xt7q2b8vdn4b https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7q2b8vdn4b/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19680206  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, February  6, 1968 text The Kentucky Kernel, February  6, 1968 1968 2015 true xt7q2b8vdn4b section xt7q2b8vdn4b Ti
Tuesday Evening, Teh. 6,

K MUCKY
The Soutlis Outstanding College Daily

19G8

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON

Education Act Hits
Money, Race Bars

in- --

By WALTER GRANT
WASHINGTON (CPS)-Presid- ent
Johnson asked Congress Monday to pass a new Educational Opportunity Act designed to eliminate the economic and racial barriers to higher education.
The President said the proposed legislation would set a new
and sweeping national goal that every qualified young person,
must have all the eduregardless of race or economic
cation that he wants and can absorb.
The proposed Educational
Educational Opportunity
Opportunity Act of 1968 was out- posed
Act would:
lined in the president's annual
Help a million and a half
message to Congress about edustudents attend college next year
cation.
full range of federal
In his special message, Presi- through the
student aid programs, including
dent Johnson also said he was
loans.
directing the Secretary of Health, guaranteed
Strengthen the guaranteed
Education, and Welfare to begin loan
program by meeting the
plan for administrative costs of the banks
preparing a long-rang- e
the support of higher education.
who make these loans. With a
He said the plan, or "strategy,"
service fee of up to $35 for each
would include " a comprehenloan, this program can aid an
sive set of goals and a precise
next
well-bein-

additional 200,000 students
plan of action."
year, bringing the total to
In addition, the President recthe President said.
ommended that Congress pass a
Provide $15 million for new
Networks for Knowledge Act of
of tutoring, counseling,
1968. "This pilot program will programs
and special services so that the
provide new financial incentives
neediest students can succeed in
to encourage colleges and universities to pool their resources by college.
Unify and simplify several
sharing faculties, equipment, liexisting student aid programs so
brary, and educational television
that each college can devise a
services," he said.
flexible plan of aid tailored to
The proposed Networks for
the needs of each student. The
Act would suppleKnowledge
affected would be the
ment the effort launched last year programs
National Defense Education Act
by the National Science Foundaeducational opportunity
tion to explore the potential of loans,
y
grants, and the college
in education. Presicomputers
program.
dent Johnson added.
President Johnson said in his
The President said the pro- to
that America is
750,-00-

0,

work-stud-

Candidates
Students

ready
message
declare a fifth freedom freedom
from ignorance. "Last fall, more
than 50 percent of our high school
graduates went on to college. It
is our goal by 1976 to increase
he
that number to
said.
To help guarantee this freedom, the President said Congress
must continue existing federal
support for higher education. Specifically, he said he would urge
Congress to extend and strength
the National Defense Education
Act of 1958, the Higher Education Facilities Act of 1963, and
the Higher Education Act of 1965.
Continued on Page 7, Col. 5
two-thirds- ,"

who have filed as
candidates for Student Government representative must
report to the SG office today
in order to get their names
on the ballot.
election is
Wednesday's
scheduled in compliance with
a reapportionment bill enacted by Student Government
last semester.

ERNEh

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1111
Mil

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7-

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Vol. LIX, No. 92

.l0r

.

I
I

They Came

.

To Bury

McCarthy

3
v

a ry

-

(D-Min-

t.

.-

V'i

-

UPI Tclephoto

Senator's Vps And Downs
a conference

in Chicago in December Senator Eugene
During
found only supporters. However, he found
McCarthy
the crowd not wholly on his side at the recent College Editors
Conference in Washington.
.)

.

Students
By Travel Tax BiU
Semi-Exem-

pt

WASHINGTON (UPI) -- The administration asked Congress Monday to enact a "pay before you go" travel tax package that would
cost the average American tourist at least $79 more. for a $1,000

trip abroad.
Of special interest to students
is a provision in the package
that would exempt students and
businessmen who go abroad for
more than 120 days. The exemption would also cover government officials and individuals
who establish residence outside
the United States. No other exemptions are included.
Treasury Secretary Henry
Fowler said that President Johnson wanted to tax American tourists 15 percent when they spent
more than $7 a day abroad and
30 percent when their outlays rose

By DICK KIMMINS
WASHINGTON
Sen. Euadgene J. McCarthy
vocates withdrawal of United
States forces from Vietnam if negotiations with North Vietnam
do not result from a bombing
halt. He made the statement at
a tempestuous meeting of 500 editors of college newspapers Feb. 3.
In response to a question from
the floor, Sen. McCarthy, the
only declared candidate for the
Democratic presidential nomination, said he would "first stop
the bombing" if elected.
If negotiations did not follow,
he said, he would order withdrawal and cessation of all military activities.
Sen. McCarthy's speech and
news conference was disrupted
once and finally ended altogether
when a contingent of persons
unconnected with the conference
invaded the podium, heckled Sen.
McCarthy, waved a newspaper
in his face, and carried a coffin
containing "McCarthy for President" buttons and an American
flag.
Leader of the disrupters, Raymond Mungo, 21, an editor of
Liberation News Service, said
the demonstration was meant to
"bury the McCarthy campaign."
Mungo said it was "naive of
him (Sen. McCarthy) to think
he could bring an end to the
war in Vietnam."
Meeting in Washington were
editors from 105 college newspapers in the United States. The
conference was sponsored by the
United States Student Press Association (USSPA).
Conference coordinator David
Lloyd-Jone- s
issued a statement
after the senator's speech that
apologized for the disruption and
said the persons involved were,
not connected with USSPA, CPS,'
(Collegiate Press Service), or organizers of the conference.
The disturbance of Sen. McCarthy's speech emphasized that
he does not enjoy the full
on Pare 3, Col. 1

government wanted to cut present duty free exemption on purchases made abroad and gifts sent
home by 90 percent. lie also
urged a levying of a 5 percent
excise tax on plane and ship
tickets to foreign destinations.
The package was aimed at
discouraging American tourism
outside the hemisphere as a way
of reducing the balance of payments deficit and the American
dollar drain to foreign countries.
Mr. Fowler told the House
group the travel tax might cut
the existing $3.6 billion deficit
above $15 a day.
by as much as $500 million a
He also told the House Ways
year.
& Means Committee that the.
Continued on Page 7, Col. 1

'Blowing Minds' At The Editors' Conference

'Guerrilla Theater' Rattles College Newsmen
By GUY

MENDES
It

WASHINGTON

was

mind-shatterin- g.

Paranoia surfaced as emotions were assaulted. Delegates
jumped from their seats shouting; some rushed to the speaker's podium, hands clenched and

tempers flaring. Others sat still -fear and astonishment keeping
them glued to their seats.
It was nandimonium.
The delegates-5- 00
student, V
...
IT.Wf.wl V.
li.w.
run o is diitiiiMiiK
Student Press Association's G)llege Editors Conference
last weekend-we- re
experiencing
a new concept in behavior stimulus called "guerrilla theater."
"A tnie happening," some
called it later; "a horror show,"
said others.
The experience, which was toThere were no panel discustally unexpected by the delegates,
was one of the highlights of the sions, seminars or wot k shops. Infour-da- y
conference that was, by stead, there were small group
no means, ordinary. The title, discussions, communication exAlternative Futures and Present periments, interaction of ideas
between delegates, and abstract
Clioices, was clearly indicative
films.
of that.

discussion featuring social theorists, writers, artists and several
hippies from Drop City, Colorado, were part of the second day's
activities. There was also a meditation session, abstract movies
and communication experiments.
All the activities were structured loosely on purjose sort
of an organized disorganization
so communication would not
be restricted.
Some 'Disgruntled'
Some delegates who had approached the conference prepared
to leant mechanical aspects of
journalism became disgruntled
about the atmosphere. A small
faction drew up a projiosal calling for the overthrow of USSPA's
leaders and the conference director, David Lloyd-JoneSmall group discussions were
Two other proposals were
set up from the information ga- written, one calling for the Colthered, and those people with lege Editors Conference to dethe same interests were grouped nounce the U.S. involvement in
Vietnam and call for immediate
together.
A light show complete with withdrawal, the other asking edi- psychedelic music, an informal
e 3, CoL 1
Continued on
s.

The first day of the conference featured Facilitator interviews in which the delegates were
interviewed on a
basis
to determine each individual's
quest -- in life, in learning, in
journalism and in the conference.
one-to-o-

Pf

* .

Experience Rattles Editors

Continued from rajre One
tors to support the war in Vietnam.
All
three proposals
were
brought up in a general assembly on the third day.
The one calling for the overthrow of USSIW leaders was
brought up first and was followed by heated discussion. Dissatisfaction with the conference
structure was voiced by those behind the measure. It was not
conducive to journalism, they
said.
Others argued the conference's objective was not to teach
mechanics of journalism but to
" ...
promote communication
to help us see what's ahead.
The proposal finally was tabled and discussion moved to the
resolutions concerning Vietnam.
Discussion was often disrupted by delegates raisingpoints
of order and inquiry. Several
times the assembly became disorderly.

They Came
For A Burial

After some discussion, lx)th
resolutions concerning the war in
Vietnam were thrown out. Lloyd-Jone- s
then stepped to the podium
and told the delegates of a group
which had been unable to attend
but wanted to express its views
of the war by film.

Lights Went Out
Suddenly the lights went out,
a curtain parted and six or eight
movie projectors threw their
images on a white backdrop behind the podium. There were
grotesque picturesof children disfigured by the war in Vietnam,
there were pictures of soldiers
in action, scenes of explosions,
and planes dropping Ixnnhs.
Hippie-type- s
ran through the
aisles, shouting and distributing
leaflets as they went. Eight different sound tracks blurted out
their noise. The result was almost chaotic.
Delegates, in effect, "blew

their minds."
"Out of order, out of order
. . . stop it, stop it," came some

hysterical shouts. Lloyd-Jone- s
stood behind the podium grasping the microphone as delegates
surrounded him, shouting and

Continued from Page One
threatening.
port of all New Left, antiwar
A voice came from the loud
Sen. Mccrusaders. Even though
speakers: "This is Capt. Jurgen-so- n
Carthy's appeal is primarily
of the Washington Police
toward younger voters, he has
Department. This assembly is
so far failed to capture the support and enthusiasm garnered
by John Kennedy in 19G0.
Sen. McCarthy said during
his
speech that he had
noticed limited political freedom
in his travels across the country,
but that the amount of freedom
on college and university campuses was far, far greater, an
opposite to the "fear and apprehension everywhere else."
He said the "young have a
greater stake in the future" and
are not limited to a "narrow
concern with the present."
In discussing Vietnam, Sen.
McCarthy said the U.S. commitment is "in no way" proportioned
to our presence there.
He criticized
U.S. activities in Vietnam, saying there is no effective pacification program under way and
that the prospects of peace are
slim.
It was when Sen. McCarthy'
finished his speech that the invasion of the podium began. After a terse few minutes combat-- '
ing questioners from. the floor
and hecklers on the stage, Sen.
McCarthy quickly exited followed by USSPA Executive Director David Peterson.
Some schools discussed pulling out of the national organization because of displeasure
with the conference.

ordered to disband. Any films
of Vietnam not previously
cleared by the state department

are subject to confiscation. Clear
the rooms; arrests will be made."
No Gps
Rut Capt. Jurgenson was no
wherein sight. "Where is Capt.
Jurgenson . . . where is he . . .
I don't
see any cops," came
the cries. Doubt, suspicion and
fear grew. The films stopped,
the lights came back on and
senses were somewhat collected.
Robert Theobald, a British
socioeconomist, stepped between
Lloyd-Jone- s
and the delegates.
He quieted the crowd and asked
them to realize what had gone
on. He said it showed "the
distance between people" and
"how up tight" everyone was.
In minutes, or hours in some
cases, realizations did come; people began to understand what
had happened. Many appreciated the experience "It really
showed where it's at," said one.
"It rang home the brutal facts,"
said another.
One girl said she was insulted by "being made to think"
in that manner and several others
voiced objection to being duped.
"Sure, you were structured
into a situation where you were
being duped," a delegate replied,
"but you're constantly being

duped today."

The South 's No.

Briefs
The Computing Center will
offer a short course in FORTRAN
IV for the IBM System 3G050
computer.
Two faculty members of the
graduate Library Science Department are completing research on
the Carnegie libraries in this
country and the Cennan book
trade after the rise of Hitler in
Europe.
The researchers are Dr. George
S. llobinski and Dr. Hubert E.
Cuzden.
Dr. llobinski' s study on
Andrew Carnegie's role in American public library development
wiU be published this year by the
American Library Association.

The South's outstanding student

ft,

l8-- 3

Adviser Suggested
For All Student Publications
Full-tim- e

President John W. Oswald has
approved a recommendation that
e
a
adviser to all student publications at the University be hired. Dr. Cifford Rly-toreported to the Board of
Student Publications Monday
full-tim-

night.

The decision was made after
between Dr. Blyton,
Dr. Oswald, Robert L. Johnson,
of Student Affairs,
and Dr. A. D. Albright, executive vice president to discuss
the responsibilities and editorial
policies of the Kernel.
"The President is strong
on the issue of freedom of speech
and is not interested in censorship, but is concerned with responsibilities. The Student Publications Board is the official
publisher of all student publications and is held responsible
for what goes in the yearbook
and the Kernel," Dr. Blyton,
board chairman, said.
"Dr. Oswald expects us to
formulate editorial policies with
the editors and advisers, to direct
those policies, and to direct the
budget," Dr. Blyton added.
Dr. Blyton concluded that as
chairman of the board he will do
everything in his power to maintain a sound program and to give
everyone freedom, and to work
with them, and he thinks all
members should do the same.
a meeting

1

"We've got to have a productive unit," he said.
In other action brought before
the lxard, Dr. Wasley Krogdahl,
who considered action against a
former Kernel editor for a 1965
editorial concerning the Young
Americans for Freedom (YAK),
asked the Ixmd in its last meeting for:
Censure of the editor responsible for the editorial which made

allegedly untrue accusations
against both the YAK and its

faculty advisors.
Official action to establish
a policy of the Kernel that provides equal space on the editorial page to persons or designated
representatives of organizations
about whom editorial comment
or allegedly inaccurate news stories have been published.
Kernel publication of an objective news item reporting the
board's action.
At yesterday's meeting Dr.
Krogdahl's requests were taken
up by the board. In answer to
the first request, the current board
said they would make no statement on the action of a previous
editor and a previous board. The
current board can only deal with
present problems.
Dr. Krogdahl's second request
was answered with the statement
that the board concurs that
on Page 7, Col. 4
ed

College Daily

The Kentucky Kjernel

NEWS

non-milita-

Campus
News

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tuesday, Tcb.

SPORTS
SOCIETY

FEATURES
daily-yo-

ur

Kentucky Kernel keeps you posted on events
here on campus, within the commonwealth, and
around the nation.

Greeting you daily Monday through Friday,
the Kernel's staff of top notch reporters and editors are constantly close to the pulse of campus
activities. When top campus news stories break,
Kernel reporters are on the scene to report the
event.
Are you curious about the latest developments
on campus? What steps are being taken toward
making UK a more outstanding university? Will
the Wildcats reign on the gridiron, the hardwood, and the diamond during the coming
campaigns? How does the social atmosphere in
the Blue Grass compare with that of other colleges and universities across the country? These
and many other timely questions will be an

swered in the Kernel's pages during the
ing year.

The Kernel won the

19G2

com-

Collegiate Journal-

ism Award as the best daily on all Southern
campuses. This honor was a great performance
as the Southern District Council of the American

Newspaper Guild passed the same honor to the
UK daily in 19G1. In 1907, Sigma Delta Chi
honored the Kernel with first place in news
writing.
Since 1918 The Kernel has had the distinction
of being rated among the nation's top ten student publications each year. Numerous staff
members have won William Randolph Hearst
awards for outstanding editorials, features, sports
and news reporting.
your newspaper. Its purpose is to
bring the news to you accurately, completely
and objectively.

This

is

* 2 --

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tuesday, Feb. f, 10f8

Girls To Take Tour Of Europe

Home-E- c
By JEANNIE LEEDOM
"Fly Away, Kentucky Bluebird" will le the theme song

ine students will visit lasluon
liouses, fabric houses and museums in Dublin, London, Brussels, Copenhagen, Lucerne and
Paris.
One junior coed said, "The
tour comes at a great time for
me. I'll have a short break after
finals and then still have a chance
to go to summer school or get a
summer job when I return."
"The students who partici- -

for about 30 coeds flying to Eur-

ope this spring.
The School of Home Economics is sponsoring an educational
European tour for students interested in textiles and design.
The y
trip is scheduled
as an extension of the
May 0
spring semester.
16-da-

14-3-

EARLY BIRD
MATINEE
1:S0 to 8 p.m.
Men. thra Frl.
All seats 60c

ONE WEEK ONLY!
4, 6, 8, 10 dally!

NOW! Ends Thurs.

X,

500-lcv- cl

OUT FAST, MOD,
FURIOUS,
VIOLENT,
FUNNY,
P1CTURFS Presents
and EXCITING!'
N.Y. Past

One of the highlights of the
trip will be the sightseeing tour

of London guided by Rafael
vice president of Student
Government.
The European study tour will
be directed by Miss Kathleen

Val-lebon- a,

u

numnnrnanotor

"V
ciMiM

starts Tor.ionnoivi

Hoell and Mrs. Charlotte
nett, members of the home

compomstion

EHdusivoi 1st nuni

"ONE OF THE YEAR'S 10 BEST!
that is not only one of the best of the year
but also one of the best seriocomic social satires we've had from Hollywood. Devastating
and uproarious, adorned with delicious incidents and crackling dialogue, a lively, exciting
experience through vivid cinema. Dustin Hoffman is nothing short of superb. Funny, outrageous and touching. 'The Graduate' is a sophisticated film that puts Mr. Nichols and his
associates on a level with any of the best satirists working abroad today. Mark it down in your
date book as a picture you'll have to see and
maybe see twice to savor all its sharp, satiric
wit and cinematic treats."

Beneco-

nomics faculty.
Miss Hoell, who will be participating in her third study tour,
sponsored a group of girls from
Khode Island last year on a similar tour. A graduate of Drexel
Institute in Philadelphia, Miss
Hoell joined the UK staff last
semester and is presently teaching interior design.
Mrs. Bennett, a graduate of
Louisiana
State University,

One student admitted, "My

arts and sciences background required by the University should
really be an asset. With my general knowledge of art and music,
perhaps I will become involved
in and enlightened by Europe."

"IT COMES

PARAMOUNT

pate will receive two credit hours.
The
course is listed as a
special problem number and is
designed to meet the needs of
our students," said Mrs. Charlotte Bennett, a
for
the tour.
On the agenda are Bunratty
Castle in Dublin, Shakespearen
points of interest in London,
lace making in Brussels, unusual
architecture in Lucerne and
Christian Dior and Lanvin salons
in Paris.

teaches textiles and other cloth
ing courses.
The cost of the trip is $665,
including two meals a day, lodging and travel expenses.
Registration for the study tour
must be completed by Friday,
Feb. 9. Junior and senior home
economics majors, graduate students and alumnae are eligible
to participate in the tour. If
space is available, other UK students may participate without
credit.

Hearts And Flowers
By KATHY ROSSER
14th of February is rap-

The

idly approaching, bringing hearts,
candy and flowers for the girls.
But what will Valentine's Day
bring for the men?
Many girls find that an 8
by 10 portrait of themselves makes
a good Valentine's present for
their steady. Or, several department stores feature Valentine's
Day ties, shorts and pajamas,
decorated with hearts and cupids.
If he likes books or hobbies,
a copy of "The Liverpool Scene,"
a book of pop poetry and interviews with people from along
the Mercey Beat, makes an unusual gift. Or a book of poetry
by his favorite poet.

If he prefers magazines to
books, a year's subscription to
Playboy or the hippie magazine
Cheetah would be an appreciated gift.
Or buy something for his car
and tie it with a big red bow
a miniature tool kit, or perhaps
a fuzzy "creature" to set on the
dashboard.
If the traditional gift of candy
is appealing, buy himachocalate
valentine, a huge red lollipop
or even a box of bourbon candy
wrapped in Valentine's paper.
There are also humorous
homemade gifts to give such as
handkerchiefs embroidered with
big red hearts or a white sweatshirt with cupids drawn in magic
marker.

A film

Bosley Crowther, New York Times

"THE FRESHEST,

FUNNIEST AND MOST

TOUCHING FILM OF THE YEAR!"
Hollis Alpert, Saturday Review
"A MILESTONE IN AMERICAN FILM HISTORY!"
Stanley Kauffmann
JOSEPH

E. LEVINE

POlStNTS

MIKE NICHOLS

Coed Takes ROTC
"They kid me and call me participated in shooting matches
Cadet Haggard, but I don't act- at Murray, Cincinnati and West
ually have any rank," saysLoret-t- a Virginia.
"I think shooting is pretty
Haggard. She is the only UK
coed taking a Reserve Officers much of a challenge,"' says
Training Corps (ROTC) course. Loretta. She started the activity
Loretta, a senior business ed- in high school and has been a
ucation major from Lexington, member of the UK team for four

is studying Military History, years.
Loretta is looking forward to
which she says is the study of
"the principles of war and how graduation this May. Although
they relate to various battles." she admits not being ready to
"When you see men being settle down immediately, she
drafted to Vietnam and KoTea, eventually plans to teach
you wonder why they have to go
over there and what you can do
to prevent it. Through the ROTC
course I'm finding out a little
bit about the various aspects of
war," says Loretta.
Loretta spends several hours
each week practicing shooting
for the Girls' Rifle Team. As
captain of the team, she has
By LEONORA DODSWORTH
ROME (AP)-P- ale
colors and
KENTUCKY
plfy
a line that is elegance that's
"" IN f " "
A ?f
A
luA 0 Sj
j
the Italian fashion look for spring
1
and summer.
The wheel has turned full
circle away from the mod and
the mini; the Italian couturiers
have been unanimous in choosf
,
ing a coolly poised heroine for
the new fashion image.
There's more fit, luore shapeliness, more femininity.
Boyishness and brashness are
COLOR by DELUXE PANAVISION
banned. But sexiness is subtle,
compounded of soft romanticism
and that
c
quality,
allure.
Women will hav e to find their
NOW SHOWING!
waistlines once more after sevLEE
eral seasons of skimming shift
shaj)cs. An abundance of belts
MARVIN
and snugly fitted bodices stress
the slender midriff.
lxok-keepin-

g.

Italians
Look For
Summer

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FORMERLY THE ASHLAND...
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SMART, NEW,
INTIMATE THEATREI
2662174

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since

1U1S.

Advertising published herein is intended to help the reader buy. Any
false or misleading advertising should
.be reported to The Editors.
SUBSCRIPTION
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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tuesday,

To the Editor of the Kernel:
I am writing this letter to express
my feelings concerning the actions of
Boston University in dropping university
credit for ROTC courses. What bothers
me most Is not the fact that Boston saw
fit to drop ROTC credit, but the fact
that this action has been accepted and
even advocated at many other universities.
The university can be defined as a
place where one seeks truth, wisdom,
sophistication, understanding, or knowledge. These terms however, for all their
nobility, are extremely vague. I submit,
that without losing sight of these high
ideals, a valid definition of the university
is a place where one is prepared to lead
a fuller, more successful life through
specialized training in the area of his
chosen vocation.
Who can say that a career as a military officer is less "professional" a profession than any other. Many educated,
honest, and courageous men have devoted their lives to this career. Were they
all bloodthirsty war mongers? Were they
all seeking money and fame? I hardly
think so. A military life, like any other
profession, demands dedication, but in
the military, the reward is never money
and seldom fame.
I find it hard to see how any group
of people can say, in effect, that a profession composed of so many men obviously dedicated to higher ideals than
most attribute to them, is unworthyornot
entitled to lie trained at a university for
university credit.
Even if we take a negative view of
the situation, our conclusions should still
World-Wid- e

Student Strike
By HARVEY WASSERMAN

College Press Service
than
CHICAGO (CPS)-M- ore
900 student activists from the
United States and Latin America have called for a world-wid- e
student strike "against the war
in Vietnam and racism."
The students announced plans
for the strike during a conference
here last weekend sponsored by
the Student Mobilization Comd
organimittee, a New
zation which helped plan large-scal- e
demonstrations in New York
and California last April 15 and
the massive demonstration at the
Pentagon last Oct. 21.

Feb.

f,

Letters To The Editor

be the same. In view of the tremendous
amount of money our country is spending
annually on defense, I would feel much
safer knowing that the deployment of the
troops and material supported by this
huge expenditure was supervised by professionals, well trained in their business.
The courses in Military Science for
which credit has been questioned involve
such topics as military history, tactics,
administration, law, and tradition. Also
included are
drill sessions.
I fail to see what makes these
subjects
less current or credit-worth- y
than many
subjects in such fields as art, music,
physical education, and education.
Should credit be offered for sculpture and not military history, for painting and not military tactics, for instnic-tio- n
in how to play the cello and not
military law, for courses involving the
construction of puppets and papier mache
figures and not military administration,
or for ballroom dancing and not military
drill
ad nauseam.
I believe that I have made my point,
for better or worse. I would add that as
a senior who has never been involved
in ROTC, I have no credits to gain or
lose in this issue. However, this is not
the point. What was accomplished at
Boston University was a serious injustice
not only to those students directly involved, but also in that a group of people
has been able to make a value judgment
with such serious implications concerning
the entirety of a given dedicated profession.
David P. Rolph
A&S Senior
ic

...

S3

There is an attempt afoot on this
campus to change this state of affairs.
Today's "Cold War" C.I. is returning
to the college campus all across this
nation. He's the recipient of $155 per
month if he's married and has no children. Herein lies the problem. His $155
a month doesn't buy the same amount
of education as did his father's or uncle's
paycheck of $105 per month plus books.
The cost of living has increased greatly
since dad went to school .after World
War II and so has the cost of education
which is only a small proportion of the
true cost of education.

Perhaps Moore saw the movie after
taking his own advice about having "a
couple of beers." Either that or he missed
the first ten minutes of the film because
he was still thinking about the previews
of the coming attractions.
Carol Schrepfer

It is a fact that the World War II
veteran who obtained a college degree via
the G.I. Bill returned five dollars more
tax revenue to his country than did his
country than did his counter part who
returned to a job without obtaining a
college education.

Craduate Student
English

To the Editor of the Kernel:

last fall on one of
their evening news programs, toured today's college campus to look at the "Cold
War" veteran. They concluded by saying
that he is not a joiner. He avoids active
participation in organized group activi- IIunUey-Brinkle-

y,

ties. Rather he attempts to blend in with
the rest of the student body. He avoids
all discussion about Vietnam, with a few
exceptions.

--

A group of veterans is going to meet
Friday, February 2, 1968, in the Student
Center Theater at noon to discuss what
the veteran of today can do to help himself to more educational assistance through
the G.I. Bill. The 750 or so campus veterans are invited to attend. The meeting
will be brief if everyone will be prompt
at 12 noon this Friday.
David Mclellan

Atroo.omer9

sociolotegecoiiiomisteg

of concentrated antiwar activity

scheduled from April 20 to April
The
period coincides
with the "Ten Days to Shake
the Empire" program announced
at a national meeting of Students'
for a Democratic Society last
December.
The black caucus at the conference last weekend called its
strike against "imperialism, racism, and the draft."

30.

10-d-

i

The majority of students attending the conference strongly
supported the strike, but there
'still was some opposition. The
centered
largely
opposition
around charges that the Student
Mobilization

Committee

is

broad-base-

aceoiLmilBiniilEgpliysicktSg

maillieiniMticMini9

et9ete9eteo

a

"manipulative elitist organizacontion without a.
stituency." Some students also
charged that the call for a worldwide strike is a bad tactic because it does not stem from nor
does it contribute