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l’ ~ We   A if A   he UK Art Department opened its doors on Dec. 3 as hundreds of people "
l· A 4*/ ig   i   ‘ A strolled in to partake in the 13th annual Open Studio Gala.
'   ‘ ;_] ll     ~   event, which was sponsored by the Department of Fine Arts and the
/‘ AA        —"` i   Student Association, had gone all out to try and make it one of
—       {ii} _  ;` ,   most spectacular department events of the year.
A AA _ `A    ' l   t`‘'‘ "Thi5 is a huge celebration of our work," said Bob Shay, dean ofthe College
" A _ " AA A     · A  of Fine Arts. "It’s very exciting?
  V     The works of students from every possible genre decorated the walls of the
l Y ‘   •iReyno1dsABuilding. Nude paintings and abstract works dotted the plastered
*    " A wgite wallgand self—portraits stared hauntingly from their places.
:  I z    ,.  visitors gazed at sculptures and designs literally sticking out of the
, as   . _   ;gl iQAfZand ceiling, still others took advantage of the banquet of food and drink.
E , _A=    every corner and hidden down every dark hall were some sort of per-
    _    ranging from live bands, free-stylists and DJs.
  V-  5 _ by .  get very few chances to get this kind of mix of people to see our work,"
Fl l  (  ` ~  ‘*°`  Withers the new] a ointed chair erson of the art de artment
.\» .·   5;    A KL, _   , A A A   , It s a very excellent showcase for student pieces of all kmds.
`aa   ’   A `  "A A   A*<»~>~    Open Studio 2004 was a combination showcase of every type of artwork.
  ,AA_» we , New    it? A Both graduate and undergraduate artists showed off work in drawing, painting,
» E   .lA. A,|asun $urré1lg_|6`§d$f ,;U`· ‘* ‘ ru. ' sculpture. ceramics. pottery, metalwork and print, A
(As; AAF   {gr m;A$gg|Am uy rgll   all More importantly for the students, most work shown in the event was ac-
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l · AA {     ;.€_f,;;,$;·€ AA *r er ;  _ ~ "People are really interested rn buying pieces — whether 1t,S for a gift or a
l -` L"?~ ‘;$   ”   » ,    ~   private collection," said Tamara Ohayon, an artist and ceramist, and president
l   _A     y  , r f the Student League of Independent Potters. "The money we make really
A   A va   »  is   nefits the students?
r A   “    ~  ‘Aj"T? "    Garry Bibbs, an associate professor and head of the sculpture department,
r it ·“ . '   I   , ”’°’“ Q   _;§greed that Open Studio gives students a chance to explore the financial aspect
l   *4 —~;4   rEr  .  mk- . . .   . .
l l _   5; :i_     *-. .¤—    __ We helped start this whole thing as a rnarketrng initiative for students,
E`? Av  ..     e— Bibbs said.
l A;» w     A”AA *   ~-    ~ ·; Bibbs is one of the founding fathers of Open Studio. He helped create it for
       ip,  A    E E the graduate students 13 years agohto soAlve gradpate students ng being able to
·     *.;&l.;· . ·°·‘t=+ ‘ E ‘~r/‘ ·   . L s ow t reir wor in a major pu ic venue. .
A A      t ' G   W _ A"This show helps them understand how l
l A .AAA__§A ,‘ Q , A ‘ things are on the outs1de," he said. “It really is l
AAA   i A  A A A U _   more of a learning experience? l
l Q A   ,_ =A  ~.. »·;. Reprinted with permission from the Dec. 6, _
;_ ·L ;_ ?       0   A 2004, Kentucky Kernel. 2
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      A A . {fil   _A_  Q , A  e-_ Professor Geri l\/lasse helps pour
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