ph.D. degree of philosophy in 1931.

Dr. Chamberlain was appointed to the UK faculty in 1929 as
assistant professor of education. He served as director of the
Bureau of School Services until he accepted the position of registrar

in 1937.

In 1962 Dr. Chamberlain returned to his teaching duties and
served as professor of higher education until retiring in 1965. In
1966 he was given an honorary doctor of laws degree from the
University.

Chandler's Motion
The screening committee's choice was approved
by the Athletics Board earlier on Monday, but only
by an 5 vote. The dissenting council members
8--

favored

UK football

coach

Charlie

Bradshaw.

The motion to delay action on the appointment was made by former Gov. A. B. Chandler,
who is a member of both the Athletics Board
and the Board of Trustees.
Mr. Chandler said after the meeting that he
considered Bradshaw "the most qualified" person
for the post. He said the situation might not be
resolved until the University has a new president.
The matter is scheduled to be brought up again
at the next meeting of the Board of Trustees on
Sept. 17.
Reaction to the Board's postponement was
voiced yesterday by Tim Futrell, summer president of the UK Student Government.
"I personally was disturbed by the Board's
action and hope it doesn't have omens for the
selection of the next president of the University,"
Futrell said.
In a prepared statement, Futrell said:

"It is particularly distressing that the meeting
specifically called for the purpose of selecting
the Athletics Director should procrastinate until a
later date on the very decision on which it was
called into session. Not only from the viewpoint
of the UK student population, but from the
standpoint of the citizens of Kentucky, let's select
our athletics chief soon . . .
Continued on Page 2, Col. 1

Out On Appeals Bond

Jail Is Learning Experience, Pratt Says

By DEBBIE TASSIE
"Maybe everybody ought to
go to jail for a week or two to
see what it's like. Or put yourself into a room or a closet,
some kind of confinement where
you can see what it's like to
have your concern for life taken
out of y ou."
back
Pratt leaned
Don
thoughtfully in his chair, his
mind on a theoretical problem,
away from the practical concerns
of the playground he is helping a group of kids to build.
He sat with his feet on the wall
to avoid his puppy who was
trying to bite his toes.
Pratt, who was convicted of
draft evasion in April, was released from Jefferson County Jail
after the Sixth Circuit Court ruled
tliat the bond set in the District Coiut where the case was
originally heard, was illegal. He
is now awaiting an appeal which
will take place sometime between
October and Decemler.
How did being in jail affect

Don? He began writing a book
about his experience, what the
prisoners said, his conflicts with
them, his conflicts with himself.
He commented that at first the
others didn't accept him.

In the midst of his thought-fulnes- s
he flashed a grin and
said, "It was neat. Being in jail
was a learning experience, something like being in college." Don
said he woukl like to see the
j)eople he met there again under
different conditions.
Shared Small Cell
The area he lived in consisted
of a walk about 30 yards long
bordered by thirteen cells and
a shower. He shared an 8 by 4
cell with another prisoner.
There were no bx)ks in the
jail. At one time, the prison
provided a library, but this was
removed at the instigation of one
of the jailers.
The only newspapers on the
walk were provided by subscrip

tions that Don and another prisoner had.
What did they do for entertainment? They played cards a
lot "Some of the guys were
pretty good at inventing card
games." And they slept. After
getting up for breakfast at 5:30
most of them went back to bed.
They had no access to a gymnasium, nor were they ever allowed off the walk, although both
these things had been possible
before. Don attributes the lack
of privileges to the political

structure.

Upon admission to jail, a prisoner must either waive his rights
to any mail or agree to censorship. The censorship included
removing newspaper articles and
returning letters. Even an issue
of the Kernel was returned.
While he was there, Don organized discussion groups about
such things as personal problems
and the war and wrote letters
for other prisoners. He is convinced of the necessity for pri

son reform. He said, "I don't
know tliat I did enough while
I was there; I hope I did some-

thing."
Expects Worst
Concerning his sentence, Don
said he had had expectations of
the worst before it was handed
down. However, he called the
severity, particularly the $10,000
bond which was later declared
illegal, "an expression of the
judge's emotions more than a

judgment."

UK law professor Robert

Sed-le-

r

who handled Pratt's case said
that severe sentences for those
who refuse induction are coiih
mon throughout the country. He
suggested tliat the purpose is to
deter others who might use the

same fonn of protest.
Don's current plans include
helping Presbyterian youth from
Kentucky clear land to build a
playground. He is also working
with people from Iexington to
form a citizens groups that will

be involved in problems of the
community. He woukl like to establish an education center either
on campus or in the community
because the "people of Lexington need to listen to ideas about

Vietnam."
in

Don finnly retains his belief
the rightness of his action. He

believes

it is necessary

to be

"completely honest in confrontation with the evil in government."
He feels it is the moral obligation of everyone living in this
country to improve the way of
life. He would like the political
structures to be more relevant
to the ieople.
Don said he doesn't know
that his act accomplished anything, but hopes that it and
others like it lave brought closer
the end of the war, the end of
the draft system, so that "maybe a few more people might not
become paid killers."

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday, June

27, 1968

-- 3

Camelot Isn't

By D. C. MOORE
Whoever said that movie makers can bring Broadway musicals
to the screen and make successful adaptations wasn't speaking of
the movie "Camelot" now showing at the Strand Theatre in downtown Lexington.
This movie which is part musical, part drama, and part love
story, is actually nothing but a high budget color spectacle and
shoukl have been left on Broadway.
On the screen there is very little in "Camelot" to retrieve it
from actual boredom. There isn't even a fairy tale effect. There
are no knights in flower, only Richard Harris as King Arthur.

r

v

V

Aiv

S

n&

P

King Arthur in this movie is a puzzling character who is fragmentary and listless. But Richard Harris as King Arthur can do two
things; one is act and the other is sing. He uses both assets to
bring poor dear Arthur to life.

-

And poor King Arthur being two timed by his wife Cuenevere
(Vanessa Redgrave) and Sir Lancelot (Franco Nero) just doesn't
stand to reason. The movie doesn't hint at reasons of any sort
for this conduct and Arthur knowing what's going on says I'm
not a man, I am a King." King Arthur just ignors what goes on
behind his back and carries out his idea for a trial by jury system.

c

Kernel Photo by Dick Ware

Esse Whispers to Grandpa In "Yon Can't Take It With You"

There is too much movie realism and broadway fantasy in Camelot with no clear objective. There is too large an area for the
movie to cover and not enough time.
The actors are required to sing when they should act and act
when they should sing. There is a continuous jerky movement in
the movie. Incidental characters are introduced like Mordred(David
Hemmings) to add a villain to the movie and somehow bring the
weak structured movie to an end.

Not all is bad. There are several highlights in the movie worth
recalling.
One is the rolling frame sequence complete with music when
Lancelot comes to Camelot. Another is the double flashback showing
Cuenevere and Lancelot together which is carefully edited camera
member of this family falls in
work.
love with Tony Kirby (Jim SeyBut "Camelot" as a finished product appears to have been
mour), the son of the wealthy
edited by a five year old with a jar of glue instead directed by
and proper Kirbys.
In the first act, set in the Joshua Logan.
So don't be fooled by the high price spread.
Vanderhof dining room, there
seemed to be a forth wall between the audience and the stage.
I
IdHH
NOW SHOWING!
As the curtain rose on the second
act the Vanderhof dining room I rr
"A DELICATE MASTERPIECE...
became a familiar setting and
the characters were firmly esIT OFFERS BEAUTY, SENSUALITY,

Centennial Achieves First
controls much of the comic actheatre tion on stage. It is around hinr
season with a which much of the comedy re--"

By D. C. MOORE

The

Centennial

opened its '68
crowing achievement, by presenting the Kaufman and Hart comedy "You Can't Take It with
You."
The play which is a period
piece and requires the fullest
attention to detail, was carried
forth with the delicate precision
of a surgeon's knife. Nothing in
the whole production seemed out
of place.
There were none of the gaudy
elaborations and modern ideas
that sometime seep through to
destroy a period play.
The production was sound

theatre.

set in New York

The play,
in the closing days of the depression, is the story of a family tliat enjoys life with everything it does.
Crandpa (Max Howard), the
head of the Vanderhof family,

t
Then there is
Kelly) who writes plays
and paints and is the other comic lead.
Working together these two
characters control much of the
comedy and in the second act of
the play they unloaded with the
talents of professionals and rolled
the audience with laughter.
Others in the family that
added to the situational set-u- p
are; Essie (Margaret Christopher)

volves.

Penny-(Margare-

urn.

f

tablished.
At this point the play moved
forward with smoothness and
speed, losing the professional

the
balerina, Donald
(Dennis Dixie) who prints, Kalen-ko(William Hays) the Russian
ballet teacher, and Paul Sycawould-b-

CI WE MA

associated

with

stigma
many
plays, and letting a natural quality appear.
Director Patricia Carmichael
more (Larry Auld) who makes and set designer Stephen Atkinson brought the first presentation
fire crackers.
The conflict in the play comes of the Centennial theatre to life
when Alice (Susan Cardwell) a in a professional manner.
e

v

AND PERFECT TASTE!'

"BeisMffliM"
TUt Diary ot

S.MA

COLOR

II

f

PARAMOUNT PICTURE

FIRST RUN!
STARTS 9:30

0

PICTURES

presents

..

The Beatles have done it
again. They have found a corporation called Apple Corps Ltd.
The organization will have
headquarters at Three Savile
How, just off Piccadilly in London and will conduct from there
a world wide enterprise in music
and films. The purpose of the
organization is to seek, promote
and produce new talent to eventual stardom.
The Beatles will also record
and produce for their own Apple Corps Ltd., exclusively.
The organization at present
is divided into two divisions;
Apple Music and Apple films.
Apple Music division's first
single will .feature Mary Hopkins, a young girl hailing from
the same village as Hichard Burton and Dylan Thomas.
The first album to be released
by the division will be George
Harrison's score for the film
"Wonderwall". The next two albums released will be: a Beatles'
successor to "Magical Mystery
Tour" and an LI featuring the
voice, guitar and songs of James
Taylor.
Heading the film division will
be Denis O'Dell producer of the
Beatles' film "A Hard Day's
Night" and Brian Lewis. They
hope to have four major productions going by the end of
the year, in addition to film
versions of John Lennon's Books,
"In His Own Write" and "A
Spaniard in the works."

A

i
PARAMOUNT

Apple

Jm Innocent Young Boy

fi
J

J

LG0QM1

v

'

jM

ADM. $1.50

WATCHING...
MINISKIRTS...MOD PARTIES...
IT COULD ONLY HAPPEN
MERRY YOUNG LONDON
IN
-- WHERE IT'S ALL
HAPPENING!
BIRD"

and
in

pnts

METROGOLCWyNMAEI?
AN ALLEN KLEIN PRODUCTION

HERMAN'S
are

ENJOY THE
HIT SONGS
ON THE MGM
SOUND TRACK
ALBUM
produced by
Mickie Mett

Mb
f

'fi

o
yvssrtt

xi

say

no more- ,-

k
V:

Plus
First Run

Western!

HERMITS
STANLEY

HOLLCWAy

TV-ML
--

1

W

22

K0CH,..CtNE
H0WARDWK0CH
A

bAKS

They could share
irihe Apache- - Hell

...but never the woman!

1

I

.NLILSIMON SST

NEAL

PARAMOUNT PICTURE

BIRD MATINEE
1:30
2:00 p.m.
MOM. thru FRI.
(incept Holiday t)
All Scots 60c

EARLY

NOW

AT

2,4,6,

8, 10

HUH

PANAVlSlOrriCHNlCOLOR

.

SmL

Si

HOWARD

ftAKAVlSJON
METROCOLOR

i.

M
Arthur Kennedy Dean Jagger
PANAVISION

and METROCOIOR

I

* 2--

KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday, June 27,

TITE

18

Board Defers Appointment

Continued from Pae One
"I, therefore, call today on
Gov. Louie B. Nunn, as chairman of the UK Board of Trustees,
to call the Board into special
session again this summer so that
a vacuum will not exist in the
UK Athletic Department
this

came apparent last year to sev eral
state agencies that Kentucky
needed more personnel than the
Kent school was supplying.

fall."

The initial objective of the
new School of Social Professions
will be the establishment of a
graduate program leading to a
Master of Social Work degree.
The tnistces also authorized recruitment of a
and the necessary faculty to man
the program.
Dr. A. D. Albright told the
trustees that the planning of the
program will take about two
years.
The only school in Kentucky
currently offering a graduate social work program is the University of Louisville's Kent School
of Social Work.
Dr. Albright said that it be
Dean-designa-

STRAND

C

feasibility

at 8:00

EVERY EVE.

sM

3

MATS.: WED., SAT.,
SUN. at 2:00 p.m.

THE

a

Accordingly,

study was conducted for UK by
Dr. Ernest Witte, Dean of the
School of Social Welfare at San
Diego State University. The findings of the study indicated the
need for the new school at UK.
Concerning the tower names
approved by the Board, one of
the towers in the new complex
will be called the Sarah Gibson
Blanding Tower and its four surstructures
rounding low-ris- e
Blanding One, Two, Three and
Four.
Miss Blanding is a UK graduate and was dean of women at
UK from 1928 to 1911. She became the first woman president
of Vassar College in 1946, and
remained at Vassar until her retirement in 1964.
Miss Blanding is a Lexington
native.

IVIOST

A

s.

'

111

EVER!
FRANCO

VANESSA

-

REDGRAVE
Based

the

on

play

Directed

Book

"CAMELOT"

by

MOSS

JACK L. WARNER

HART

and lyrics

by

Directed by

ALAN

JW

Music by

LERNER

FUTURE KING" by

AND

JOSHUA LOGAN

FROM WARNER

PAN AVISION

LIONEL

DAVID

NERO - HEMM1NGS

From "THE ONCE

FREDERICK

T. H.

JEFFRIE
LOEWE

WHITE

TECHNICOLOR v7
BROS.-SEVEARTS
N

FIRST HILARIOUS SHOWING!
1

A--

r

k

1

uh

l

As

PH.

252-449-

JTOITS

5

Adm. $1.50
visit Universal City Studies

When in Southern California

y

1966.

v
in
Dr. Kirwan spent 1966-6- 7
Austria as Fulbright professor of
American History at the University of Vienna, and recently reBuildings in UK's dorm complex were
sumed his fulltime teaching post
named by the Board of Trustees Monday
in the UK history department.
in honor of Sarah Cibson Blanding, former
Complex
UK dean of women and president of
In other action, the trustees:
Honorces
Vassar College, and Dr. A. D. Kirwan,
V Authorized
the purchase of
former UK football coach, dean of students
2
Perkins Pancake House at
and dean of the graduate school.
S. Limestone St. for $163,100.
The building will be renovated
studies for the junior college sysas an administrative extension Donald executive director of the
tem effective July 1.
UK Research Foundation effor the University Medical Cenfective July 1.
Appointed Dr. J. Marvin
ter.
Jolly director of the Hazard ComAppointed Dr. Robert GorAppointed Mr. James Y. Mc- - don Matheson coordinator of self munity College.

i

918-92-

Dr. Thomas D. Clark and
Dr. Clement Eaton, historians
who have retired at UK, were
e
featured in a
story in
4
the June
edition of the
Christian Science Monitor.
Each has lectured widely,
both in the United States and
abroad. Mr. Eaton will be a Pitt
professor of American history at
Cambridge University in Britain
next year.
They were asked to reflect on
their experience and long-tim- e
contact with the South.
Dr. Clark commented on social upheaval in the South by
correlation with changes in agriculture and industry. He said
migration from the farm to the
urban area promises greater political influence for urbanites and
the breaking of the shackles with
full-pag-

RICHARD

by

to

22-2-

tTMAtNO

Produced

19G0

-

Monitor Features UK Historians

-

aFWaX

School from

'Si-

Social Upheaval Topic

BEAUTIFUL.
MUSICAL
LOVE
STORY

The other tower and its four
"satellite" buildings will bear
Dr. Kirwan's name.
Former Graduate Dean
Dr. Kirwan captained the UK
football squad of 1925, and served
as head coach of the Wildcats
from 1938 to 1914. He was dean
of men at UK from 1947 to 1949,
dean of students from 1949 to 1934,
professor of history from 1954 to
1960, and dean of the Graduate

codsdsMa

which rural Southern voters hobbled their urban neighbors.
Southern education, he says,
a
has generally experienced
change. The lower South still offers little graduate study. But
outside of the Deep South there
are now some prestigious research
libraries.
"Since 1954," Dr. Clark says,
"a disgraceful amount of money
has been invested by legislators
and governors in futile searches
for ways to bypass desegregation of schools and open voter
rolls for qualified persons. As
long as extremism such as bombings, burnings, and groups like
the Ku Klax Klan exist," he
contends, "the region has serious
unfinished business." Dr. Clark
indicts churches, public officials,
and news editors for failing to

accept the heavy responsibility
of leadership in this transitional
age.
Dr. Eaton approaches the issue historically from the Civil
War and discusses some of the
key people in the changing South.
"The Civil War and reconstruction did not seriously disrupt mores and folkways." He
says, Mississippi for example has
changed little in 100 years in their
attitudes towards the Negro Professor James Silver describes it
in "Mississippi, the Closed So-

ciety."

UK McCarthy

Supporters
Meet Today

An organizational meeting of
UK's Students for McCarthy to
plan canvassing of the Fayette
County area is bing held at
8 p.m. tonight in Room 245 of
the Student Center.

Phil Patton, chairman of the
group said canvassing will begin
s(M)ii and continue until the July
20 county meetings in which delegates to the state convention are
chosen.

FX ft

Patton said Sen. McCarthy's
national headquarters have designated Kentucky as a "priority
state. . because Kentucky is the
last state to hold its convention."

ill.

.

n

Patton said a gain in delegate
strength for McCarthy in Kentucky "would have a psychological effect" on the national convention.
McCarthy is planning a trip
to Kentucky in early July, Patton
said.

JB(DINIINIIIIE
'

The Kentucky

TtCHNlC0L0R

fftOM

WiXHR

CO SUHHiNG

BOB DENVcR JOE FLYNNEilEN WESSON
DAVID HARTMAN
m1IM1

tome

A UNIVERSAL

WHI!l
PICTURE

.,k j

ik

iiu winmii

CiinkUvU

TECHNICOLOR'

2nd BIG COMEDY

"NOBODY'S PERFECT"
NANCY KWAW

AIR - CONDITIONED

JEANETTE NOlAfJ

color

DOUG McCLURE

NOW
SHOWING

MIS

jf

Iernel

The Kentucky Kernel, University
Station, Umvemity of Kentucky. Lexington, Kentucky 40506. Second cLasa
potttage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Mailed five timet weekly during the
school year except holidays and exam
period, i.nd once during the summer
tension.
Published by the Board of Student
Publications, UK Post Office Box 4UtitJ.
Begun as the Cadet In IBM and
published continuously as the Kernel
since mi 5.
Advertising published herein Is intended to help the reader buy. Any
faUe or misleading advertising should
be reported Ut The Editors.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
27
Yearly, by mall
$.10
Per copy, from files
KERNEL TFI.FP110NI3

Editor, Managing Editor
Editorial Page Editor,
Associate Editors, Sports
News Desk
Advertising, Business, Circulation

1331
1330

U1
1319

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday, June 27,

1908- -5

Kernel Forum: the readers write
God And Country
To the Editor of the Kernel:
This is in answer to the article I read in a late edition
of the Kentucky Kernel, expressing adverse opinion of the Pastor
of the Tatcs Christian Church
of Lexington.
You, being a member of the
Students for a Democratic Society, are either an advocate of
the Communistic Dictatorship,
or are really unaware of just
what you have joined. The title
of the organization has a very
misleading name. You are slowly
being lulled into the Communistic Dictatorship and are attempting to drag the rest of the good
Americans in with you.
The series ofCfod and Country
sermons were (sic) an excellent
thing. The Pastor is NOT a Mer

chant of Fear; he is stating to

his church (and all Christians)
their
that if they do not
rights and show appreciation for
them by their daily living and
example, they will lose them.

It is a great thing to live in
a country where a person may
state how he feels about our
government and can know that
no one is going to put him in
a concentration camp for it. It
is also good to know that he
may vote in elections and know
that he will not lose his friends
and his job for it; and that he
will not be put in jail for it; that
he may attend his church and
know that he will not be jailed
or killed for it.
I also believe in higher education. Higher education does advocate using one's mind; tyut be.
careful what you think oh, for

you can lose mind and sold for
wrong thinking and wrong actions. The University of Kentucky is a land grant college,
supported "by our state and some
funds for Agriculture and Mechanical Arts be sure to use
this for betterment and not for
degrading. It was never intended
that this University be used for
the downgrading and overthrowing of our country.
ACADEMIC FREEDOM -This is used to sometimes mislead. Yes, a professor SHOULD
have the freedom to teach his
subject for what it is; to contribute to the students' knowledge, to make him a better person in his chosen profession but
not to advocate the perversion
of our Constitution of the United
States and overthrowing our government. Communism has al

ready gotten its ugly head in the
University. We should not let it
progress further.
It is time for good Americans
to wake up and
our
allegiance to our country.
Ann C. Frank
University Alumnus
m

Editor's Note:
The editor of the Kernel is
not a member of the Students
for a Democratic Society and
there was nothing in the editorial to which she referred which
stated that he was.

I have read
quite often, most
recently in the Kernel, of black
students' demands. Most I understand and sympathize with. One
which I can't fathom is the desire for separate housing facilities
for black students.

This seems to be a proposal
which would more fittingly come
from some southern governor's
office. It's nothing but the often-use- d
"separate-but-equa-

doc-

l"

trine 1968.style.
Have all the demonstrations,
marches and rallies for civil rights
been to achieve this purpose.

Black Separatism

Logically, the next step is for
them to demand separate schools,
sardonic or facetious. If some
To the Editor of the Kernel: black student has an answer, I'd
Would someone please take be most interested in hearing it.
time to explain something which
James Nolan
is to me thoroughly baffling?
A & S Senior

Some Representation Equal

Students Across Nation Help Find New Presidents

The resignation of John W. pointed to the presidential screen
Oswald as president of the Uniing committee following three
s
and demonstraversity once again forces the insti- days of
tution to activate that laborious tions. The full committee will
machinery to choose a successor. consist of three students, three
Here, as elsewhere in the nafaculty members, three administion during recent years, the stu- trators and possibly two or three
dent body has made it known members form the State Board of
that it feels its views are es- High Education.
In 1967, at UCLA, students
sential to the selection process.
A student review board was were asked "to transmit ideas
named to screen applicants for the as to the necessary selection criteria for the new University presvacated post.
The Student Board is to make ident." Student officials there
were displeased that they did
to the Presrecommendations
idential Screening Committee, not have a more direct voice
composed of representatives from in the selection process. Some
faculty, alumni and the Board students were particularly upset
of Trustees. The student group that they were doing no more
will have no vote in the final than giving suggestions.
At the University of Minnesoselection of the president.
ta, three students were named
In recent years, students from to serve on the Alumni Advisory
other universities throughout the Committee by the Minnesota Stucountry have demanded and re- dent Association Senate. They
ceived representation on the presserved with eight alumni and
idential selection committees at eight members of the faculty to
their institutions. For example, recommend candidates for unithis Spring at the University of versity president.'
Oregon three students were ap
The appointments of students
sit-in-

No Recruiters-N- o
College Press Service
WASHINGTON (CPS)-T- he
Senate has voted to deny National Aeronautics and Space Administration grants to any college
or university where recruiters for
the armed services are barred from

the campus.
The ban was attached as an
amendment to a bill authorizing
dollars

made recommendations as to the
criteria to be adopted in choosing the new top administrator.
The chairman of the Board of
Trustees pointed out that the
Board was "firmly of the opinion that responsible leadership
of the student body should be
given an opportunity to study
the problem of securing a suc-

cessor."
Separate student and faculty

participate in disruptive demonstrations be drafted first. However, the administrations lifted
their ban on recruiters after Selective Service officials assured
them that the draft would not
be used as punishment.
In discussing the amendment,
Curtis said, "It boils down to a

armed forces recruiters from their
campuses.
The NASA authorization bill
presently is being reviewed by a
House-Senat- e
conference committee. The House bill authorizes
$10 million for NASA's sustaining university program, but the
Senate version authorizes only
$9

committees submitted lists of possible successors for the presidency
to the Board of Regents at the
University of Michigan. Though
interthere was considerable
action between the two groups,
the idea of submitting a joint
list, was mutually discarded because it was felt that this would
defeat the purpose of having several different committees involved in the selection process.

More and more people
are buying guns to protect
themselves from more and
more people buying guns.

NASA Grants

very simple proposition: Are we
NASA' going to tax the men fighting
reladuring the 1969 Fiscal year. The for our country, and thier
amendment passed the Senate tives and friends, to pay their
portion of a grant to a univerwithout dissent.
Most observers think the sity that will not even let the
amendment will face little op- recruiters of the U. S. Governcampus? I
position in the House. In early ment come on the one answer
can conceive of but
May, the House overwhelmingly
approved amendments designed to thaU We should not." been in'Curtis said he has
to deny federal financial assistance to students who partici- formed by the Department of Deforce
and
pate in campus disturbances or fense that army haired air
from any
recruiters are not
riots.
"
compuses at the present time.
As approved by the Senate,
the ban will apply only to NASA However, he said navy recruiters
six and marine
grants awarded in the future. An are barred from
would permit renewal