xt7qbz61895b https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7qbz61895b/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19631115  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, November 15, 1963 text The Kentucky Kernel, November 15, 1963 1963 2015 true xt7qbz61895b section xt7qbz61895b i

Flu Shots Or Not?
Unlikely This Year
Due to a great deal of misunderstanding on the
part of
students and faculty members concerning the inHuena
Dr. Jack I,. Mulligan, director of the University Health
Service has issued the following statement.

University of Kentucky
NOV.

vac-tin-

"Information available to the
University Health Service at present does not Indicate that a
widespread Influenza epidemic is
expected this year.
"However, the United States
Public Health Service recommends that persons of all ages
who suffer from chronic debilitating or metabolic disorders

Vol. LV, No. 42

fill the post of executive assistant for special projects was
Jim May, senior commerce major. Chris Gorman, A&S junior,
was thosen executive assistant for committees.
Chellgren stated that the posts
"The congress is entitled to
would be at the vice presidensend members to all meetings of
tial level and would be responthe University Faculty," said
sible directly to him.
Chellgren. ''It will be Chris Gor"As special projects assistant,
May will be responsible for the
coordination of committees concerned with special Student Congress projects such as the Washington Seminar and the Harper
Lecture Series," Chellgren said.
He added that all the committee
chairmen for these projects would
be responsible directly to May.

Milk-toas-

-1

ry;

It

"

man's job to notify the members
who are to attend the meetings
and to make sure they know the
students' position when it comes
to a vote."
"Both are capable fellows who
will be specifically responsible for
specific Jobs, and will become
members of the presidential cabinet," concluded Chellgren.

Christmas Seal
Title Sought

By 12 Coeds

Miss Christmas Seal of 191)3 will be elected by University
students from 12 UK coed candidates. Voting i done through
contributions to the Christmas Seal drive.
is
The annual competition
ntion as part of the Christmas
sponsored by the Blue Grass
Seal campaign.
Tuberculosis

and Health Associ- -

....

4

"

uvft

3

f-1-"

Ballots, along with Christmas
sepls, have been mailed to the
students. Each dollar contributed
to the drive means one vote in
the contest.
The contest ends at midnight
Dec. 18. Students who do not receive ballots and seals may get
them by calling the TB Associaor by contacting
tion at
one of the contestants.
Candidates and the organizations they represent are Nancy
Loughridge, Alpha Delta Pi sorority, Phi Delta Theta and Tau
Kappa Epsilon fraternities; Frances Pattie, Alpha Gamma Delta,
Phi Sigma Kappa and Farm-Hous- e;
Lorraine Ellis, Alpha XI
Zeta Beta Tau and
Delta,
Lambda Chi Alpha.
Susan Ramey. Chi Omega and
Pi Kappa Alpha; Sally King,
Delta Delta Delta, Phi Kappa
Tau and Triangle; Carol Lynn
Miller, Delta Gamma and Delta
Tau Delta; Paula Thurman, Delta
Zeta, Alpha Tau Omega and
Sigma Phi Epsilon.
Candy Johnson, Kappa Alpha
Theta and Alpha Gamma Rho,
Toni Barton, Kappa Delta and
Sigma Chi; Cullie Anne Cowden,
Kappa Kappa Gamma and Sigma
Alpha Epsilon; Pat Witt, Pi Beta
Phi, Kappa Sigma and Kappa
Alpha; and Susan Winn, Zeta
Tau Alpha, Phi Gamma Delta
and Sigma Nu.

Oswald To Address
Seed Group Tonight
Dr.

I

CI. gyrtyw

r lb
t

'

John Oswald, president of
the University, will be the featured speaker at a joint banquet

"

r'

I
'

2)

-

These are candidates for the 1983 Miss Christinas
Seal contest. They are, front row from the left,
Callie Anne Cowden, Sally King, and Susan Winn;
secoud row, Ton! Barton, Susan Rainey, Pat Witt

Eight Pages

Two new special staff positions have been announced

Sigafoos Freud, a grandson
of the late Sigmund Freud, was a
professor at Puritan University
(PU) who was fired from his
employment on the ground that
he was too liberal in his teachings of Communism and sex.
Freud sues for two year's back
pay and for damages to his reputation. The defendants include
the president of Puritan University, Casper Milktoast, and the
members of the board of directors.
Joe C. Savage and Harold D.
Rogers will defend Puritan University, while James R. Odell and
William B. Martin will try to get
compensation for the plaintiff,
Freud. Professor James R. Richardson, instructor for the Practice Trial Court class, will preside over the case as judge.

,;

13

by Paul Chellgren, president of Student Congress. Named to

Practice Trial Court, a
class for third year law students, will present a civil case
involving freedom at 6:30
p.m. Monday in the Lafferty
Hall courtroom.
t,
In the action of Freud v.

Biennium Budget
The 1964-6- 6
Request Is scheduled for prime
attention at the Board of Trustees meeting at 10 a.m. today.
Other items on the Agenda include: recommendations of the
President, transfer of restricted
funds to reimburse the Haggin
Fund; recommendations for furof Peat,
ther implementation
Manvick, Mitchell and Co. report, and special committee

15,

By BOB RYAN'S
Kernel Assistant Daily Editor

Moot Case

Trustees To Get
Request Today

KY., FRIDAY,

Announced By Chellgren

'Freedom'
Is Next

BUDGET

LEXINGTON,

Two Special Positions

family physicians regarding Immunization."
Dr. Mulligan said there is no
reason to immunize the entire
population without an expected
epidemic because there is a little
calculated risk involved in giving
the shots. However, he said it is
advisable for those suffering from
these chronic ailments to be immunized before the flue seasons
begin in January.

"The.se Include rheumatic heart
disease, arteriosclerotic heart disease, hypertension, chronic asthma, chronic bronchitis, bronchiectasis,
fibrosis,
pulmonary
pulmonary emphysema, pumon-ar- y
tuberculosis, diabetes melli-tu- s,
and Addison's disease.
"Others include pregnant women, persons over 45, and particularly those over 65 years of age.
"Only students with illnesses
noted above may receive the Influenza vaccine at the University
Health Service during the following hours: 8:30 to 11:30 a.m. and
1 to 3:30 p.m. Monday through
Friday until Dec. 1.
"The University Health Service recommends that all faculty
members and University employees who have one of the
above Illnesses consult with their

n

1

JLr,-..,- y.

Kernel Photo By Clyde Wills

1

i

and Carol Lynn Miller; third row, Frances Pat tie,
Lorraine lllis, and Candy Johnson; fourth row,
PauU Thurmau and Nancy Loujhridge.

of the Kentucky Seed Improvement Association and the Kentucky Seed Dealers Association
at 6:30 p.m. today.
The two groups will meet at
UK today and tomorrow. Robert
Garrison of the South Carolina
Association
Crop Improvement
will speak at 11 a.m. tomorrow.
A panel discussion is scheduled
on future
for the afternoon
trends.

js

s

"

JIM MAY
SC Executive Assistant

KB A Head Says

All Lawyers

Must Prolect

Profession
By GARRY HUDDLESTOV

Kernel Staff Writer

"Many inioads are being
made in the law field ami
every Iawer must help protect his
William
L. Wilson. preNident oi tlie
a r Association,
Kentucky
told a Law School gioup
piofe-sion,-

1

csici clay.
Mr. Wilson, a senior partner
of the Daviess County law firm
of Wilson and Wil.-on- ,
spoke on
the practical aspects of the law
profession.
He said that even thoush there
are many more different branches
in law today tisan ever before,
members of other professions,
such as insurance agents, and
realtors, are successfully cuttir.5
in on the lawyers and narrowing
the field of law.
Mr. Wilson told the law students that their profession was an
"exciting but exacting" one, and
that they had the double responsibility of upholding the courts,
and instilling a public respect
in them.
He uiged the students not to
too much with,
busy therm-elvemaking a living, and to take part
in tluir State Bar Association.
He called the Association the
"one hope of keeping the law
profession intact."
Since 1948, the K.B.A. president has been a member of the
State Bar Commissioners, and
last year, served as its vice president. A member of the Daviess
County and Kentucky State Bar
Associations, Wilson is associated
with the Owensbcro law- firm of
Wilson and Wilson and has practiced before the Interstate Commerce Commission.
Wilson was admitted to the
Kentucky bar in 1935, after he
completed his undergraduate ani
legal studies at Washington and
Lee University. He was a member of Omicron Delta Kappa,
men's honorary fraternity, and in
1943. served as state president for
the Junior Chamber of

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tiulay, Nov.

2

15,

13

WBKY Buys
Xenoglottaphobiac: Transmitter YWCA Schedules
Should Know Better?
Membership Drive
KILL BAXTER
Kernel Sports Writer
s ought to know hotter.
Xcnoglott;i)li)l)i;u
If you think, that's interesting, you should know
Tiy

xenoglottaphohiius

that most
are polygamic and just don't rcalic it.

Dr. Niel Plummer, head of the
University's School of Journalism,
told a meeting of Journalism students Wednesday that last yenr
alone he made 30 speeches around
the state on xenoglottaphobiacs.
"Most of today's people are suffering from xenoglottaphobia,"
said Dr. Plummer. "I imagine almost everybody on this campus
is."
Don't go to the Med Center for
a check-u- p.
Xenoglottaphobia is
the fear of foreign languages.
"Most people come to UK and
find out they have to take 12
hours of foreign language," Dr.
Plummer said. "They think
they're dead."
Actually, he told the students,
Americans are polyglots, or people who speak a number of languages.
"All of you," he said, "speak
from three to five, and sometimes
as many as 10 foreign languages."
The answer is in the basal roots
of American words. The expanded Anglo-Saxo- n
language that we
Fpeak comes from a number of
other languages.
"The only American words I
can think of are ugh, squaw, papoose, and squash," he said.
"Those are native American
words."
He named some political terms,
such as buncombe and roorback,
which are latter-da- y
American
coinages, and said thnt onomatowords (sound-alikesuch
poeia
as ding-donsplash, choo-choand the American barf, were occurrences in all languages.

Lances
Applications for membership
in Lance, junior men's honorary, are now being accepted.
Letters of application should
include grade point average and
all activities while in college.
The letters should be turned
in to Larry Lovell at the AG It
House no latter than 5:30 p.m.
Monday. There will be a meeting of Lances at 6 p.m. Monday
in Room 119 of the Student
( enter to discuss applications
for membership.

But other than that, he told
the students, all our words are
foreign.
"I advocate the etymological
approach," Dr. Plummer said.
"Learning the roots of our words
Is the key to curing xenoglottaphobia. Just say the words 'gynecologist, a female or woman doctor' you have already spoken
in Greek (gyne-- ), French (fern-- ),
Your fear
and German
of foreign languages ought to be
disappearing."
Dr. Plummer said he did not
recommend "sequipedalianism,"
the use of words that "are a foot
and a half long," but that the
Journalist should be prepared to
use any word when he needs it.
"Just as a soldier needs varied
kinds of arms for different kinds
of warfare," he said, "the Journalist needs to be armed with
words. You might have to use a
certain word only once in your
life, but when that time comes
you should be able to use it."
"Nothing is frightening about
foreign languages," he concluded.
"You speak them all the time."
Now all. you have to do, says
Dr. Plummer, is become a quidnunc.
If you are one, you'll look it up.

LAW JOURNAL
STAFF NAMED
Eight University law students
have been named to the staff of
the "Kentucky Law Journal,"
quarterly publication of the College of Law.
Chosen were Tommy W.
Chandler, Dixon: Donald S. Muir,
Gilbertsville; William G. Kohl-hep- p
and Joseph T. Burch, Covington; George W. Mills,
Bennie Joe Harrison,
Calhoun City, Miss.; Paul E.
and
Hieronymus, Barbourville;
Larry D. Garmon, Glasgow.
Members of the Journal staff
are chosen on the basis of academic standing and proven ability to do legal research and

WBKY, University FM radio
station, has purchased a new
radio transmitter.
Bob Towers, chief engineer for
WBKY, said that the new transmitter was bought from the Collins Radio Company for $8,000,
model which
a Collins 830D-1operates with an output of 1,000
watts.
The new transmitter Is pushbutton controlled, with a fully
automatic starting sequence. It is
a new variety of radio transmitters designed to handle stereo-F-

Towers said the transmitter
would be Installed close to the
first of January." He said WBKY
would probably be "off the air
for a week while M&O Is installing it."

CLASSIFIED
FOR SALE

FOR SALE

1950 Plymouth,
tires, good heater;
cheap. Good for around town.
Leave note in box 4482, McVey
at 8:30 a.m.
Hall or call
good

YWCA will begin an intensive three-dadrive next Tuesday in an attempt to double it$
.membership
present membership.
dormitory residents.
Mary Lee Sayers, membership
The committee plans to contact
indicated that the
more than 500

The University

.

campaign would have a double
purpose. "We will use the drive
to evaluate the Y program and to
recruit new members," she said.
The campaign will emphasize
personal contact, and prospective
members will have opportunities
to meet Y cabinet members.
"We feel the personal contact
method gives a clarification of
interpretation of our program
that does not come with printed,
Kellogg-material,"
Chrystal
YWCA executive director, said.
is divided into three
The drive
parts based on the place of residence of the women to be contacted. A chairman heads each
division.
for the drive,
members of the current Y cabinet, are: Linda McBeath, town
students; Mary Lee Sayers. sorority members, and Linda Mills,

Those to be contacted were selected at random.
Town students on the random
list will receive' invitations to
coke parties from 3 to 4:30 p.m.
in
and
Wednesday
Tuesday
Room 206 of the Student Center.
Students may come either day.
These parties will be open to
other campus and town residents
who have not been contacted
formally.
Each sorority has one representative on the membership
committee who will do recruitment work within her own group.
Cabinet members will speak to
the sorority house residents concerning the Y programs.
teams will call on
girls living in dormitories on
Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday afternoons.

12N4t

FOR SALE 1953 Mercury. Automatic trans. 37,000 miles. $125.00,
13N4t
Call Bob Gallt at
FOR SALE A Fiat Bianchina
convertible,. 1959. Newly overhauled. Contact Bill Young,
35 miles to gal. 14N3t

mmk

mm

f

FOR SALE 1958 Chevy Delray.
$400
Radio, heater, seat-belt- s.
cash. See Bill Wodraska, MN421
or call
after 5 p.m.
14N3t

1.1

MISCELLANEOUS

ALTERATIONS of dresses, skirts
and coats for women. Mildred
Cohen. 215 E. Maxwell. Phone
6.
lOStf
J-l-

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that

Irma-a-

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Last 2 Nights

HELD OVER!

STARTS

UK STUDENT
TO ATTEND
MI MEET

CI9M

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hodueiwn

7:30

TECHNICOLOR

ADM.

ADDED
WALT DISNEY'S

NOW SHOWING!

'LAWRENCE

University student, Janet
Burke, A&S freshman
from
Christian County, will attend the
National
Club Congress in
Chicago.
Janet is one of a group of 32
from Kentucky who will
attend the congress Dec.
A

"LEGEND OF
SLEEPY HOLLOW"

Different By Faith,
Skin And Calling

OF

ARABIA'
Winner of seven
Academy Awards

But What

A

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'He is not of our faith

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nor

our shin.' said

of

Mother

Maria.

is a man of

5ea'nes5

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Adventure They

TODAY!
Shows Cont. from 12:00

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Shared!

2 SMASH HITS!

'THE INTERNS'
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ffffimm
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Michael Csllan
Cliff Robertson
ALSO
Joanne Woodward
Ricliard Bcymer in

MS HITS!

3

starts 7:30

Ad.n. 75e

'THE STRIPPER'
rkonT
tuimioN-iiii'f- co

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NOW!

my

2:00 - 4:00 - 6:00 -8:00 . 10:00
"Evil is inherent in the human
mind, whatever innocence may
cloak it . . ."
12:00

"EXPERT SHOCKER!
NY DAILY NEWS

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MOTtSTAM

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Stanley Adams

JERRY COLDSMiTh

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One of the Greatest Movies of All Time

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LIONEL BARRYMORE

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Friday, Nov.

196.1-

-3

Social Activities

Shew Sidelights
mm.
It's here, the UK winter has morrow, the day will be filled
finally descended. It took a while
with fun as the group passes the
getting here but in true Kenafternoon at a sociable gathertucky style left nothing to the ing. Then they will dine and
Imagination when it came.
adjourn to the Pheonix Hotel
where the dancing will go on unWithout a doubt the drizzly,
til the wee hours. The Carnations,
nasty, season is making the student body comfy and cozy with The Trendels, and Judy Wood
will be there to keep things gocutting winds and icy rains, inis a full
terspersed with blobs of snow. ing. That tomy friends
weekend
say the least. This
For those of you who are experirevel will end after Sunday dinencing your first Kentucky winter, this stuff lasts all winter and ner at the house.
DOES get worse. A word of adMoving on to a little less tiring
vice, stock up now on cold pills, 'schedule, the Sig Ep's will be
Kleenex, cough syrup, and nose
Joining the bathers as they trip
the light fantastic at the Campdrops.
bell House pool tonight. These
Well enough of the preperation
for snizle time. The weekend events are usually quite nice until you venture out into the
looks like it should be a fun
crisp weather and your wet hair
time dispite the weather.
turns into an icicicle. Pneumonia
Starting off the weekend in Inanyone?
teresting: style the Baptists are
Swimming Isn't the only form
Youth Night at the
sponsoring
Coliseum tonight. This affair will of recreation available on campus
this weekend. The AGR's will be
have many interesting features.
toOne of the most charming will be having a Wild West party
night at the chapter house.
none other than Miss America,
Donna Axnm. This should be Thanks to the pledges, it's their
bit of joy to the activities, the
enough to draw the men out, but
house will have the traditional
In case they don't go for beauty
old saloon atmosphere, complete
there will be Bobby Richardson
with gambling tables, and swingof the New York Yankees.
ing doors. They didn't say anyIf you don't go for either cf thing about the dancing girls and
those people if you don't there's
barmaids but the old time music
wrong somewhere
something
will be provided by the ContinGovernor Combs will be on hand entals.
as will George Schweitzer, an
If your are dating a Kappa
atomic scientist. In addition to
this weekend, better stock up
this there will We a 2,000 voice Sig linament, badages, and a pilon
choir providing background mu-ti- c. low.
Girls, your dates are taking
It all starts at 6:30 p.m.
you to Gardenside to iceskate.
scene there will Dress warmly and be prepared
On the Greek
fce activity but there has been a
that ice is harder than you think.
After several hours of mass hyelight slacking off in parties,
must be study panic or some-thin- g. steria' the group will move back
to tha chapter house for recuperation, a warm fire and soft muIt seems that those female fasic will be the RX.
vorites, house parties, have startTomorrow the Cat's are away
ed. The SAE's, usually a pretty
at- Baylor. That's deep in the
Individual bunch, are playing
heart of Texas. Well not quite
copycat this year. The Pledges
but it sounds good. So tune in on
marched around to the various
living units Wednesday in their that as you study or prepare for
TJ's reading a proclamation and your date. Some girls do start
handing out invitations for the
weekend. Seems to me fiere is
snother group on campus that
Leader Named
uses horses and Rebel uniforms
NEW YORK .V The tandem
for invitms? their dates to a weekartit:c leadership of the Lincoln
end. Who knows, tlie next grov.p
to do this may adept the sheet Center repertory theater has been
cor.vertel into a triangle with
and hood of Ku Klux Klan.
appointment of Harold Clurman
Anyway, the SAE's are starting as executive consultant.
off the weekend by moving their
Clurman, a veteran sfage didates into the house after 3 p.m.
today. Tonight, there will be a rector and writer, is to work with
Elia Kazan and Robert Whitedance at the house. I have been
head, who have been involved in
told that the dates will be attired in their party favors for the project for two years. His
this occassion. So it seems it will functions will include preparation cf future programs, guidance
be the usual sloppy dress type
of the training program and deaffair. The Nighterawlirs will be
house music. To
velopment of the acting company.
providing the

15,

By Nancy Loughriilgc

early

awfully

on that sort

of

thing.

The men of KA will be rushing again at the house. The
Houserockers will be on hand to
help the order convince the
rushees that t heir's is the only
fraternity around.
The Campbell House pool is a
popular place this weekend. There
will hardly be time for the pool
keeper to change the water before
the ATO's Jump in. After this
should
weekend the
have a run on flu shots.
The Pike's are weekending also
with their dates in the house for
Saturday night and breakfast
Sunday before they travel to
church.
You've heard of Playboy magazine, the Playboy Clubs, with
their private memberships and
keys, and the famous Playboy
Bunny, well this weekend the
Sigma Chi's have confiscated all
of these things.
The house will become the bachelor's answer to paradise as
rushees will be provided with
keys to the front door. The Torques will be on hand to set the
swing as the Bunnies mingle with
the crowd.
The men of Farmhouse will
hold their annual Las Vegas party tomorrow night at the house.
Fatima will be the featured attraction an the Centaurs will be
there to speed the outlaws on
their way.
Once again the Roaring Twenties will be revived as the Fiji's
set the stage for their Purple
Garter party. The Continentals

will be there to see that the "It
Girls" and racoon coated men
have a good time.
The Lambda Chi's have a
tame weekend on the agenda as
they troup to Joyland for a little
fan and relaxation.
The Phi Sig's will be letting off
steam tomorrow with a "Go To
Hell" party sponsored by the new
actives. It's one of those come as
you want to come parties. Kon
Tiki and the Rafters will be there
too give Satan a hand ia claiming souls.
The Delts are making the
gangster scene with a "Mafia
The gunmals, hoods,
Party."
hatchetmen and get away cars
will be in evidence.
Maybe the weekend, filled with
sleep and mirth, will brighten
some of those sad faces I see
passing by my window as I write
this. Cheer up there are only
four more weeks till finals.

AFHOTC Sponsors
11

AFROTC cadets elected
new sponsors In elections held
Monday and Tuesday, Cadet
Bill Stanfill announced yesterday.
The 11 will bring to 23 the
number of Air Force Sponsors.
The new members are Marti
Carpenter, Judy Carwell, Carol
Ennis, Judy Gooch, Jackie
Jones, Kelly Kirby, Bonnie
Lindner, Charmane Marlowe,
Pat Mudd, Tarn Robinson, and
Mary Lou Veal.

Meetings
Art Club
Professor Edward Rannells will
discuss "Space in Painting" at
the Art Club meeting at 7:30
p.m. Monday in Room 208 of the
Fine Arts Building.
ZTA
The ZTA's had Dr. Adlestein of
the English Department as their
guest speaker Monday. The members of Tri-De- lt
joined the ZTA's
for the event.

Elections
Patterson
Patterson Hall
elected its officers
They are president,

ner;

Hall
has recently
for the year.
Betsy Skin-

Barbara

Sprowl; Secretary, Sally Schaaf;
Treasurer, Pauline Pinion; A.W.S.
Glenda Rhine-har- t;
representative,
and W.R.H. representative,
Laura Mueller.
Pin-Mat-

Pat Cary, a sophomore

educa-

major from Louisville, to
Pat Vaughn, a senior commerce
major from New Castle and a
member of Sigma Nu.
tion

The Gift That Only
You Can Gicel
Your Portrait by
Curtis Wainscott

of

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I

* The Kentucky Kernel

Budget Proposal
tlic appioval of ;i hiennium
budget request tod. iy, the University
Boaid of Trustees will ni.ii k the beginning of a new era: the Oswald
years. What those years will bring to
the University will depend in large
measure upon the man lor whom they
sue named.
President John Oswald is to present to the board his plans for the
future, in the form of a budget recommendation. The University's future
Jies in those plans.
Intense study and consultation will
fulminate when the board approves
a plan for spending University in- "Wi til

Campus Parable
Religion

Something kicks me in my theological rump every time I use the
word "religion." I get the strangest
feeling when I read the Bible that
"religion" is precisely the thing God
5s against. The prophets
protested
against it, and in the New Testament
James says that true religion is visiting widows and orphans! How often
cur "religion" becomes a way of eluding God. We seek to find God and
serve him through patterns of religious life which deny his radical claim
upon us and his sovereignty over all
liis creation. And then we are surprised when the most sensitive spirits
in the university simply reject our
domesticated versions of the "good
news" and get on with more important
matters.
Biblically speaking (but check me
out on this), true piety consists in the
service of God and not in any form
of religiosity. We need to examine our
religion, if we have one, to see if it
is really a way of serving God or just
a means of refuge from him. The
idolatries of the pious are no less
offensive to God than those of the
impious.
John R. King
j
Presbyterian Chaplain

come dining the coming two cars.
We are involved in a battle for the
leadership of higher education in Kentucky, and the fust weapon at hand
is this budget request. It will determine whether we strengthen ourselves
as an institution for graduate study,
research, and scholarly publication, or
whether we abdicate our position of
leadership to the state colleges.
President Oswald has made his
position clear in outlining his obbudget. His
jectives for the 1961-6primary aim is to strengthen the University in areas which distinguish it
from the state colleges.
There is no more effective defense
for the University's position of leadership than a strong, progressive program. If the University is providing
rethe state a dynamic graduate-studsearch program, there can be no
justification for duplication of efforts
by the state colleges.
Hopefully, the Board will strongly
endorse President Oswald's recommendation with minimum quibbling ever
details. A united board can do much
to project the image of a university
determined to progress behind the
leadership of its new president.
When the budget request is sent
to Frankfort it will compete with
requests from other state schools, and
with the political prestige of the state
college presidents. The decisions made
there will define Kentucky's attitude
toward its educational system. The
University can be strengthened with
full support of the legislature, or the
state colleges can be given aid and
comfort in their desire to broaden
graduate programs.
The recently concluded political
campaign saw the University Board
of Trustees characterized by one candidate as "packed" by a Democratic
governor. These accusations would
seem less credible in light of strong
board support for the new president
and his recommendation.
In short, the 1961-6biennium
budget request carries the future of
the University with it.

University of Kentucky
college uany
Vutstanaiugclam
under trie

lie South s

Act of March 3, 187V.
matter
Entered at trie pout office at LrJriniitnn, Kentucky a iccond
rubUshid tour time a week limine tlie rrtrulnr houl yrnr -- r, pt during holiday! and exami.
SIX DOLLARS A SCHOOL YEAii

David Hawte, Managing Editor

Sue Endicott, Editor

Daily Editors:

Elizabeth Ward, William Chant, Richard Stevenson, and John Townsend

Carl Modlcki, Campus Editor
Tom Finnie, Circulation Manager
John Burxhard, Advertising Manager
of Sports
Jerry Schvreman and Walter Pacan,
John Pfeiffih, Arts Editor
Nanct Lotjchridge, Women's Page Editor
Phones: News, extensions 2285 and 2302; Advertising and Circulation. 2308

Letters To The Editor

6

A

Paradox?

To The Editor:
The Tuesday, Nov.

12, issue of the
Kernel features what we believe to be
a most ridiculous paradox. On page
one we find a detailed rejx)rt of Dr.
Oswald's speech made at the
dinner at which we outlined
a new budget and commented on the
goals of this University. Vet, when
we turn to the "editorial page," we
find in an editorial and in the "Letter
to the Editor" the antithesis of the
goals of this University.
If the University "is on the verge
of a greater mission" as Dr. Oswald
says, then shouldn't the editorial page
contribute to this mission? Our contention is that trivia, such as who
should wear what and when, don't
belong on the editorial page. Surely
such bickering over w here the "ladies"
and "gentlemen" have gone should
either be placed on the social page
or disregarded altogether.
We believe that the editorial page
is too important to waste on something so meaningless. The University
should be a place of intellectual pursuits, not a prep school where everyone is disciplined and trained to obey
the rule of following the current style,
whether the current style be sloppy
or neat.
Just what this whole argument has
gotten us we don't know. We hope
that enough people are interested
enough in the responsibility of the
press to see the significance of the
paradox. What a shame that Dr. Os- -

wald's ideas, as expressed on page
one, had to be so degraded by the
editorial's contention that we're not
dressing in the proper mode.

Mary Frances Richardson,

Grad-

uate School; Russell T. May, Arts
&
Sciences
Senior; Dudley L.
Mann, Graduate School; Cuing
Woo, Graduate School; Annabel S.
Fields, Arts & Sciences Senior;
Pete Diachln, Arts & Sciences
Senior; James Cunningham, Graduate School; Ronald S. Strance,
Arts & Sciences Senior; Cary J.
Finder, Arts &: Sciences Senior;
Randall Storm, Arts & Sciences
Senior.
(Editor's Note In all fairness to cur
editorial staff, the writer, et al. of the
above letter should be advised that on the
day prior to the appearance of a brief
editorial on student attire, the Kernel
editorial on the
published a half-pag- e
fine objectives of President Oswald. Related articles concerning Dr. Oswald appeared on Oct. 23, Nov. 1, Nov. 8. and
Nov. 13. Throughout September the Kernel
published repeatedly the proposals and
plans as outlined by our University president.)
,

Kernels
Does thou love life? Then do not
squander time, for that is the stuff