xt7pvm42s23v https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7pvm42s23v/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19191212  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, December 12, 1919 text The Kentucky Kernel, December 12, 1919 1919 2012 true xt7pvm42s23v section xt7pvm42s23v mm.

The Kentucky Kernel
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY

VOL. X.

LEXINGTON,

U. K. MEN ATTEND
BIG CONFERENCE TI6ERT IS INSPIRING

DATES FOR ORATORICAL
PRELIMINARY

CHANGED

Eligibility Rules Are An
nounced for Entrance to
Oratorical Contests
TO BE BIG EVENT
The preliminary contest for the pur
pose of selecting the representatives
of the University of Kentucky to com
pete In the two big oratorical contests
to be held in Lexington In March
1920, has been postponed to January
14, 1920.

Dr.

Mcvey

Discusses
Training

Vocational

Dr. Frank L. McVey, Dean Paul P.
Boyd and Ezra L. Gillid went to Lou
Isvillo last week to represent
tho
University of Kentucky at tho twenty-fourtannual meeting of tho Association of Colleges and Secondary
School of tho Southern States hold
there December 4th and 5th.
President McVey addressed tho convention Friday, his subject being, "Is
There a Tendency to Vocatlonalize
Our Colleges of Liberal Arts and
Sciences, and If So to What Extent
Is It Wise to Folow Thl3 Tendency?"
Thi3 meeting of the Association was
the first held in Kentucky since that
held in Lexington some twenty years
ago.

i

No. 12

MUST HAVE PICTURES
MADE NEXT WEEK LOAN COMMITTEE

GIVES

SPEAKER AT Y. SERVICE Lovendale Proves Skillfull Photofl

Compares Body to Ancient
Temple in Speech

h

CHANDLER SINGS

rapher; Will Go to Virginia
Military Institute.
All dates to bo made with J. Victor
Lovendale, White's photographer, who
Is making tho Kentuckian pictures,
must be arranged before Monday, at
3 o'clock.
Mr. Lovendale announces
that the proofs for the pictures and
extra personal order3 will bo handled
by a young woman, whom White will
send down from New York at an
early date.
Mr. Lovendale wishes to express
his appreciation for his kindly reception and treatment here at the University. He is an artist In his work
and he has given
satisfaction. Mr. Lovendale photographed
the pictures for "The Better 'Ole" and
for "Lombardi, Ltd." He will go to
do work for Virginia Military Academy after finishing here.

Investigation Shows High
Percentage of Students
Earning Expenses
The Investigation
acently completed by the Faculty Loan Commit
tee has brought to light some remark
able and interesting facts in regard to
the earnings of the students of the
University.
The student body has
shown one of the highest percentages
of wage earners of any of the universities of tho country. Of the 90 per
cent, of the student body who filled
out questionnaires sent out by the
committee It was found that out of
400 men students,
63 per cent are
either earning their entire expenses
or earning part of their way through
school. Of this 63 per cent. 27 per
cent, are earning their entire way, 12
per cent, half of all their expenses and
25 per cent, are earning approximately a fourth of their expenses while In
school.
Of those earning money during the
summer and the school term It was
found that 20 per cent earn their en
tire way through school by working
in summer and during the school
term, 22 per cent, earn
s
of
their way and 21 per cent, earn at
least a third of their way.
Statistics given by the women of
the University showed that 22 out of
the 240 girls arc helping in some manner to defray their expenses and of
these 22 five are earning their entire

Once more soft cushioned wicker
chairs were placed beside the battered Recreation Hall chairs and once
more dining room furniture and parlor furniture were dragged Into use
to accommodate students and faculty
members who attended the "Y" meeting held at Patterson Hall Sunday
evening. Dr. John J. Tigert made a
humorous and at the same time in
spiring talk upon the "Temple of
God."
"Happy" Chandler, accompanied by Elizabeth Kimbrough, sang,
'God Will Take Care of You."
Dr. Tigert, in his talk, likened the
temple to the human body, its conse
cration being that act by which one
Is dedicated to the service of God; the ASSOCIATION OF
heart, representing the Holy of Holies
out of which come the issues of life;
COLLEGES HAS MEETING
the temple was the repository of law
as the human body is the repository
of law; not laws written on tablets of 15 Entrance Units for All
stone but laws written in the human
Kentucky Colleges
heart.
Favored
"The temple," said Doctor Tigert,
Fifteen units as a requirement for
"is a place of sacrifice and the body
Is also a place of sacrifice.
It is entrance to Kentucky Colleges and
necessary for us to sacrifice our phys- the bestowal of only one degree, that
ical and natural propensities that God of Bachelor of Arts, on graduates of
may have some place in our develop the College of Liberal Arts, will prob
ment; that we may transform our ably be adopted by Kentucky Colleges
bodies from material things to trans- as a result of conclusions reached by way.
cendental spiritual things. God has heads of Institutions of higher learn-tgThe College of Arts and Sciences
Saturday at the fourteenth anual has the highest percentage of stugiven man the ability to choose and it
is therefore necessary for him to se meeting of the Association of Ken- dents who are earning money by the
tucky Colleges.
week, but the College of Engineering
lect and imitate the best of life."
Will B. Campbell, president of Ken and the College of Agriculture have
During the social hour which fol
lowed, tea and sandwiches were tucky Wesleyan College, Winchester, larger numbers of students
who
served and "Happy" Chandler, accom- was elected President of the Associ work in the summer.
panied by Elizabeth Cook, rendered ation for 1920.
Out of 39 Junior Engineers 38 are
As a result of this meeting also wage earners.
several solos "Lonesome for You,"
It was shown by the.
"Because," "At" Dawning," "The Ros- Junior colleges of Kentucky will from survey of the classes that the Freshary," "When You Look in the Heart this time on be given partial member men and Senior classes lead with
ship in the association.
high percentages while tho Sophoof a Rose," etc.
This was the first meeting of the as more and Junior Classes are low in
sociation in two years, the war and their percentages.
the influenza epidemic Interfering
The purpose of the survey by the
BOYS' BASKETBALL SCHEDULE
with the convention last year. The Faculty Loan Committee was to assessions were held Saturday, begin- certain just how many of tho students
January 17 Cincinnati at Cinning at 10:30 o'clock in the morning, are wage earners and to get the stacinnati, offered.
In the Little Theatre.
The president, tistics compiled.
These will be
January 23 Maryville at Lexingplaced beforo the people of Kentucky
Frank L. McVey, presided.
ton, offered.
Thirty-sirepresentatives of Ken- with a view of showing tho needs of
January 31 Georgetown at Lextucky colleges were present.
students at tho University of Kenington, offered.
Will B. Campbell, who was unani- tucky for iargor and more liboral conFebruary 1 and 7 University of mously elected president,, i3 the most
tributions to tho loan fund and to
Tennesseo nt Lexington.
recent addition to officers of the col- scholarships. Tho Faculty Loan ComFebruary 14 Centre College at lege world in this state. He was mittee
has always been active in tho
Danville, offered.
elected last summer. T. 11. Leigh, of aid of deserving students, usually tho
February 17
Georgetown at Georgetown, was elected
upperclassmen, Juniors and Seniors,
Georgetown.
and Frank L. Rainey, of Centx'O who lacked sufficient funds to enable
February 21 Wesleyan at LexCollege, Danville, secretary and treas them to complete their college work
ington.
urer,
rroressor Harney will enter but on account of inadequate funds
February 27 and 28 University
upon his twelfth year in this office. this work is necessarily limited.
of Tennessee at Knoxvllle.
In addition to the officers, the follow
Tho purpose of tho questionnaires
March 6 Centre College at Lexing were elected members of the Ex- sent out for the students to (111 out
ington, offered.
ecutive Committee, Dean John L. Pat- - and return, was to get the statistics

The contest of the State Associa
tlon is to be held on March 1, 1920
Representatives
of Berea, Kentucky
VVesleyan,
Transylvania,
Centre
Georgetown Colleges and the State
University will takte part.
To be
eligible to compete In this contest a DR. M'VEA DELIVERS
student must be an undergraduate,
who doe3 not hold a Bachelor's de
gree and who is pursuing a regular
course of study at the time of the
State contest. Students who are over President of Sweet Briar
Speaks in Chapel
twenty-seveyears of age are barred
from the contest. Contestants must
In a convincing address in Chapel
also be members of either the Pat Tuesday, Dr.
Emllle McVea, president
terson or the Union Literary Society of
Sweet Briar College, spoke on "The
The rules governing the character
World and .Our Responsibilities 'to
of the orations require that no ora
It." There are three reasons why
tlon shall contain more than two
the colleges and universities
feel
hundred words and such quotations
that they can justify their demands
shall be indicated by quotation marks
for endowment funds." said she
Any outline, synopsis or analysis at
'First, the universities teach men to
tached to an oration shall be consld open
their eyes. Second, they dis
ered as part of the oration in making cover new things
for men to see.
this count.
Third, they help us to understand the
The prize for the winner of the present
In the light of the past.
contest of the Kentucky Association
"The question is, are we worth
la a loving cup awarded by the State
what we get out of our education?
Association. A forensic "K" on a gold
There should be no bargain counters
medal will be awarded by the Univer- in
life," the speaker went on. "We
sity to her own representative.
must make ourselves worth what our
The winner of the Kentucky State University gives
us. It is our busi
contest becomes eligible to compete
ness to interpret the meaning of that
in a series of contests leading to the
great word Democracy In the cities,
championship of the States of Kentowns and counties from which we
tucky, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Nebrascome.
ka, Missouri, Iowa, Minnesota, Mich"We all hear a great deal about
igan, Kansas, North Dakota and South
this 'country's program of Americani
Dakota. The State has been unanization. Let us ask ourselves what
mously elected to membership in the
kind of Americanization we are going
Interstate Association of the Middle to teach?"
West.
The winner of the Kentucky State U.
K. REPRESENTED AT
contest which is to be held at the
SOUTHERN CONFERENCE.
University of Kentucky on March 1,
1920, will represent
the State on
Dr. Tigert and "Daddy" Boles Leave
April 2, 1920, in a contest against the
for Alabama.
winners of fir3t honors in Ohio, InJ. J. Tigert and S. A. Boles left Lexdiana, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michiington Wednesday for Birmingham,
gan and Illinois. This Eastern DiAla., to attend the anual meotlng of
vision contest will be held at one of
the Southern intercollegiate Athletic
the colleges in Wisconsin. If tho
Association which will be held in that
Kentucky man wins one of tho first
city December 12 and 13. Dr. Tigert
three places in that Eastern Division Is tho delogato
from the University
contest, he will compete for final
of Kentucky, and Mr. Boles is also
honors against the winners of the
attonding tho convention in the infirst three places in tho Western Diterest of athletics in Kentucky. Many
vision. Tho final contest will be held
Important questions, such as tho eligon May 7, 1920. Thi3 series will make
ibility of Freshmen in intercollegiate
the K. I. O. A. contest especially imathletics and other subjects of vital
portant this year.
importance will bo discused at the
convention.
(Coatlauet oa Pg 8)
Patronize
n

4

KYM DEC. 12, 1919

wide-sprea-

11

n

x

Our Advertisers

nwmw

(Continued on Page Two)

(Contlnued on Page Two)

'mvmmmwf.y w'?mmw'm)m''!' '-

-

wpo'ciMfcaaatwj?

lljW!Kllwgnw''lw

Nl8(sistBE.';'

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

PAGE 2

STRAND

CONCERTS DAILY, AFTERNOON AND EVENING

THE

STRAND ALL AMERICAN
ORCHESTRA

"THE BEST ORCHESTRA

IN

HOME

OPEN 10 A. M. TO 11 P. M.
Children, 9c pkisflc wartax
Adults,. 18crplus 2c war tax

THE SOUTH"

than to offer a wide variety of
OF KY.
to pupils nnd give them only
COLLEGES HAS MEETING
face training.
(Continued From Pago 1)

ASSOCIATION

sub-Ject- a

LOAN COMMITTEE GIVES

REMARKABLE FIGURES
(Continued From Pago 1)

sur-

this line of work nnd not to help
:ho students to gain employment, ns
EXCHANGES
has been the erroneous belief. The
University "Y" Associations maintain
U 1113 ANA, 111., Dec. 7. The oldest
employment bureaus for tho benefit
soil experiments held in the United and help of students who desire work
States 13 on the campus of the Uni- and they are ready at all times to
versity of Illinois.
give tho students any help in their
It is within five minutes' walk of power In getting employment.
the agricultural college building nnd
thousands visit the experiment field NEW FURNITURE ADDS
every year. This oldest Held was
TO HALL'S APPEARANCE.
started by George E. Morrow, who
was a professor of agriculture at the
The Recreation Hall at Patterson
university for 17 years, and the fields Hall has been made moro beautiful by
are known as the Morrow plots. On the addition of a set of wicker fur
a part of the field corn ha3 been niture. This
furnlturo is upholstered
grown on the same land every year in an attractive shade of dclf blue,
since 1879, on another part corn and which harmonizes with draperies and
oats have been grown in alternation, other fixtures of tho hall. It consists
and on a third part corn, oats and of six new pieces, two rockers, two
clover have grown in rotation.
straight chairs, a lounge, nnd a table,
On an adjoining tract of land, 50 which at tho present is decorated
additional experimental plots laid out with potted plants and ferns. A
a
by Dean Eugene Davenport a few
has also been added, and the
months after he came to Illinois in Recreation Hall has assumed a most
rotation system with home-lik1895, a
atmosphere.
It is now a
corn, oats, wheat, clover and alfalfa source of great delight to the young
is now in operation.
women of the University. We wish to
At the end of this year the Morrow express our thanks to the Board of
plots will have been under experi- Control for these additions.
ment for 40 years and one more year
will complete a quarter century of
AN EXPONENT OF DARWIN.
carefully conducted investigations and
(Cento.)
accurately recorded agricultural facts
Maiden Aunt, "How perfectly your
from the more extensive Davenport frock fits, dear; I thought you college
plots.
girls soared above such trifles."
"Oh, no! We believe in the
survival of the best fitted."

OF

"ONLY THE 1EST IN MOVING PICTURES"

PARAMOUNT, ARTCRAFT, GOLD-WYAND SELECT PICTURES

THE CLASSY PLACE
FOR THE COLLEGE STUDENTS

in

toraon, University of Louisville, Professor Clnrk, Ueroa; Dcnn P. P. Boyd,
University of Kentucky, nnd C. C.
Frecnmn, Transylvanln College.
Professor Henry Lloyd, of Transyl-vanl- a
was chairman of the Committee
on Nominations.
The recommendation that fifteen
units ho required for entrance to Kentucky collegiate institutions camo as
the result of the report of Dean Thomas McCartney, of Transylvania College, chairman of the Committee on
Accredited Schools. Dean McCartney
roported that not more than two colleges of Kentucky require the same
subjects or the same amount of credits for entrance. This makes inconvenience in transferring students from
preparatory schools and in arranging
the curricula of colleges, Dean McCartney said.
It was brought out in the discussion
that colleges and preparatory schools
would give students fifteen credits for
entrance to college if required to do
BO.

of high
In line with the
schools and preparatory institutions
and colleges was the address of Dr.
Frank L. McVey who spoke on "Preparation for College."
Dr. McVey urged that high schools
of Kentucky be influenced to narrow
their curricula and to, give more
training in important studies rather

Vic-trol-

HOME-MAD-

CANDIES AND LUNCHES

E

McGurk & O'Brien
"EVERYTHING NEW"

PHOENIX FRUIT STORE
FOR FRUITS, CANDIES, NUTS
PHOENIX BLOCK
A TIP FROM BECK

Why worry about Clothes?

New Clothes are so high right now that we all
can't afford to buy them and to those who can't
just get out one of the old suits that you have and
send it here, it will be just the thing to wear to a
dance, party or schQol call.
BECKER DRY CLEANING CO.
Cleaners That Satisfy
Lime at High
Phone 621-X

five-cro-

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Cropper's Laundry
(Incorporated)

PHONE 210

Co-e-

HERE'S YOUR CHANCE.

DO YOU DANCE?

MRS. LAMBERT'S SCHOOL OF DANCING

Every Afternoon 1 to 5
Tuesday and Fridav for This Week Only
Evenings

8

to 10:30

OVER WOMEN'S EXCHANGE
Phone

1809--

Graves, Cox Co.

Y

ONLY A FEW MORE DAYS OF THE DAMAGE
BY WATER SALE OF MEN'S SHOES
College Men here's your chance to save money on your shoes.
The damage in every case is very slight and does not impair the
permanent wearing qualities or looks of the shoe being no more
than a new pair of shoes would get after being worn out once in
the rain.

BRING YOU& SHOES TO US
TO BE REPAIRED
RIGHTWAY
114 North Limestone

SHOE STORE

The Christmas Store for
Men and Boys.

Great display of practi
cah useful gifts now
ready.

N. LEVY, Manager

Street

yourself a new
warm Suit or Overcoat
extra values now.
Give

TRIANGLE CLUB
Invites you to attend their

WEEKLY DANCES
Wednesday and Saturday Evening, at 8:30 p. m.
Over Ladies' Exchange, North Upper St.

Montague's Orchestra
Admission $1.00
COMMITTEE
JOHN MARKING

HERBERT NUNNELLY

RAY McCOWAN

Graves, cox sco.
Incorporated.

114 N. UPPER

* PAGE 3

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
FOR ORATORICAL

DATES

PRELIMINARY CHANGED

Down Toivn

(Continued From Pago 1)
Southern

The

Oratorical

League

University Book Store

Meeting Place

test which

will bo hold In Lexington
on March 5, 1920, will ho ono of tho
two biggest events of its kind in tho

of
United States. Representatives
tho Stato Unlvorsltcs of Virginia,
North Carolina, Alabama and Kentucky, and of Johns Hopkins Univor-stand Vanderbllt University will
take part. Tho rules governing eligibility and orations for this contest are
as follows:
"Only persons who aro pursuing
undergraduate studies at tho time of
the contest and who have not received
academic degrees shall be admitted
as competitors.
"No speech in tho contest shall exceed twenty minutes in delivery.
Speeches must deal with political, social or economic subjects of current
interest. No speaker in delivering his
speech shall use quotations without
making it clear that he is quoting.
The amount of quoted matter In one
speech must not exceed 200 words."
The prize to the winner of this contest will be $60 in cash awarded by
the Southern Association. A forensic
"K" on a gold medal will be awarded
to Kentucky's representative.
Kentucky's representatives in both
of these contests will be chosen on
January 14, 1920. If the winner of
the preliminary contest meets the
eligibility requirements of both associations he will be permitted to represent the University in both contests,
on March 1 and on March 5. If the
winner of the preliminary contest
meets the requirements of one association and not of the other, he will
represent the University in the contest for which he is qualified. The
next highest contestant in the preliminaries who meets the eligibility
requirements will be chosen to represent the University in that contest for which he is qualfiied. The
preliminary contest will be judged by
a board of judges consisting of three
members of the faculty. Manuscripts
of the orations of contestants in the
preliminaries must be given to Professor E. C. Mabie not later than

The College Store

for

For College People

y

3t

January

Text Books

Open Until 8 P. M. Every Evening

Pennants

NOTICE TO STUDENTS.
To the students of the University:
Following is the Senate rule regarding absenco bofore and after holidays:
"Absence from classes immediately
preceding and following a holiday or
examination period shall be reported
at once to the Registrar. Students
absent at these times must present
their excuses in writing to the Discipline Committee immediately upon
return to the university. If tho excuse is not satisfactory to the comf
credit will be deductmittee,
ed for each day or fraction of a day
of absence."
Tho time for presenting excuses to
the chairman of tho Discipline Committee, C. R. Melcher, has been
to Friday noon, December 12.
If by that time no excuse is presented
tho Discipline Committee will take it
for granted that tho student has no
reasonable excuso to offer.
EZRA L. QILLIS, Registrar.

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We Earnestly Solicit Your Patronage

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The finest and most complete exclusively retail Optical establishment
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A faithful and accurato Optical Service in all its branches.
EYES examined by an Optometrist intimately familiar with the most
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The grinding of the lenses, the expert fitting and all other details
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WE FEATURE ONE DAY SERVICE

AND SUPREME AUTO OILS
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10, 1920.

Students who plan to enter these
contests are requested to report to
Professor Mabie at once so that they
may get well started on their speeches
and be able to do effective work on
them during the Christmas holidays.

University Boys

Fayette Optical Shop

Va .!mM

iHammoih Garage Co.

Lexington, Ky.

Phone 3972

W. Main St.

313-31- 5

H. CLAY

ODENBAUGH,

Optometrist

(Incorporated)

EAST MAIN ST.

R. S. WEBB, Pres.

MURRAY PRINTING

WELSH

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COLLEGE STATIONERY

GRADDY-RYA-

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ENGRAVING

CO.

AND

Incorporated

DIE STAMPING

THE COLLEGE BOYS' STORE
Clothing, Furnishings, Hats, Shoes and Tailoring

FRAT and DANCE PROGRAMS
124-12-

LEXINGTON, KY.

N. LIMESTONE

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one-hal-

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Ladies' and Gents' Tailors

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Loxlnfton, Ky.

1S99

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Records
Musical Instruments
Player Rolls
Sheet Music

Christian Music Co.

Everything Pertaining to Music
Moving, Tuning, Repairing and Refinishing

Competent Home Tailors
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Pianos a Specialty

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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

PAGE 4

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
Published every Friday throughout tho College ycnr by the student body
of the University of Kentucky, for the bonoflt of the students,
nlumnl nnd faculty of the Institution.
The Kentucky Kernel is tho official newspaper of tho University. It
is issued with n view of furnishing to its subscribers nil the college news
of Kentucky, together with n digest of items of interest concerning the
Universities of other States nnd Cnnnda.

Miss Blandlng "March on tiptoe
one, two, three,
four common
walk."
Deanle Harbison "Did dddld you
say 'enmol walk.' "

SUBSCRIPTION, ONE DOLLAR AND FIFTY CENTS A YEAR.
FIVE CENTS THE COPY.
Entered at Lexington Postofflco as Becond-clasmall matter.
s

A. GAVIN KORMENT.
Louise Will ..

EDITORIAL STAFF.
EDITOR-IN-CHIE-

F

Mnnaglng Editor
Managing Editor
.Co-eEditor
.Squirrel Food Editor
Sport Editor
.Exchange Editor
.Feature Editor

-

Robert Raiblo
Adele Slado
Mary Elizabeth James.
Donald Dinning
Margaret McClure
Frances Marsh

.Assistant

Prof. "What's
problem ?"

d

AGAINST

Dot Blntz "Pitt would have been
Prime Minister for a longer time If he
hadn't died."

CENTRE NOT CONVINCING.

It is with extreme astonishment and surprise that such a thing should
be deemed possible of any Kentucky college that the Kernel notes In the
columns of newspapers of recent date, a wholesale indictment of Centre .College, our neighbor Institution, by West Virginia, making charges so disgraceful In their import as to leave forever the stigma of professionalism
on the little Kentucky college, If It does not immediately refute them beyond
the shadow of a doubt.
The charges, made by one Major Earl Smith, a West Virginia University
alumnus, and said to be .the result of investigations made by him, set forth
that "Red" Roberts, of Somerset, Ky., who is well known in this section of
the State, is none than one of tho former Nesser brothers, formerly members
of one of the great professional teams of Ohio, and that his brother, also
investired headed, "plays end or half" on the Centre team. The
gator also claims that McMillan is a professional player known as Scruggs,
and that several other professionals played on the Centre eleven.
Major Smith says the team was brought together by "Moran, coach,
who came from Texas, and Jim Duffee, Columbus, Ohio, sportsman and ref- r
eree," and that the money necessary to hire these men was put up by "race
horse and hotel people of Lexington, that big, sporting Kentucky town."
If the main facts in Major Smith's charges are no more reliable than
the details printed herewith, the whole thing would make an entertaining
fairy story but nothing else.
The writer knows that McMillan and Roberts played on the Somerset
High School football team before entering Centre In 1917, at the time according to Major Smith, that they were playing professional ball in Ohio, and it
is hardly possible they could be in two places at once, except in a fairy story
in which Major Smith seem3 a past master.
The Kernel, a Kentucky publication, wishes to express its sincere hope
and confidence that Centre will at once dispel all such rumors that besmirch
its fair name and bring disgrace upon one of the oldest and most honored
of Kentucky colleges. The charges look at present to 'be merely a
of "sour grapes" of fairly defeated opponents, whose champion
takes this means to bring solace to their wounded vanity and lessen the
sting of defeat by an adversary whom they thought was insignificant; but if
these charges are proved untrue, and the Kernel has every reason to believe
that they will be so proved, no censure would be too great for the one who
brings such accusations against the good name of so venerable an institution as is Centre.
Centre College should at once take steps to brand these charges as false,
and bring down upon the heads of their authors the just rebuke that all
false charges merit, if they be false.
It is exceedingly unfortunate Jthat such controversies should arise
"between educational institutions of high standing, and especially of such
j'Serious nature as this purports to be. No matter how the matter ends, it
should be a lesson and reminder to all who may have at any time in the
future an inclination to air their views of any college through the columns
of the press, to use such caution in their speech as to b.e more convincing
than Centre's accusers seem to have been in the present instance.
n

j

tho answer to this

Coed. "Sixty."
Prof. "How did you get it?"
Volco from back of room "Looked
in tho bnck of the book."

REPORTERS.
Elizabeth Marshall, Elizabeth Card, Mary Archer Dell, James A. Dixon,
Margaret Smith, Martha Buckman, Harry Cottrell, Terrll Corn.
BUSINESS STAFF.
Business Manager
J. P. Barnes
H. B. Loyd
Circulation Manager
J. Burton Prewitt, Gilbert Smith
Assistants
CHARGES

Lykelle Pome.
Thero once was n fair suffrngetto
Who said, "Walt 'til tho bnllot we got
Prohibition shnll rule,
Factory kids go to school,
And n womnn bo president yet!"

Harding and Cook were shooting pool.
Cook won and Ed remarked non
chalantly, "Cook, you pay for this, I
lon't want to break this two bits."
PAROXYSMAL

PARODIES

In the language of the poet
Though the meter may be wrong,
(There are many who won't know It)
I'll express myself In song.
i

I've read the lines that Frizzy wrote,
'TIs time that others had their turns;
And "Freshles" poems get my goat,
So let me be while genius burns.
T'was in the day of Troy and Tyre,
While Jennie Wren was young,
That fierce old Haman did aspire
To have proud Mordecai hung.
The little Paramecium, growing frantic,
With his setae all arrayed,
Vowed he'd cross the broad Atlantic,
Would he swim? no, he" would wade.
"My gas is gone," the ballooner spoke,

"I'll park in this cloud a while
And fix my Kipp Generator which is
broke
"It's as fractious as a chile"
speaking, science is
Epizootically
absurd,
Not in idle words I speak it, but assiduously
Voicing the sentiments of every bird,
Studying valence and formulas
plte-ousl-

"Open up old boy," said the starfish
to the mussel,
It happened off Panama,
And the slanting ray of the departing
day,
Was the last the mussel saw.

Since the foregoing was put into type, the Kernel has been reliably
informed that the author of the charges against Centre has acknowledged The meeting came quite unexpected,
his mistake and has made full reparation for the attack on the good name
It happened in this way,
of that institution.
A long freight train became disconnected,
At the end of a perfect day.

FOOD

Wo will not linger on this theme,
When all the earth Is glad,
But from the farmer's words 'twould
seem,
'Twas the only colt he had.
Ambrose.

The Kentucky Colonel says: "In a girl's heart and never know It."
NOTICE.
of the Lykelle Pome be suah
The Knight of the Lexington Drug
and don't pronounce it with the ac- retorts: "Isn't that Just like a wocent on the last syllable. It Is
There will bo an Important meeting
man? She leads on a man she doesn't
"
that it will sound
of the Press Association Monday,
care a straw about and turns a cold
fifth hour, In the Journalism rooms.
to the one she's crazy about
Mademoiselle On Dit says: "A girl shoulder
Every member Is expected to be presalways knows when a man's in love and theu accuses him of breaking her ent and any prospective members will
with her, but a man can almost break heart! Just like a .woman."
be welcome.
Bpeakin

Lyk-'elle.-

THAT AWFUL PICTURE!

LITERARY SOCIETIES

"Resolved, That tho coal strlko is
Behold' the constant procession of
legal nnd Justifiable," was tho subject
gloom-fillesufferers ascending the of a
debnto at tho meeting of the Union
Armory steps nowadays!
Old and
Literary Society last Friday, and the
young, from careworn Seniors to
affirmative, supported by Alprin and
giddy Freshmen nrc having their pic
Conkwrlght, proved victorious over
Hires "took." For tho co ed, thero is
tho negntlvc, upheld by Zuckerman
a rather agonizing preliminary.
nnd Gartln.
the debate tho
First comes the question of hair! program was lfter
concluded with an Interr
For tho
date with the pho esting talk on
tho "Mountains of Ken
tographer, the maiden debates on the
tucky," by Sylvester Woods.
dnto of the shampoo.
One's hair
Patterson Literary Society.
shouldn't look too fluffy and halo-likTho declnmatlon contest of tho Pat
and still It mustn't Ho close to ono's
head like the skin on an onion and terson Literary Socloty for the Crura
then, Argument: What about tho old Medal took placo Friday night In the
Little Theatre with Professor Mable
faithful net 7
Seven con
boy3 may discuss tho relative presiding as chairman.
Tho
merits of a Jeweled stickpin and those testants fought for tho honors, among
of a plain, elegant gold one, although them officers and prominent members
Several of the con
wo can't believe that they are that of tho society.
Beau Brummollsh,
certainly, testants were old men who had been
but
whether tulle Is becoming In an even- In declamatorles before, but the ma
ing dress picture Is a more vital ques jority were either new members or
tion now at Patt. Hall and fair co eds old members for whom this was the
have been rended bitterly as to the first contest.
The Judges, Prof. T. T. Jones, Mr.
respective "taking" qualities of the
A. W. Whiting and Dr. Guy Smith,
evening dress nnd middy.
Tho date fls painful enough, for awarded the honors as follows: First,
what good Christian enjoys the ordeal W. I. Moore, "The Black Horse and
second, J. B. Prewitt,
of the camera!
No wonder the Hindu Hi