xt7pvm42v67f https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7pvm42v67f/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19650325  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, March 25, 1965 text The Kentucky Kernel, March 25, 1965 1965 2015 true xt7pvm42v67f section xt7pvm42v67f Inside Today's Kernel
Editor discusses conditions in Selma,
Alabama: Poge Four.

Several celebrities lend their support
to the march in Selma: Page Seven.

Oxford Married Students are Worried,
Too: Poge Fire.
Sunglasses Worldwide Saga is
Poge Two.
Student Center Board candidates and
appointed officers are announced:
Page Seven.

Indonesian articles
play: Poge Three.

are

on

now

TT

dis-

Brad show signs two more players for
next year's squad: Poge Six.
New

plans are announced

University of Kentucky
MARCH 25,
KY.,

by SuKy:

Vol. LVI, No.

Page Six.

9G

LEXINGTON,

1965

THURSDAY,

Eight Pages

Returning Students
Must Preregister
By End Of April
By TERENCE HUNT

Kernel Staff Writer
The new registration process
for the fall semester calls for all
returning students to meet with
advisers to plan and complete
IBM schedule cards during the
month of April.
Next year's ID pictures are also supposed to be made during
April.
R. L. Larson, associate registrar, said IBM schedule cards
and class schedule books should
be in the adviser's hands April 1.
This preregistration process
applies to students in colleges of
Agriculture and Home Economics, Architecture School, Arts and
Sciences, Commerce, Education,
Engineering, Nursing, and Graduate School.
Students meeting with advisers will first fill out trial schedule
cards for preliminary planning
and, after it has been approved by
the adviser, will complete the
orange IBM schedule card. Listed
on the IBM card should be the
class, class number and section,
and time desired.
Previously, the class section
number did not have to be listed.
Completed schedule cards
should then be taken to the basement of the Administration Annex, which will be open every

day, 1 to 5, Monday through
Friday, during April.
Mr. Larson advised that all
students planning to return to the
University in the fall preregister.
Those who do not will be required to wait until the late registration period, after classes
start, he warned.
This summer all preregistered
students will receive either complete or incomplete schedules.
Courses will be assigned using
the spring semester grade point
standing as a priority.
Also included will be information regarding when the student
will be required to report to the
Coliseum in the fall.
All students will participate in
registering in the Coliseum, either filling out the information
cards or completing class schedules.
Completely scheduled students will finish their registration
Sunday afternoon, August 29 by
filling out the usual information
cards regarding religious preference, address, and telephone
number.
Mr. Larson said another reason for the Sunday registration
completion was so the registrar's
office can determine the number
of students not returning, and
can collect the left over class
ticket cards for redistribution.
Registration on Monday and
Tuesday will be reserved for students with incomplete schedules.
Students entering the Coliseum
and finishing registration will be
admitted according to a random
alphabet system, Mr. Larson said.
He stressed the importance of
students prcregistering and then
appearing at the Coliseum at the
appointed time. He said students
not prcregistering or not reporting
to the Coliseum at the appointed
time will be required to register
during the late period.
Another part of the new registration program outlined by Mr.
Larson proposed that all returning students have ID pictures
made during the month of April.
This will allow students to
pick up ID cards upon their return to school, instead of waiting
until later in the semester.
Mr. Larson said students not
having ID cards made this semester will have the ID taken on
the make up date, Oct. 15, and
will not be able to be admitted
to athletic or University functions
requiring an ID.
.

-

Jury Finds
Abbott Guilty
Of Murder
Robert R. Abbott was found
guilty of murdering
Wanda Cook, a nurse at the
University Medical Center, and
the twelve-majury recommended mercy.
The mercy recommendation
makes a life sentence mandaDayton,
tory for the
Ky. man.
Abbott's attorney, Harry II.
Mcllwain, said he will appeal
the case.
The jury deliberated for 24
hours before returning the verdict.
Throughout the trial Abbott
had contended that his fiancee,
Alice Ewing, 22, had shot Miss
Cook in a jealous rage.
About 200 spectators packed
the courthouse awaiting the verdict.
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Committee Will Coordinate Fine Arts

Members of the fine arts committee of the Student Center are (from the left), seated, Kathy
Ware, chairman; Kay Leonard, cochairman; stand -

,
ing, Leila Bitting-- Allan D. Chlowitz, John R.
Moeller, Cecile Moore, Babs Rutlandand Diane
Godman.

32 'Senior Students' Enrolled

Under Tuitionless Program
"People are writing to us almost
everyday from far away. Right
now we have a man with us from
Seattle, Washington. He is studying chemistry."
Dr. Kauffman said he has
heard from past "students." One
woman was so pleased with the
program that she made a rather
substantial donation for a scholarship fund.
Several center "students"
wrote to President Oswald thanking him for the privilege of attending college. Some indicated
they would remember the University in their wills.
Some of the "students" are
taking typing "in hopes that they
will earn some money typing
thesis papers, term papers and
other projects for students."
This program of education for
the aged has been adopted by
Eastern State College and is being considered by another major
college in the state.
Besides the Herman L. Donovan program the Council will
begin a special program in conjunction with the Centennial year.
"This will be our main interest
now," said Dr. Kauffman.
The Council will be participating with the State Commis"The program is exceedingly sion on Aging in Louisville in
worthwhile," said Dr. Kauffman. this project. It will be a coopera

By LOIS KOCK
Kernel Staff Writer
; The Herman L. Donovan Program sponsored by the University's Council on Aging is in its
second semester.
The program offers to any
citizen over 65 the opportunity
to attend any class at this University free of charge. It began
last year in the fall semester.
The Council was formed in
April, .'963. Dr. Earl Kauffman,
chairman of the Recreation Department in Physical Education,
was appointed the director of the
council. It was basically a planning organization until last fall
when it established the first program, the Herman L. Donovan
program.
In the fall semester 33 "senior
students" attended the University. Their classes ranged from
chemistry and mathematics to
typing and shorthand.
This semester 32 enrolled.
have remained in
Twenty-nin- e
classes. The program has extended to the Community Colleges.
Dr. Kauffman is awaiting a report from each college to determine the total enrollment.

.

tive affair between the two groups
to achieve three goais:
(1) To organize study groups
for the aged throughout the state.
(2) To promote the Governor's
Conference on Aging, Oct. 6, and
(3) To organize Senior Centers
in the communities of Kentucky.
"The Council's one big service is its function as an information center," Dr. Kauffman
said. "We are accumulating a
wide variety of materials on all
phases of aging, and it's available to any person interested in
this field."
Council members are called
upon to make talks to various
groups in town. "Many groups
in general call upon us extensively for help. I hope to have
the recreation majors rendering
direct field services to the senior
citizens soon," he said.
The Council aids the University's retired faculty members.
It represented them on the Centennial Committee and obtained
tickets for them to the past Centennial activities.
Mrs. Ann Wright, a volunteer
counselor, arranges
parties and teas for the "stu-

dents."

The Council has been a member for two years of the Gerontological Society.

Director Says Health Service Efficiency Up

EDITOR'S NOTE: This story
was prompted by an anonymous
letter received by the Kernel
which suggested the health serv-icand the campus police had
failed to render aid to a sick
student at night. This account by
health service officials is the first

e

of a

two-pa-

rt

series.

By STEVE ROCCO
Kernel Staff Writer

"We could have the greatest physicians in the world but
we wouldn't be worth anything
unless we were geaied to

These were the words of Dr.
J. L. Mulligan, director of the
Student Health Service, as he
discussed the University facility
for students. He added that sickness impairs the student's primary purpose here, that of getting an education, and to be efficient the Health Service makes
every effort to assist the student as rapidly and effectively
as possible.
Dr. Mulligan feels that the
Health Service this year is more
efficient than at any time in the
past. Whereas last year the average waiting time for a student
from entrance to the time he

talked with a doctor was about
an hour, students now wait only
"an average of 20 minutes."
The remarkability of this, according to Dr. Mulligan, lies in
the fact that the number of visits
is up 35 percent over last year
while the enrollment has risen
but 16 percent. "Generally speaking, the annual increase in visits
parallels the increase in enrollment. This year is the first time
this has not happened," said Dr.
Mulligan.
The Student Health Service
is expecting a 30 percent increase
in visits for the next school year
over the current school year.

Dr. Mulligan said that in the
school year the Student
Health Service had about 17,000.
visits. This year it is averaging
about 120 visits a clay. Of these
120, it is necessary for 85 to 90
to see a physician.
The increase in the use of the
service, Dr. Mulligan feels, is the
result of a larger staff of doctors
19C3-6- 4

and nurses providing better service, and the enlarged orientation
program for new students at the
University.
First, a brochure is sent to all
prospective students with their
application forms. This brochure
briefly explains who is eligible

and what services are provided.
This brochure is also posted on '
the bulletin boards on each floor
of dormitories.
A booth is in Memorial Coliseum for fall registration, said
Dr. Mulligan, and there is a
doctor and nurse there to
answer any questions a student
may have about the health program.

In September, the Health
is explained at orientations conducted by the deans of
men and women.
The first actual contact with
the student health service for
Continued On l'age 8
Service

* THE KENTUCK Y KERNEL, Thursday, March 25,

2

19G5

The Saga Of The Sunglasses:
Musicians, Europeans, Students
.1.
r
r
a saie guess mat a tlot oi
young people reach for their sunglasses in the morning before they
put on their lipstick. Some people
even suspect that the "shades"
don't come off until lights out.
.

ii

.

s

Mademoiselle magazine's 71
campus correspondents across the
country report that the ubiquitous
which began as a fad,
is now an established part of most
collegiate wardrobes
The whole sunglass thing probably started with the jazz musicians of the 1940s, whose successors wear them to this day. It was
picked up by American movie
stars, then by European movie
stars, becoming synonymous with
a particular kind of Continental
chic.
The fad bounced back to the
U.S.A., to be emulated by young
Fifth Avenue fashionables, jet
setters, and beat and
types along both coasts. It
finally spread inland, from Hawaii to Iowa to Maine, adopted
by the young,' who took over the
look as if they'd invented it
themselves.
Sight, except when it's sunny,
has nothing to do with it. Sunlight, in fact, is a negligible factor in the wearing of the "shades . "
The real reasons? There are two.
; One:' sunglasses are a surefire
way
of looking inscrutable, mysterious
and unquestionably "hip."
Secondly, they're a glorious
form of eye makeup. Not only do
they draw attention to the eyes,
which are often visible through
the dusky lenses, but they substitute for eyebrow pencil, shadow,
and liner all at once.
They even double as a headband. Many girls prop theirs on
top of their heads half of the time,
either to be able to see what
they're doing or because this is
sun-shiel- d,

--

1

;

flu
Sun, Anyone?

The newest sunglasses, designed
long ago by the Eskimos, are
predominantly opaque glass with
tiny slits for seeing: without any
glare.

KlOWr
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Recipes

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as masterful as with

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Like sophisticated fare? Stir a
little red caviar into sour cream
and serve (instead of butter)
with baked potatoes.

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"Bergman, with his

A HEW

Surprise! Desserts, long a tradition of sororities and fraternities on the University campus,
are with us again.
Thursday night, before spring
vacation, the DZ's entertained the
SAE's with a dessert at the sorority's chapter house. The story
sounds familiar, but it certainly
seems like it's been a long time
since the word "dessert" appeared in a conversation.
Good going! Maybe some
other Creeks will follow suit. . .

LAST TIMES TODAY
"THOSE CALLOWAYS'

TOMORROW

FIRE IH

s
Sunny Korns, ajuniorelemen-tareducation major from Portsmouth, Ohio, and a member of
Alpha Delta Fi sorority, to Tommy, Jacobs, a senior commerce
major from Lexington and a member of Phi Delta Theta fraternity.
Nancy Jo Cotton, a senior
history major from Pittsburgh,
Pa., and a member of Chi Omega
sorority, to Bob Rawlins, a senior
political science major from
Bcthcsda, Md.
Jean Conovcr, sophomore elementary education major from St.
Petersburg, Fla., to Tom Sprow,
a sophomore mechanical engineering major at Ohio State University and a member of Alpha
Tau Omega fraternity.
Pin-Male-

MAN OF RES0LVEI

LAST TIMES TONIGHT
'Anatomy of a Marriage'

black and white.

AT 12:15 - 3:05
5:15 - 7:25 - 9:35

the ultimate chic of the Sunglass
Look holding in place the long,
straightish, shiny, swinging hairdos that are an inseparable part
of the image.
Leaving the more fashionable
aspects of the glasses momentarily, Mademoiselle turned to an
optometrist for his views in "The
Sunglass Syndrome." He points
out that gray, green and brown
lenses are best for cutting down
glare; a blue lens, while mysteri-osis primarily a fashion gimmick. Although plastic lenses
scratch more easily than glass,
they are considerably lighter. Peripheral distortion, which results
in tired eyes rather than any kind
of permanent damage, may occur
with both plastic and glass lenses.
He suggests that sunglass
wearers avoid second grade varieties and buy only glasses of reputable manufacture. Metal and
aluminum frames cost more, but
they are sturdier than plastic.
Huge frames do not necessarily cut out more glare and light.
The latest streamlined version
appears in April Mademoiselle
a strip of opaque, colored plastic,
with a narrow slit of glass across
the middle, more frame than glass.
Made by Sea and Ski and available in six colors, they're patterned after the slitted wooden
frames worn by Esldmoes. While
most wearers might not have to
battle blinding storms in them,
they do look wonderfully, and
literally, "out of this world."
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Desserts

BAYLIS

Produced

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Kentucky Kernel, University
Station, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, 40506. Second-clas- s
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Published lour times weekly during
the school year except during holidays
and exam periods, and weekly during
the summer semester.
Published tor the students of the
University of Kentucky by the Hoard
of Student Publications, Prof. Paul
Oberst, chairman and Stephen Palmer,
secretary.
begun as the Cadet in 1894, became the Hecord in IttoO, and the Idea
in 19JU. Published continuously as the
Kernel since 1913.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Yearly, by mail $7.00
Per copy, from files f .10
KERNEL TELEPHONES
Editor. Executive Editor, Managing
Editor
2321
News Desk, Sports, Women's Editor,
2320
Social
Advertising, Business, Circulation 2319

JR.

NOW!
'"SuVicT--i
I

COLOR

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The Kentucky Kernel
The

-

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HE GREAT ADVENTURE BEGINS WITH

JANET MARGOLIN BRAD DEXTER
AUiMruiPKtuit

IS TOG

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William Campbell 'Victor Buono

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Rtlcaied thru

UNITED

ARTISTS

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday, Marth 25.

1965

-

.1

University Displays Indonesia
School first and Agriculture
By SANDY OTTO
Kernel Arts Writer
School second.
A small red and gold gilded
The program is financed by
door In the Museum of Anthro- both governments. UK receives
a federal grant from the Agency
pology leads to a display of traditional Indonesian culture now for International Development.
This project is headed by the
open to the public.
This display was set up at Campus Coordinator of Overthe suggestion of Dr. Chamber- seas Program, Dr. William Jan-selain and Dr. Donovan as a permanent symbol of the experience
There are 191 Indonesians
the University has shared with visiting UK now. They arc livIndonesia.
ing in four cooperative houses
Since 1956 UK has sponsored on campus. The average stay is
in Indonesia' one of the largest around 18 months although some
international' educational proj- have stayed for four years.
ects ever undertaken by an AmerThe Indonesian government
ican university. During this time, expects to finish the program by
n.

approximately 600 Indonesian students have come to UK to complete their education and have
returned to Indonesia to teach.
These students must have attained the highest degree available in their field in Indonesia
and must have had some teach-- ,
ing experience.
Approximately 110 American
faculty members have gone to
Indonesia to teach for an average of two years. One third have
been from UK.
This program was initiated by
the Indonesian government by
invitation to the U. S. in 1955.
The Indonesian government sent
a team of Indonesian university
presidents to visit 16 American
universities. Their purpose was
to find three universities that
would upgrade the Indonesian
university facilities. The team
chose UK for its Engineering

James Loveless
Artwork Shown
James Loveless, assistant professor of art, will present an exhibit of paintings and drawings.
The formal ppening of the Fine
Arts" Building ;Art Gallery show
was' held- Wednesday' evening.
The Loveless work consists
mostly of abstracts, although
some recently executed figura-tive- s
are also included. The show
will remain in the Art Gallery
until April 3, with viewing hours
set at noon to 4 p.m. Monday
through Friday, and 7 p.m. to
9 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays.
Mr. Loveless was chairman
of the art . department of Hope
College in Holland, Michigan. A
graduate of DePauw University,
he received a master of fine arts
degree from Indiana University.
Mr. Loveless has exhibited his
art work widely, in both regional
and national showings. His most
recent
showing before
his appearance here was at Olivet
College, Olivet, Michigan.
-

-

one-ma- n

SHIRTS

..

That You Will Be
Proud To Wear!
IN by 9 a.m . . .
..

5

The material for the display
"Introducing Indonesia" was
collected by George Hinds of the
Agriculture School at the University of Illinois and Vincent Nelson, professor of Geology at UK
at the request of UK.
The collection emphasizes the
traditional rural life rather than
the modern city. The tools, vessels, musical instruments, fabrics, and puppets are an expression
of the habits, mores and customs
of a dynamic people.
At the top of the steps are
dance masks of the evil spirits.
They are characterized by big
bulging eyes, protuding lips and
fangs. These masks are part of
the costumes of the dancers, each
character having his own mask.
The dancer assumes the role of
the character of the mask.
Colorful designs are painted
on the costumes also worn by the
dancers. Each character in the
dance has his own distinctive
costume and set of movements

for

$1.00

Professionals At
Reasonable Prices
ALTERATIONS
EMERGENCY SERVICE

Cro I ley Cleaners
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display of leather puppets
how the Indonesians
dramatize their epic poems from
the 8th century. The puppets "are
held behind a thin screen to present a shadow effect. The famous Javanese Shadow-plais
Wajang Kulit which is a series
of central plays based on traditional literature and mythology.
The puppets are manipulated
by a master puppeteer or Dalang
with an orchestra accompanying.
The performance lasts 10 hours.
Other displays include batik
making (a dye technique), religious symbols, fishing gear,
household goods, art work, musical instruments and kitchen utenA

shows

'

y

sils.

The isolation of the islands
of Indonesia plus varying degrees
of outside influence from India,
the Near East and Europe have
combined to produce a culture
as outstanding for its unique
blends of separate traditions as
for its rich diversity within these
traditions.
"Introducing Indonesia" may
be seen by the public by appointment at the Museum of Anthropology. The display will be open
until the end of the semester.

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The
- run ofyear-

"In

ay

is over but extended college tours are being,
planned for this winter and again
in 1966.
Most of the original company,
including Gloria Foster, Moses
Gunn and Fred Pinkard, are set
for the first swing that starts in
January and winds up in June.
White America

Hi

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inr

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HI Hi H

Higbee Mill Road

at Clays Mill Road

10:45 a.m.

Service and
Church School

HALE'S PHARMACY
is s. limestone
Aero. From U.K. Medical Center

SUNDAY, MARCH 28
Speaker
X

JOSEPH

We Cash Student Check.

Drug

Sundrieg

...

Fountain

CANNON

Commissioner of Corrections
Commonwealth of Kentucky

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Ohio State University Symphonic Choir

White America9 Tour
NEW
YORK (AP)

'It

it

Appearing: last night at the Student Center Grand Ballroom, the
Symphonic Choir of Ohio State University presented a concert.
Directed by Trof. Louis II. Diercks, the Choir consists of 68 voices
and has been recognized as one of the nation's finest college choral
groups. Aimo Justus KiviniemI,
director of the University of'
Kentucky Choristers, was for- - I
TTXTFnn
JT
merly a member of the Ohio
U 11 1 1 HXlLlM
State University Symphonic
Choir.
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* volt: Just How Far
With injustice heaped upon injustice, the American Negro now
entering his 102nd year of de jure
freedom has resorted to a number
of means for redress of his grievances.
The right to protest injustice is
basic to the American form of government.
Another question of American
jurisprudence is also involved: may
one go beyond the law in protesting
injustice?
It is true that the Selma demonstrators have broken local ordinances and traffic laws, they have committed "breach of peace' an offense against southern provincialismand have no doubt been a
considerable nuisance to many
Alabamans.

UI

Made It Back To The Church"

and with this we would completely
concur. They do grind slowly, indeed, as almost a century has passed since human bondage was outlawed by the Constitution.
We should not let the fact be
obscured that this same Constitu-- .
tion has been openly flaunted by
both public and private citizens in
all sections of the country. But,
perhaps, it has most vocally been
ignored in Alabama where a racist
governor is bound to a slowly dying

'
'

cauve.

The legal question of just how
far one may go in his protest obviously has no answer.

The Founding Fathers found
their own particular answer in open
revolt. They then established a system where, hopefully, revolt would
never again be a necessity.
These "crimes" have caused
But that system of equality to
some jurists to rise up in a form of
all men was based upon the anticilegal protest and call for action
that good and just laws
against these who "openly flaunt" pation
the Constitution. They seem to be passed by good and just men would
be obeyed by a large majority of
saying, "Protest, but obey the
the people.
rules."
They seem to ignore that it is
precisely these "rules" that are at
the heart of the Selma and Montgomery protests. Here a sizable
number of American citizens has
been denied the right to exercise
their citizenship at the polls.
A number of intricate and complicated "rules" have been established to accomplish this mass
disenfranchisement. They range
from complicated literacy tests to
the requirement that a white voter
vouch for a Negro's "qualifications"
to vote.

When this system falters and
the courts fail to give assistance
as they did until little more than a
decade ago the whole base of
American democracy suffers.
Even recognizing their bending
of Alabama law, one must admire
these Negro sufferers and their leaders. The nation is indeed fortunate
that the more militant Negro leaders have not been able to successfully compete with the likes of
Martin Luther King for leadership
in the Negro ranks.

One must also marvel at the restraint shown by Negroes throughWe are sure that these vocal
jurists would remind us that the out the past century as delay after
"wheels of justice grind slowly," delay was added to their disappointments; the quest for full citizenship progresses with agonizing
(msii

HBri

CITY ST

slowness.

Unfortunately, the nation has
not been similarly blessed at the
local and state level. Leaders like
Governor Wallace have made a
mockery of the American system of
government and dashed the hopes
for citizenship of thousands of

citizens.

"THAT'S

ITI

DON'T

LET

The tide is slowly turning. Let
us not obscure this victory with
criticisms of the minor "violations"
which have occurred. For if the
American Negro bends the law no
further than he did in Selma, it will
have been truly a miracle of restraint in the face of inhuman

'EM MAKE

A MOCKERY OP OUR IAWI"

The Kentucky Kernel
The South's Outstanding College Daily
University of Kentucky

ESTABLISHED

THURSDAY, MARCH 25,

1894

William Chant,

19C5

Editor-in-Chi-

David Hawfe, Executive Editor

Sid Webb, Managing Editor

Linda Mills, News Editor
Walteh Chant, Associate News Editor
IIenhy Rosenthal, Sports Editor
Cay Cish, Women's Page Editor
C. Scott Nunley, Arts Editor
Blithe Hunsdohf, Feature Editor
Toxi Finnie, Advertising Matuiger

Thomas Behsot, Ahthuh

1

1

Got One Of 'Em Just As She Almost

Business Staff

Michael

L. Damon, Circulation Manager

Editorial Page Staff
en dehson, Claudia Jefeiucy, Robeht Staib, James Svaha

r

-

.

'

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'

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m

"V

rrv

Government And The Arts
The painter John Sloan once said
that he would welcome a Government Department of Fine Arts because "then we'd know where the
enemy is."

Many Americans, whether artists
or ordinary citizens, are likely to
share Mr. Sloan's instinctive hostile
response when they read President

Johnson's statement yesterday and
the Rockefeller Brothers Fund report
earlier this week, both of which urge
greater government support for the
arts.
It has been traditional in this
country to believe that art is none
of the government's business. And
artists, looking at the experience
of certain other nations, have a
healthy fear of the state with its
powers of censorship and its bureaucratic patronage conferred at the
price of obedience to political and
esthetic orthodoxy.
But in a free society there is no
necessary or logical antipathy between government and the arts.
Each seeking its own ends has only
to respect the domain of the other.
If, as it has been said, poetry is apt
to be "the fragile partner" in any
alliance between poetry and power,
this is no more true for the arts than
for scientific research or any of the
other intellectual disciplines that a
civilized government fosters and
protects.
In short, what the National
Science Foundation has done for
science and what the National Institutes of Health have done for
medical research, the National
Foundation on the Arts and Humanities, which Mr. Johnson now
proposes, could also do.
President Johnson suggests that
the new agency would principally
underwrite special operating costs

and bring touring theatrical, musical and dance groups to communities that rarely get to see them. The
Rockefeller Fund proposes that the
Federal Government devote most of
its effort to building new facilities.
Mr. Johnson's approach is obviously the less costly.
There is no need to choose finally between these two approaches.
Rather, the need is to experiment
in inventing new institutions and
new procedures in order to find a
happier economic location for the
arts between the wastelands of bureaucracy and the arid compulsions
of the market place. This effort
could well extend beyond government. As Dr. James A. Perkins,
president of Cornell University, has
pointed out, the universities and
the foundations are only at the very
beginning of a serious effort to find
their own proper working relationship with the artist.
-- The New York Times

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday, March 25,

19f.r- -5

OXFORD MARRIED STUDENTS TROUBLED
How Much, Or How Little, Docs It Take To Live
The London Sunday Telegram
the whole struggle will have been
now too

How much or how little-c- an
a married student live on?
The question was raised with
some emphasis recently by the
news that an Oxford graduate
has been growing vegetables in
the garden of his digs to feed
himself, his wife and child.
The grant on which this couple
are living is 450 pounds a year;
but there are. plenty of others in
Oxford surviving on less. You
don't have to spend long thereto
unearth cases of considerable
hardship.
Take for instance, the life of
Alan Wood, who is 22 and in his
final year, reading R