xt7pvm42sf6p https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7pvm42sf6p/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19581119  newspapers sn89058402 English  Copyright is retained by the publisher. http://www.kykernel.com The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, November 19, 1958 text The Kentucky Kernel, November 19, 1958 1958 2013 true xt7pvm42sf6p section xt7pvm42sf6p Dean Welch To Leave TVA, Return To UK
Dr. Frank J. Welch, dean of the College of Agriculture,
wltl return "scon," UK President Frank O. Dickey said
in a statement released Monday.
Dr. Dickey's statement ended rumors that Dean Welch,
now serving as a TVA director, would be granted an
extension of his leave of absence.
President Dickey's statement said:
"Dr. Welch and I have discussed his leave of absence
from his post as dean of the College of Agriculture and
Home Economics and director of the Experiment Station,
and the Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees
lias also been acquainted with the arrangements in
connection with the return of Dean Welch to the

has been any other understanding. We are pleased that
Dean Welch will soon return because there are a number
of problems that require his consideration."
Dr. Dickey Indicated that no further action by the
Doard of Trustees would be necessary. It had been
reported earlier that no request had been made to extend
the leave.
It has not been announced when Dr. Welch will re
turn, but his leave of absence expires Nov. 30. Reports
say he will require several more weeks to complete his
business with the TVA.
Dr. Welch was named to the TVA post by President
Eisenhower. He took the oath of office Nov. 25. 1937.
to serve until the Senate confirmed his appointment.
The UK trustees granted Dr. Welch a leave of absence
soon afterward.

University.
"As has been the case since the leave was granted
last year, we expect Dean Welch to return. There never

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UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY

LEXINGTON, KY., WEDNESDAY. NOV.

Vol. L

X

Two Parties Compete
even Seats Contested

k

i
v

V.

t In C Election Today
Seven seats will be contested in dates on either ballot. All incumCongress primary bents eligible for
this
y
elections today.
jeu r f a ilecLtaf ileI
There are a total of 34 candi before last Thursday's dead line.
dates from the two parties vying There are no candidates from
for a place on the ballot in the either party entered from graduate
general election to be held in school, but
chairmen of
both
December: Student Party" has 22 parties have announced that cancandidates on their ballot and the didates will be
entered in the

.'

.

,

UK Microfilm Center

UK'S MICROFILMS
ARE OVERLOOKED
BY BROWSERS

It's the Microfilm collection in
the Archives Department of the
Margaret I, King Library.
Here,

innumerable pages from

old letters, diaries, and family papers of former Kentucky residents

can be found. One of the most
important of these is the Gov.
Isaac Shelby Papers, invaluable to
Kentucky historians. Gov. Shelby
was the first governor of the Commonwealth.
Another important set of documents, the Draper papers of Madison, Wis., also give a detailed insight into Kentucky history.
Other microfilms on hand in
the library are copies of books out
of print, rare manuscripts, periodi-Continuon Page 2
ed

idac

December race.
Party has four
The Students'
candidates fur one seat in Home
VOTING PLACES
are
and Law. The candidates
Leroy McMuIlan. Billy Joe MitchIN TODAYS
ell. James Kagland and Grorgia
ELECTION
Ann Walker.
In the race with mo.--t candidates,
Agriculture - Ag 11 nil ding
thnt of
the
Home Ec - Home Et Iu idling Students' Arts and Sciences. Mary
Party has Rose
A & S - Journalism Iluililing Bill.ngs. Kay Evans. Tom Jarboe.
lint Kirwan. Judy Schrini and
Commerce - While Hall
Garryl Sipple.
On the
Education - Talor Etl lUlg. Party slate are Ed Tangu-- Campus
CharEngineering - Anderson Hall lotte Bailey and Lynna Chase.
In Commerce each party has
Law - Lafferty Hall
three candidates seeking nominaPolls will he onen from 9
tion. The Campus Party ballot will
a. m. to 4 j. m. Voting will have Lynn Buckner, Steve Clark,
and Taylor Jones and the Students'
he hv ID cards.

9

students and faculty alike doing
research for term papers, projects,
writing bocks or "just plain bros-ing- ."

on

or-catid-

-

Y)

By BILL PASTUCH
of the biggest and best InOne
formation sources on the University campus often goes unnoticed by

Congress, over objec- chairman or member of the steertions from SuKy, voted to set up a ing committee would be in charge
steering committee to administer of a particular phase of homecoming.
future Homcomings.
debate ever the
During the
weekly meetAction come at the
Meese proposal representatives of
ing of SC Monday night.
The proposed pi? - to establish a SuKy presented their ude of the
steering committee was offered to issue.
Don Mc Intoeh, SuKy vice presiUie assembly In a general form by
dent, said if ' homecoming was
Bernie Meese, chairman f the

Student

organization,
taken from the
"SuKy would probably collapse".
The organization aLso contended
that their handling of homecoming
was representative of campus opinion.
Meese pointed out

that as far a
committee could learn, SuKy
his
was never officially delegated the
authority to administer the homecoming weekend. The SC representative said he received this Information from various members of

Party will have Robert Barrett. Bill
Hanley. and Terry Kuesier.
l.

TM.

a

l

1

1

J-i

from each pfcrty In the College of
Education. Vying for 2 positions on
December ballot are Students' Party candidates Betty J King. Jo
.Moyer, and Evelyn Steele.
For
the Campus Party are Wayne Wilson. Phil Co. and Betty Grren.
Another content with tuo .seats
open to be filird in December, is
in Engineering John Bailey. Dick
Vat'Kin and Harold Hicks
will
represent the Campus Party. whi!
the Students' Party will counter
with Colin Lewis. Carlcton Godey.
Robert Lee Bohn, ami Ed Thomas.
With the Catnp.i Party candidate unopposed. Robert K. Hunt
and Robert Manchester are conn
ducting a
race for tho
privilege of representing the Students' Party in the College of Law.
colleges of Ag, Home
In the
Ec and Law, with only one Campus
Party candidate in each, there is
expected to be an overwhelming
Ccontinurd On Page 2
two-ma-

Football Season To End
With Alumni Banquet

Campus Party has 12.
The big race will be in Arts and
Sciences where the Students' party
has six candidates for one seat and
the Campus Party has three canThe University football season
didates.
Only two Campus Party candi- will officially end Monday, Nov.
dates are unopposed; Maitland 24 at the annual Alumni AssociaRice in Ag and Home Ec and Dick tion football banquet.
A floorshow will be presented by
Vimont in Law.
There are no incumbent candi the freshman varsity squad after

SC Takes Homecoming From SuKyj

ommittce Investigating the future
f UK Homecomings.
On Nov. 10 the SC assembly approved a possible plan whereby the
steering committee would be independent from any particular
campus organization. Meese proposed at that time that the homecoming steering committee would
function along lines similar to
those of the Little Kentucky Derby steering committee.
each
delication
Under such

No. 31

,

the Student

.

10, 1)VS

LL

v-'- v

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I

The appointment, which was confirmed July 15,
carries a $20,000 a year salary. Dr. Welch's UK position
pays $13,000 a year and Includes a residence.
Soon after he became a TVA board member. Dean
Welch was named by the Hoard of Trustees as a eon
sultant to the Extension Service, College of Agtlrnltarft
and Home Economics, and to the Experiment Station.
His residence is also maintained by the University.
Dr. Welch often returns to Lexington on weekend.!
to meet with UK staff members. He frequently Addres.sc
farm organizations around the commonwealth.
A number of farm organizations have urged th
appointment of someone else if Dean Welch did not
resume his pot. but President Dickey has maintained
that he would com back. Dr. Dickey said that if Dr.
Welch had not intended to return he would not havo
asked for a leave of absence, but would have resigned.

the University administration.
Meese also reported that the UK
alumni office expressed an interest
in the idea of placing homecoming
under a steering committee.
The homecoming issue was not
the only point of debate in SC
Monday. Tlie question of UK affiliation with the National Student
Association fell one vote short of
passage.
the necessary
The proposal, submitted by Bob
Wainscott, SC secretary of student
affairs, was debated for about 15
minutes.
The question is set to come up
again next week because some of
the objection raised came from
groups that wanted to
sorority
speak to their membership about
the question.
If the NSA affiliation passes the
assembly by the necessary two- two-thir-

.

ds

thirds vote, It will go on the ballot
in the December SC election as a
constitutional amendment.
Daring the NSA debate. bth
Dean Seward and Dean Martin,
said the organization
has a
"clean bill of health" as far as
university officials across the country are concerned.
The measure was voted on and
te
two
were necessary because of the closeness of the count.
The vote was 16.2 in favor of affiliation and 8 8 against. The fractions come from the greek repof
resentatives who have one-fift- h
a vote each.
- A vote of 16.7 or over would have
been required for passage of the
NSA question.
re-vo-

players on the regular varsity team
have introduced themselves and
their dates.
Principal address of the evening1
will be given by Vice President Leo
IVL C'hamberlin. R. A. Shively, director of Intercollegiate athletics,
will be master of ceremonies.
The Samuel L. Huey Scholarship
award will be presented and each
graduating member of the team
will receive a watch from tho
Alumni Association. Coach B Linton Collier also will speak.
Tickets for the event, open t
the public, are 12.59 and may fc
reserved by calling or stopping fcy
the Alumni Office in the SUB.

Directories On Sale
SUdent

directory sale

begin today in Room
SUB.

1CT

will
of the

The directory lbts the phone.
University address, hometown
address, classification, and col
lege of each student.
Each residence hall will receive
en free directory for each phoao
it has lUted.
They sell for 13 cents.

* II2TIIE KENTUCKY KERNEL. Witliu
4

sdav. Nov. If), 19"ft

THE

1

' In

Continued From P;iee

Continued From Page

1

nnd many original
Kentucky rtnte tax lists. Old marriage records and lists of important
wills photographed for the Mormon Church in Salt Lake City are
also on file.
Some of the
mot significant
pieces In the collection are the
English hooks printed before 1610,
the oldest printed hooks in the
Library Microfilm Archives.

raK mara7ine?,

BRIDGE ADDICT
By ANDY

Election

Microfilm

EPPERSON

Sstcms ;uc woiult oils tilings.
line ;iio sstcins lor oliiratinj; our children. A plumbing
s)sKin biings hot and (old tunning water to our homes. I heie
i

I

Also available for inspection, are
aie sew tal agi i( ultuial s stems not to mention the inlinitc the complete i'sues of the Lexingniimher ol sxstems cmplmcd hy race horse plaurs. I heie aie ton Herald-Leadand the New
York Times newspaners, while the
reu sstems lor dexeloping new systems.
er

They're eerywhere.
Not too Ions ago they invaded
the Bridge world. Culbertson and
dorm, to mention two of the best
known. dc eloped systems for
l.layint; bridge. These two systems,
however, ean't hold a candle to
the one I'm going to write about
today. It is the gieatcst system
Endue has ever known.
It has no name; it has been
eelled several things. Its players
will also remain unnamed; they
1(0, have been called several
things.
Don't take my word for it,
I'll list the numerous ad- vantages it offers and then you
can Judge for yourself.
unimportFirst, the
ant voire inflection are exploited
to the utmost. For example, if. a
iMipie of this system springs up
in his chair, leans forward and
bellows "One heart, partner," like
a proud papa learning: of his new-hor- n
set-mindl-

son, his partner knows

im-

mediately that he is on at least
8
points with a 7 card heart
suit. Conversely, if he slumps and
mumbles "A heart" in a meek
voice, his partner is assured that
he is weaker than a watered-dow- n
Tom Collins.
Another equally important of
this system is what is called the
Amazed or Astonished Question.
This occurs when right hand opponent bids one spade and our
player finds himself with 18 points
and six spades to the
The system is quite clear on this
point, he simply leans over, looks
the opponent straight in the eye,
and asks in most preplexing voice,
"You bid one spade?," as if he
couldn t believe how such an
asinine call could be made. This
tells his partner (1) "But that's my
bid." (2) Tf vyou have anything
at all partner, this will be the
worst slaughter since Sherman's
march through Georgia."
In Culbertson's system you are
reduced to a mere double to try
to describe your holding.
Then there is the Pleased Nod,
one of the system's strongest
points. Although used quite effectively in the bidding, it is far more
dangerous for defense. Suppose
our player's partner leads an are
and he sits with the kingqueen
and no other card higher than
the' three with which to signal.
This creates no problem. He simply
puts the three on the table, looks
at his partner, smiles sweetly, and
6--

17-1-

Ace-Quee-

n,

l'-'-

two-par-

LAST TIMES TODAY
HCl
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DESIRE UNDER
THE ELMS

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GOftOON SCOTT

TARZAM

CO-HI- T

JOHN MILLS

Nov. 26th T day only
"THE BOLSHOI BALLET"

NOV

Showing
Nifcly
THUR

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Double Feature

52

Hnn'f

ntnowT ptw ws

STARTS TOMORROW

ly

P,e,e-thouch-

"Tf vrm

Student P.im

al

SAT.

v

TO
STARDOM

T'll

pic, up

my cnair ana wrap ic
around your head."
And now the partner will pass
. . . he'd better, if he values his

f

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.

life.

These are just a few of the
manv manv advantages this svs
tern offers. To list them all would
require a book. But from these
fPW examples, you can surely see
that no other system approaches
it. if you reallv like to win at
iuidge, I would heartily rerom- niCnd that vou trv it.
You'll probably be a winning;
player in no time at all
if

4

...

you live that long;.

MOVIE GUIDE

.

BEN ALI "Love and War," 12:34,
2:39, 5:04, 7:19, 9:34.

CIRCLE 25 "A Streetcar Named
Desire," 7:00 and 11:00.
"Flaming Frontier." 9:35.
"The Naked and the
Dead." G:45 and 10:45.
"White Squad." 9:25.

FAMILY

.,

2;3

J2

7:03.9:27.

4

Starts Today
It

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ASHLAND
'Robbery Under
Arms." 2:15. 5:30. 8:40.
"Gervaise," 3:40, 5:50, 10:00.

1

A
:

If the situation is reversed, how- - STORAND
"Party Girl." 12:00.
ever, and he doesn't want the suit
2:00. 4:00, 6:00, 8:00, 10:00.

fff

A&S

-

and
the
nineteenth
centuries, plus American Periodi- the library.
cals Series, many of which date
back before 1850.
SELF SERVICE LAUNDRY
Miss Jacqueline Bull, director of
COIN OPERATED
the Archives, said that the MicDRYERS
WASHERS
rofilm Collection is one of the most
complete of Its kind in Kentucky.
10 min., 10c
9 lb., 20c
Phe said that additions to the files
Money
SAVE
Time
are being: made frequently and
DO IT YOURSELF
that they should be checked by
.
students and faculty from time Open 8 A. M. to 9 P. M. Daily
Yet another advantageous prin- - to time to see what is new.
Phone
877'i E. High
ciPlc of this system is the Ke
The microfilm and microeards
lieved Pass. This happens when
our player's partner has seemingly
fallen in love with his hand bid
all the way to the five level while
EXCLUSIVE
nur hnv snt in tnrmnntnH cilnnno
Finally the opponent on the right
RETURN
ovcrcalls his partner's bid. Now
SHOWING
:v
comes the Relieved Pass. Our boy,
OF THE
gripped with a frenzied fear that
SEARING
his partner will bid again utters
SOUTHERN
a long, low sign and murmurs
DRAMA
"Whew, I pass!" To'even the most
THAT
unperceptive partner, this indiBOLTED
cates (1) "Have you lost your mind
BRANDO
or did you have one to begin with?"
O.)

t i:

(iarrvl Sipplc

number cf Minlmts' Party votes
cast.
The poll- Mill open at. 0 a. m.
nnd will dose at 4 p. m. Counting,
of the votes will begin after the
election in Room 8 of the SUB
nnd results will be posted in the
hall of the building hourly.
A ballot of the voter's choice will
be given to him upon presentation
of his It) card at the polling place.
The voter may vote in the primary
of only one party.
Today's primary is the first such
primary ever held at

is now UK.
Louisville Courier-Journprocess of being completed.
in the
Besides microfilm, the Center
has files of microeards. These eon-tai- n
reading
English literary periodicals of can be scanned on
chines which are provided
eighteenth

returned but is forced to play a
high card, a different method is
employed. lie quickly slides his
card tinder the others keeping it
from bcir.f? seen, scoops - up- the
trick, turns it face down and as- sumcs an expression of absolute
disgust. If questioned about what
card he played, lie invariably
doesn't remember. This tells his
partner plainly "What in Heaven's
name are you trying to do to us?
Keep it up and we will be utterly
ruined."
Gorcn is not nearly this com- -

down as ,f to say "Keep up the
good work, partner."

GIRL MAD!

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STARRING

UIlMrAIOOL uuoo
JOHN IRELAND

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KIM SMIIH

COREY

AUEN BARBARA IAN5

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NOW
NEW STARS AND

NEW

KIM HUNTER

4

J color

by

KARL MALDEN

2nd Feature:
"FLAMING FRONTIER"
In Cinemascope

LOVES

JERRY WALDS

iniouEirjDivAnA

m-w- m

7

tt--

oe Luxe
t

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brando
screenplay by TENNESSEE WILLIAMS

SCOOP!

Cope Canavero
in colo"Rocket Roar"

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ROTC Classes Easy? Not So,
Says Kernel's Ace Reporter
)( KLNSPIIX

Hy ACNE

KOTC classes, regarded by many
r.v "crip" courses, are, in actu.ility,
as tough as any course on campus.

Long

rthe

-

f

under

wrong

im-

-

the
have been
many
of
butt
;'jokj.'s. The time

Ml.

lias come, I
think, to correct
some
oi inese
impres sions. I
.'.hall attempt to
a
beyond
j Drove
doubt

i reasonable

the public
Good Ol Acne that

is

misinformed.
I
my argument.
To illustrate
of
a" few examples
hove secured
tac truly intricate problems that
rppcai cn ROTC tests. Here are
10 of the m:
(It Which of the following are
ROTC cadets required to
.sa-kr-

e?

U. S. Army officers.

a

Uniformed police dogs.
troops.
c. Uganda
an officer
While drilling
w; Iks up to you and asks you
yc ur name. You should :
a. State your name and ua:ik
in a correct military manner.
I. Tell him to mind his own

name. You should say:
a. "Here, sir."
b. "Goxpsuxtl."
may intorm
c. Nothing, he
you you've been drafted.
(5) In the
KOIC every cadet
to give a five min, volunteers
ute talk in class. In the KOTC
"volunteer" means:
a. Willful, personal choice.
b. You will be drummed out
of the corps if you don't.
captain drags you.
e. Tie
screaming and clawinj, from
under you desk.
(G Cadets often receive demerits.
Demerits are a sign that a cadet has been:
a. A bad. bad boy.
b. Selected for the honor of
extra drill at seven in the
mornings.
bravery, above
c. Cited for
and beyond the call of duty.
(7) Drilling asain already. At the
Ranks,
command. "Open
March" you ?hou!d:
a. Take three .steps forward
sharply execute a dress rir,ht

2

business,
Tell him where to go.

Find out if the trip is
necessary.
c. Punt.
should be
The KOTC cap
correct military
worn in a
manner. If a cadet violates,
this, he receives:
a. Two demerits.
b. A hero bailee.
c. The 'Congressional Medal
b.

(8)

New
.sfroiaHf line

of Honor.
Yoo boo, drilling aeain.

The
"Hicht Face" is
jii en. I Ins means that :
a. '"Fool's names
and fool's
f.ues are often seen in public
places." And ours. the major is declaring, is the one
this adae refers to.

COATS
'

turn

b. Obviously, you should

your face to the richt.
They are yiwni; ou a spelling test. You should take out
pencil and paper and write
"Face" in the correct military manner.
10
Head of the UK ROTC Department is:

4

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You look your best
in a tweed top coat

a. Col. GiuLbh.
b. Is'ikita Kruschev.
e. Wyatt F.arp.
So, as you ran easily set, some
of the stories
ciriulatuis about
KOTC Department .are eontiletely
without basis. 1 hry are not a
ridiculously easy as some people
would lik to think.

.

'

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V

appearance.

1

Takes Third I'laee

lcal-l- y

from Groves Cox.
They have a way of
doubling your satisfaction of fit ond

'

UK Debate Team

dress.

er

it,s-

command

.

b.

pea-shoot-

9

v.. i.

y.!mm!.h.

.

UK debater,
Tex Fitzgerald.
placed second in individual speaking in a debate tournament held
at the Uimorsity of South Carolina

Friday and Saturday.
The UK debate team was third
in the varsity division of the Carolina Fori .'s :cs.

IS8

c.
3

again, the command
Right Dress" is given.
This indicates that:
a. You should align yourself
with the man on your right,
t. The major is infuriated at
your inability to wear your
uniform in a correct military
Trill

manner.'

The drill instructor is calling your " attention to the
broad strolling
past on the right.
You are m class. The roll is
being
called. You hear your
c.

ood-looki-

4

ng

English: MAN WHO SQUANDERS
HIS LUCKIES
Thinkllsh translation: When this gent
gives someone the shirt off his back, he
throws in free laundry service. In passing around the cigarettes, he knows no
peer it's "Want a Lucky, pal? Keep
the carton!" The man's really a walking
testimonial to the honest taste of fine
tobacco (he buys 247 packs of Luckies
away
a day). Thing is, he gives
which makes him a bit of a tastrcl!

WIDE

VISION
SCREEN

frtm

CtntinvMt

WED.

2 PM

NOV.

THURS.

9-2-

0

"GERVAISE" - (French)
M. Schcll - Francoise Pcrior
ALSO

"RCBERY UNDER ARMS"
(Color)
Pcrer Finch - Ronald

English

Lewis

2-1(-

Cartoon

tmmA

English: DOASTFUL URCHIN

SOPORIFIC

SPEECHMAK1NG

Thinkllih: BOriATORY
ARTHUR

PHINCL.

MtMriili

5TAIL

U

Enalish:. RUflBFR HOT

HOUSE P.- -

EngI,h;

.

nnn

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Heaters
Electric
open 6 p. m. price 65c
5 ACADEMY AVARDS
'in-ca-

Tennessee Williams
penned it!
Elia Kazan
produced it!
Marlon Brando -

11

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2nd feature
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5

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"THE NAKED AND THE

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* The Kentucky Kernel

Death Of A Tradition

University of Kentucky

clf

the Tot Office at LfiinBton, Krntuky
Murch 3, 1879.
urcond
irmttrf nnArr W Act
Published (our timrg a wrek during the regular hool year rxcrpt holidays and exam.

Entered

SIX DOLLARS A SCHOOL YEAR

Jim Hampton,

Editor-in-Chi-

ef

Larry Van II006E, Chief Sports Editut
Society Editor
Ann Roberts,
Ashlet, Business Manager
Norman McMullin, Advertising Manager
John Mitchell, Staff Thotographer
r
Marilyn Lyvcw and Judy Fennebaker, Proofreaders

Andt Eitebson, Chief Netcs Editor

Ferft

WEDNESDAY'S

NEWS STAFF

Joanie Weissingeh, Editor
Larry Van IIoose, Sports Editor
James Nolan, Associate Editor

In Today's Primaries

e

The Choice Is Yours
Today's Student Congress primary
marks the lirst time in UK history
that both political parties have nominated their candidates by popular
vote.

Although many students may not

lealie

mary is without its disadvantages, but
we feel that the merit of giving the
students a choice in icgard to nominees as well as SC rcpiescntativcs is
the single feature which cannot be
o ei looked.
Last spring the Students' Party held
a primary which drew only 800 to the
polls. Today should be a different
story since Jjolh parties arc following

this, it is nevertheless important. In the past UK political parties
have always nominated candidates in
a caucus meeting, a meeting which
until now could always be called a the primary procedure.
traditional "smoke filled room" type
One factor that aiways causes
of procedure.
of politics great concern is the
We feel the use of the priniaryis' lack of participation of the electorate
another step forward in promoting in primaries. Last spring's primary
student interest in all phases of poli- with only 800 voting is a small pertical action, but it isup to the stucentage compared to the 2,100 who
dents themselvesto take advantage voted in the SC election in May.
of this new privelege which is now
Obviously the vote today will not
theirs.
be as high as the SC elections
in
Wedo not contend that the nri- - December, but certainly more than
10 per cent of the student body should
take part in the party nominations.
KERNELS
We as college students should cerThere was a young lady named tainly be more interested in nominations than we have been in the past,
Bright,
Whose speed was far faster than especially since a great majority of
UK students are eligible to vote in
light;
state and national elections under
She set out one day
Kentucky law.
In a relative way,
We urge as many students as posAnd returned home the previous
sible to vote today. A heavy vote can
night. A. 11. R. Buller.
stu-'tlen-

An expert is one who knows more
and more about less and less.
Nicholas Murray Butler.
0

The best liar is he who makes the
smallest amount of lying go the
longest way. Samuel Butler.

a

ts

crack-down-

WASHINGTON (AP)-T- he
government has disclosed new Herniation estimates for all the states and reported the
West is growing about twice as fast as
the nation as a whole.
Census Bureau estimated the
The
Wests joj)uIation on July was zd,
uj) about 30 per cent from 19 and
million counted in the April

one-hal-

373,-00- 0

f

1950 census.

'The average rate of population

grow-

th for the entire nation during the eight
years was 15 per cent. The North Central states had a growth rate equal to the
national average ami the South's population increased almost as nnuh 11 per
cent. The Noitheastern states lagged well
behind the average with a 9 per cent
giovrth rate.
As of July 1, the estimated population
ol the I'nited States was
ol
which 171.133.(100 wcie civilians. The
estimated opuI.ition
including ser icemen stationed overseas was 17 1,0 1,000.
Six ol the nation's 10 fastest growing
Mates, percentage wise.' are in the West,
'flute ate in (lie South and oik is in
the North Ctnlial legion.
in-l
The 10 stalls and pen eul.iges
tease aie: Nevada, 07 per tent; l lon'da,
dO; Aiiona. 5L'; lklware, 13; Caliloi ni.i,
17.V-'iO,0-

-

?

But the Tennessee game cannot be
thought of as just another football
game it is THE game. A victory over
Tennessee and the return of the keg
can justify a losing season. A loss casts
a pall on a winning year.
Last year, the Wildcats, students
and fans went into the game dis

long-standin-

g

The Readers' Form
chestra by (some members) deserting
after the season was well under way,
I hope to continue with the orchestra
and the remaining four scheduled

A Musical Note
To The Editor:
In reference to the front page story
in the Nov. 11 Kernel (headlined)
"Two UK Instructors Dismissed By
Kahlson," I would appreciate it very
much if you kindly would make a
correction.
Out of the 10 former members of
the Lexington Symphony Orchestra
who, as a
committee,
.went to see Mr. Lehman, the president of the symphony society, and
tried to get me removed as musical
director of the orchestra, Mr. Jerry
Ball was not one in full accord with
the others he intended to "quit anyway because of poor musicianship"
(meant on my part, of course). But
"MrrBall's name wasnot" iric IucTed Iff
the list to be dismissed from the
orchestra by me. Mr. Ball is a fine
gentleman
a a very line artist
and horn player.
Despite (a) concerted attempt to
have me fired and to cripple the or

prove the point that students are not
indifferent to their surroundings and
especially their student government.
Party nominations are now in the
open at UK. Let's keep them that
way by casting our vote. Pick your
party and your candidates and make
your voice known.

concerts.

For further facts, please contact
Mrs. F. A. Pattie, personnel manager;
Miss Mary-JLeeds, conceit master,
or Mr. Lehman, president of the
o

society.

Erik Kahlson
Musical Director
Lexington Symphony Orchestra

sell-appoint-

So Grows The Nation

1

couraged after a prac tie ulat ly poor
year. They came out alter the upset
as cocky and proud as il the team had
won every game of the season.
The question of dismissing classes
is not so much at stake as is the point
ol whether keeping the traditions and
color of the Tennessee game arc
worth keeping. Traditions tend to
build loyalty and cieate a bond between a university and its student
body. Without them, a university,
even with the highest academic standards, becomes a "diploma mill."
The national dissatisfaction with
American education Is justified and
even long past due. Higher standards
at UK and elsewhere aie necessary
lor national sectuity. However, to
by making
remedy the situation
schools and univetsities cold, antiseptic things by abolishing all traditions
and activities- which are not "educational," is foolish.
Faculty refusal of a holiday following a victory over Tennessee would
only serve to undermine the traditions surrounding the game. Universities are made gieat by the loyalty fostered by tradition as well as by high
academic standards.. The loss of one
day's class time is not, we believe, too
high a price for students or faculty to
pay for keeping a
tradition viable.
We urge the faculty to consider
these facts at their meeting today, and,
if they feel the tradition is more im-- .
.
.i
t
I
poriaiu man one ciay s nnsseui classes,
to allow a holiday next Wednesday if
we beat Tennessee.

Unless affirmative action is taken
by the .faculty this afternoon, the very
young but relatively well established
tradition ol a holiday alter a victory
over Tennessee will die. President
Dickey has said that as matters now
stand, classes will not be dismissed
either Monday or .Wednesday if we
win the game. The faculty will have
to decide whether dismissing classes
is more important than losing a little
more tradition.
tradiUK has too few campus-widtions as it is even with the Patterson statue legend. The color of the
Tennessee game, with its traveling
keg, intense excitement and the recently added holiday, is something
which needs," we sincerely believe, to
be preserved.
The administration, however, feels
just its strongly that to dismiss classes
in the face of the national hoop-lover educational standards just because of a football victory would
bring more censure of UK's supposedly low academic level. Raising the
iccpiired overall standing to a U.O was
a step forward. Would nurturing the
tradition ol taking a day off after
beating another team in football cancel the good effects of this year's

Seven states have boosted their population by more' than one million since
1950.
They are California,
Florida.
Texas, Michigan, New York, Ohio and
Illinois.
The 1 1 states listed in the swift ly
growing Western region are Montana,
Idaho, Wyoming, Colorado, New Mexico,
Arizona,
Utah, Nevada,
Washington,
Oregon and California.
All the estimates are preliminary and
will be revised next year on the basis
of school enrollment and other data.

KERNELS

A wise woman nev