xt7pvm42sf8v https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7pvm42sf8v/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19541203  newspapers sn89058402 English  Copyright is retained by the publisher. http://www.kykernel.com The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, December  3, 1954 text The Kentucky Kernel, December  3, 1954 1954 2013 true xt7pvm42sf8v section xt7pvm42sf8v Fall Completion Date Set For Girls ' Dorms
Tin nfw v.oinen residence hull, made possible throuh a
coctiilMition tn tl- - University from tin Keencl.ind
Foundation, is expected to Ik ready for occupancy next fall.
iSesKlent Hall
5, as it is storage spare for clothes, and
referred to b those connected washing and Irontnff facilities have
plagued many residents of the
with its eonstr.ction, is to !e a wtimfn'j halls. Those living In the
$2(X).()IH)

four-story--

struc-

ture and no v. is under construction in rear of" Patterson
Hall. It will house

residents.

alxut 320

,

new hall, once It open, will find
these old chores a pleasure. In the
basement, there will be eight unit
of the automatic washer-drycombinations, plus a huge drying
room. The entire washing and drying process will cost only a few
cent
trnninir furilt.
ties will also be available.
storage problem has
The trunk
also been answered, t hief Engineer Klgan B. I arris reported that
a large "trunk room" will be
the g round floor, with an
entrance only a few steps from the
freight elevator. Incidentally, a
passenger elevator will be available
in the building similar to the one
now In Jewell Hall.
The communication system
new hall will have a "personalized" touch. Tentative plans
are that Incoming phone calls-wil- l
be handled In an improved manner. When a cull Is taken at the
main desk In the lounge, the operator ran call directly to the girl's
room, by means of an inter-co"qyannunckator" system, which has
a speaker in each room. The girl
the.i receives the call at the phone
located on each floor
There Will be one phone on each
floor for Incoming calls, and sever

Coin-onernt-

lopping me n,t or convenience
for the fn-e- d
mill be the fully
equipped kitchenettes, one on each
floor, complete tilth Move, refrigerator and cabinets. After the curfew hours, when the girls are
lo the hall, they may then
appease their appetites by preparing snacks in the modern kitch-

enettes.
A grill
j,; 0 be on the main
floor, adlpcfnt to a large lounge
which will be in operation during
the day for .he residents and
guests. Another nall grill will also
be opened on 'he basement floor.
This one will be basically fur
breakfast.
Dean tf W'jmen Sarah B.
Holmes said two alternatives would
bo ottered lor ne residents as far
as the m.vn r..v."ti. are concerned.
They wonkl be allowed to eat in
the present r:eterla located in
Patterson Hall or meal -t-ickets
would be sold to allow the Kills
to eat in the ? ;'!ent Union
One of iese two will ulti,
mately be
depending upon
which shows the most promise of
success after a trial run.
In the prtst. the problem of
Caf-teri-

rhn-i-.i-

a.

n-the

?

1

Jyt

w

...,..

r

cm
r

t

1

11

!

i

1

"eT

it

I f4

' s,
I Nf

,
;

uf
t

j

Home Was Meter Like Thin
This is how the new residence hall for girls will look
next falL The tl.ZSO.000 building is being financed
through a S7WMHM gift from the Keeneland Foundation, a I7T2.000 loan from the federal government.

and the remainder from accumulated earnings ha
the I K plant fund. The
structure will
house mure than .100 women students.
four-stor-

y

.

m

HOE IRWIE IL

eral others will be distributed
throughout the building for outgoing calls.
A buzzer, system Is also planned
to call a resident to the main
(Continued on Page 31

'

Vol. XLVI

I'niversity of Kentucky. I.exinuton. Ky.. Friday. Dec.

.1.

No. 10

l!15l

UK Student Parkin g.May End
Vie ivs A re

Varied
On Saturday Rule
( onllictiiw iiiteiiVretations of the
Saturday class
ruling banned touetlier tin's week, leaving more confusion than

ilaritv.

UK"h Collier

New Garage
May Solve
UK Problem

Nan"l

SEC Coach Of Year
Coach Bianton Collier, riding
high on the rrest of a successful
e
football season, has been
as the SEC "COACH OF THE
YEAR".
And there Is talk that his
present three-yea- r
contract will
soon be extended.
Meanwhile, the sports spot-- ,
light swings to the opening of
the 'basketball season tomorrow
night when Adolph Kupp's ragrrs
meet LSI .
Details may be found in the
sports section.
riU-n-

'l'roKisals under

Monday nitht. Dean M. M. of their courses on Tuesday.
White of the Cnllege of Arts and Thursday and Saturday.
Sciences said the 40 per cent rule
In the same boat with the
tit Saturday clashes had been in
and the Kernel, the
s long as I've been Student Oovernment
effect for
Association
dean"
construed the : tep as a move toy
explained that, instead of ward a
He
class schedule tor
m:ikmg a nrw ruling, he strengtli-ene- d the University.
Meeting informally Monday
the nM one. In the past, "he
said, approximately 40 per cent of night before Dean White's iiitur.
Arts and Sciences courses have pietation was uiveu 14 SO A membeen onerrrf o:i Tuesday, Thurs- bers readied themselves for battle
day and Saturday.
With what was believed to be a
IX'.xn White said the bolstering change in the present systeiu.
step which will probably nfiect
An SGA committee report from
colleges was t:iken to lighten UK Vice President Leo M. Chamh
the class load some students have berlain confirmed misunderstand-ini- ;
to carry on Monday, Wednesday
ot the ruling.
and Friday. He also, said that,
The report, based on a Nov. 24
lew students would interview with Dr. Chamberlain,
be utiected.
indicated that the Administration
Tlie move, announced
or part of it also believed Satearlier
By IU TTV JO MARTIN
fius month, does not make Satur- urday classes were beinu made
day claws compulsory.
Dean compulsory lor reason other than
"I l.muiiiU ot the (Ireens." an
White said, but means that each that vuven by Ileun White.
department will oiler 40 per cent
'Continued on Hate Ji
.iiiiiii.il itiiinonv at l'k'. will ( J. Ill I'eerre, let P iX itan
lie hi Kl at 5 p.m. Wednesday era tenor, will appear at S
in the Creat Hall of the Slndeut p.m.
Mond.iv in Memorial
'
I
A
( Coliseum as part oL the ( eiitr.il
I'nio'i.
"BrttU'ing Home Christmas" has keiituikv. C i in ti it ('(illicit
been chosen for the theme of this and l.eitiue Scries. Students
years pronram, sjxwsored by the
Young Men's and Young Women
are admitted on II) eaids.
Christian Associations and the
Born in New York. Peerce is now
Student Union Board, winch
opens the Christmas sea- in his fourteenth season with the
Metropolitan. His performances on
son on campus
radio, television, in the movies, and
1 his year's program has been
changed somewhat from that of on HCA Victor records have made
previous, jcats and is lo iiulutl his voice well .known throughout
.
world.
.
a dramatixation of the Hanging of the
He Is one of America s busiest
the Oreena in the traditional manconcert tenors, besides concert
ner.
Jim Baker. YMCA president, will bookings there are the aniiiiully
and Sail
be narrator for the program, and scheduled Metropolitan
Margaret Holylield, Student Union Francisco 0)era aileaiances
As a radio performer.
will serve as
Board president,
I'eene
sang for two years on "Oieut Mohostess ol the ( treat Hall
Members of the YWCA and ments in Mu'ic" and has appealed
'YMCA cabinets and the Student on the fold. General Mutuii.
Union Board will perforin the Lucky Strike and Firestone iiiumc
show s.
actual "Hanging of the Greens."
.s
,
JUimm- - m
'
Norma IWine. YWCA president, ' In 144. I'eerre became the fir.t
will give the oeuing and closinc singer In the
history of
prayers and read the traditiutial, 4he New York College of Music la
Con (it u
I
Christmas Story from St Luke.
be accorded the honorary DocThe I niversily Student Kiting torate of Music Degree. Among
Brnie Shively, I K athletic director, presents Nril l.owrv the
Mil AS award for the outstanding senior football player of 1HS4.
Quartet, composed of Kuth Trim- 'those ho h
been so bunorrd
ble, lioris Z.ahilka, Konnir I it krns.
Coach Collur looks on. The award, given Ukt Monday night at the
Banquet, is basi-on scholarship, leadership, and
ami Barbara Haves, will play a are I rill Kreisler and Jaw ha
Aluinri
(Continued on Page 3i
HrileU.
service. iSee story on page IS. I
six-da-

Date Set
For Xmas Jaii Peerce
Program Will Appear

11

Here Monday

li

-

'i

v

-

--

gr

lotions, Seil

.11'

consider--

'

tion li' I'niversity .oflieials to
ease I ks knotty parking anil
traffic prolilenis iniliide thesu
drastie measures:

(I) F.liminatinn. of all student
parking on the campus.
i?l rrohibiting sophomores, aa
well as freshmen, from bringing
"
cars to school.
i.'I
Construction of a ssodera
parking garage, p4sililv on the.
intra-murslhlrtn field or on
the
vacated site of the
Scot I Street Barracks.
No delinite decision has- - been
reai hi d on any of the proposed
measures. A committee appointed
bv President H. L. Donovan Hits
seine ter its studying the parkin
MMn-to-b-

'

e

situation

This group, headed by

Met) Leslie I.. Martin,

is

Ian

of

Mineying

the present parking facilities witlt
eve toward recommending ail
unproved parking and tratlic con-trot on campus
Parking has long been a difficult
problem to .sol.e The
)rcsent
system of permit parking sets up
- qunhf
. ruu iiki wh
lor eertmn
led
,
students.
But the new proposal would
all campus parking to staff
and faculty members and possibly handicapped students.
In an effort r find a suitable
adjacent parking area. University
oflieials aie studying the feasibility ol constructing a large,
parking (i.irage.
The Intramural field, as a prospective site, would offer added
means of revenue, throughout I lie
tear, the garage could be used for
parking during athletic contests at
Moll field and the (ollsrura.
The big question murk lacing
adiiillilsti atlon oflieials Is whether
students would Mipjort such a
costly piukmg project. Some esti- males lij.ice the expec led rental
fee for students parking in the
karate nt 10 cents a day.
Tlie i urrent headache of tninij
to issue parking peinnls lo Just
a handful of Muneuts is evident
in this semester s situalioii.
Permits have been Issued to IRS
cars,
going lo staff and faculty
members, and 20U lo students.
I here are only Hi parking
place
un the rainpus.
)'

j

.

or

i5

J

* TIIK KKNTITKY KKKNF.I.. Friday, Her.

2

.1 1931

DINE AND DANCE AT THE

(luignolGroiip
Will Present
'Uncle Vanya'
(imHiiol
)tay of

GREEN DOME
EVTRY I

Ix- -

CIm

through Saturday, I.Vc.
in tin- (impio! Thrator. Curtain time is 8:10 p in. with a
11 at
iiatiiM-Saturday,

!.

2. 10 p.m.

9

x

SWEATERS

35

Kentucky
DRY CLEANERS

1

.

Every man should have

-

pendent, is the party's
and l.iz Bell. Kappa Kappa

f
i

secretary-t-

reasurer.

United Students delegates voted
unanimously to accept Scott Street
Barracks as a permanent organizational member of the party. A
Scot t Street delegate, to be elected
by the men's residence unit, will

represent the organization at
ture USP meetings.

fuv.

Ten positions in six colleges are
oen in the election. Party meetings have been scheduled by the
USP lor every Monday at 4 p.m.
In the Student Union Building

Y"

i

500

(.Vouim Will Co

button down shirt
with box pleat in back. Colors 5.50.
White

(Jirislmas (luroliug
The YWCA and YMCA groups
will go Christmas caroling at Kentucky Villuge and Julius Marks
Santaroium Tuesday night.
After caroling they will wrap
priwentH for the Christmas party
given annually for children at
Lincoln School.

The annual

YWCA-YMC-

be

HOSE

1.50 up
New Fall and Winter hose,
latest patterns colors in cotton and wool.

''"

t

4

i

A

Clirtstmas worship program will
held Dec.

ARGYLE

BUTTON DOWN COLLAR

j

Jm

4

-

14

The

AXIE WELLS
Shop
Dressmaking
Alterations
TaiUrad Cpats and Suits
Burtons and cits
203

I.

MAIN

TATTERSALL VESTS

ALL SILK REPP TIES

- 2.50
New stripes, colors to

PH0NI

V

10 00 and 15 00
com-plime-

rt

the charcoal, grey
and brown suits.

TOPCOATS

921 South Lime
Euclid at Woodland
6th and Lime
157 South Lime

Dial

hour free parking for

.street in new parking center lot

with beautiful color tones.
It's comfortable and casual .
at least one tweed sports coat for his
wardrobe perfect for travel, business, casual wear.
.

SUITS

Plain DRESSES

all Meyers' customers across

$45

meetings.
Officers for the year were elect- eri. the party platform was formu- laied. and a slate of candidates
was chosen at the special sessions.
Matthew H. Franck. indeiiend- ent, was named the new president
of USP. Don Whitehou.se, inde-

35c

PLAIN

CASH AND CARRY

Imported Tweed Sports Coat

Plans for the forthcoming Student Government Association elections on Wednesday. Dec. 15. were
this week by the United
Students Party In a series of called

y

Ladies

SKIRTS

USP Discusses

.

l

Man's and

Plain

LAUNDRY

lbs.

One-Da-

PANTS

54

wfcx

Cir..

CLEANED AND PRESSED

,"

SELF SERVICE

OtmiVin.

For

I

CALL THE KENTUCKY DRY CLEANERS
$"
Cer,
Service Upa Beauest

Special

..,

.

SGA Elections

raaarati4W a
Dmh,
2JI r

2

NEW
MANAGEMENT

Lexington

boots.
Maybe Santa Claim will bring her
pair of
Ivan Volnllsky. (t'nrle Vanval,
hrr snn. Wallace Neal Brigo;
Balmorhea State Park, southThe Oeorge West, Texas,
Mikhail
stro, rountry dortor, house lawn holds a mounted court- n west, of Balmorhea, Texas, has the
Long-hor'(iene Afkle; Ilya Trleirln.
largest wnlled swimming
is the last
in
an Impaverlshed landowner. Longhorna glass case. It great West world'sfed bv natural springs at the
pool
steer of the
riue of 2fi.O00.OO0 gallons per day.
nuroe, Barbara Gamhill; and a herd
laborer, Fred Sllter.
The play will be arena staned
"with only Vine setting. It Is believed that this Is one of the few
times that any of Chekhov's plays
liave been presented tn this mariStudents! Da your laundry en Thursday or Friday and boat tha ruhf
ner.
Chevy-Chas- e
Shopping Center
Ashland
"Unrle Vanya" which Is also
railed "scene from Country Life."
UP TO
SOAP FREE
Is the story of a family living In
Damp Dried
Washed, Triple-tintewtithern Russia around 1890. The
family is having a difficult time
trying to maintain Its estate when
Thursday I to
to 9
Monday 1 to 5
the paofesHor and his wife came
Friday
to 5
Tuesday S to
ta 9
there to live.
Saturday I to 5
Wednesday- -ta 1 2 noon
The play is a. portrait of characters who are oppressed by the difDIAL
877 E. HIGH ST.
ficult times they are having and of
their unsuccessful attempts to
overcome them.
Mr. Hrigics, wha ta playing the
same role in ahk h he starred last
year at Vale Drama School, ht the
lirectar. Mra. Loto Roblnwn h) the
director,
with Ernest
Rhodes the technical director.
Fred Sliter and Ben Ardery arc
the assistants to the director
The patron tickets, which are
five tickets for $5. will no longer
be sold after the final performance. Dec. 11. Student ticket will
go on sale for $.70 today In the
Guipnol box office or may be
by calling ex. 2396.
(Waf-flcai-

W"""

For The Finest Cleaning In

The cut Includrx: Alexander
fwrebrykov, a mired professor,
J owpri Mathews; Helen Andrelev-T- t.
his wire, Illa Rherman: Marin
Vaxsillevna VonlUknya. mother of
Berebrykov'a Brut wife. Terry Tur-

ner:

and ffataeaity
partial
ir
spacieltyl

v

-

r

NIGHTS

Forrest Dean

Tuesday

l

AND 5UWAY

And The "Kentucky Colonels"

TIm'uNt'.s
srcoml
"1'ik.Ii1 Van-.,- "

prrt'iit--

IDA Y, SATURDAY

Dance to the "Cool" Music of

thr wason,

will

-

Combination checks of
low, grey, blue.

yel-

* tup

Girl's Dorms Saturday
(CsakUsHsed

frm fsre

V.

r
floor to receive a
accommodation that the new resident will be "blessed'" mith will
be the hair dryer, beauty shop
style, yhlch will be located In a
separate room and whlrh will be
available for "home permanent,"
.tiny In and day out.
The nwu of the hall will
two ftrhi each.
each amir of imdm, one
bathroom will be located far an
by the favr girl. Even balh tub
are planned, complete with a
shower, for the
--

JlrL- -

.

The furniture for the rooms hai
rot yet been selected, but probably It will be of modern design.
Ftudy area will be provided for
each win. The hall will be divided Into three wing on each
floor; an east, west and central
wing. For those room-matwho
wish to study when the other
wants to sleep, study halls will be
available.
The advanced modern designers
flf the new structure didn't fail to
take Into account the eternal problem of girls and their dates with
no place to ro. A ba.sement recreation room will be open for the.se
couples. Ping-poncard Karnes,
etc.. will be placed here along with
magazines, radio, and television.
"
The entire hall will be under the
direction of a supervisor, who will
live in a suite Just off the main
lounge. Each floor will have Its
own floor supervisor, probably a
g,

graduate student.
"When this project

Is complet-

ed. It will be something that all
Kentucky, as well as the Keene-lan- d
Foundation, may be proud
of." Dean Holmes said.

A

UK Cinema Open's

Class Rule

visitor.-Anothe-

Continued fram face 1)
Dr. Chamberlain, the committee
y
reported, reasoned that
classes were being enforced to eive
proper education. The
student
Vice President also wa quoted by
the committee a saying that Dean
of Women Barah B. Holmes was
worried about lotting control over
the women when they travel weekendsespecially if they don't get.
home quickly.
Other reasons given recently bv
Dean of Men Leslie L. Martin and
by several Faculty members were
that the University wanu to utilize
classroom space fully by adding a
sixth day and that school spirit
can be improved by keeping more
students on campus.
With these reasons in mind, the
14 assembly member made three
suggestions to hand to next Monday night's SOA meeting.
First. It wa decided to make it
known that the ntudents don't object to Saturday classes ftsK .such,
but prefer to see the present system retained.
Second, the 14 members SUg- KeMea collecting student opinion
by passing petitions before this se
mester ends. The last sten sug
gested was to make an effort to
have Faculty members express
their viewuoints.
uurlng the session, it was point-- !
ed out that the present system was
adequate for handling the Hood of
veterans who entered UK after
World War Two. The group also
expressed doubt that school spirit
could be boosted by enforcing Sat- urday class attendance.

rniurslay
With The Great Pasture'

.1.

1

(;r"--

3

9i

1

"

iConlinaed from face I)
prrludr and paMlode f hrMma

music.
Thomas
"flood Christian Men Rejoice.'"
Howerton.
"Lulay. My Liking." and
The
Raymond Wilkie. Holly
and the Ivy" ill be sung
townspeople
by the University Women s ;li-clurics: "The Devil
V ,,lm
and Daniel weoster. 'Mr, Deeds Hub. under the direction of James
Music Depart-me(tnfH To Town." "Don Quixote," King, University
staff
filer
'Tlie Oreen Pa si in es- all Amer- Club wtll be member. The Buraccompanied by
ican movies; -- BI(kxI of a Poet
i a Jones.
ba
French
"II Trovatore"
Italian:
The audience
Bring
Siidko." "Orand IllUMon" Rus- Christmas" to willrumpus Homo
the
with a
sian: "Troika"
Austrian; and carol-sinunder the direction of
"Ma lor Barbara'
l)rttih.
Mrs. Ruby Hart, director of the Miss Jean Marie MrCoiihrll of the
Audio Visual Aids Bureau, reports College of Extension and Adult
dual arc projectors and Fducation.
t tnat
w"
serein will be used for
The Student In ion will he
d
lh Khoaing.
by a 2a.fol I hrlilma Insr
-"'
furnished by the Student t'ainn
A s,rin8 1,1 Mrl'"- Tturn
ordinary glass, when dipped Into Hoard.
The YWTA beKan
it. to a clear and ptrilUIM'tlt HUl- cr.
"f the Oreens'- about 20 years nc.

By BOB IIOWIRTOV
music; J T.
Campus Cinema will oivn '""try. Robert
dent; and Dr.
I
,

six-da-

its

season

with

he

Creen Pasture."' This film t ill
le shown m Jaylor l.ilin.itiin
auditorium on Thursday, Dec.

nt

-

9. at S p.m. Season tickets will
Ik' $2.00 and individual tukcN
"i

:

cents.

--

g

The Campus Cinema Is a uro- gram of 10 showings to a maximum
limit of 450 people in Taylor Edu- cation auditorium. Films to be
shown are those otherwi.se una vail- able to lical theaters. Cinema is
?oK!SHr,h, nh;Pr,?,flt PrJ.1Ct

'

.

deco-rate-

j

-

wiS VtL

First of the series, The Oreen
Pastures." Is a standard great stage
play with an
cast and
starring Rex Ingram. The 100- minute movie features Negro .spirituals and belirfs.
Ticket will be available tomor
row at the Audio Visual Aids
M.I..J.,. Hall In iUm Win.
dent Inton Building, and from
each member af the sponsoring
committee.
A cross section of student and
faculty representmg
various de- -

-

uacsmn
Boreft
."

--

Lf.ll

L1I1CI

Ut

(111

I

HIIIIHJ.Y

MS

I

n

rif I

Boy With Chirk," etc.,

OPEKATOU
0n every American campus there are four standard futuus:

'

group This "sponsoring
o.
ivy; No. J a statue of the founder; So. 3 l'lulip Morris
committee consists of: Dr. and
Mrs. Ernest Myers, psychology; Cigarettes; No. 4 The Operator.
T,,-Paul Stacy, Knglish; Dr. W. nil
' lvy ' ,0 provenl strangers from mistaking the colletre for
Snedegar, physics; Miss NormaX warehouse. The statue of the founder provide sliade for inajvinir
Vn tlie weather is tine. The l'lulip .Mom Cigarette are an aid
Cass, library; Dr. Card, agricul-- I
ture; Dr. Paul Obeist. law; Leonard
evicentratiiiii when you are studious, an aid to sociability when
and a source of smoke rings to impiess new girls
'ou
Press, radio arts; Marvin Rabin.
. . . And Tlie Operator is the man you can't do without.
Well do 1 ivnicmlicr The Operator on my campus. He was a young;
man with a ready smile, a quick mind, fifteen complete changes of
wardroltc, a six iH'iu apartment, a red convertible, and assorted
Stocks, bonds, seeuritX's, and socntiif mortgages.
The Operator's oiiuinvwere a smin-- of lively speculation. Some
said he Was left over IrnniXJic old t apeme gai.g. Sonic said lie wa
Judge Critter. Some mid lie sprang fr'.m the brow of Zeis.
,,
I.,
II
llll
t
But, in fact, he was just an oislinary vtudi nt to hcc.ni with. In
hisirst year lie studied hard, took cjimus lecture notes, got good
...
:
i grades, and made u big reputation usNl friend in ticcH. Ilc'd lend
you money; he'd let you copy his lecture" notes; he'd write tlicnw
for you; he'd sit up ull night to help you cr.tji for an exam. All of
this was done with infinite good nature on his pilv ami no ohligal ion
on your . . . The first yeaC, that is.
v
In the second year The Operator started to operutev lle'tl still let
you copy his lecture note
but it cost you a quarter, fiitt'ng up to
help you cram cost ou veiita an hour till midnight, 75 cents'
hour
afterwards. Hi price for writing theme were based on a slaling
scale a dollar for a '('", two for a
three for an "A". A
cost you nothing, and if you flunked, you got a dollar credit on trids
I
next, theme he wrote for you. .
Hi service expanded steadily. He added a line of crib for
examinations. He hooked bets on football game. He did a bit of
-bootlegging. He ran a date bureau. He rented cars, tuxedos,
boutoniiicres.
,
;-.'Ihit all of these were really sideline. His main line wa lending;
money. At any hour of the day or night, for any amount from a dollar
to a hundred, The Operator wa always ready with a sympathetic
ear and cash on the barrelhead. And he rarely charged inure than
st,lectl()n

1

-

-

CASE HISTORY

CAMPUS-TO-CAREE- R

,

f
f

if

KfVTITrKV KFRN'KI,. Friday. IW.

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ft

:k
If

l-

-ii

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IJ

mm,

rt

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g

150

percent intcsvst.

Usury

and sharp trading are practices not calculated to win
affection. Nobody loved The ,t ipviat.?r- - liut noUxly did anything;
about it either ... . Because undergraduates live in a perpetual stute
of need need of money, need of lecture notes, need of romance,
need of beer, need of something and The Operator wa the goose
that laid tlie gulden eggs and, therefore, safe.
Nor diil The Operator seek ulTcclion. He just went his
way, serene and carefree . . . No, not quite carefree. One
thing troubled him: a fear that some day he might graduate. Graduation, leaving school, would mean the end of his empire. Yuu can't
run a business like that from the outside; you must he right in tlie
niitkt of thing, spotting opportunities, anticipating needs, kio piiux
your finger on the public pulse.
So he took great pain to stay in school, but never to graduate.
Tin kc accomplished by constantly shifting majors. He Would cuiue
within a semester of getting a li.A. in sociology and then transfer
to law. When he had nearly enough law credits, hVd switch to
business administration. Then from business administration to
psychology, from psychology to French, from French to history,
and so on, meanwhile getting cultured as all get out, rich as Croeaua,
and never accumulating quite enough credits for degree.
finally, ol course, it caught up with him. 1 here came a semester
when no matter what he took, he hud to wind up with noma kind of
a degree. He looked frantically through the class schedule trying to
find some major he hadn't tried yet. And he found one physical
education. So, sleek and pudgy though he was from high living. The
Operator entered the department of physical ed.

well-heel- ed

W. D.

(iarland. E.E. '52, I'niv. of

California, is working for the I'ucinc
we thoiiglit
you'd be interested" in wliul Dam
told U alaiut his first

Telrtlione Company,
'

(Reading time: 45 second

,.y

litre

i.

t

...

Dun Cur Itin J makes iiopv tli.sti ilmtinu' measurement!
uith a Level Uiiiiituiiun RicuiJir

Aly job

is to help solve problems
of noise and other intei Terence on tele-

phone lines due to power interference.
is the technical
; Inductive
term for the work.

"First thing the Chief Engineer explained to me was that 'all the answers
aren't in the book.' lie wa right. Most
of the problems have required a combination of electrical engineering, a
knowledge of cost and generous
amount of ingenuity. like U that n ay.
It's given me an immediate opportunity
to put into practice the theory I learned
at school.

ex"In addition to this on
perience, I hate atlstnded several special training courses deducted hy the
the-jo-

h

company. Now I'm breaking in a new
man, just like when I Matted."
Don Garland's work is typical of many
engineering wsignnienU in the Bell
Telephone Companica. Hiere are similar opportunities for college graduates
with Bell Telephone Laboratories,
Western Electric and Samlia Corporation. If you'd like to get more details,
aea your I'laeemeiit Oilier?. He will L
glad to help you.

M

jj

It was a mistake. Among the paopU b kad to wrestle and box
with were some great hulking fellows who, like everybody else o
campus, owed him money.
Their tiny foreheads creased with gU as they regarded Tha
Operator's trembling little body; their massive biceps swelled joyously; their flexors rippled with delight. Humbling happily, they
fell upon him and covered him with lump, the smallint of which
would have taken first prize in any Jump contest you might name.
Confused and sick at heart. The Operator dragged hi battered
members home. He knew ha had U get out of physical ed; his hfa
was forfeit if be did not. So, uuhappily, ha transferred tolome other
course, and the following Juno, a beaten man in his cap and gown,
received with lifeless hands a diploma and a bachelor of arts degree
and shambled out into the great world.
I don't know what happened to The Operator after graduation.
It's not a bad guess that he's serving time in some pokey aomew liere.
Or maybe he wa lucky and went into the advertising business If so,
'"
be is surely a big man on iladison Avenue today.
But, as I say, I don't know what happened to him. But tin I do
know: another Operator appeared on campus as soon as this one
left, and he in turn was repluced by another, and the prises guea

on endlessly.
For a long a

boy students like girl students better than going;
as lm a parents cling to U delusion that the iiIIomimo
M'm
they had at college is RutVicient for their children, as long
run warm and cash run short, there will be an Operator operating
every cumpus every where.
on
. im
r Mil

to

BELL TELEPHONE SYSTEM

cUihs,

mm--

Ta.S tvluin

bmuiht to gnu bit the rn'ik'f of flllt.ll'
uio think iiiU would tti)J'J their cigarette.
is

MOKHI.H

'

* A Mountain Called Saturday
This business about Saturday classes has
been confusing. First came the announcement that each department in the College
of Arts and Sciences woukl schedule 40 per
cent of all classes on Saturday. Then came
the wave of student opposition. This was
followed by various reasons given by members of the ' Administration to support the
move.
SCA was preparing to do something about
it. Monday night's informal gathering was
filled with a vigor and enthusiasm which

undoubtedly would have led to something
more than a cursory investigation. The Kernel was preparing to back SGA to the hilt.
The revolution was shaping up.
Then Dean M. M. White of the College
of Arts and Sciences threw new light on the
r
of the
affir.The"deaii, a
first water, explained that the
of
the students was without foundation. The
rule, it seems, has Ixt'ii in effect for a long
time. Dean White maintains he's enforcing
it to lighten the class burden of students
who have to double up class work on Monday, Wednesday" and Friday.
Even more encouraging was the dean's
comment that few students will be affected
by the bolstered rule.
All this is pleasant. The mystery lies in
the reasons and excuses made by the Administration for something which supposedly hasn't been done making Saturday classes
mandatory.
straight-shoote-

near-pani- c

Several reasons have been given by Vice
Chaml)erlain and Dean of
Men Ieslie IV Martin. These reasons, in
brief, were: To fully utilize classroom space,
to pep up school spirit, to provide proper
education and to give Dean of Women Sarah
B. Holmes adequate control Over women

IoM.

President

students.
These reasons may be perfectly valid
they may have solid bases. But we can't nrr-derstand why they were given. Dean White
stated the reason for enforcing the rule
simply and to the point to spread courses
out so all of them don't fall on Monday,
Wednesday and Friday.
The answer which is most probable is
that there has been a gross lack of understanding between the" students. Dean White's
office, the Administration and the Faculty.
As Dean White said Monday night in a telephone interview, this whole matter is comparable to the mole hill becoming a mountain.
Even so, this newspaper would like to go
on record as being opposed to Saturday
classes. The
work week has beaccepted part of American life.
come an
Teachers are part of this plan and students
should be. That sixth day should Ik; a day
which the student or teacher has to himself,
to study or to relax. The seventh day has
already been provided for most generously
by Higher Powers.
"'

.

five-da-

Just hold the ball a minute. Maybe he'll get mad and to away.

By RAY IIORNBACK.

come duty of seeing sons, doomed to the
,
same fate, born.
'
As coujd be expected, the people most
interested in this drive toward insanity are
the coeds the cruel, vicious, selfish, thoughttless, careless, mean, barbaric, atrocious,
vv
lecture.
coeds.
These activities, of course, are absurd.
The men may smile, agree, consent, promThey are refreshingly absurd, but tliry a!.-ise, and concur with tin mad marriage drive,
are dangerous. As a matter of flummery, but deep down in their diffusive little sou!;,
they are almost .subversive. At
theyv they are putting up their guards.
are not in the t tradition of fair play.
Remember, men, don't let this stuil go to
Marriage experts all 20 million of them
your head. All that glitters isn't gold but all
are invading the campus. Clergymen, docthat twitters is enough to drive you mad.
tors, psychologists, women's clubs atid frustrated men are joining the crusade for marA respected scientist stopped in the other
riage. But this is all refreshing, like a mias-mi- c
day to fill us in on some hitherto unknown
breeze from a toxic swamp.
These campaigners for matrimony are not facts about archeology. It seems that the
telling the truth. Marriage is horrible. It has oldest standing structure in the world is the
been said that a man or woman alone is fence by the Journalism Building.
like half a pah of shears, incomplete, lonely,
miserable. Well, that statement is ignorant,
Here's a real gem for lovers of classical
stupid, illogical and square. Who wants to
literature. A man walked into a tailor's shop
be a pair of shears?
Another bit of truth these vile people and put a pair of torn trousers on the counhave failed to bring out is that marriage ter. The tailor asked, "Euripides?" And the
unlimited can upset the ba