xt7pnv996n1h https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7pnv996n1h/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19301114  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, November 14, 1930 text The Kentucky Kernel, November 14, 1930 1930 2012 true xt7pnv996n1h section xt7pnv996n1h Best Copy Available
FRIDAY EDITION
SEMI-WEEKL-

KERNEL

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
UNIVERSITY OP KENTUCKY

VOLUME XXI

SPIRIT RENEWAL!
STUDENT BODY REQUESTED
TO AID IN REGENERATION

NEW SERIES NUMBER 20

LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 1930

WILDCATS TO BATTLE CADETS SATURDAY
t

1

Men to
Accompany Sons to
Sidelines

j,

Students of the university have
been given the privilege of exchanging their tickets for reserve seats
tlwt they may be with their parents
during the game.
All fraternities and other campus
organizations are cooperating to
make this first University of Kentucky's "Dad's Day" a success. This
day is universally observed by the
majority of eastern schools and by
many of the Southern universities
and colleges.
Out of courtesy to the members
of the football squad the Athletic
Association made the arrangements
for the dads to sit on the sidelines.

Series of Six
Hops to Begin

On December 13
The first cadet hop of the year
will be given from 3 to 6 o'clock on
the afternoon of December 13 in the
Scabbard and
men's gymnasium.
Blade, national honorary military
fraternity, will sponsor the dance
aad will conduct its first pledging
exercises of the year at that time.
will furnish the
The Kentuckians
music for the occasion.
Heretofore there has been five
cadet hops during the year but this
year there will be six. The price of
admission is fifty cents for each
hop. Season tickets, good for all six
dances are on sale for $3.00. These
season tickets may be used by one
boy and date for all six of the
dances or for six boys and dates for
one dance. The tickets may be procured from any member of Scabbard and Blade.
Dates for hops throughout the
year are: December 13, January 18,
February 7, March 7, April 11, May
9.

Council Announces

Plans for Annual

Dance

ic
Council
The Men's
announced that December 19 will be
the date for the annual formal
dance held under the auspices of
that organization.
Fraternities of the council have
agreed to respond 100 per cent in
purchasing tickets for the dance.
men are Invited to
attend the dance, and when the
tickets are Issued, may obtain them
from members of the council.
Admission will be $1.50 and $2.00.
Thus far the council has not engaged an orchestra.

GEOLOGY SEMINAR MEETS
"The Geologic History of Jeptha
Knob," by Paul Averltt, and "The
Causes of the Extinction of
saurs," by William P. Haller, will
be the topics discussed in Geology
Seminar 4 o'clock this afternoon in
room 203, the Science building. Tho
public is Invited.

Captain "Floppy" Forquer, pictured above, will lead the Wildcats in
their last appearance on Stoll Field in the game tomorrow with V. M. I.
Others besides Captain Forquer who are playing their final game here
are Howard Williams. Carev SDicer. Robert Baughman, Jake Bronston,
Tony Gentile, Lawrence McGlnnis, Max Colker, Otho McElroy, Conrad
Rose, Louis Toth, and Ollie Johnson.

Saturday's "Tilt Not
To Be Radiocast
Cancellation of the radiocast
Milipf the Kentucky-Virgin- ia
tary Institute football game on
Stoll field Saturday afternoon
was announced yesterday afternoon by Elmer G. Sulser, director of ;the unlversltx. extension
studios of WHA8, Louisville.
Previous arrangements had been
completed to give a
announcement of the game between the Wildcats and the Flying Squadron, but the management of WKA8 deUi that The
CtuHer-Journal
and. Louisville
Times station eauM net spare the
time necessary for Saturday's
tut, he said.

DARNELL WINS
CHEMISTRY CUP
Winner of Freshman Scholarship Trophy Announced by
Alpha Chi Sigma Fraternity, Donor of Cup
According to an announcement
made by John Sprague, president of
professional
Alpha Chi Sigma,
chemistry fraternity, Matthew C.
Darnell has been declared winner of
the freshman chemistry scholarship
The cup.
cup for the year 1929-3- 0.
presented by the alumni members
of the fraternity, Is given on the
basis of scholarship and promise in
the field of general chemistry.
Darnell, a sophomore in the College of Arts and Sciences, is a mem- -,
ber of the glee club, a pledge of
Omega Beta Pi, honorary
fraternity, and a member of
Phi Kappa Tau social fraternity.
He is active in Y. M. C. A. work, and
was a member of last year's freshman track team.
Alpha Chi Sigma is a national orOfganization of 47 chapters.
ficers of the local chapter are
Sprague, president; Ncal Cain,
John
Burgess Mason, secretary, and Henry Polk, treasurer.
Professor Mitchell, head of the
feshman chemistry department at
the university, each year recomfreshman
mends the outstanding
chemist to the fraternity.

DR. MIMS SPEAKS
TO ENGLISH CLUB
Frank Stone Is Elected to
Presidency of Organization; Duke Johnson Is
Secreta-

ry-Treasurer

Frank Stone was elected president

of' the English club at the second
meeting of the year which was held
in the lecture room ox McVey hall,

Tuesday, November 11, at 3 o'clock. On. Bdward Mims, jprof essor
c
Incfeh atVaaderbUt university
and speaker at the university convocation Tuesday morning made the
lecture for the afternoon.
Duke Johnson, president of the
Junior class, was elected secretary-treasure- r.
Dr. L. L. Dantzler of, the
English department of the university introduced the speaker. Dr.
Mims devoted his time to the subject of poetry and the aid that
knowledge of poetry gives the individual. According to Dr. Mims
literature gives the student recreation, comfort, and inspiration.
He contrasted the popular idea
of the poet and the theme of poetry with the knowledge we have of
Shakespeare,
poets
the great
Browning, Sidney Lanier and John
MasfifleM
He says that literature
is the greatest key to the social
life of the particular period In
which it is written.
Dr. Mims ended his address by
naming and explaining the limitations of life which literature can
There were approxiovercome.
mately 50 members of the faculty,
patrons, and students present at
the meeting.

Trustees Approve
Purchase of New

Foundary Cupola

The purchase of a new cupola by
the College of Engineering fer the
purpose of melting iron in the foundary was approved at the last meetThis
ing of the board of trustees.
cupola built by the Whiting CorporHarvey, 111., of the most
ation of
modern design having a capacity of
two tons of metal every hour was
necessitated by the Increased enrollment in the college.
Two heats must be taken each
week for all students now enrolled
Y. M. C. A.
to have an adequate training in
To the layman
foundary practice.
the heating and melting of metals
Is a fascinating process and the stuThe university Y. M. O A. lnau dents of any department are Invited
gurated Its student finance cam- to watch this process as It Is carpaign with a supper at 6 o'clock ried on In the Engineering Founlast Tuesday night at the university dary.
commons. Bart Peak, secretary of
the organization, made a short talk
in which he explained the system
of soliciting funds from the stumembers were
dents. Thirty-tw- o

Begins
Finance Campaign

Street Roped For
Student Skating:

Members were sent to places 01, oiuaems imertbicu 111 mc um
tn solicit snort of roller skating found an
money. At the close of the even- ideal location for the renewal of the
Tuesday
ing's work, th report showed that exercise in Lexington
$497.50 had been collected. Malcolm night. The Civic League sponsored
cam- the skating project between the
Barnes Is in charge of the
hours of 7 and 9 o'clock. Three secpaign.
Last year 50 members reported for tions of the city were roped off for
the flrst drive in the finance cam- the skaters, and policemen were on
paign, and succeeded In collecting duty directing traffic around tho
This year the skating areas. Euclid avenue be$500 the flrst night.
university has donated $1800 to the tween Rose street and Aylesford
cause, and an amount of $800 is ex- place. North and Cramer avenues
pected to be raised from the stu- and the Bryan Station pike between
dents. The funds raised in the Arceme avenue and Castlewood were
er
campaign will be used in carrying the sections roped off. Paul
was In charge of the Euclid
on the program planned for the
skating rink.
year at the university.
rociHonxo At mAn cHirtonts

Dr. Sidney C. Durst, director of
the Cincinnati College of Music and
organist of national repute, will present an organ recital Sunday afternoon in the Memorial auditorium.
The recital is the first of four
Dr. Durst is scheduled to give here
this season. His other recitals will
be given during January, February,
and March.
Dr. Durst served as acting director of the College of Music of Cincinnati last year and was chosen
director of the institution last Sep
tember. He is principal of the theory
and compositions departments of
the school. Dr. Durst is a graduate
of the Institution which he now
heads.
Dr. Durst has given weekly re
citals for many years at Juniper
Hill, the residence of George Berry,
Frankfort, Kentucky. He will be
remembered by many as having given the opening recital on the university organ about a year ago and
for several organ recitals in the
course of the season.
The vesper program will be made
up entirely from the works of German composers and Is as follows:
1. Prelude and Fugue in A Minor,
Bach; Benedlctus, Reger; Romanze
from the Second Suite, Renner.
2. Sketch, Opus 58 No. 4, Schumann: Chorale Prelude Brahms;
Chorale Prelude, "Jeiu hllf slegen,"
Karg-Eler- t;
Chorale
Prelude,
"Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stlmme,"
Karg-Eler-

t.

3. Traeumerle.

Strauss-Gau- l:

tato (Sonata, Opus '14).x

Agi

Short Wave Station
Is Given High Rank
VK6MO, Australia, Requests
Arrangement of Schedule
for Communication
The short wave radio stat!6n at
the University of Kentucky has taken very high rank in radio trans-

On Thursday of
mission circles.
last week a radiogram was received
Australia,
from station VK6MO,
"Your
signed Curedale. It reads:
signals coming in very loud, wouro
like to arrange schedule with your
station."
Through this message it will be
possible to arrange a schedule which
will enable the station at the University of Kentucky, which is W9JL,
to be in contact at prearranged
times with the station In Australia
so that conversations can be carried
on.
A prize, in the form of a pin, was
offered at the beginning of the year
by the Amateur Radio Relay League
of America to the station nanoung
the highest total number of mes
sages during July, August and September. Mr. Isaac Watklns, an Instructor In the College of Engineer- ins and in charge of station W0JL,
has been notified that the prize for
this section has been awarded to
the University station.

Former University
Professor to Direct
Boston Commission
John T. Troxwell, former university professor, has been appointthe employment and
stabilization commission of the city
Boston, according to an Associatof
ed Press dispatch' from that city.
Mr. Troxwell, who left the university in February, has been for nine
months district manager of the mill
workers' union at Haverhill.
Mr. Troxwell was formerly in the
economics department of the uni
versity, and was succeeded here by
Prof. L. C carter. At Haverniu
Mr. Troxwell has handled the dealings of more than 10,000 mill wokers
with tho Haverhill Shoe Manufacturers' Association.
He was appointed to the Baltimore office by Mayor William F.
Broenlng of that city. Mr. Trox-e- ll
said he would consider the proposition for a few days before giving
his decision
ed director of

PHOTOS TO BE MADE
photographer
Kentucklan
the Men's Gymnasium for
the last time this year on Monday
and Tuesday, November 17 and 18.
All persons are requested to have
their pictures made if they have not
already done so. All seniors are required to purchase a copy of the Annual, and those who have not done
so are urged to have their photographs taken at this time.
Tho

will be in

regeneration

Stoll Field

rally will be held

RESERVES TO BEAR

order to restore, renew, and renovate the waning spirit of the Wild-

BURDEN OF ACTION

cats.
Coach Gammage, "Bromo"
Sulzer and innumerable Princes of Advance "Dope" Points to Biff
the Pigskin will be present. Cap
Blue as Probable Victors
tain "Floppy" Forquer and Com- -.

Cincinnati Musician Is Regular Artist of Blue
Grass Region

Approximately twelve dads of
football men will accompany their
sons to the player's bench Saturday, and from that position watch
the Wildcats battle the Flying
Squadron. Other dads of University of Kentucky students will be
honor guests at this first celebration of "Dad's Day" at the university.
Kenneth Andrews, end, and Cecil
Urbanlak, halfback, will have the
Dr.
oldest and youngest fathers.
Andrews, who Is a Lexington physician, attended Columbia Unlveslty
and was physical director of Transylvania College In 1897. He Is past
70 years old.
Urbaniak's father, who Is from
Fairmont, West Virginia, Is the
youngest of the dads. He will also
travel over the greatest distance to
see his son play.
Other football men whose dads
are attending are Howard Williams,
Lexington; Bo Meyers, Louisville;
Bob Baughman, "Stanford; Malcolm
Foster, Nicholasvllle; Tom and Jack
Phlpps, Ashland; William Humber,
Henderson; William Galllafd, Lebanon; Ed Evans, Louisville; "Floppy" Forquer, Newcastle; and Carey
Spicer, Lexington.
Some of the sons whose fathers
were lettermen during their college
days are Bo Meyers, whose dad attended Texas University; Tom and
Jack Phlpps, whose father plaftt
baseball at Morehead Normal; Shipwreck Kelly, whose father was a
football and baseball star at Notre
Dame Preparatory school, St. Mary's
College and Mt. St. Joseph College;
and Bob Kipping, whose dad attended the university and Georgetown College and was a baseball

i

A

at the Men's gymnasium tonight in

WILL GIVE WORKS OF
GERMAN COMPOSERS

Fraternitites, Ajthletic Association Work to Make
Event a Success

Pan-Hellen- ic

1930 SEASON

Four Programs

ANDREWS' PARENT TO
BE OLDEST ATTENDING

i'

Entire Student Body Is UrRcd
to Assist in Attempt at Twelve Seniors to Participate
Regeneration
in Final Appearance on

ORGANIST TO BE

VESPER SOLOIST

Fathers of Football

I'

Renovation Rally V. M. I. COMBAT IS
For Aid of Grid LAST HOME GAME
Spirit Is Tonight OF

Dr. Sidney Durst to Present
First of Series of

TO MAKE LAST HOME APPEARANCE

U. K. SATURDAY

letttrman -

Guignol Lead

AT U. K. SERVICE

DAD'S DAY TO BE
INAUGURATED AT

pictured
Margaret
Lewlsj
above, has been assigned the lead-

Miss

ing feminine role In Camlllc, second Guignol production of the
year. Miss Lewis has appeared in
many dramatic productions since
coming to the University of Kentucky, where she now holds the
position of secretary of the university Y. W. C. A.

Debaters Will
Make Debut at
Murray College
The debating team will make its
debut in Intercollegiate competition
when four of Its representatives
meet men from Murray State
Teachers forensic squad of western
Kentucky November 14 and 15 in
five cities. These meets are of a pre
liminary nature with the purpose of
serving as a preparation for the in
ternational debate with Cambridge,
England; the University and Murray College being the only Kentucky
schools that will appear against the
English debating team.
The subject of the five debates,
"Resolved that the emergence o
women from tne home Is a regrettable feature of Modem Life" is the
one which will be used In the Cam
Coach Suther
bridge discussions.
land will send four men against
Prof. L. J. Horton's Murray team,
which Is composed of Clay Copeland,
and Forest Pogue, lettermen, representing the negative, and Holman
Jones, H. B. Moody, and E. G. Rou-to- n,
on the affirmative.
Sidney Schell and Richard Weavof the German
er, opponents-to-b- e
debate team, will meet the Murray
affirmative squad in Russell vUle and
in Hopklnsville. on Friday. William
Ardery and Hugh Jackson, who
will appear against Cambridge, are
to meet the Teachers' negative crew
in Mayfleld and in Paducah, Friday
morning.
The grand climax will come Saturday night when Schell, Ardery,
and Jackson, appear against Mur
ray's men In the Teachers own city.

Gillis Points Out

Radical Changes in
Attendance Rules

Prof. Ezra L. Glllls, Registrar,
urgently requests that all students
pay particular attention to the Section 7 of the new attendance rules.
The rule incorporates two radical
changes that may, if they are not
noted, cause much sorry and
The rule is as follows:
"Section 7:. A student with an
absence on the day imme
diately preceding or following a va
cation or holiday shall have a penalty of three hours (and three quality points) added to his requirements for graduation,- with the exception of the College of Law,
where the penalty shall be two
hours and two quality points.
"The two important points of difference between this rule and the
old rule are: 1. Instead of .1 point
being deducted from the students
standing, three (3) credit hours and
three (3) quality points have been
added to the graduation requirements, for all students except those
in the College of Law (Note rule).
2. According to the old rule a
student was not penalized except
for absence from the last class before a holiday or the flrst class after a holiday. Under the present
rule a student is penalized who is
absent from any class on the day
preceding or the day following the
holiday."
Registrar's Office.
FALL

FESTIVAL PLANNED

Students of home economics and
agriculture are cooperating in plans
for the annual Fall Festival, which
will bo held Friday night, November
k
pavllllon. A
21, at the
model exhibit from each department
in the college of agriculture, a program feature
and a milking contest for girls,
will be a few of the high lights of
the festival.

former Big Blue gridder, will ad- dress the student body.
Billy Hubble, SuKy representative
anin charge of arrangements
nounced last night that the pep
meeting is expected to be one of
the most successful of the year and
said that he was confident that the
two recent defeats would not deter
students from attending the rally.
The band will play intermittantly
throughout the evening and a horde
of white sweaters, blue lettered, unfettered cheer leaders will exert
themselves no end in twisting the
volume control.
Coach Gamage was hesitant about
bringing his little boys out tonight,
believing that the meeting would
be poorly attended and would give
his Wildcats a poor Impression of
student backing. He has been assured that such will not be the case
and members of SuKy urge that
every student make arrangements to
be present at the gathering, which
probably will be the last of the
football season.

of Encounter

I
I

In the last game to

be played
on Stoll field this season the Flying

Squadron of Virginia Military Institute will meet the University of
Kentucky Wildcats tomorrow afternoon at 2 p. m. In one of the most
colorful of the minor games on the
'Cat schedule. It will be the tenth
meeting of the two teams and a
chance for the Cadets to balance
the score in games won and lost
with the Kentucky team.
Although the boys of the Bltr Blue
are doped to win, the "dope' won't
mean a thing In tomorrow's battle.
The two teams have met nine times
In the history of the school. Of
these matches, the Cadets have
been victorious four times and the
Wildcats have been returned victors
In Ave of the engagements.
Coach Gamage will prabably use
reserves for the most part of tomorrow's game with the exception
of the senior members of the team.
This will give the ailing 'Cats an
opportunity to rest and be in the
pink of condition for the next
game; the Tennessee game to be
played at Knoxvllle, thanksgiving
day.
The game tomorrow will mark the
last appearance on Stoll field of
11
stalwart players who have
share and then some
Program on German Science done their
toward placing the Wildcat teams
and Industry Parallels With in the position of respect they now
Current Study Topic of occupy among their Southern Con- -

J

ENGINEERS HEAR

DR.0TT0KQPPIUS

Dr. Otto Koppius, College of Engineering, addressed the general engineering assembly, Wednesday, in
Memorial hall, on the topic, "Germany In Science and Industry." The.
assembly, paralleled with the present program of Pan Politlkon, was
nrfeddtti over bv W. P. Faulconer.
chairman of the engineer's division
of Pan Poutlkon.
R. C. Barbee, a graduate of the
Rncrineerincr
Collese in 1910 and
captain of Kentucky's football team
1909, tne year it oeat iiunois,
In
attended the assembly.
Ancnrdinc to Dr. KoddIus. Ger
many since the Napoleonic Wars
and up to the tune or ine woria
War maintained flrst place in the
field of science and of industries related to science. Germany was able
to outstrip other countries in inese
fields because of her outstanding
and inspiring teachers and zealous
workers, and as her instruction
methods were more thorough her
people were always ready ior new
problems. Germany did not
hctwMn mire and aDDlled
sciences and developed, her indus
lliruugii uiuiuuuu iuiu
tries
mrf siitatities! her Phvslkallsch
Technische Relchsanstalt served as
a model for the government bu
reaus of standads 01 many nauuns,
Including our own.
the nutstandlne llehts of
the world's scientific progress were
the Germans, Kepler ana Copernicus, who were Instrumental in
nVmnirinf thp Middle Aee idea of
the universe and who laid the foun
dations for Planck and Einstein's
present day quantum and relativity
theories.
Hpimhnitz. clausius. and Mayer
developed our present ideas of conservation of energy; Klrchoft and
Bunsen developed spectrum analysis; Ohm, Weber, and Gauss made
discoveries;
Important
electrical
Hertz flrst Investigated radio waves;
Roentgen discovered the
Lleblg was a great organizer and
teacher In the chemistry fleld; Ost-wawas Important in physical
chemistry;
Kekule worked with
shiftiiral formulas: Wohler worked
compounds; and
with synthetic
Hofman and Bayer aeveiopea syn
dyes.
thetic

1892

V.
V.
V.
V.
1925 V.
1929 V.
1927 V.
1928 V.
1929 V.
1912
1921
1824

M. I., 34;
M. I., 3;
M. I., 7;
M. L, 10;
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.

I.,
I.,
L,
I.,
L,

0;
JO;.

0;
6;
12;

Kentucky,
Kentucky,
Kentucky,
Kentucky,
Kentucky,
Kentucky,
Kentucky,
Kentucky,
Kentucky,

0
2
14
3
7
9
25
19
23

ference brethern. These men are:
Baughman, Bronston, Gentile, McElroy, Spicer, Toth, Ollie Johnson,
Dusty Williams, Colker, Rose, Kipping and Captain Forquer.
The Cats will be decided favorites
In the game notwithstanding losses
to Alabama and Duke. The Cadets
are preparing to put their strongest team of the season on the fleld
when they meet the Cats and will
make an effort to atone for three
defeats already suffered this season.
The Wildcats have been getting
(Continued on Page Eight)
V. M. I. PREPARES FOR TILT

Kernels to Be on
Delivery Trucks

By E. R. TRAP NELL
Sports Editor, The Cadet
The V. M. I. Flying Squadron will
go to Lexington, Ky., Saturday, de
termined not only to make up lor
the poor showing made by two other
Virginia teams out there this season.
but also to avenge the victory that
was snatched from them by the
Wildcats last year. While Captain
Roy Dunn Is the only regular left
who played against Kentucky in the
1929 fray the whole squad is suffi
ciently imbued with that spirit to
make some hard sledding lor tne
Kentuckians.
With three victories and three
defeats on the slate already the
Cadets are anxious to make as
good a showing as possible against
the powerful Wildcat sqiud. The
comparatively green forward wall
which Coach Raftery has developed into an asset is not the power that the veteran line of the
1939 Squadron was, but the Kentucky ball carriers will find It
knows a thing or two about defense. What Captain Roy Dunn's
team lacks in power and experience it makes up in that spirit
which is a part of aU V. M I.
teams.
Dunn has been one of the shining
lights on defense this year with his
work at backing up the line. Wil
liams and Travers, halfbacks, the
latter playing his flrst year of varsity football, have both shown themselves to be smart defensive men.
Laugliorn, at quarter, with Williams
has led the running attack and
Dunn has done most of the line
bucking.
The work of Gill, end, Ford,
tackle, and Shell, center, has been
the main power in the line. The big
Is a dependarangy snapper-bac- k
ble offense man and Is all over the
fleld on defense. Gill is reckoned
by the Cadet followers to be the best
end at the Institute in years. Ford,
playing his last year for the Red,
White, and Yellow, shows tho results
of three years under Coach Ed

The Kernels will not be placed In
tho post office boxes as previously
announced but will be available,
Tuesdays and Fridays, on the first
floor of McVey hall, from a conveniently located paper truck, according to C. It. Smith, business
manager.

Many of the Flying Squadron's
backers are not highly enthusiastic
over tho fact that the scrap with
the University of Kentucky is the
last before the annual battle with
V. P. I., on Thanksgiving. Tho Big
Reds have had more than their
(Continued on Pago Eight)

kuu

Get Your Tennessee
Tickets From Boles
S.

A. "Daddy" Boles announces
2,000 of the original

that there are

tickets for the Tennessee
game left and they, may be obtained
at his office now. These tickets will
bo held until five days before the
game, and will then be returned to
Knoxvllle. There will be no opportunity to buy these tickets on
arrival in Tennessee. The tickets
are $3 each and may be obtained
only upon payment of cash.
3,000

Hess.

.1

"3

i

* fi Best Copy

;
THE KENTUCKY KERNEL,

PAGE TWO
imtffitfflwtmwmfflfflwfflttttmffltmttffltwfflttmmwfflwm

11

QOCIETVI
MF
ELLEN MINIIIAN, Editor
Phone Ashland 3648

-

M

H

XI H

Last day of the art exhibit at
the Art Center.
Sunday, November lfi
Vesper Services nt Memorial nan
at 4 o'clock Phi Beta, honorary
; music
fraternity
for women In
I
charge of the program.
Tea after services In the faculty
club rooms of McVey hall.
Exhibit of Gorman prints at the
Art center, continuing until Novcm-!b23.

Lc Ccrclc Prancals meets at Patterson hall.

tmtK::t:tt::m:ttt:tttK;tt:tt:tt:mntttttmmn

Ward-OiTu- tt

CALENDAR

NOVEMBER

Friday, November 14
Exhibition of American painters
November
at the Art Center.
Is a suspension bridge
Stroller try-ou- ts
continued.
Swung from October's scarlet ridge
Agriculture Assembly at 9 o'clock
To the white rim of December.
An Interim
In the morning. Prof. L. J. Horla-chBetween two sheer banks of time.
speaking on "German AgriculHere wayfarens pause for rest
Before they climb the crest of ture."
Saturday, November 15
winter,
University vs.
Football game.
And render thanks
Virginia Military Institute on Stoll
For safe passage
field at 2 o'clock, with the Dad's
On the frail winter troll;
of the students, guests of honor.
And pray for guidance
To the trail's end.
"Dad's Day" at the university.
By Ethel Homlc Fuller

HUNGRY?
RUSH ACROSS THE CAMPUS

to

ALEXANDER'S
S. LIME

WEDDINGS

OPPOSITE MEMORIAL HALL

wwwwwwt
PALAIS ROYALE DANCE CASINO
Open for Winter Season

The marriage of Miss Virginia
Ward and Mr. Andrew Offutt was
solemnized Saturday, November 8,
at the home of the Rev. W. P. Fryman, of Cynthlana, who officiated.
The bride Is the daughter of Mr.
Charles F. Ward, of Knoxville,
Tenn., and was graduated from the
university In the class of '29, with
a B. S. degree In home economics.
Mr. Offutt Is the son of Mr. and
Mrs. John Offutt of Somerset and
Is In business In that city, where
the couple will make their home.
Home Economics Club
The Lexington Home Economics
with a dinner
Club entertained
meeting in the cafeteria of the
University Training School building
at 6 o'clock Thursday evening. The
university resident teachers were In
charge of the program.
Miss Ronnella Splckard, of the
home economics education department, and Miss Statle Erickson, of
the home economics department, reported on the national association
meetings held In June at Denver,
Miss Elizabeth Spears and Miss An
na Culton, who were student dele
gates, reported on the division of
student clubs of the same national
convention and Miss Ethel Parker,
of the home economics education
deDartment. told of her trip through
the Canadian Rockies and Alaska
last summer.

Misses Eleanor Dawson, Mary Elizabeth Price, and Alice Bruncr, as
honorary sophomores; Misses Edith

Reynolds, Virginia Dougherty, Virginia Ncvlns, Emily Hardin. Eleanor
Smith, and Fannie Woodhead.
Active members of the chapter
are Misses Ellen, Mlnlhan, Lois
Purcell, Margaret CundllT, Louisa
Blckel, Mary Virginia Halley, Frances L. Holllday, Dorothy Carr, Virginia ShncfTcr, Edna Smith, Henry
Phelps,
Ettn
Stone,
Kathcrinc
Eleanor Swcarlnger, and Mrs. Rcld
Mcacham.
FRATERNITY ROW
Miss Lillian Terbune was initiat-

ed into Alpha Gamma chapter of
Botn Sigma Omicron Monday night.
Misses Lucille Traband, Louise
Otterbach
and Kathcrinc Vogel
spent the week-en- d
at their home
in Louisville.
Miss Gladys Davenport Is spending the week-en- d
nt her home in
Harrodsburg.
Beta Sigma Omicron entertained
new girls of the university Wednesday afternoon with a bridge party
nt the chapter house and Thursday
afternoon with a tea dance in their
honor nt the house.
Messrs. Thomas Riley, Max Kerr
and Fred McLane were in Duke,
North Carolina over the week-enMr. Austin Henderson visited his
home In Ashland, Saturday.
Sigma Chi fraternity announces
the initiation of Messrs. Jack D.
Hays of McKee, Ky and Joe Mont
gomery of Somerset.
Mr. Sam Menefee, Louisville, was
a guest at the Sigma Chi house
over the week-enMessrs. James Somes, George Hll-le- n,
and Bill Lusky spent the weekend at their homes in Louisville.
Mr. Austin Henderson spent the
week-en- d
at his home in Ashland.
Sigma Nu fraternity announces
the Initiation of Messrs. Edward C.
Peters of Springfield and John B.
Rogers of Taylorsvllle.
Mr. Sam Kennedy spent the week
end at his home in Somerset.
Messrs.. William Glover, James
McRoberts, and Gilbert Monarch
spent the week-en- d
at Mr. Glover's
home in Springfield, Tenn.
Messrs. Freddie McLane, Tom
Riley, and Max Kerr attended the
Kentucky-Duk- e
game.
Messrs. Richard Nelser and Bob
at NewMlleus spent the week-en- d
port, Ky.
Mr. Connie Gaines was a guest at
the Kappa Alpha house for the week
end.
Mr. Ralph Tucker spent the week
end in Cynthlana.
Messrs. William Selby and Marion Longmeyer spent the week-en- d
at the latter's home in Frankfort.
Mr. Bonnie Holllngsworth spent
at his home in
the week-en- d

Luncheon for Alamnae
Mrs. Barckley Storey was hostess
Dance Tickets 3 for 25c
Admission 25c
for luncheon Saturday at her home
entertaining alumnae of Chi Omega
Res. Tables 50c
sorority.
Those present were Mrs. Thomas
Underwood, Mrs. John Shouse, Mrs,
242 E. Main
Phone Ash. 642
Henry Harper, Mrs. William Marrs,
Mrs. John B. Bryan, Mrs. Frank
WED.., THURS., FRI., SAT. NIGHTS
McKeekln, Miss Elizabeth Bowman,
Mrs. Cecil Cantrlll, Mrs. George
Hinchcllffe, Mrs. Charles Mllward,
Mrs. Clinton, Hoffman, Miss Kitty
Caldwell, Mrs. James Wilder, Mrs.
Wilson,
Howard
Mrs.
Tilford
LUNCH
Churchill, Mrs. Allen Cloyd, Miss
Antionette Harrison, Mrs. William
Klnnard, Miss Marcla Lampert,
We serve hot chicken, croquettes, soups, chilli, delicious
Miss Mary Sydney Hobsion, Miss
salads and dainty sandwiches. Unusually fine
Barkley,
Anna
Roberta
Miss
home-mad- e
pies and cakes
Messrs. Ralph Woodal, Norman
Frances Richardson, Miss Betty
Greaves, Miss Elizabeth Bryan, Miss Tate, and Albert Kopenhafer spent
Shelby Spears.
in Somerset
the week-en- d
FOUNTAIN DRINKS
Miss Peggy Schuman spent last
Alumnae Organization Has Dinner week-en- d
in Cincinnati.
Shoppe
Miss Lillian Ballard spent last
Meeting
with Misses Gay and
The members of the alumnae of week-en- d
FAMOUS FOR CHOCOLATE FUDGE CAKES
Theta Sigma Phi, honorary journal Bruce Loughridge on Tates Creek
istic fraternity, met at dinner Tues Road.
Misses Katherine and Myra Smith
day evening at the Lafayette hotel
for the purpose of organizing an spent last weekend in Frankfort.
Ray Crume spent the last week
alumnae chapter at the university.
The officers elected for the year end in Cincinnati.
Rufus Wilson spent last week-en- d
are: Miss Matha Mtnlhafl, president: Miss Margaret J0fcy, vice in Louisville.
BUSES
Misses Martha Holman. Josephine
president;
Miss Kathleen Fitch,
treasurer; Miss Janet Lalley, record- Weill, Ellen Goode, and Mary Eliza ing secretary; Miss Virginia Boyd, beth Brother will spend this weeKTo
end in Ashland.
corresponding secretary.
Mrs. Goldwin Lewis, Miss Flor
ROUND TRIP $y50
The tables were decorated with ence Lewis and Adoree Rose