xt7q833n075b https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7q833n075b/data/mets.xml Lexington, Ky. University of Kentucky 1963 1964 The University of Kentucky Gradute Schools course catalogs contain bound volumes dating from 1926 through 2005. After 2005, the course catalogs ceased to be printed and became available online only. course catalogs English University of Kentucky Copyright retained by the University of Kentucky. Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. University of Kentucky Graduate School course catalogs A Bulletin of the University of Kentucky Graduate School, 1963-1964 text A Bulletin of the University of Kentucky Graduate School, 1963-1964 1963 1963 1964 2020 true xt7q833n075b section xt7q833n075b UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY

Graduate School

1963 64

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A BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY

  

f at the Post Office Lexington, Kentu ,Under
16,1924 Acceptance for mailing at special

30, 1920. Edited by the Department of «Public
e 0 I0 ’nted under its direction.

VOLUMESS JULY, 1963 NUMBER 7

 

  

 

 

 

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY

Graduate School

1963-64

 

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Contents

University Calendar for 1963-1964 ........................................................... 4

General Regulations of the Graduate School ................................................. 7
Subjects and Directors of Graduate Study ...................................................... 29
Graduate Courses of Study ................................................................................ 33
1. Agriculture and Home Economics ................................................ 33

11. Arts and Sciences ............................................................................ 57

III. Commerce and Economics ............................................................ 143

IV. Education .............................. . ........................................................ 153

V. Engineering .................................................................................... 173

VI. Law ................................................................................................ 193

VII. Medicine .......................................................................................... 197
VIII. Pharmacy ........................................................................................ 203

Fellows and Scholars for 1963-1964 ................................................................ 205
The Graduate Council and Graduate Faculty .................................................. 207
Index .................................................................................................................. 21 3

 

 

 

   

   
  
 
 
  
  
 
  
 
  
   
  
  
  
 
 
   
 
  
 
   
 
  
 
  
  
 
  
  

University Calendar for the Year 1963-64

1963 F all Semester l

Aug.1 Thursday—Last day to submit application and transcripts to Adi IV
missions Office for Fall Semester 1963-64 1 1V

Sept. 3, 4 Tuesday and Wednesday—Classification, registration, and orienta~‘ 1‘
tion for students not pre-registered 1‘

Sept. 5 Thursday—Class work begins

Sept. 9 Monday—Last clay to enter an organized class for the Fall 1

Semester
Sept. 16 Monday—Last day to drop a course without a grade

I

I

Sept. 17,18 Tuesday and \Vednesday—Last days for filing application for; 1
December degree in College Dean’s office I

1

Oct. 11,12 Friday and Saturday—Graduate Record Examination

Nov. 28 Thursday—Thanksgiving holiday

Dec. 2 Monday—Last day to drop a class before final examinations 1

Dec. 5 Thursday—Thesis deadline )

Dec. 11 Wednesday—Last day to submit application and transcripts to Ad- ]
missions Office for Spring Semester 1963-64 l

Dec. 16-21 Monday through Saturday—Final Examinations 7 1

Dec. 21 Saturday—End of Fall Semester

Dec. 23 Monday—All grades due in Registrar’s Office by 4:00 pm. A

1964 Spring Semester

Ian; 13-15 Monday, Tuesday, \Vednesday—Registration

Ian. 16 Thursday—Class work begins

Ian. 22 W ednesday—Last day to enter an organized class for the Spring:
Semester

Ian. 27 Monday—Last day to drop a course without a grade

Ian. 29, 30 \Vednesday and Thursday—Last days for filing application for”
May degree in College Dean’s office

i

March 13,14 Friday and Saturday—Graduate Record Examination

March 14-22 Saturday noon through Sunday—Spring vacation. Class Wk
begins Monday, March 23rd, at 8:00 am.

April 18 Saturday—Last day to drop a class before final examinations
April 23 Thursday—Thesis deadline

May 4-9 Monday through Saturday—Final Examinations

   

     
   
  
 
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
 
   
 
 
 

l
-64 ! May 9
J May 9
l May 11
‘ May 16
and orientar‘ May 17
May 18

cripts to Art

1964
June 5, 6

June 8

for the Fall}

lication for a June 11

June 18
J June 22, 23

nations June 26, 27
July 4
iscripts to Ad- July 13
July 31
August 1

0 pm. August 3

|
l

l
for the Sprifll‘

3

plication for 3

un '

Class work

    

.inations

Saturday—End of Spring Semester

Saturday—Last day to submit application and transcripts to Ad-
missions Oifice for 1964 Summer Session

Monday—All grades due in Registrar’s Office by 4:00 pm. ,
Saturday—Alumni Day
Sunday—Baccalaureate Services

Monday—Ninety-seventh Annual Commencement

Summer Session

Friday and Saturday—Registration

Monday—Class work begins

Thursday—Last day to enter an organized class
Thursday—Last day to drop a course without a grade

Monday and Tuesday—Last days for filing application for July
degree in College Dean’s office

Friday and Saturday—Graduate Record Examination
Saturday—Independence Day holiday
Monday—Thesis deadline

F riday—End of Summer Session

Saturday—Last day to submit application and transcripts to
Admissions Office for Fall Semester 1964-65

Monday—A11 grades due in Registrar’s Office by 4:00 pm.

 

 

 

  

 The Graduate School

ALBERT DENNIS KIRWAN, M.A., LL.B., PH.D., Dean
LEWIS W. COCHRAN, M.S., PH.D., Associate Dean
LUCY ROBERTA HOGAN, A.B., Administrative Assistant

Introductory Statement

THE UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY began offering graduate work in 1870,
and awarding graduate degrees in 1876, although the Graduate School as
a distinct unit was not organized until 1912.

The Graduate School is concerned With advanced study and research
carried on by the faculty and students of all colleges and departments.
Under it the total graduate resources of the University are merged in
order to promote the achievement of knowledge in an atmosphere of

 

 

 

free and lively inquiry.

Graduate work is oflered in all colleges in the University. Directors
of graduate study in the various subjects are listed in this bulletin just

before the list of courses.

The following advanced degrees are conferred:

MASTER OF ARTS

MASTER OF SCIENCE

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURE

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN HOME
ECONOMICS

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN
AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN CIVIL
ENGINEERING

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ELECTRICAL
ENGINEERING

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN LIBRARY
SCIENCE

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN MECHANICAL
ENGINEERING

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN
METALLURGICAL ENGINEERING

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN MINING
ENGINEERING

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN NUCLEAR
ENGINEERING

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN PUBLIC
HEALTH

CHEMICAL ENGINEER (CH.E.)

CIVIL ENGINEER (C.E.)

ELECTRICAL ENGINEER (E.E.)

MECHANICAL ENGINEER (M.E.)

METALLURGICAL ENGINEER (MET.E.)

MINING ENGINEER (E.M.)

MASTER OF ARTS IN EDUCATION

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION

MASTER OF BUSINESS
ADMINISTRATION

MASTER OF MUSIC

SPECIALIST IN EDUCATION

DOCTOR OF EDUCATION (ED.D.)

DOCTOR OF ENGINEERING (ENGR.D.)

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

 

 

 8 / GRADUATE SCHOOL

The degree of Doctor of Philosophy is offered with major work in the
following fields: Agricultural Economics, Anatomy, Animal Science,
Biology, Biochemistry, Chemistry, Dairy Science, Diplomacy and Inter
national Commerce, Economics, Education, English, Guidance and
Counseling, History, Mathematics, Microbiology, Physics, Physiology.
Political Science, Psychology, and in the combined fields of Sociology
and Rural Sociology. Minor work may be carried in any department
offering graduate courses.

 

Organization of the Graduate School

THE GRADUATE FACULTY consists of the Dean of the Graduate School
and all persons appointed thereto by the President of the University in
the manner set forth below. As the chief University agency for the
promotion of the ideals of graduate study, it determines the policies of
the Graduate School and makes recommendations to the University‘
Faculty on such matters as require the approval of that body, and it may
make recommendations on other matters to the President, or to other
administrative officials. All rules affecting graduate work and the inaugu-
ration of new graduate majors must be approved by the Graduate Faculty.

New Graduate Faculty members may be proposed to the Dean of
the Graduate School at any time by the college deans and departmentl
heads concerned, or in the case of persons not attached to a college
faculty, by the Executive Vice-President of the University. Eligibility
qualifications are as follows:

1. The doctor’s degree or its equivalent in scholarly reputation.

2. The rank of assistant professor (or equivalent), or higher.

3. Scholarly maturity and professional productivity as demonstrated
by publications, editorial services, research surveys, creative work‘
or patents; and research in progress at the time of proposal.

4. Definite interest in graduate work and the willingness to pat
ticipate in the graduate program.

Appointment to the Graduate Faculty is made by the President of:

the University on nomination by the Dean of the Graduate School after

he and the Graduate Council have studied the credentials submitted ill.

support of the proposed members.

Administrative officers assigning teaching and other duties to mem‘
bers of the Graduate Faculty who are taking an active part in the graduate
program(i.e., are heavily engaged in directing theses, carrying on p10
ductive research, etc.) should make appropriate reduction in the duties
required of such teachers.

   
  
 
 
 
 
 
  
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
  
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   

  
 
   
 
  
 
  
  
 
 
 
 
  
  
  
 
   
  
   
  
  
 
 
  
  
 
  
  
 
  
 
  
 
 
  
  
 

 
  

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UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY / 9

THE DEAN AND Hrs OFFICE. The Dean of the Graduate School is
charged with the administration of the policies adopted by the Graduate
Faculty and the University FaCulty relating to graduate studies. He
presides over all meetings of the Graduate FaCulty and calls meetings
of this faculty whenever he thinks it advisable or whenever requested
to do so by one fourth of the membership. He makes recommendations
to the Graduate Faculty respecting the requirements for advanced
degrees, the regulations necessary to insure a high standard of graduate
work, the departments of colleges authorized to offer courses leading
to graduate degrees, and all other aspects of the graduate program. He
appoints a committee for each graduate student, arranges for final
examinations, advises students with regard to their studies and the
requirements of the Graduate School, and in all other ways administers
the graduate program in the interests of efficient instruction and the
highest attainment possible on the part of each graduate student. He
is responsible for determining and certifying to the Registrar candidates
who have fulfilled requirements for advanced degrees, and he reports
annually to the President of the University on the work of the Graduate
School and its needs.

The President and the Dean of the Graduate School are members
ex—officio of all committees of the Graduate Faculty.

THE GRADUATE COUNCIL is composed of eleven members and the
Dean of the Graduate School, who is chairman. There are eight elected
representatives and three members appointed by the Dean of the Grad-
uate School. One of the elected members is from the College of
Agriculture and Home Economics, two from the College of Arts and
Sciences, one from the College of Commerce, two from the College of
Education, one from the College of Engineering, and one from the
College of Medicine. The member or members from each of these
colleges are elected by the Graduate Faculty members in that college.
The term of oflice of the elected and appointed members is three years,
and no member may succeed himself until three years have elapsed since
the completion of his last term.

The Graduate Council approves or disapproves proposals concerning
courses offered for graduate credit, and advises and lends assistance to the
Dean in his execution of policies and regulations determined by the
Graduate Faculty. Specifically, the Council

1. Studies requests of departments relating to proposed graduate
programs.

2. Reviews existing programs and courses.
. In cooperation with the Dean, initiates recommendations to the

 

 

 

     
 
     

10 / GRADUATE SCHOOL

\

  

Graduate Faculty. (This procedure is not intended to preventa
faculty member from bringing any recommendation or request
directly before the Graduate Faculty.)

  
  
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
   

The Graduate Council has only such authority as is herein granted,l
or such as the Dean or the Graduate Faculty may delegate to it. A!
majority of the Graduate Council constitutes a quorum for the trans.
action of business.

 

. l
DIRECTORS OF GRADUATE STUDY. A director of graduate study"

serves as adviser to each student majoring in his area until the student
has a thesis director. The director of graduate study then recommends .
that this thesis director be appointed the student's adviser or committee .
chairman. In areas where theses are not required, the director of
graduate study is the adviser for all students not writing theses. All
student classification schedules must be endorsed by the student’s adviser.

If it is desirable, a director of graduate study may recommend that
additional advisers in the area be appointed. A director of graduate
study who is to be absent from the University for as long as a semester
must call this fact to the attention of the Dean so that a substitute may
be appointed.

Directors of graduate study make annual reports to the Dean of the
Graduate School on the progress and needs of graduate work in their
areas in time to permit the Dean to use this information in his annual -
report to the President of the University.

The Dean of the Graduate School, with the advice of the college
dean(s) and the approval of the President, may recommend to the
Graduate Faculty the areas of graduate study and research into which
the University may be divided. (The logical unit for an area isr
department. By common consent, however, certain departments maybe
grouped into an area; and in exceptional cases a department may he‘
divided into two or more areas.) The Directors of Graduate Study for .
the various areas are recommended to the President of the University
by the Dean of the Graduate School after he has conferred with the
respective graduate stafis and college deans of the areas concerned.

 

a- ,(K

ESTABLISHMENT AND MODIFICATION OF GRADUATE PROGRAMS. An
area which wishes to establish a new graduate program or modify an
existing one must submit its program to the Graduate Council, which
will make recommendations concerning it to the Graduate Faculty.

HONORARY DEGREES. The selection of candidates for honorary degreeS
originates in the Graduate Faculty, and the Graduate Faculty makes its
recommendations to the University Faculty.

Honorary degrees are normally conferred at the May Commence-
merit, but may be conferred at other times with the approval of the.

    
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
  
   
 
 
  
 
 
  
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
  
  
  
 
  
  
 
  
  
      

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raduate study1
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UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY / 11

Graduate Faculty. Recipients must be present in order to receive
honorary degrees.

Admission

A student who is a graduate of a fully accredited institution of
higher learning and has a grade—point standing of 2.5 on a basis of 4.0
may apply for admission to the Graduate School by submitting to the
Dean of Admissions two official transcripts of his undergraduate courses
and a written application at least a month before anticipated entrance.
Application blanks may be obtained from the Dean of Admissions or
from the office of the Graduate School. A student with a grade—point
average of less than 2.5, or a graduate of a non—accredited institution,
may be admitted only after entrance examinations and other evidence
acceptable to the Department, the Dean of the Graduate School, and
the Dean of Admissions indicate that he is capable of doing satisfactory
graduate work. Individual departments may establish higher require—
ments.

It should be clearly understood that a graduate student may not be
able to begin immediately a full graduate program leading to the degree
he desires. It may be necessary for him to demonstrate his ability to
write accurate and effective English or he may have to satisfy certain
prerequisites which he omitted in his undergraduate curriculum. De-
ficiencies are determined by the department in which the major work
is to be done. Ordinarily, a graduate student may begin a full program
in any field in which he has a balanced undergraduate major or its
equivalent.

Admission to the Graduate School by the Dean of Admissions entitles
a student to take such courses as he desires, provided he has the neces—
sary prerequisites. However, admission does not automatically make a
student a candidate for a graduate degree.

Attendance in the Graduate School at the University of Kentucky is
not a right. It is a privilege which may be withdrawn by the University
or any area of graduate study if it is deemed necessary by the Dean
of the Graduate School in order to safeguard the University’s standards
of scholarship and character.

ADVANCED DEGREES FOR FACULTY MEMBERS

‘ Members of the faculty of the University of Kentucky having a rank
hlgher than that of instructor may not be considered as candidates for
advanced degrees from this institution. They may take graduate courses,
but these may not apply toward a degree from the University.

 

 

 

   

12 / GRADUATE SCHOOL

 
  
 
 
 
 
 
   
  
 
  
   
 
  
   
 
  
  
 
 
 
  
  
  
  
  
   
  
 
 
 

THE GRADUATE. RECORD EXAMINATION

61
All students working for graduate degrees must take the Graduate G
Record Examination (the Area Tests, the Aptitude Test, and the,
Advanced Test in the major subject). This must be done no later thanl A
the first term of graduate work. (See the calendar at the front of this‘ towaI
bulletin.) l part 1
‘ APPLICATION FOR FULL GRADUATE STANDING 7 211;:

A graduate student desiring to earn a graduate degree must be stude
approved for full graduate standing by the department in which he? be at
intends to major and by the Graduate School. Application should be to be
made as soon as scores on the Graduate Record Examination are avail-

 

 

exce
able, and in any case prior to the beginning of the semester or term in 1 be 5;
which the degree is sought. . Schoj

To be admitted to full graduate standing, a student (in addition to l given
meeting the admission requirements) must have scores on the Graduate l the (
Record Examination satisfactory to the department concerned and to l withi
the Dean of the Graduate School, and a B average or higher on all assigr
graduate work completed at the University of Kentucky.

Graduate work taken before a student is admitted to full graduate
standing will be evaluated by the Director of Graduate Study in the 1:
major area and by the Dean of the Graduate School at the time the _ drop
application for full graduate standing is considered. r his i}

GRADUATING SENIORS AS PART-TIME GRADUATE STUDENTS Sf“?

A senior in the University of Kentucky lacking no more than six onlyé
credit hours for graduation and having an undergraduate average of at '3 from
least 2.5 may register in the Graduate School with the consent of his l
college dean and the Dean of the Graduate School. Approval of the
appropriate director of graduate study is required if the student is to be ‘ T
an applicant for a degree. The total load of such a student may not the l
exceed twelve credit hours. The graduate residence assigned is one and l basis
one—half weeks for each credit hour of graduate work beyond the six or I ith
fewer credit hours needed to complete undergraduate requirements. The ' :Jclv'
incidental fee is that of a full-time student in the school in which more 1,;
than half of the work is taken. In cases where the load is evenly divided scale-

between the schools, the larger fee is assessed. Requirements for the
undergraduate degree must be completed during the semester in which
the student is allowed to register for part—time graduate work. Students ‘
desiring to enroll in the Graduate School under these conditions must j
fill out in duplicate a petition listing the course or courses to be taken

in order to complete their undergraduate requirements. The petition

must be approved by both deans concerned.

mwmnw>

  

      
 
   
 
 
  
  
  
  
  
 
  
  
  
   
  
 
 
   
  
 
  
  
  
 
 
  
 
  
  
 
  
  
  
  
   
  
     
  

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taken
etition

 

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY / 13

General Requirements for All Advanced Degrees

COURSES AND GRADES

All courses numbered 500 through 799 may be counted for credit
toward a graduate degree provided they are approved as an appropriate
part of the student’s graduate program by his graduate adviser or com-
mittee. Courses numbered 400 to 499 carry graduate credit for non-
maiors only. An over—all average of B on all work taken as a graduate
student, as well as a B average on all work carrying graduate credit, must
be attained before an advanced degree may be awarded. All work is
to be counted and none of it may be omitted in computing the average
except those grades in courses which do not give graduate credit may
be omitted from a student’s average by the Dean of the Graduate
School on recommendation of the student’s adviser. D grades are not
given to graduate students. An “incomplete” (1), unless the Dean of
the Graduate School grants an extension of time, must be removed
within one calendar year after the close of the term in which the I is
assigned if the student is to receive credit.

DROPPING OF COURSES

During the first ten class days of the term a graduate student may
drop a regular course without a grade, provided he has the approval of
his instructor, his director of graduate study, and the Dean. Regular
courses may not be dropped later in the term without the assignment
of a grade: W if a student withdraws passing, E if he is failing. However,
only under very special circumstances may he be allowed to withdraw
from a class within two weeks of the final examination period.

GRADES

The official grades of graduate students are recorded in the office of
the Registrar. The Registrar provides official transcripts on the same
basis as for undergraduate students. Also, he provides the Dean
with the grades of all students in order that the Dean may be able to
advise students concerning their programs.

The grading of graduate students is done according to the following
scale:

A—high achievement 4 grade points per credit
B—satisfactory achievement 3 grade points per credit
C—minimum passing grade 2 grade points per credit
E—failure 0 grade points per credit
I—incomplete see explanation below
S—satisfactory see explanation below

 

 

  

 

 14- / GRADUATE SCHOOL

A grade of I (incomplete) may be assigned to a graduate student
if a part of the work of a course remains undone and there is a reasonable
possibility that a passing grade will result from completion of the work. _
No student may graduate with an I on his record without the permission l
of his adviser and the appr0val of the Dean of the Graduate School. ‘

A grade of S (satisfactory work in progress) may be recorded for
students in graduate courses which carry no credit; and in graduate
seminars, independent work courses, and research courses which extend t
beyond the normal limits of a semester or summer term. The grade may
not be given to a student in a course carrying credit if the student has i
done unsatisfactory work or if he has failed to do a reasonable amount l
of work. The project must be substantially continuous in its progress. ‘
When the work has been.completed, a final grade will be substituted for .
the S.

Once a grade (other than an I or S) has been reported to the Regie )
trar’s Office, it may not be changed unless an error was made at the time 1.
the grade was given and recorded, and then only upon the writtenI
unanimous approval of the instructor, the Registrar, and the Dean of
the Graduate School.

 

l

REGISTRATION AND CLASSIFICATION

i
All students expecting graduate credit must be enrolled in the i
Graduate School. Graduate Students will conform to the general regin (
tration schedule of the University and may not enter later than the last
allowable date set by the Registrar.
Before registering, a graduate student must obtain his adviscr’s at}
proval of his proposed program.

STUDENT LOADS AND SHORT COURSES

The normal load of a graduate student during any semester is twelve .
credit hours, and under no circumstances may it exceed fifteen credit i
hours. In the summer session the normal load is six credit hours and ‘
the maximum nine. Graduate students serving in the University as;
assistants or part-time instructors should register for less than the normal
load, as determined by their advisers. Persons holding full-time working
or professional assignments, whether employed by the UniverSity or not, i
may not take for graduate credit toward a degree in any single semester .
or term more than 5 credit hours. A student may petition for a waiver
of this rule if he meets the following conditions: (1) has satisfactorily
completed six credit hours of graduate work; (2) has attained higher ‘
than national average scores on the aptitude and advanced tests of the
Graduate Record Examination; (3) and has appropriate employmfiflt
facilities and conditions. Two short courses of 4 weeks or less, or hw

    
  
 
 
 
  
  
 
  
  
 
  
 
 
  
   
  
  
  
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
  
  
 
 
 
 
 
   

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full—term courses and a short course, may not be taken simultaneously.
A short course may not carry credit greater than the number of weeks
during which it is offered.

“RESIDENCE” DEFINED

One of the requirements to be met by a candidate for an advanced
degree is that of residence. Meeting this requirement does not, however,
qualify a candidate for a degree. A longer time may be required to meet
other requirements.

Full-time residence (18 weeks) requires a minimum of 9 credit hours
of graduate course work, or the equivalent in thesis research during the
regular academic term. In the summer session full-time residence (9
weeks) requires a minimum of 6 credit hours. Part—time residence is
computed on the basis of one and one—half weeks of residence for each
credit hour earned, except for short courses of less than eight weeks, in
which case the number of residence credits may not exceed the actual
number of weeks involved. If a full—time student becomes a part-time
student by failing courses or dropping courses, he receives one and one-
half weeks of residence per credit hour in courses completed with a
satisfactory grade.

The summer school student is assigned full residence (9 weeks)
provided he is taking courses which together require residence for the full
eight weeks and provided he earns a minimum of six credit hours,
whether in short courses alone or in a combination of short and full-term
courses.

The Registrar makes the computations for short courses and recom-
mends to the Graduate Oflice the amount of residence earned. The
final evaluation of residence, as well as of course and other requirements,
rests with the Dean of the Graduate School.

A master’s candidate working on his thesis and in need of residence
credit may register for a maximum of nine weeks of residence in course
No. 768 in the appropriate department.

A doctoral candidate working on his thesis and in need of residence
credit may register for course No. 769 in the appropriate department.

TIME LIMIT FOR DEGREES

No course or residence credit may be given for graduate study
completed more than eight years prior to the end of the semester at
Which the student expects to receive his degree unless such credit or
resrdence is specifically validated by the Graduate Council on written
recommendation of the appropriate director of graduate study. No course
or residence credit may be validated in this manner if completed more

than twelve years prior to the end of the semester in which the student
expects to receive his degree.

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY / 15

 

 

 

 16 / GRADUATE SCHOOL
GRADUATION

Advanced degrees may be conferred at the close of any semesteror
summer session, but commencement exercises are held only at the close
of the academic year. A student who is scheduled to receive his degree
at the close of the academic year is expected to attend the commence-
ment exercises unless he is excused in writing by the Dean of the
Graduate School. Students who are eligible to receive degrees at the
end of a first semester or a summer session may elect to defer their
graduation and participate in the next commencement exercises. Appro-
priate academic costume must be worn. The graduation fee covers the
cost of the diploma, the hood, and, in the case of the master’s degree
(with thesis), the binding of the thesis.

Students intending to graduate at the close of a given semester or
term must make formal application (at the Graduate Office) for the
degree within the first two weeks of the semester or term.

FEES

Registration fees per semester are $110 for residents of Kentucky, i

$260.00 for non—residents. Part-time graduate students who are legal
residents of the state pay $13.00 per semester credit; non—residents pay
$31.00 per semester credit. Students carrying full loads in the summer
session pay one-half the regular semester fee. Those taking less than
full loads pay the regular semester credit fee. The Registrar determines
the status of one’s residence for purposes of assessing fees.

Graduate fellows, graduate assistants, and instructors pay the fees
assigned to Kentucky residents.

General Requirements for All M asters’ Degrees
(See also pages 7-16)
TRANSFER OF CREDITS

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. I
With the approval of his graduate adviser, the dean, and the Reign

trar, a student may transfer up to six credit hours (but no residence)
toward the satisfaction oi the minimum requirements for masters'
degrees, provided the work in questi