xt7prr1pk05p https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7prr1pk05p/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19690912  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, September 12, 1969 text The Kentucky Kernel, September 12, 1969 1969 2015 true xt7prr1pk05p section xt7prr1pk05p Friday Evening, September 12,

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By JEANNIE ST. CHARLES
Kernel Staff Writer
Settling down in the padded
cushions of the President's Room
for its first meeting, the Student
Government cabinet discussed

the Free University and dorm

Concerning the Free

V

Jack Hall, dean of students,
speaks at the first Haggin Hall
forum of the year. Dean Hall
'
spoke concerning the student
Code.

Kernel Photo by Dick Ware

Dean's Views Sought
At Haggin Hall Meet
By TOM BOWDEN

Kernel Staff Writer

Dean of Students Jack Hall
spoke on the Code of Student
Conduct last night at this year's
first session of the Haggin
Forum.
The program was held in the
upper lounge of Haggin Hall.
Aided by two of his colleagues, Ken Brandenburg, and

Mrs. Betty Jo Palmer, assistant
deans of students, Dean Hall
attempted to clarify points of
the code by answering questions from among the assembly
of about 100 persons.
Most of the questioning was
done by about 10 persons,
whose questions centered on
the issues of the Free University and the specific powers and
limitations of the code.
Dean Hall was quizzed on
the Free University by several
participants on the refusal to
give official recognition to the
Free University. Hall stated that
Stuart Forth, acting vice president of student affairs, did consult him in his deliberations on
the Free U.
Dean Hall added, however,
that Dr. Forth Mid not take a
vote" on the matter. "I don't
think it would be fair to him
(to give my views on the Free
University)," Dean Hall said.
One participant, however,
did ask if Dean Hall agrees
with "the spirit" of the Free
he
University. To that question
"Yes."
responded,
Several questions were raised
as to how the code figured in
the banishment of several students from the campus because

of their involvement in court
actions.
Dean Hall said that all of
the accused students' rights as
citizens are still retained. However, he said that the University
made a "value judgment," and
"until it (the lawsuit involving
the alleged attempt to burn
the UK Commerce Building) is
resolved, they are (considered)
guilty."
One participant asked if a
student "signs away to any
degree his rights" when he enrolls in the University. Dean
Hall responded: "The student
does not lose his citizenship
role." However, "when you
sign up, you must live under the
code."
Dean Hall stressed that no
or academic ofdisciplinary
fense information is included in
transcript files, i.e., files which
are open to other colleges and
to private individuals, excepting
suspensions and expulsions. All
other official actions are kept
on file in administrative offices
but are not available to anyone outside the University except by written permission of

Univer-

sity, Dean Hall was asked if he
thought there would be an answer to the "hypothetical question" asked by the Free University concerning their acceptance
as a student organization and if
there was a chance the administration would reverse their decision since they were now "backed up against a wall."
"You're asking me to play a
guessing game," Hall answered.
He added that the University
has made no official press release as to its decision thus far.
"Any release has come from
the Free University itself." Hall
assured the cabinet there has
been no commitment on President Singletary's part.

with many questions concerning
the problems of the dorms.

Refrigerators Are Issue
One of the main issues was
the use of refrigerators. According to Dean Hall, there is a
definite health and safety problem involved. Admittedly Jewell, Boyd and Patterson were the
only dorms in which refrigerators would be a safety hazard said Hall.
He also mentioned the fact
that the University has spent
around $20,000 on ice machines
in the dorms. This could be influencing the decision to permit
refrigerator use.
Dean Hall said investigations
are being made concerning
dorm limitations and student
demand. The logic of the fact
that, food can be kept in metal
containers but not in refrigerators was brought up, especially
since added electricity ' wattage

YAF Seeks

Hours Under Study
The proposal of AWS concerning women's hours is now
under study. Dean Hall said
the problem is being approached with as much urgency as
possible. He said he hoped a
decision could be reached by
next semester but added that
that does not mean any changes
would go into effect then.
Dean Pond assured the cabinet that the men's dorms were
getting "squared away" fairly
well. She felt her office had
handled all of the "vocal" problems although shifting is still
underway.
The women's dorms are still
crowded but are slowly being
relieved of their overflow. The
housing office allows for a
drop-orate each year.
4-- 5

Overflow
v

The UK chapter of the Young
Americans for Freedom (YAF),
When asked why the Free now numbering 20 members,
won't be quite the same this year,
University would be detrimental to the University, Hall according to YAF chairman Bill
Dawson.
could only say his answer would
"YAF will switch emphasis
be personal opinion and second
from the image of a reactionary
guessing.
group to a more
Free U. Is Question
posture," said Dawson. ,
Since Dean Palmer's office
"We invite
deals with authorizing student with SDS of a memorial rememorganizations, she was asked brance service peace day on
why the Free University was Mahatma Gandhi's birthday, this
not recognized.
October 4th," he stated. This
She stated there was no puryear marks the 100th aniversary
pose in debating the issue at of Gandhi's birth.
this point since it could be dePlans for this semester call for
bated as to whether the Free a drive to sign up at least 50
University is an organization to new members, Dawson added.
begin with. Her department had The local chapter will also have
decided to pass the buck to the YAF state chairman and
Stuart Forth, acting vice pres- prominent Lexington conservatives here as speakers this seident of student affairs.
Dean Pond was confronted mester.
action-minde- d

J

could be handled by the complex and new dorms.
Tim Futrell, SG president,
added that the problem of the
refrigerators was a much greater
practical problem for students
than the Free University.

ut

ImageChange

Dean Hall said the University
had planned for a 500 student
enrollment increase and a 2,000
member freshman class.
there was a 1,500 student enrollment increase and
2,300 freshman class.
The housing office allows 170
beds for
and dropouts. A combination of these
factors has been basic to the
d,

"no-show- s"

dorm overflow.
At the beginning of this year
a few freshmen were living in
the Phoenix Hotel. To avoid a
repetition of this problem next
year, Dean Hall suggested that
application dates be moved up
so that a better estimation of
how many students would be in

university
made.

housing

could

be

Open House Discussed
Open houses and regular
on Pare 7, Col.

1

.

t

it y

the student.
Dean Brandenburg, read
through the code and pointed
out various changes. He emphasized the importance of the
addition of Section 1.3a, which
deals with definitions and punishments for "disruptive and

coercive" ccts.
Dean Brandenburg reviewed
the sections concerning cheating and plagiarism for the benefit of freshmen, calling the two
offenses a "major stumbling
block" for incoming students.

13

Futrell Introduces Cabinet
Free University Discussed
problems.
Jack Hall, dean of student
affairs; Rosemary Pond, dean
of residence hall programming;
and Mrs. Betty Jo Palmer, assistant dean of students, also
attended the meeting for questioning and briefing purposes.

Haggin Forum

Vol. LXI, No.

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON

19G9

-- .

....

v:

I,

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if

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7:
1

SDS jHiWtillil?

Free University students met in the Student Center last night in a
room "hich had been reserved for an SDS meeting. For Free U story,
See page 8.

Kernel Photo by Dave Herman

* 2

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Friday, Sept.

12, 1969

Sorry Tom, They Can .
By JEAN RENAKER

Assistant Managing Editor
Tom Smothers is laughing at
Dan Rowan for being "foolish".
Meanwhile, Rowan is warning
him that he'd better be careful
about what no one is really
sure.

L

Finally Smothers tells Rowan
he's crazy, "they couldn't censor
a whole show."
In many ways, it was just
another show. It was full of the
usual Smothers Brothers' humor.
If it was offensive to anyone,
as Tom Smothers said, "That's
the way the cookie crumbles."
He might have said, "If it
offends you, maybe that's what

L

iyO

Behind this (louresccnt wall, Emmet t Williams
is reading "The Boy and the Bird'! while UK art
instructor Ay-paints over his leg onto a cardboard box. Williams is one of the pioneers in
the field of concrete poetry and is at ' present,
at the UK school of Fine Arts.artist-in-residen-

Williams' Concrete Poetry;
Words In Graphic Motion
.

By DAN GOSSETT
Arts Editor
Emmett Williams is a concrete
poet.
Being a concrete poet merely
infers that one writes concrete
poetry. Concrete poetry is the
term that the unversed is hard
pressed to define. Quoting Wil-

....

liams in "Anthology of Concrete
Poetry" published by Something
Else Press Inc., "The visual element in their poetry tends to be
structural, a consequence of the
poem, a 'picture' of the lines
of force of the work itself, and not
'
merely textural." '
In other words, the concrete
poet attempts to make a graphic
representation with the words of
his poem. Not limited to the confines of linear,
representation, the poet is free
to use any combinations of words
and symbols inanydesign thathe

gave a program of his poetry for
an assembly of art students
Thursday afternoon: The word
'program is used instead of 'reading' because other' things were
happening while Williams read
that were nonverbal but still related to the poetry.
Since concrete poetry employs
visual representations,' an oral
reading would not convey a full
understanding of the poem. To
allow for that, Williams invited
three UK art instructors to paint
on stage in conjunction with the
"
.

.

readings.

With the room completely
dark, except for two black lights
focused on Williams, the readings began. With each stanza, Ay-Eimi Suzuki or Jimmy Suzuki
would place a 3 ft. by 3 ft. cardboard box in front of Williams and
paint on it with flourescent spray
paint. The boxes eventually
feels fit.
formed a wall in front of WilWilliams, who is currently liams which the artists disto the School assembled with the second part
of Fine Arts for the fall semester, of the poem.. I

you deserve."-

-

one with a belief in Cod, the
sermonette was blasphemous .ia
the extreme.
It was also extremely funny.

Steinberg only achieved what
other comedians had tried to do.
He made one laugh,. not because
it was particularly what he

What matters about the show
is that this was the show that
ostensibly cost Tom and Dick
Smothers their comedy hour, and
started the fight with CBS.
The controversy was reopened
Tuesday night by the telecast
of the "forbidden program" (so
it was billed) by a Lexington
TV station and 80 other stations
across the country.
Except that Tommy had the
show almost entirely to himself
(Dick appeared only in the opening segment), and Dan Rowan
of Laugh-Istood in for Dick,
the format was the same.
The subjects of their humor;
as usual, were what CBS objected to. But the subject matter
was not as offensive as CBS
would have had the audience
believe.
CBS may have had a legitimate excuse for censorship in
David Steinberg's sermonette.
The sermonette was an irreverent 'satire "on God,'
Jews, and Gentiles. He left no
one's beliefs unexplored. To any- n

-

to-d-

SALTY TOMS

Oyster Bar

LEXINGTON'S FINEST SEAFOOD RESTAURANT

and CHERRYSTONE
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but because it
wanted
was impossible not to. He was
striking too close to the truth.
"You remember Cod. I told
you about him last week."
Sorry about that, Tommy.
Maybe, after all, CBS Just
can't take a joke.

Also Fast

Service

t

Carry-Ou-

Banquet Facilities Available

Phone

2022 Liberty Road

252-950-

6

APPLICATIONS
Applications, for positions on the University
of Kentucky Judicial Board are now available
at the following locations:
Dean of Students Office, Room 206 Administration Bldg.

Student Government Office, Room 204 Student Center
POSITIONS ARE OPEN TO ALL STUDENTS
FRESHMAN CLASS

7

Applications must bo returned before
Saturday, September 20, 1969
ARE COUNTRY

SET GIRLS SPOILED?

ABSOLUTELY!

the-Bibl-

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word-after-wo-

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DONEn

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jilt wwwi&wWiyMww

(i

TOSH

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Jewish students

Gyprair

at the University of Kentucky

are cordially invited to worship

With

the Jew

ish Community of Lexington for the forthcom
ing Holidays.
Temple Adath Israel
Rosh Hashanah
Sept. 12,

Rosh Hashanah

7:00 p.m.
9:00 p.m.

Sept. 13, 10:00 a.m.
Yom Kippur

Sept 21, 7:00 p.m.
9:00 p.m.

Sept. 22, 10:00 a.m.

124

lion Synagogue

Ohavay

North Ashland Ave.

Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.

12,
13,
13,
14,

7:30
9:00
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a.m.
p.m.
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and Sherlock Holmes
...it's elementaryl Sleuthing cape In brown,
black and white plaid; black and white tweed
pants, and baby-ri- b
sweater in white wool.
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Sizes

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Cope $42; Pants $22; Sweatei$15.

Yom Kippur

Sept. 21,
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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL Friday, Sept.

Today
Student discussion of
"Evolutionary Ethics" will be held
today at noon In the Student Center
cafeteria.
i

rriomorrow
x
The Graduate Student Association
has its opening graduate and professional "In Position '69" Saturday,
Sept. 13, from 1 to I p.m. at The
n
Big Barn, Maine Chance Farm,
Pike. Information concerning the
UK campus and the town of Lexington will be available and UK
President. Dr. Otis A. Sineletarv. will
be there. Cost is $1.50 per person;
children admitted free.
A campus table tennis organization
is taking new members from 2 to 6
p.m. beginning Sept. 13 in Room
307 of the Complex Commons. There
will also be a meeting at 7:30 p.m.
Sept. 17. and every Saturday and
Wednesday afternoon.

'

i

.y

t-

33-2- 6.

j

;

Coming Up

There will be a free concert in
the amphitheater behind Memorial
Hall on Sunday, Sept. 14 from 9
p.m." featuring nyt and! Crabtree.
A Jam session will take place be-.tween 8 and 6 p.m.

Auditions for Thornton Wilder
Pulitzer Prize winning play, "The
Skin of Our Teeth," will be held at
ky's
MOREHEAD
the University of Kentucky Laborpublic universities should
atory Theatre at J p.m. Sept. 14.
There are parts for approximately
not expect continued, massive
eleven men and eleven women. This
increases in legislative appropriaproduction will be directed
by Clay Nixon. Scripts are available
in Room 114 in the Fine Arts Bldg.
tions, state Budget Director Law,A11 Interested students are invitedto
rence E. Forgy said Thursday
.audition for the play which will be
performed Oct.
night.
Fcrev told a meeting of the
Professor Don Higglnbotham of the
of North Carolina will! Mnreruflrl
(Universitymilitary-civilia- n
OWC university far.
examine
relations In.
"Some Thoughts on the Colonial Mil
ulty the current percentage of
ltary Tradition," at 3 p.m., Monday,
the state budget devoted to highSept. 15, in Room 206 of the Student
Center. It will be presented by the
er educatioh probably will not
Department of History. The public la
Invited to attend.
expand because the state has
The . Lexington Baha'l Community
reached the limits of its tax strucpresents Linda Marshall speaking on
ture.
.
"Youth Builders for a Better World,"
in the Student Center Room 206 at t
Cone are the fruitful years of
p.m. on World Peace Day, - Sunday,
the past decade when state aid
Sept. 14.
The Graduate Council of O.S.A. will to public colleges jumped $14
IS In
meet at 7:30 Monday, Sept.
million in I960 to $95 million
Room 1.13 of the Chemlrtry-Physic- a
'Bldg. to plan the policy.
this year, Forgy said.

-3
"-"- V-

(AP)-Kentuc-

New-tow-

'

19G9-

Increases In
College Funds
Not Expected

TODAY and
TOMORROW
A Graduate

12,

Conceptions

.'.

.

;

"I

HORSEBACK RIDING FANS

Rent A Horse from
OAKHILL RIDING SCHOOL
on the Tates Creek Road

V

Students receive a special rate $2.00 per hr.
BRING A FRIEND and have a picnic!
Call
266-898- 4;

Forgy, who also is Deputy
Finance Commissioner, said
there would be slight annual increases as the economy grows,
but that the universities' hope
for future large increases probably
rests with Washington and var1

ious

programs.

revenue-sharin- g

Forgy defended the "five percent sales tax, which he credited
for a "50 percent increase in
state revenue," but flatly predicted that the tax would never
be raised again.
.

The Conceptions sang In the Student Center
Thursday night. The band was one of five
playing at the student fair.

Awards

Fulbright-Hay- s

Graduating seniors and grad- should contact Mrs. Charlotte
uate students are eligible to apply Kennedy, extensions 2442 or 2831
fee the Fulbright-Hay- s
Awards for more information.
for graduate study arid research
Processing of an application
takes several weeks and the deadin 1970-7The awards provide grants line for applications is Nov. 1.
for travel, tuition and maintenance for. one year of academic
work in any of 34 countries.
OLD STUDENTS!
Those students displaying superior ability, having an interest
NEW STUDENTS!
in study abroad and prepared in
language ability for their studies,
GRADUATE
1.

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STUDENTS!
TRANSFERS!
FACULTY!

OJ

STAFF!

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472 Rose Street
254-372-

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The Kentucky Kernel

The Kentucky Kernel, University
Station, University of Kentucky, Lexington. Kentucky 40506. Second class
pottage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Mailed five times weekly during the
school year except holidays and exam
periods, and once during the summer
session.
Published by the Board of Student
Publications. UK Post Office Box 4tM0.
Begun as the Cadet in lttl4 and
published continuously as the Kernel
since 1913.
Advertising published herein is Intended to help the reader buy. Any
false or misleading advertising should
be reported to The Editors.

Sept 31, 1969

212 SOUTHLAND DRIVE

Southland Shopping Center near
Nicholasvillc Rd. Phono
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1321
2320
244T
2311

* 'Well, Speak Of The Devil

...

'
ajrraH'

fcrK(w

r..

k SrlKO

On Apathy
The presence of apathy on the that will tolerate passivity
this will be a happy world.
University of Kentucky campus is
tradition. In an age It is those who care that must
a
of change, widespread concern and bear the burden.
nearly universal involvement in stuThe futility of an individual's
dent matters, there is no indica- activities in this
complex world,
tion that the situation will be al- the
resistibility to change of any
tered.
sort and the roadblocks that face
Even those people who are most each of us when he tries to
express
distressed about . the cancer .of- himself to a world that doesn't
apathy realize the futility of their care is enough to cause us all to
concern. This editorial is not ex- consider the
advantages of the bed
pected to eradicate UK's apathetic of inactivity.
nature. It is merely a warning of
But surely there is something,
the dangerous consequences of such
more meaningful in life than watchan attitude.
There are two easily classifiable ing a bad situation get worse. Surewe haven't reached the point
categories of people in this con- ly
that our best efforts will go untext: the doers and the done toers.
heeded.
jThose who are aware of their surIt is the subtile, encompassing
roundings and are continually tryto improve them belong to the joy one feels when he is able to
ing
first class. Those who drift with accomplish something through his
the tide and allow themselves to be own efforts that makes life meanmanipulated are of the second class. ingful for one who cannot condone
This latter class must include the the life of apathy. This is all he
mass majority of UK students.
gets, and seldom does he get that,
Every man is entitled to his but should he want anything more?
own choice of participation or
For a group hung up on conFor those whose per- formity and unconcern perhaps it
is of the sort would be a good experience.
sonality make-u- p
indefi-natel-

time-honor-

The Kentucky
ESTABLISHED

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER

1304

.

James W. Miller,

itate his election.
Jack Reeves served as Associate

Professor of Political Science at the
University for many years until his
retirement last year. Perhaps no
other man in the state has as
thorough grasp of what an efficient government can accomplish for
the people it governs. Certainly
there are few men who have reflected as deeply as Reeves on the
nature and purpose of the political
process he wishes to influence now.
Asitle from his obvious personal

Bob Brown, Editorial Page Editor

Robert Duncan, Advertising Manager
Chip Hutcheson, Sports Editor
Carolyn Dunnavan, Women's Page Editor

.
i

Dottie Bean, Associate Editor
Dan Gossett, Arts Editor
Don Rosa, Cartoonist

.

The Old Guard Changes
The

influence of Old Guard Re-- ;
publicanism is on the wane in
Washington, as a new generation
of modern-minde- d
senators and re-

tors Taft and Vandenberg before
him. He supported President Kennedy on the nuclear test ban treaty.
He embraced the civil rights and
voting rights acts as legislation
"whose time had come." He supported President Johnson through
dangerous waters on Vietnam.
Some of the Senator's more personal advocacies now may fade
away: the proposed constitutional convention to overturn the Suone-vopreme Court's one-maapportionment decision, and his
effort to reverse the court's ban on
public school prayers. But undoubtedly the Nixon administration will
be glad not to have to cope with
such emergencies as Everett Dirksen's single-hande- d
blocking of the
of Dr. John Knowles
appointment

presentatives advances centerstage,
with which the Nixon administration is usually in tune. The passing of the Senate's melliflously
voiced Minority Leader, Everett
McKinley Dirksen, both silhouettes
and accentuates the change which
time has wrought.
Republican politics and policy
will not be vastly altered by his
departure. As a wise observer has
said, there is room for only one
leader among the Republicans when
they are in power. That leader today is Richard M. Nixon, busy at
revamping party outlook, highly
rated in the opinion polls and
mecommanding a
to HEW.
has been
chanism. Senator Dirksen
But no evaluation should miss
less necessary to the new President
qualifications, there are other reathe point that here, in this tousel-hairesons for promoting Reeves' candi- Ifhan he was to Democratic PresiMidwest-erne- r
diapason-voice- d
dacy. It is usually the case that dents Kennedy and Johnson, when
was a genuine representative
those men who know most about he could mobilize within his ranks
of the old senatorial school, the dishow a governing body can and almost automatic support on crucial
tinctive colorful personality, in an
does operate are content to apply issues.
their knowledge only in a theoretiSenator Dirksen's ability to age when too many legislators are
d
"organization men.""
cal context. If political scientists, guarantee votes had not been thorHe knew, as did Sir Winston
who are trained extensively in that oughly tested, this session, though
at times the Nixon team could Churchill, the value of oratory and
discipline, were more prone to prachave done with better congression- he mobilized his rolling periods
tical applications of their knowlfor causes both great and small.
edge, perhaps ,the corruption and al liaison. But palpably his influin politics, thethrust-and-parrinefficiency which they claim is so ence rested on a narrower base of Hedelighted
the deals and subhard-cor- e
Republican stalwarts
prevalent would be eliminated.
terfuges. He was a sentimental,
than heretofore.
" new left politics" tough-mindeshrewd, zestful inAt any rate, this fall's voters
Adherents of
dividual and the Senate is the
have a rare choice. It is very selmay wish to dismiss Senator Dirkdom that a man of such commonly
sen as a "buffoon." But in im- more lustrous because he orated
and operated there for so many
recognized integrity and ability1 portant fact he was decisively inmakes himself available for
fluential when key issues hung in years.
the balance, eyenaswere Sena
Te Christian Science Monitor

On Politics
interest in Lexington. Some thir-

Editor-in-Chi-

George H. Jepson, Managing Editor

-

teen candidates have announced
their intention of occupying the
office. Of this number there is one
man who's qualifications necess-

12, 1969

Editorials represent tfie opinions of the Editors, not of the University.

ed

The race for city commissioner
is one which has attracted much

Kernel

University of Kentucky

y,

n,

well-organiz-

ed

te

d,

mild-voice-

y,

d,

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Friday, Sept.

12,

19G9- -5

Administrators Expected To Be 'Tougher9

By The Associated Press

Radicals warming up for a
new round of student upheavals
can expect to find tougher ground
rules on campus this fall as administrators move to restore
peace to the academic commun- ity.
A nationwide Associated Press
survey shows that university and
college administrators, once helplessly baffled by violence behind
walls, now are deter- -'
mined to deal decisively and firm-- !
ly with forces seeking to obstruct
the normal life of the academic
community.
Student Involvement
At the same time, the survey
discloses
that administrators
have taken steps to accommodate constructive student demands for more involvement in
y
the
conduct of college
and university affairs.
Other survey findings:
Across the country there's
been a loosening of restrictive
campus regulations, such as rules
forbidding men students from
visiting coeds in dormitories.
An increasing number of institutions are moving to offer
more opportunities to minority
groups, and to widen the field of
black students.
Campus security forces have
been beefed up at many schools.
Administrators say they will rely
more on court orders, such as
injunctions, to curb radical activists. And many say they won't
hesitate to call police onto campus when necessary.
Students On Councils
On a majority of the campuses, students this fall will be
filling places on faculty and administrative councils previously
off limits to them, according to
a poll by the American Association of State Colleges and Uniday-to-da-

versities.
No administrator will predict,
however, that these and other
changes already put into effect
are enough to head off disrup-

tion.
What emerges most strongly
in the AP survey is the determination of administrators to avoid
the image of the university president powerless in his own domain when violence strikes.

Well

The stiffening attitude is reflected in beefed up security
forces at many institutions.
The University of Maryland,
for example, has installed a security supervisor with a background of work in police. He has
a campus force of 47 officers
and says he would like to add
10 more.

lations:
"You think twice about sleeping with a girl when you know
you have to face her the next
morning at breakfast and at
lunch and at dinner and at
breakfast."
The sexes share the dining
room and living rooms at Lambda
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ficers.

bombing incident led

cluster of

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L

a

private institutions
40 miles from Los Angeles to
increase campus security patrols
by two men bringing the total to

More Regulations
Cornell University, rocked by
the black militant takeover of
Straight Hall in April, adopted

16.

"Radicals accuse us of resorting to fascism when we are forced
to summon help from police,"
he says. "But in a totalitarian
society, police are called to settle
an issue. Nobody on any campus
expects police to settle an issue.
.We call, them in to
'
a minimum order and peace so
that we can get on with the
business of the university, which
is supposed to be education.",
Reflecting public impatience
with recurring waves of campus
turmoil is a series of bills passed
,in 20 state legislatures in the)
past four months.
Most of these measures prohibit blocking buildings, interfering with classes and intimi-- :
dating members of the university
community.

Nu but the men and women
have separate rooms and baths.
However, the sexes often mix to
study together in their quarters.
Another coed habitat on the
Stanford Campus, Crove House,
has a resident "housemother"
whose comment sums up the feelings about such living arrangements:
"You should see the scenes

at the door and in the bushes
x
houses . . .
at some of the
The lockout hours and all that
it just gives the kids an overemphasized idea of sex."
There is no lack of sex on the
one-se-

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in July regulations banning attempts to obstruct university
operations or to interfere with
any group through the threat of
physical force.
Firearms,- - language likely to
incite the use of physical force
and "persistent noise" also are
banned in the Cornell regulations.
The sampling of administrative moods makes it clear that
college authorities are anxious
to employ the efforts of moderate students this fall to curb
disruption.
Brandeis University President
Morris Abram asserts that only
2" to. 3 percent of the nation's
student population are "revolutionaries." The majority, he
states, disapprove of major features of American society but
cannot be classified as radical
activists.
Social Ills Corps
proposes using the
manpower of these concerned students and faculty members to
develop "a skilled, committed
corps to work off campus on
the great societal ills which re-- .
Abram

Sex -Less Sex?

d

causes.

new degree programs in

group which says it intends to speaR for the "quiet
majority" is the reorganized Association of Student Governments, which has provided services to students on 300 campuses-ovethe past five years.
A

r

needed.

academic year.
At the University of North
Carolina, students have formed
a "Hayakawa Society" named
after San Francisco State President S. I. Hayakawa, famed for
his defiance of radical activists
to speak for what it terms
"the silent majority."
Taking up the issues which
loom again this year as possible
targets of student unrest, admin

Black Studies
In Montana, a state with one
of the nation's smaller black populations, State University has
set up a black studies program
and currently is developing one
for, Indian studies. At the University of Montana in Missoula
an
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