xt7prr1pgv3r https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7prr1pgv3r/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19211014  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, October 14, 1921 text The Kentucky Kernel, October 14, 1921 1921 2012 true xt7prr1pgv3r section xt7prr1pgv3r t

The Kentucky Kernel
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
LEXINGTON, KY,. OCTOBER 14, 1921

VOL. X

HOE URGES

NOTICE

A

WARRIORS

PREPARE

FOR

DIP IN CLIFTON POND

Class Differences Will Be
Settled On Field of
Battle Today

RULES ARE SUBMITTED

All students who are interested
In the Rhodes Scholarship are requested to see Miss Buchagnanl in

President McVey's office and secure
application blanks Immediately.
Tho University of Kentucky Is allowed to name four applicants and
as yet only one student has applied.
The applications must bo filed before October 29.

The contest of strength and prowers
between the Freshmen and Sophmoro
men of the University will be witnessed Friday afternoon, at 3 o'clock when
the two classes, armed to the teeth
and ready for the grim struggle will
assemble on opposite sides of Clifton
The
Pond for the annual
is one of the most imposing and sensational events of the University year with the cable drawn
across the pond and the ardent supporters of each class urging them on,
cheering them and fighting with them
until the last second of play when the
vanquished strugglers are dragged into
the icy waters of the pond.
The following rules for the conduct
have been set down:
of the
1. That the contest shall be held at
3:00 p. m. on Friday, October 14, at
Clifton Pond.
2. That tho contest shall be refer-eeby three members of the faculty
and Junior and Senior members of the
Student Council, as well as the commandants who shall act as starters.
3. That the rope shall be placed in
such a .position that each side shall
have an equal amount of available
rope.
4. That the captains of the team
shall draw for the side of the pond.
5. That the senior class shall see
that the cable shall be returned to tho
University immediately after the contest and not taken to town.
6. That fair play shall be guaranteed in every respect.
7. That the buildings and property
of the University shall not be marred
by numerals or in any other way.
8. That afternoon classes shall bo
dismissed for Freshmen and Sophomores and seventh hour casses for all.
Faculty Committee,
Funkhouser,
Roberts,
Bureau.
r

Tug-of-W-

AT

Tea Served by English Club
At close of Program
Numbered among the delightful affairs of this week was the recital given
at 4 o'clock Monday afternoon, at Patterson Hall by Miss Elizabeth Roberts,
the young Kentucky poet, who is the
guest of friends in Lexington. The recreation hall, In which the program
was given, was decorated with ferns
and vases of marigolds while the platform upon which Miss Roberts sat wa3
banked with flowers.
Prof. L. L. Dantzler, head of the
Department of English at the University, presided and introduced Dr. Noe;
a close friend of Miss Roberts, and
who with a beautiful tribute to her
work and her achievements, presented
her to the audience.
Miss Roberts who was reared in
Springfield, Kentucky, is essentially a
children's poet but through her charming verses has achieved honor and recas well. Sho
ognition from grown-up-s
was singularly honored by having been
elected president of the Poetry Society of tho University of Chicago and by
having several poems qublished in tho
Atlantic Monthly.
At the close of the recital tea was
served by the members of the English
Long
Club, to faculty and friends.
tables attractively arranged and placed at each end of tho room were presided over by Mrs. L. L. Dantzler and
Miss Dora Berkeley who assisted by
the members of the English Club served tea to one hundred and fifty guests

STROLLERS
TO

FOI1B.

IS

IMPORTANT

ISSUE

located as follows Art and Science
students, Administration Building:
Agriculture students, Agriculture
Building; Law students third floor
of Science Building; Engineering
students, Dicker Hall.
Students are held responsible for
one visit each day to these boxes.
All students are requested to call
at the Reglstor's office and leave
their Lexington address.

Public Instruction Granted
By Legislature

MISS ROBERTS

TRY-OU-

TS

BEGIH OCTOBER

20

UNIVERSITY CHAPEL
TO BE STUDY HALL
Members Selected DifferThe University Chapol, which is
ently; Must Fill Out
rarely used except during convocation
Questionaire
meeting or chapel exercises, will
ihenceforth bo converted into a study
hall for the students, at such times as
there are no meetings or exercises
.scheduled to take place within the
loom.
This movement is being fostered
because of the luck of room for students to study between classes. Tho
library is much too small to accommodate the students who seek refuge
there on rainy dayB as It only seats
approximately 125 persons. Thus many
wore forced to sit In cars or walk
nhout on ths campus between classes
and in that way waste much valuable
time. With the chapel open everyone
will bo ablo to find a place in which to
study. Someone will bo thoro to Bee
that quiet is maintained and it is
thought students will find this an excellent place for preparing their les- -

Says Amendments Will Correct Fundamental Ends
In Educational System

ATTENTION!

All University mall for students
will be placed In post office boxes

Office of Superintendent of
PHOTOS FOR ANNUAL

Fair Play is Guaranteed By
Committees In Charge

AD0PTI0N0F

No. 3

s
for membership into the
Strollers, dramatic organization of tho
University, will begin Thursday, October 20. The officers of tho organization have drawn up a que3tlonalre
which applicants for membership must
procure, fill out and return not later
Theso
than Monday, October 17.
blanks may bo obtained from John E.
imrks or other members of tho Strollers.
Tho method of conducting tryouts
this year has been changed with tho
intention, of providing means to dovoto
more timo to those who desire membership and also give them a bettor
opportunity of displaying whatever
dramatic ability they may possess, to
a better advantage.
Try-out-

(Continued on page 5.)

Prof. J. C. T. Noe, head of the department of Education was the principal
speaker at Chapel Tuesday morning,
taking the place of Mr. Jones of California, who was unable to All this appointment, as had been announced.
Professor Noe's address was an explanation of the two proposed educational
ammendments to the consttuton of
Kentucky.
Dr. McVey after conducting the devotional exercises Introduced Professor Noe. He began his remarks by
laying particular stress on the importance of these proposed amendments
by saying that in his opinion they are
the most important issues that Kentucky has voted on for many years.
Among other things Professor Noe
said that the business of education is
the greatest business of Kentucky or
of any other state, that Kentucky rates
with the highest In native ability but
that her educational system is in a
deplorable condition, consequently she
1? suffering from Ignorance 'which results in prejudice and her great natural resources are remaining undevelop-de- .
One of the proposed solutions, Professor Noe believes is to make Education a profession by giving the office
of Superintendent of Public Instruction to a professional educator, Under
the present law a man can only serve
in that office for four years and it
take3 four years to understand tho
office well enough to avoid blunders.
The present law removes the trained
and experienced man from the office
and puts an Inexperienced man in his
place. Again, under tho Constitution
the Superintendent must be elected at
tho samo time as the Governor and
nominated by a political party. At tho
party conventions this office Is usually
the last one mentioned and some man
is selected for geographical reasons
or to lend strengeth to tho ticket. Under the proposed amendment the office
of Superintendent of Public Instruction is to bo put into the hands of the
Legislature. They will create a nonpartisan Board of Education and will
designate the qualifications and modo
of election of tho superintendent and
ho .will hold office as long as he renders satisfactory service to tho state.
Tho second amendment Is proposed
for tho financial assistance of the poor
school districts of tho state. Under
the law the children of school ago are
counted and that number divided into
tho state fund. For tho wealthier districts thb Is well and good but In the
poor ones it is Impossible to have
enough funds under tho per capita distribution to conduct an effective school.
Tho amendment proposes to create a
bonus by releasing 10 per cent per
capita of the school fund to bo distributed according to tho needB of tho
districts.
Tho Professor closed this explanation
with a plea for bettor education in
Kentucky and for equal scholastic opportunities for every child.

TO

IN KENTUCKY

TOWNS

Department of English, History and Education Conducting the Movement
TEACHERS TO ATTEND
Largest School in Grouq
Located at Paris

BE TAKEN

Kentuckian Office Located
in Journalism Rooms
Plans have been made with the
photographers, Caufleld and Shook, to
take the pictures of the students for
the annual. The sale of annuals has
been started and is going over successfully. Several have entered the contest to sell the greatest number of annuals allured by generous prizes, but
it is still open to students who wish
to hustle.
The 'Kentuckian' is being housed
this year in the Journalism rooms. A
partition has been made dividing the
outer room into two offices which will
be occupied by the 'Kentucky Kernel
and the annual. Frances Marsh,
and C. V. Watson, business manager will be in the office
every afternoon to make any further
arrangements about the pictures of
individuals and of organizations who
have not yet reserved space.
Ed Gregg, entered school last week
and will take up Ms work as art editor.
His work on the annual of last year
will be remembered and his return
speaks well for the success of this
year'3 publication. An effort is being
made to make the annual of '22 the
most artistic in the history of the University. The cooperation of the Art
Department has been enlisted and a
great amount of the work will be put
out from tills department under the
direction of Ed Gregg. All students
In the University are permitted to submit work either In tho literary or art
department.
editor-i-

n-chief,

MISS RENICK'S

OPENED BY UNIVERSITY

DEATH

The Department of University Extension of tho University of Kentucky
will open some extension schools in
different parts of the State this week.
Perhaps the largest of these will be an
extension school at Paris, Kentucky.
Two and perhaps more University professors will conduct a 3eries of lectures there under the direction of thp
Department of University Extension.
Doctor Edward Tuthill, head of the
Department of History and Political
Science, .will conduct a series of lectures on History.
Professor E. F.
Farquhar of the Department of English will conduct a series of lectures
perhaps
in
Contemporary
Drama.
These courses will be attended by the
teachers of Paris Public Schools, Paris
High School, the teachers of the Public School's of Bourbon County, and It
is also expected that a number
of
ladies from the woman's club in Paris
and xicinity will attend.
Teachers
from the Bourbon County High School
at Millersburg will also attend.
The University is also opening this
week a course of lectures in Georgetown, given to the teachers of the
Georgetown City Schools. The course,
which will be in the field of Education, will be conducted by Dr. Edward
Sies, Professor of Educational Administration at the University of Kentucky.
The University is also planning a
course in the Mountain Section in
Southeastern Kentucky. In the city
of Harlan, the University will conduct
a series of lectures in the field of
Education.
Mrs. C. N. Bolinger, a
graduate of Teachers' College. Columbia 'University, and for some time supervisor of training schools in New
Jersey, and connected with the Stato
Department of Education in Vermont,
has been engaged to conduct tho
course at Harlan. Mrs. Bolinger is a
resident of Harlan, and tho Univer- (

Continued on pago 5.)

Funeral of Popular Student RADIO CLUB WILL BE
Attended

by

REORGANIZED SOON

Many

University Folk

The many phases of Kathleen
Uonlck's short life were represented in
tho largo assemblage of friends who
gathered Sunday afternoon at tho
home of her parents in Bell Court, for
tho last service lovo and sorrow can
render its dead.
An adoring family circle Including
her sister, Frances Rouick, '24 student
nt tho University; scores of collego
friends, teachers, men and womon, who
had worked nnd played with her und
had loved tho Joy sho put In both; fraternity sisters In Chi Omega and Mortar Board in which sho was initiated
last June a few months after the fatal
Illness claimed ilior; church friends
who had loved her radiant faithful service and' tho spirit that Illumined all
wore represented In person and in
It--

(Continued on page

G.)

The University of Kentucky Radio
Club which was founded in 191G is to
bo reorganized and in view of having
a profitable year.

Tho firat meeting

of tho year will bo held Tuesday Oct.
11, at 7 p. m. on tho third floor of the
Civil and Physics
building.
Dean
Freeman, who is exceedingly well
versed In all lines of radio Avork, will
address tho meeting.
Tho club Is to Install a complete new
and modern receiving equipment some
time In tho near future, to start work
as soon as tho condition of tho atmosphere permits.
All students in tho University who
aro interested in radio are urged to be
present as there Is to be an election
of officers to servo tho entire year.
A good timo Is In store for all who attend tho first meeting.

* g-

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

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Loiuinuous reriormance, in a. m., i. ji p. m. mirncD iiuiuiv
Every Day) Personally Selected, so that the variety is sure to please everyone.
Courteous Attention; (Best of Order. "Go Where The Go's Go.")

ORPHEUM THEATRE
AfFFT

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7v?F

Liiayeiic Billard Hail, For fienilemen
4.

a. m. to Micimgnr. nrst uiass, uew uquip
mcnt) Being the only tables of this late design
in the City. A Game of "Billards", or "Pocket-Billiardswill be Enjoyed, as we permit noth
ing but perfect order
7

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..ifr

WILDCATS TROUNCE THE1

The Scores:
1901
190(5

0

1907
1911

IS

0...

1917
1918
1919
1920

During Battle With The
West Virginians

22
28
3fi

0
0

191G

Two Teams Run in by Juneau

no

0
0

1S97

4R

r

0
0
0

33
0

0

20

Are we

SCORE

IS

28

TO

down-hearted- ?

Pound Center Stops
Kentucky Line Plunges BLUE AND WHITE WILL

260

PJtzen-burge-

....0

i

Campus

t

Personals

The following VirlsVere 'in the Infirmary for a few dnys last week because of slight illnesses: Mary Colvin,
(Catherine Hnnley, Margaret Black,
Kitty Conroy, and Elsie Rache.
9

m

Sarah Cardwell spent last
at her home in Harrodsburg.

week-en-

(i

0

Juneau's eleven easily defeated Marshall in the second contest of the year
on Stoll field last Saturday afternoon
by the decisive score of 28 to 0. Three
tallies were put across in the first half
and the other in the final period.
Despite the 2G0 pounds of beof in the
form of one Crowe, center on the visiting outfit, and a brain and determination behind it Pribble, Sanders and
Fuller made big gains thru the line for
r
the sum total of 107 yards.
and Hay, guards on the defeated team aided the powerful Crowe
materially in stopping the onrush of
Uoyd, Fest, Enlow, Hickerson, Ramsey, Server and Fleaman. During the
entire season it is improbable that the
Blue and White will encounter a much
larger line.
The first touchdown came just after
Colpitts recovered a fumble when the
Wildcats were within smelling distance of the Goal. Lavin went over on
the fourth down.
The second tally came after a series
of rushes up the field by Fuller and a
beautifully executed pass to Lavin
which put him within one yard of the
line. Sanders put it across.
Rice caught off a nice pass behind
the goal for the third pointmaker.
Substitutes and Pribble bucked the
ball over in the last period for the
official 28. Brewer, Neal, and Brown
were having a track meet on the
gridiron, while the guards tackles and
ends kept the opposing players out of
the way, when the final tooter tooted.
The game was good nevertheless.
Both teams iwere fighting all the time,
although things were rather clack in
sovpvnl Instances in the last half. It
was an excellent game before the hard
contest with Vandy next week end.
(Note The bay window on the powerful center from Marshall was not fat.
It was all muscle; each, man who ran
his head into it (will testify according
iy.)
Kentucky (28) Position Marshall (0)
Crist
L.E
Rllce
Gillespie
L.T
Server
Hay
L.G
Enlow
Crowe
C
Fest
Pitzonberger
R.G
Ramsey
Hankus
R.T
Fleahman
Hammond
H.E
Colpitts
Dobbs
L.H
Lavin
Hagee
Q.B
Sanders
Lady
R.H
"Fuller
Fixer
F.B
Pribblo
Scoro by Quarters
7 14 0 7 2S
Kentucky
00
3Iarshall
Touchdowns,
Kentucky:
Scoring
Lavin, SanderB, Rice, Prlbbe. Goals
from touchdowns, Server 4.
Wathen
Kentucky :
Substitutions
for Colpitts, Rldgoway for Rice. Baugh
for Ramsey, Hickerson for Enlow, Fest
for Boyd, Russell for Baugh, Neale for
Fuller, Brewer for Sanders, J. C. Brown
.1.
for Hickerson, Whuley for Pribble,
WilL. Brown for Lavin. Marshall:
liams for Hugee, Hagee for Williams,
Johnson for Lady, Rice for Fizer.

I

MEET COMMODORES NEXT

Helen Taylor and Mary Swinney
were guests at the Kappa House last
week.
Coleman Hunter of Winchester, was
a visitor on the campus last Tuesday.

Margaret Lavin spent last
in Paris.

Kentuckians Have Never at her home
Defeated The Eleven
Ed Gregg,

week-en-

d

SYMPATHY EXPRESSED HORACE MANN HOLDS
BY SENIOR CLASS
INITIAL MEETING
The following memorial has been put
upon the minutes of the Senior clasB
at the death of Miss Kathleen Renlck:
"From among the ranks of our classmates we miss this fall the face of one
who thus far on our journey has been
to each of us an inspiring presence;
we miss the voice that had for all and
nt all times a note of gladness and of
cheer; we miss the spirit that entered
so readily into all things of interest to
our class and to our University.
To us, the Senior Class, now entering upon the last quarter of our pilgrimage, this loss has brought a heritage of deeper seriousness, and of
deeper sympathy. We will go on toward our goal without this' beloved
classmate, but we will do so with an
added feeling of our responsibility.
And as we go, tho we shed a tear at
the thought of our bereavement, yet
there comes also a calm beautiful
serenity as we think of her as Qiaving
'wrapt the drapery of her couch about
her, and, sustained and soothed by an
unfaltering faith, lain down to pleasant
dreams"

.Displays .Literary
Taste and Becomes Member

'Big Jim" Server

"Big Jim" Server has turned literary.
After a very interesting program consisting of "Personal Experiences of a
Book Agent" by Affie Hammond, Current Events by Catherine Hendricks
nnd a debate, "Resolved that Highway
Robbery should be punished by death,"
Clay Porter, affirmative and Charles
Hubbard, negative, "Big Jim" gave his
name to the secretary for enrollment
as a member of Horace Mann Literary
Society. He said that he had suddenly
realized that he had spent most of his
time training for athletics and had
decided that lie needed to cultivate a
taste for things literary.
The program committee asked him
to take the affirmative of a debate
"Resolved that Labor Unions should be
Abolished." He accepted. The debate
is to be (held 7:30 next Thursday
evening In Education building. Everyone is invited. You have seen Big
Jim fight on Stoll field. You will want
to see him fight in his new role. His
colleague is C. Anderson and his opDean Freeman gave an interesting ponents are Dewey Welch and Lenore
address to the large audience present Patrick.
at the
meeting of tho
Radio iClub ilield in the Civil and
W. W. Chambers, of the class of '16
Physics building 7:30 p. m. Wednesin Law was a visitor in the Law Deday, October 11. The year promises
partment Monday. Mr. Chambers is
to be an auspicious one for this
now practicing law in Tennessee.
Society.

Louisville, at editor of
the 1920 and 1921 Kentuckian is being
welcomed back to the University by
game his many friends. He has matriculatThe annual
will be staged Saturday on Stoll field. ed in the College of Arts and Sciences.
This year the Blue and White is
Ann Hickman visited relatives in
going to defeat the Tennesseeans and
.
it will be the first victory for the Wild- Klemingsburg last week-endcats over the Commodores since
The Philosophian Club had its first
Gabriel blew his horn and since Solo- man, ye iwise man of old, took unto meeting for the year Tuesday night.
Miss Margaret Settles, President, was
himself the 298th wife.
There are obstacles, in the way of in charge. A general business session
dope and whatnot but, "what is dope was held, and plans for the year
that thou art mindful of him?"
Mercer succeeded in holding the U.
of Ga. to 28 to zero two weeks ago.
Vandy trounced tlie defeated school
nigh unto Babe Ruth's home run
record, 42 to 0 last Saturday. Saturday we trounce Vanderbilt. Never has
Kentucky scored on the coming team.
When Doc Rodes was quarter in 191C
the Blue and White took the ball to
within three yards of the coveted goal
Every man should study himself, decide what role
but was unable to take it one jot further.
he's going to ploy in Hie, and then dress the part.
In 1919 our squad outplayed them for
Many an important business transaction has been
n scoreless tie; last year they won, 20
to nothing and this year Juneau and
carried throuflh, and many o big position won, bethirty nine men, good and strong, are
cause the man wore such Clothes as we're offering
awaiting their arrival.
for Fall.
The men have been instilled with
the pent up energy of years and are
There's a long story of quality and value behind
going to put everything and a little
more into the fray.
every Suit and the Suit itself can tell
best.
The game one of the football classics
888
purports to be the best in
of the South,
years.
X7
The freshmen and band will form
in the usual place, and parade over on
the field. The referees whistle will
blow at 3:00 o'clock and the gates
will open three quarters of an hour
earlier.

From Vanderbilt
Vandy-Kentuck- y

it

Kitty Conroy had as her guest last
her aunt, Mrs. W. D. Griffith, of Crawfordsville, Indiana.
week-en-

d

Satisfy that "Sweet
Tooth" with a box oft
our delicious Home- made Candy.
A

00

Sweet to Please Every Taste.

VP

Copyright

HATS, SHOESJand FURNISHINGS
and see our line of
favors for every occasion.
Come

I
I

For The College Fellow

In

The Edna E. Thomas
Candy
137

4.

B. K. fcCa.

W.

Company
Main

St.

GRAVES, COX & COMPANY
Incorporated

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
J AAAA

Alumni Notes
states.

y

In Kentucky "Education Week" was
observed from Septmber 4 to September 10, with dally meetings in 100
counties. In theso county rallies local
nlumnl of tho University of Kentucky
with officials of city and
county schools and rIfh tho Stato Department of Education. Kentucky Dad
marked the clase of the week. Whero
a separate meeting for alumni of tho
followers of the Blue and White joined
in a general
meeting.
educational
Alumni and faculty of the University
were speakers at the educational meetings held throughout the week.
Letter campaigns were carried on
by the alumni chairmen in eight
states; Kansas, J. A. Yates '10 Pittsburgh; Texas, Leo Breiwer '08 San
Antonio; Louisiana, Styles T. Howard
'04 Tallulah; Virginia, George H. Gilbert '05 Richmond; Florida, Joe Roem-e- r
'14, Gainesville; Georgia, T. H.
Burruss Jr. '11 Macon; Oklahoma,
John Vick Faulkner '95 Manltou.
Meetings by clubs and temporary
organizations were held at Evansville,
Ind.; Denver, 'Chicago, Birmingham,
Detroit, Huntington, NewYork, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh,
Raleigh,
Cincinnati, Washington, and in
Kentucky
at LaGrange, Paducah,
Lexington,
Louisville,
Frankfort,
Lebanon, Owensboro and Pineville.

tho Alumni Association. Our motto
was "3tlck to It" and wo must live up
to Jt. My now address is 2515 Wick-haAvenue, Newport News, Virginia.
(Mrs) OlHno Crulckshnnk Wilson,
Class Secretary."
X

X

Mrs. II. Wilson, formerly Miss Fanny
Weir '0G is living at 1236 Hampton
Avo. Newport News, Virginia.
X

X

Donald T. Wright ex '20, owner and
editor of tho Waterways Journal, St.
Louis, was n recent visitor a,t the
Alumni Office.
X

X

Bill Mathews '08 visited his brother

Dr. Walter Mathews in Lexington last
week.
X

X

Clifford T. Dotson '17, attorney at
Harlan, Ky., atoned for paying his due3

two weeks late by getting three new
members for the Association.
X

X

J. Donald Dinning

'21 former
of the Kernel is studying law
at Yale, (his address 1564 Yale Station, New Haven.

x

editor-in-chi-

x

Henry F. iCromwell '16 Is a technical
representative of the Hercules Power
Company now covering the South. He
iwas on the University campus for a
day. The firm has taken over naval
stores and is using a now process on
rosin, turpentine and pine oil.
X

X

Charles E. Planck '19 says "I have
been leading a rather high life recently, having just completed three trips
on which I took pictures of neighboring towns from the air. They will appear in the rotogravure section of the
X
X
Sunday Free Press (Detroit). I am
Thornton Lewis '06, who has been planning to
come home for the Thanksassociated with the Buffalo Forgo giving game."
Company for fifteen years has joined
X
X
the York Heating & Ventilating Corp.,
Class of '21
Philadelphia, aa
and
iC.
Raymond Rodgers is with tho
general manager.
National Surety Company, New York.
New-Have-

T

X

X

Thomas Robinson '14, who was a
recent visitor at the University, is
mine foreman and engineer for tho
Perkins-BowlinCoal Co. at Sassafras,
Perry County, Kentucky. The property is just being developed. When operating at capacity the mine will have a
daily output of 1,800 tons and will employ about 600 men.
g

X

X

X

George Gregory is teaching
school at Covington, Ky.
X

high

X

iRobt. J. Raible is with the Citizens

Union National Bank, Louisville.

X

Mrs. Robinson, formerly Miss Paul
ine Hank '14, iwas in Lexington also
visiting her sister Miss Nell Hank, a
senior in the College of Arts and Sciences. Tom Jr. four and a half years
old and Charles Edward, two and a
half are nominees for the Wildcats of

PAY HERBERT GRAHAM

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DUES.

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Tho samo need of com
plete
from all alumni Is
felt tliih year as last, and much great
or success Is possible. Tho first thing
Is to become a paid up member of the
Alumni Association and a reader of tho
Kornol. Tho next Is to Bend In an account of your personal history to Margaret Tuttlo, Room 1201, 49 Wall
Street, New York City or to mo at the
Pree Press, Detroit." C. E. Planck
'19 Class Secretary.

"You will find check for dues enclos
ed. Allow mo to thank you for your
kind persistence In reminding mo of
my duly. I look forward with great
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interst lo tho Kernel." John P. Head, "It Is one, of my regrets at boing so
Assls'tnnt Chemist, Stato Board of far away, not to bo ablo to keep in
Health. Concord. N. H..
closer touch with you all. I read the
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letters about activities on tho old
"I look forward with, a great deal of enmpus with much interest." Georgo
interesf. to any nows of tho Univer- W. Warwick '16, Armstrong
Cork
sity." Carlton C. Curtis '94, cashier Company of Spain, Apartado do
s
A. A. Housman & Co. 20 Board St.,
No. 17, Algeciras, Spain.
New York City.
"Most of the Buffalo bunch are back
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from vacations and we are going to
'Enclosed find check for four dol- get together and form an organizalars, dues for Mrs. Hunt and myself. tion next week." O. K. Dyer '04, AsWork If progressing nicely at Arkan- sistant Sales Manager, Buffalo (N. Y.)
sas. The enrollment is 25 per cent Forge Company.
ubovo last year and In Agriculture we
have practically 50 per cent more
FRED AUGSBURG, '21
than last year."-RussA. Hunt '18
NOW WITH AUTO CLUB
University
of
(Prof)
Arkansas,
Fayettevllle.
Was Managing Editor of the Kernel
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Last Year
"I hand you my check for two dollars, U. K. alumni dues." Wade H.
Fred K. Augsburg, who was graduatPerkins 'ol, manufacturing
confeced from the College of Arts and Scitioner, Denver, Col.
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ences with the class of '21, was recently
"I am enclosing check for my alumni appointed touring manager of the Lexdues. I am always interested in news ington Automobile Club and has taken
of the University and my fellow up his duties in the office of the organiznlumnl." Trice M. Bell '19, (Prof) ation in the Board of Commerce buildDepartment of Electrical Engineering, ing at 108 North Upper Street.
University of Illinois, Urbana.
He was managing editor of the Kernel
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last year, and was prominent in student
"Am enclosing dues. Please send activities, being a member of the cast
me the Kernel and Directory. I am of the annual Stroller play each year.
just out of tho hospital." H. B. Pope He is a member of Kappa Alpha, Alpha
'05, R. R. 2, Shepherdsville, Ky.
Delta Sigma and Delta Sigma Pi fraX
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ternities.
"I am enclosing check covering anThe Automobile Club is a new organinual dues. Please accept my cordial zation which intends to mark all the
regards and best wishes for a success- roads, and protect all needs of the
ful year." Lynn B. Evans '15, Branch motorist.
Manager, The Studebaker Corporation
of America, Kansas City, Mo.
Cor-rco-

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College Wowcn's Club
Discusses Dress
All College Women in Lexington
Urged to Join the Association

are

Tuesday afternoon at 3:00 o'clock
the Central Kentucky branch of the
Southern
Association
of College
Women hold tho first meeting after
the summer vacation nt tho homo of
Mrs. Edwin Stanton Good, Roso
on South Limestone.
Tho theme for tho year Is "Modem
Tendencies," and tho subject for dis
cussion was, at this meeting "Tendencies in Dress." Mrs. Ansel F.
Hemnway was chairman of the program, assisted by Miss Willis and Miss
Pettis.
A skit to illustrate the subject was
presented by Mrs. Hemonway and
Mrs. Good. Afternoon tea followed tho
formal session. Mrs. Thomas Cooper
was chairman uf the social committee
assisted by Mrs. L. J. Horlachor, Mrs.
E. A, Bureau, Mls3 Gladys Lowe, Miss
Geradlno Willis.
Tho officers of the club are: presi
dent, Miss Mabel Politt;
dents, Miss Alice Karr and Mrs. D. J.
Healy; secretary, Miss Anne Garnet;
treasurer, Mrs. Bureau.
The club is making an earnest ef
fort to have every college woman in
Lexington become a memeber of the
American Association of University
Women and to enroll In the local
branch. Invitations have been mailed
to them all, numbering about one hundred, to join.
Cot-tng-

vice-pre-

TRIANGLE FRATERNITY
ANNOUNCES FLEDGES
Triangle fraternity of the University announces the following pldges:
Raymond A. 'Stoesser, '24, Louisville,
Ky.; John E. True. '24, Harrodsburg,
Ky.; John L. Gray. '24, Owensboro,
Ky.; Ralph Boren, '24, Paducah, Ky.;
John A. Wilson, '24, Hartford, Ky.;
Carl M Riefkin, '24, Covington, Ky.;
Alebert Stone, '24, Louisville, Ky.;
Clyde Gibbons, '22, San Francisco,
California.

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"Beat you to it. Sent my dues in
almost a week ahead of the notice. I
wish you would suggest to the Athletic
Director that he send a few football
posters each week to the president of
each alumni club in Kentucky. Many
will come to the games who might
forget until they see the poster. Besides tho poster .will show that thero
is some one in the town really interestClyde D. Hared in the University."
rison '19, Lebanon, Ky.

"I am sorry not to have had a part
In Kentucky Day. I am glad it was
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a success and I hope this is only
"Enclosed find my check for dues. I
beginning compared to Kentucky Days
yet to come. It is by such efforts that
'38.
our Alma Mater will tako her proper
Fred K. Augsburg, '21
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place among other institutions."
j
Tourlnsr Manager
j
"The class of '11 must be 100 per Arlle E. McGuire '18, principal of the
LEXINGTON AUTOMOBILE CLUB
cent paid up, full fledged members of Spanishburg (W. Va.) High School.

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"U. K, '19.

"t" t"

"J" "J1

am looking forward to receiving the

Kernel." Richard E. Henry
1 ers Bank of Mortons Cap, Ky. '19, Plant

"Josslo Tapp '20 and I nro rooming
together and working for a Master's
dogroo at tho University of Wisconsin.
Yours for succe