xt7qft8dgc2g https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7qft8dgc2g/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19190410  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, April 10, 1919 text The Kentucky Kernel, April 10, 1919 1919 2012 true xt7qft8dgc2g section xt7qft8dgc2g THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
LEXINGTON, KY APRIL 10, 1919

VOL IX
SUBSCRIPTION

CONTEST

FOR ANNUAL

STARTED Foremost American Poet

The Business Manager Announces Rules For Canvassers For "Biggest
and Best" Yearbook
PROFESSOR

VACHEL LINDSAY TO
ENSIGN PULLIAM DIES
SPEAK HERE THURS.

SLIGHTED

The subscription contest staged by
the Kentuckian staff for which cash
prizes and copies of the annual will
be awarded the winners is progressing
well. Several prominent students of
the University have entered as contestants and the Kentuckian editors
thru the kindness of the Kernel, take
this opportunity to give the rules governing the contest and to state that it
Is open to all students of the University.
The student who gets the largest
number of subscriptions for the annual will receive fifteen dollars in
cash, the ono who obtains the next
largest number will receive ten dollars in cash. The third prize is a copy
of the 1918 Kentuckian. The business
staff of the annual announces that 350
or more copies must be sold during the
contest. However there are usually
400 to 500 copies sold each year and
it is believed that more than 600 copies
will be sold this year, because the 1919
Kentuckian surpasses in general makeup and quality any annual produced
by the Senior class of the University.
The 1919 Kentuckian will be bound
in grained leather with a
cover. The features of the Year Book
in the hands of Eliza M. Piggott and'
an efficient staff promises to be uniquely interesting.
The prizes given this year are large
enough to assure interest and competition in the contest. A member of
the staff discussing the prospects of
the Annual with a member of the
faculty was told that during ten years'
connection with the University the professor had never been asked to buy an
Annual. He has bought one every year
because he is as interested in the Annual as any student on the campus,
but no campaigners or contestants
have ever asked him to subscribe. His
case may be representative of the entire faculty. With 107 members of
the faculty and a student enrollment
of 750, a large number of subscriptions
may be secured. "A hint to the wise is
sufficient."
semi-flexibl- e

Rules of the Contest.
Any student of the University Is
eligible with the exception of the
members of the business staff.
1.

The contest ends Thursday, May
must be entered in the manner and form stated
below before 3:30 r m. of that date.
The winner of first prize must turn in
150 or more subscriptions and will bo
awarded fifteen dollars in gold. The
winner of second prize must turn in
100 or more subscriptions and the con- 2.

16, and all subscriptions

(Continued on Page Two.)

Is

Southeast In Interest of
Theory of Poetry.

Touring

IN COUNTRY'S

PHOTOGRAPH OF
GAY, ERAZIER AND YOUNG
KINNEY GRAVE
IS SENT HOME
Mrs. Nola E. Miller recently received
a letter from Captain Powell of the
ninety-nintAero Squadron, verifying
the announcement of tho death of her
son, Lt. Howard Kinne, and containing
a map showing the location of his
grave near Romange. Altho Mrs.
Kinne had been notified of her son's
death, she had still hoped that the report was a mistake until she received
the letter.
Lt. Kinne was a former student of
the University and especially prominent in football. He will be remembered by all who saw him for the
touchdown he made in the Purdue
game nearly four years ago. He was a
member of A. T. O. fraternity.

Former University Boy Killed in Crash of Plane at
Hampton Roads Air
Field,

Ensign

Harold A. Pulliam, former
student of the University, died Friday
April 4, as a result of injuries received in a seaplane accident Thursday, during a flight near Fort Monroe.
An operation had been performed in
hope of his recovery, but efforts to
save his life were of no avail.
Ensign Pulliam entered aviation
service at the beginning of the war
and was considered one of the most expert flyers in the service. He had been
selected as one of the pilots to make
the trip overseas in the coming
WILDCATS VS. TIGERS IS
SENIORS TO DEDICATE
flight.
After serving in Europe during the
TREE TO CLASSMATES war, he was appointed instructor at KY. BASEBALL HEADLINER
Pensacola, Florida, where he has done
notable work. He was a member of
Slomer or Lasley Will Pitch
Memory of Dead Comrades the Sigma Nu fraternity.
to be Honored Arbor Day;
Funeral services were held Monday Opening Game of Season
Patterson to Speak in at the home of his parents, 505 East
Friday 3:45 p. m.
Chapel
Main street, the Reverend R. K. Mas-si- e
The varsity baseball season will beofficiating. He is survived by his
The tree to bo planted by the Senior
gin Friday afternoon with a game beparents, Mr. and Mrs. K. G. Pulliam,
class on Arbor Day, April 25, will be
Georgeand one brother, Captain K. G. pulliam tween the Wildcats and the
dedicated to those members of the
town Tigers to be played on the local
Jr.
class who lost their lives In the war
The pallbearers were Grover Creech, diamond. Both teams and their "backand to their classmate who was killed
Floyd Wright, William Baughn, Morris ers" are confident and a hot contest is
in a parade in 1916, when he was
expected.
The game is to begin
Pendleton,
Collis Ringo, Monroe
thrown by a cable Jerked by a speedpromptly at 3:45 o'clock. A large crowd
Fletcher, John Wesley Marr and Guy
ing street car.
is expected out to witness the first
Huguelett.
At a class meeting held Tuesday aftgame of the 1919 season in Lexington.
ernoon the class decided to honor
Seven Letter Men In Line-up- .
those members of the class who would BOYS, GLEE CLUB TO
Practice during the past few weeks
GIVE FIRST CONCERT of good weather has been held regularhave graduated with them had it not
ben for their service in the war. These
ly and the team is in excellent condiThe Boys' Glee Club of the Univermen were L. W. Herndon, Stanley H.
tion to begin the season. Seven letter
sity will give its first concert of the
Smith, Aubra H. Townsend and Chesmen may be seen on the diamond
year In the high school at PIcadome,
ter B. Helm.
with the Wildcat lineup Friday afterFriday night. The boys will be met
noon, and it is believed they will show
Eldridge Griffin was a member of
at the end of the Broadway street car
the
the Freshman class of 1916 and was
form. Propps, a letter
line by automobiles which will take
man who did exceptionally good batkilled at the corner of Broadway and
The last
them to their destination.
ting and field work last year, will be
Third streets in a parade celebrating
practice before the trip will be held toin- condition to begin the season with
the class victory in the
day (Thursday) at 3:30 p. m. and
the squad at second base. He was abThis is the first recognition officially
every member of the club is urged to
sent from practice for several weeks
which the class has been able to make
be present.
on account of a bone bruise on his left
with the exception of the flowers sent
Professor Lamport and .the Glee
hand. Kohn, Muth and Mizrach, three
to the funeral.
Club have received invitations from
A decision was reached in the meetother letter men, will take everything
Ludlow and Bellevue high schools, to
ing to have a special chapel hour for
that comes to the outfield. O. Brown
come to Cincinnnatl for two days and
and "Dutch" Burnham, at the positions
the members of the Senior class and
sing one evening at Ludlow and one
of first and third bases respectively,
to invite former President James K.
evening vat Bellevue. These dates will
will defend their corners of the diaPatterson to address the meeting. It
be arranged.
mond like veterans.. Captain Zerfoss
has been some time since the "Grand
The glee club is said to be much
and Sauer are also good at their posiOld Man of the Campus" has spoken
stronger this year than it has been for
tions, and are expected to make their
to the students of the University and
several years. Professor Lamport exmany are anxious to hear him.
share of the runs. Thomas or Kings-lanpects to give several concerts in the
will catch, and Slomer or Lasley
The tree to be planted will be a burr neighboring towns.
will pitch.
oak and will be placed in front of the
It is probable that as many men as
Old Science building.
Lee McClain
COMMANDANT DIES
possible will be used by Kentucky in
and Ed Dabney will be the speakers of
Colonel Samuel M. Swelgert, comthe occasion, being representatives of mandant at the University In 1902, died the opening contest to give them all
the Senior and Junior classes respect- Saturday at his homo in Walton, Ky., irvno experience, unless Georgetown
ively. The usual Arbor Day program as the result of a paralytic stroke. ren'.ly appears as dangerous as the
say. In
of tho team
members
will bo presented. Classes will bo held Colonel Swelgert was seventy-threthe outfield Sauer, W. E. Brown and
for the first two' periods und a holiday years old and served in the
Mays will probably bo given a chance
will bo granted for the rest of the day.
war. Ho was buried Monto show their ability.
day morning in the Frankfort ceme(Continued on Page Three.)
"K" DANCE SATURDAY tery with military honors.
trans-Atlanti- c

at

old-tim- e

-

r.

d

e

Spanish-America-

LEADS

TAKE STROLLER

SERVICE

New

The poet, Vachol Lindsay, will lecture in the University chapel Thursday afternoon at 3:30 under the auspices of the English Club. The public
is invited and there will be no charge
for admittance.
In the opinion of Professor Phelps of
Yale, Mr. Lindsay Is the foremost
American poet, and will probably create a new school of poetry. In his lecture Thursday, Mr. Lindsay will read
from his poetry and explain his theory.
He is touring the Southwest and has
been well received by University audiences.

No. IB

n

With Tenative Cast Chosen,
"Under Cover" Gains Momentum in Student Ef-fto Stage S. R. O.
or

Show
DESIGN

IS

WANTED

With Gus Gay, Emery Frazler and
Lucy Young in the leading roles, rehearsals of "Under Cover," have been
gaining snap since the announcement
of the tentative cast Friday afternoon.
Gus Gay, who has the part of Stephen Denby, was the leading man of last
year's play, "Mice and Men," and will
also be remembered in the part of Jefferson Rider in "The Lion and the
Mouse."
He was a member of the
Soldier Players, of Camp Taylor during the summer season.
Emery Frazier, by many considered
the Strollers' most promising dramatic
find, is cast as Daniel Taylor, a deputy
in the Customs. Frazier was the leading man in "Father and the Boys," and
"The Lion and the Mouse."
Tho Lucy Young is a new comer in
Stroller productions, she is handling
the difficult role of Ethel Cartwrlght
very creditably.
A cover design for the program is
wanted, a prize of two orchestra seats
being offered for the best
design presented. Since the play will
be presented about May 1, all posters
submitted should be in the hands of
Stage Manager Creech within the next
two weeks. Mr. Carroll M. Sax, who
is to coach the cast for the last ten
days will arrive in Lexington, April 20.
free-han- d

-

The cast as selected by Stage Manager Creech follows:
Ethel Cartwrlght Lucy Young.
Steven Denby Gus Gay.
Daniel Taylor Emery Frazier.
Michael Harrington Lee McClain.
Mrs. Harrington Eliza Spurrier.
Nora Rutledge Margaret Smith.
Sarah Peabody Carlisle Chenault.
Amy Cartwrlght Mary E. James.
Monty Vaughn William Baker.
James Duncan Duane Rogers.
Harry Gibbs E. T. Tapscott.
Peter Fred Augsburg.
Lambart A. E. Bell.
This cast Is not the final selection,
but if members prove their ability to
carry the parts for which they have
been selected, they will bo retained.
For the leading characters there will
be understudies, who will be called
upon in the event tho principals proves
wanting.

STUDENTS MAY GET WORK.
Mr. Owens "Y" secretary, has several applications for students to do afternoon work, tending gardens, cleaning houses, etc. Any student wanting
any kind of work should call at tho
Y. M. C. office in the Gymnasium

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
The best in Moving Pictures
PARAMOUNT, ARTCRAFT,
GOLDWYN AND SELECT PICTURES
Remember, We Lead ; Others Follow

TRACK SQUAD IMPROVES
WITH

GOMJGOF

SPRING

We Need More Candidates
to Make Winning Team,
Coach Gill Says,
However
These balmly spring afternoons are
working wonders with Coach Gill's
track squad. Any afternoon one may
see scantily olad athletes out on Stoll
Field training for the coming inter
collegiate events.
Around the track will jog a rookie
who is striving to gain wind, an an
thusiastic candidate will sprint by him.
and in the middle of the field two
youths may be seen practising with
the discus. At another spot a man
may be sen putting the shot, and an
other hurling the Javelin.
"On the MarkI Get Set! Go!"
On one side of the field several
hurdlers may be seen training for
speed and efficiency. "On the mark!
Get set! Go!" Off one will go, taking
the hurdles with a scant inch to spare,
and making the distance in good time
Pole vaulters are scarce, but one or
two men may always be seen vault
ing up into space and dropping easily
over the marker.
More Men Needed
"We need more men," says Coach
Gill, "everyone who has any ability at
all should come out and help make a
winning team." Men who are now
included in the squad are Akin, Baum
Garten, Bell, Claire, Cook, Dabney,
Granagan,
Gray, Gibbons, Huber,
Howell, Knight, Malone, oMore, Nich
olson, Roll, Rector, Shouse, Shaw,
Swearlngen, Stephens, Williams, Vil
helm, Grabfelder, Porter, Snider, Fore'
man, DeBrovey, Graham, Kohn, Warth,
Baugh, Downing and Enlow.
Look 'Em Over, Boys.
Some of the candidates and the en
tries are: 100 Yard Dash Grabfelder,
Snider, Foreman, and Williams; Run
ning High Jump Wllhelm, Claire and
Snider; Half Mile Run Knight, Graham, Gibbons, and Shouse; 220 Yard
Dash Grabfelder, Foreman, Williams,
Snider and DeBrovey; Pole Vault
Nicholson; 120 Yard Hurdle
Claire and Shaw; 440 Yard Run
DeBrovey, Kohn, Snider and Williams; Running Broad Jump Grabfelder, Snider, Nicholson and Claire;
220 Yard Low Hurdle Claire, Shaw,
Wilhelm and Warth; Shot Put Downing, Baugh, Warth and Enlow; Org
Mile Run Gibbons, Knight, Baumgar-ten- ,
Graham, Shouse and Malone; Discus Throw Downing, Gray, Snider and
Baugh; Javelin
Downing, Gray,
Baugh and Claire.
Wil-hel-

TRIPLETT AND EBLEN
RETURN FROM HENDERSON
The "Henderson Gleaner" recatly
published a news item concerning two
outstanding students in the Law College. They are Cardwell Triplett and
Mervln Kohl Eblen.
The item was to the effect that
Messrs. Triplett and Ebleu, who are
fast attaining prominence in oil circles were in Henderson last week in
the Interest of the Beech Grove Improvement Company. Mr. Triplett lives
in Beech Grove.

STRAND
OPEN

ADMISSION

10 A.

all-america-

M. to 11 P. M.

and 20c, War

10c.

Concerts Daily, Afternoon and Evening
THE STRAND'S
n
ORCHESTRA
The best Orchestra in the South, Hear it.

Tax Included

Porter, Elizabeth Smith, Ruth Gregory,
EARLY SPRING
Mnud Asbury, Llllle Cromwell, Cath(Continued From Pago One.)
erine Christian, Nell Alford, Josephono
SHOWING OP
Evans, Elizabeth Klmbrough, Frances
testant will be awarded ten dollars in Klmbrough, Thompson Van Deron, ElQUALITY WORSTEDS
THE POPULAR
gold. The third prize will bo one copy la Brown, Jennie Simmons,
and Jo
of the Kentuckian to be awarded to Carter.
good
AND Theholds reliable, all woolen fabric
CONFECTIONARY
its Rhape splendidly under
that
the one receiving the next largest num
all conditions and loks like new after
ber of subscriptions.
a year's service.
LUNCHES
"K" DANCE SATURDAY
4. Those wishing to enter the conSUITS AND TOP COATS
test will be supplied with two blanks,
one to be signed by the subscriber in
which he agrees to pay for one copy
of the Year Book, and the other is a rePOPULAR PRICES
ceipt signed by the contestant on be$27.50,
$25,00
$30.00
half of the Business Manager, which
states that the subscriber has paid one
$32.50
$35.00
$37.50
dollar down as part payment for one
Cleaning that satisfies
Hare Backer clean that suit
payment of
This first
Kentuckian.
one dollar with the agreement must be
handed in to the Business Manager.
Each blank so entered will count one
Cor. Limestone and High.
Phone 62 J --Y.
vote for the contestant. A deposit of
145 W. Main St.
Lexington, Ky.
$1.00 is required with each subscription.

SUBSCRIPTS CONTEST

McGURK'S

Just because it is soiled does'nt
mean it's permanently spoiled
Becker Dry Cleaning Co

Justright

Tailoring Company

W. B. MARTIN'S
AT
SHORT MINING COURSE

GOOD ATTENDANCE

The short mining course in the department of Mining Englneernig offered to the miners of Kentucky opened Thursday, April 1st, with an enand prosrollment of about twenty-fiv- e
pects of a larger enrollment soon.
Professor Barr Is supervising the
course and the term promises to be
the most successful ever held since
the course was first offered. The plan
of the term's work has been much improved this year, and is an opportunity for the miners of Kenturky.
It
has created much interest thruout the
State and is a step towards placing
Kentucky up the ladder of mining efficiency and success.

Spring Suits
HATS,
SHOES
and
Furnishings
that are full
of that
'dash and pep'
that every
College Fellow
Wants

DISHMAN LEAVES

THE UNIVERSITY
J. A. Dishman, one of the most prominent athletes in the University, will
leave this week for Henderson, his
home, where he will remain until the
University reopens next September.
Dishman captained the varsity bas
ketball team which recently concluded
a successful season. He Is captain- elect of the 1919 football team and
a member of Sigma Alpha Epsilon fra
ternlty.

2U

CUT

HAIR

SHAVE

1S

SHAMPOO

2Sc

TONIC

1Se

Lex., Ky.

153 8. Limestone St.

PRESCRIPTIONS
Everything a complete

Drug

Stor

Should Have.

Join's Drug store
The Post Office Pharmacy
MAIN & WALNUT

PHOENIX
TAXI CAB CO
INCORPORATED.

PHONES

1854-368-

0

the New Things
while the time is Good

DAY AND NIGHT SERVICE

College Men receive
special attention here

Phoenix Hotel Lobby

See

,

Copjtlfhtl m
Tkt Brat et KayptntulaM

CITY RATES

50

CENTS

R B, Robards

KAPPAS ENTERTAIN
The Kappa Kappa Gamma Sorority
entertained with a five hundred party
on Friday afternoon at the home of
Miss Jo Carter, in honor of Misses
Henrietta Bedford and Anna Nelson.
The decorations were jonquils and
hyacinths with light and dark blue, the
colors of the sorority. The prlzeB were
won by Misses Marjorle Riddle and
Lillie Cromwell.
Those present were Misses Henrietta Bedford, Anna Nelson, Mrs. C. W.
Leapart, Misses Beth Rodes, Mildred
Taylor, Elizabeth Millard, Lena Withers, Jane Gregory, Helen Porter Roberts, Lillian Collins, Marjorle Riddle,
Mildred Collins, Dorothy Walker, Dorothy Middleton, Elizabeth Marshall, Fan
Ratliffe, Mary Turner, Helen Taylor,
Helene Cregor, Irene Evans, Mildred

BARBER SHOP

Graves, Cox & Co.

COLLEGE BOYS' TAILOR

INCORPORATED.

Cleaning,
$1.11
Cleaning,
fl.M
Suits Pressed
.S9.it
ALTERATIONS A SPECIALTY
ALL WORK GUARANTIED

"College Fellow's Shop."

SUITS

AND

PRESSED
Suit
Suit

PHONE

Lexington Drug Co,
INCORPORATED.

102

East Main St.

HEADQUARTERS

Phone 154
FOR STUDENTS

Matthew

1550--

Y

Lex.. Ky.

152 S. Lime.

A.

Mangione

Progressive Shoe Hospital
My work and prices always
keep me busy
140 South Limestone

Shots repaired while you
wait

!

* I

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
T

health and happiness, I am,
"Yours fraternally,
"HERBERT GRAHAM."
"Collego of Journalism A. E. F. University A. P. O. 909, France.

"BELGIUM
CONQUERED

PAGE

I

WAS NEVER

Co.

Graddy-Rya- n

J)

INCORPORATED.

Former Journalism Fellow
Here Now Instructor in
A. E. F. University In
France
WRITES OF NEW WORK
Captain Herbert Graham, graduate
of tho University In the class of 1916,
and fellow for one year In the Depart-meof Journalism, Is teaching Journalism in the American Expeditionary
University at Beanne, France, a government institution with 5,500 students
and GOO instructors.
In a letter Just received from Captain Graham, by Enoch Grehan, of tho
Department of Journalism, the young
officer tells of his present work, and
indicates the possibility of his return
to the states at no distant date. His
letter, with personal phases eliminated,
will be of interest to former fellow
students and instructors here. It fol-- .
lows:

FIRST K DANCE SAT.
The first "K" dance of tho year

moted by 1919 Kentucklan staff of
the University will be given In Buell
Armory Saturday afternoon, April 12,
from 3 to 6 o'clock. Admission will
bo fifty cents.
Tho Kentucklan dances have proved
Old stupopular at the University.
dents will attest to that, and a word of
advice to newer students is to get In
on the first one and see proof. Smith's
Saxophone Sextette has been engaged.
Attention is called to tho change in
time for this dance. Tho longer days
admit of a later beginning for the dance
so it begins at three, stopping promptly at 6 o'clock. There will bo six
Following is the program:
Program.
1.
Fox Trot.
2. "Dear Old Pal o' Mine," Waltz.
"Mn.n.nw " firm CJtnn
"Ja-da,- "

4.

5.

"I'm Always Chasing Rainbows,"
Waltz.
"Hindustan,' 'Fox Trot.
"Till We Meet Again," Waltz.

Captain Graham's Letter.
6.
"France, March 18th.
"Dear Mr. Grehan:
"Much to my surprise and pleasure,
I am back at the old game, in a new
FACULTY FACTS
Institution, teaching Journalism in the
A. E. F. University at Beanne, Cote
d' Or.
"Of course you have heard someProfessor E. F. Farquhar is to dething of the project, the university. liver the commencement address beThere are now 5,500 students in the fore the high school graduates at Clinseveral colleges, and 500 or 600 in- ton, Ky. on May 14. On the following
structors, the former recruited from day he will speak to the eighth grade
the entire A. E. F. and the latter from graduates.
the Y. M. C. A., the colleges and uniWayland Rhoads, son of Professor
versities in the states, and from the McHenry Rhoads, supervisor of high
army.
schools, has been appointed assistant
"Professor M. M. Fogg, of the Uni- in the department of Animal Husversity of Nebraska, is head of the bandry at the University. Mr. Rhoads
College of Journalism.
He spoke of is a 1915 graduate of the College of
having had Edness Kimball in one of Agriculture, and since his graduation
his classes at Nebraska.
There are has been county agent in Kenton
Journalism men from the universities
of Wisconsin and Kansas, and newspaper men from Atlanta Constitution,
VISIT FROM PRAETOR
Kansas City Star, Milwaukee Journal,
two proprietors and editors of small
The Sigma Chi fraternity of the
country papers.
University had with them for a guest
"We are using Bleyer's 'Writing and Monday evening one of their Grand
Editing,' and 'Types of News Writing,' Officers, the Praetor of this Provl
James Melwin Lee's 'History of Jour- dence, Mr. Ricks, of Nashville, Tenn.
nalism, Hyde's 'News Writing and Cor- He Is on a tour of inspection of the
respondence,' and a few others. I am chapters and an informal smoker was
enclosing a university schedule. At given in his honor Monday evening at
present I have two classes, Writing the Sigma Chi chapter apartment on
and Editing. The director spoke to North Upper street.
me about taking the Editorial, but I Mr. Ricks went from here to Dan
have not decided yet. By the way, ville to visit the Centre College chap
my salary as a Journalism instructor ter who will entertain for him there.
is about $3,000 slight increase over
my last one. Nest ce pas?
WILDCATS VS. TIGERS
"The university is only a mile from
(Continued From Page One.),
Beanne, quite a center of culture. They
still make wine and hold to their faThe Wildcats have good material for
mous paintings. There are some very the box. Lasley and Slomer are the
good
trips around here. I two who will most probably be used in
have been on only one. I arrived on the Georgetown game. "Doc" Lasley
the 14th (March). The course is sup- won his laurels last season when his
posed to end in June. I hope to have sldearm shoots proved entirely too
an excuse then for a request to return mysterious for his opponents and even
to the States at once.
bigger things are expected of him this
"I am living with the Director of year. Slomer is a newcomer, but he
Insurance, Frank L. James, of Indian- has speed and curves aplenty, and
apolis, who must be about the best in will strengthen the team considerably.
his profession. That is something to
Georgetown, too, has several old
my advantage, I think. Six of us have men back, including the battery of Sul
a suite of four rooms, bath and hall, livan and Moss, who wil) again threatnot bo bad when you consider this is en tho Wildcats with some entirely
still the army.
new slab artist puzzles. However
"Withal, however, I shall be glad to Coach Gill believes he has his men in
get back to Kentucky and look around good condition, that they will put up
for something to start in September or a really classy game of ball in the
sooner.
With sincere wishes fori game Friday.
.

r

pro-

sight-seein-

g

V

Belgian Patriot at Forum
Tells Experiences of Long
Life in Devastated

140 West Main St.

Telephone 903

"Wear for Young Men and Men Who Stay Young"

Country

Victor Bogaert, Lexington citlaen,
and Belgian patriot, spoke to the students and faculty of the University
In the Y. M. C. A. rooms Thursday afternoon, on "Belgium Before the War
and After." This address was of unusual Interest, coming from one who
has witnessed the things that have
happened In ravaged Belgium.
The speaker gave a picture of Belgium In her prosperous days before
tho war, of Belgium and her undaunt
ed spirit thru tho war, and of stricken
Belgium, as she lies today, the victim
of the Hun. In speaking of Belgium
before the war ho told of tho progress
the country had made commercially
and said that in comparison to her size
her commerce was seven times greater
than Italy, twelve times greater than
Russia and four times greater than
the United States. Politically and re
ligiously, she was one of the most free.
Germany made her mistake when
she took for granted that Belgium is
divided because she is made up of
Flemish and Walloons, but "Flemish
and Wallons are our Christian names
and Belgium is our family name," said
Mr. Bogaert.
Then came the crash when the German horde swept down upon an unsuspecting country and completely devastated all, killing women and children, burning villages and leaving a
barren tract in their wake. Tho physically wrecked, the unconquerable
l'
spirit of Belgium has never quailed,
peoand it still lives in her
ple who are planning to put their nation
again on its feet.
If Belgium deprived of all her resources is to live and be a nation
again, It is up to the Peace Conference
to act and act promptly. Mr. Bogaert
spoke very highly of the aid given Belgium by the United States, how In
1914, when the Germans robbed every
baker and every butcher shop, leaving
the country without any food, Mr.
Hoover had food sent to alleviate the
famine, and how nobly Brand Whit-locacted toward Belgium in protecting her against the Germans.
Mr. Bogaert told harrowing stories
of incidents which he witnessed during the battles of Ypres, Newport and
La Pame, the memory of which spur
him on In the work of the Belgium
Relief Fund, In which he is now

THE PHOENIX HOTEL
LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY

r

A Metropolitan Hotel

Respectfully selicits the patronage ofJUniversity People

JOHN SKAIN, Manager

for
PRICE for price, gradepipe grade,
is no better
made
than a W D C. You can get a pipe
with the familiar triangle trademark in any size and shape and
grade you want and you will be
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war-wor- n

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Nerve.
Freshie "Say guy we can't go into
with these Sophomores.
thin
They will be sure to pull us thru."
Another Freshie "Well, I guess if
we do have to pull, It will be coming
to us to get a good ducking, because
we haven't had any hazing yet.

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OLD MAN HARRIS
Editor of the Kentucky Oil Journal,
of Louisville, has made scores of his
readers from $100 to $800 on "inside
tips" on oil and mining stocks tells
what is good buys and what is bad
froe to his subscribers only, Sample
copy free. Map of Kentucky oil fields
16x25 inches wash drawing and a
beauty free to agents who will take
subscriptions for mo among their
friends. Tho Journal is 16 pago?, Illustratednow $2 per yeur soon $3.

Chas

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University
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* J

I
9

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

PAGE 4

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
Published ovcry Thursday thruout tho Collcgo year by the student body
of tho University of Kentucky, for the benefit of the students,
alunml and faculty of the Institution.
THE KENTUCKY KERNEL is tho official newspaper of the University.
is issued with a view of furnishing to its subscribers all the college new
It
of Kentucky, together with a digest of items of interest concerning the
Universities of other States and Canada.
SUBSCRIPTION, ONE DOLLAR A YEAR. FIVE CENTS A CORY
mail matter.
Entered at Lexington Poatofflce as second-clas- s
EDITORIAL STAFF
EDITOR-IN-CHIE-

THORNTON CONNELL
Charles Planck
Miss Eliza Spurrier
Miss Eliza Plggott
Lee McClain
Frederick Jackson
Robt. J. Raible
Donald Dinning
Miss Mildred Graham
Miss Austin Lilly
Miss Virginia Helm Milner
Miss Louise Will
Cecil Heavrln
N. D. Witt
Frances
McClure.

Marsh, Margaret

Managing Editor
Assistant Editor
Associate Editor
S(mirrel Food
Featuro Edltor
Mllltary Ed,tor
Sporting Editor
Editor
Home Economics
Patterson Hall
Philosophian
Law
Engineering

:

REPORTERS.
Smith, Roberta

"Co-Ed- "

Blackburn

and Margaret

BUSINESS STAFF
Business Manager
Edwin T. Tapscott
Assistant Business Managers
J. P. Barnes and Carl Denker

In the next few years the University of Kentucky is
destinec; to grow and develop amazingly. Comprehensive plans for a bigger and better University have
been made. Some of them are already materializing. It
will not do for the students to lag behind. Certainly it
will not do for the fraternity men to take the slacker's
ntriinrio TTvnfpvniHps here are now confronted with a
great opportunity. The Kernel sincerely hopes that they
will take advantage of it immediately. President McVey,
who seems heartily in favor of the proposition, will gladly receive representatives of any fraternity that wishes
to become better acquainted with the plan. It is understood that several of the fraternities have, made applications for leases already. Now is the time for the others
'
to act.

JUST A LITTLECOLLEGE SPIRIT, PLEASE.

he hnd to pay ten cents for tho snmo
stuff with foam on it.
Pepleas Wonders.
From tho way some of these rookies
of tho battnlion drill they must think

they arc following tho hearse
Georgia Negro's funeral.

at a

My friend don't bo a stuck up mutt,
For you will find it. true,
That you can look down on your

neighbor,
But you can't make him look up to
you.
These coming stars of the 1919 baseball team should attend Dr. McVey'a
lecture on the "League of Nations."
No doubt a number of hints will be
passed along to make them come up
in the table of averages.

"Play ball!" sounded by that goat of goats, the umpirethese words will officially begin the 1919 baseball
season for the University of Kentucky next Friday
afternoon.
The Kernel believes that there is not a student m the
University who does not want the Wildcats to be victorJoy Thought