xt7qft8dgr6w https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7qft8dgr6w/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19540625  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, June 25, 1954 text The Kentucky Kernel, June 25, 1954 1954 2013 true xt7qft8dgr6w section xt7qft8dgr6w VOLUME XLV

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY, FRIDAY, JUNE 25, 1954

Board Studies
Centennial
Preparation

IBM Card System

Used First Time

Larger Enrollment
For Universities

v

1

President H. L. Donovan has been
directed by the University Board of
Trustees to appoint a committee of
15 faculty members to prepare a
study of "what the University can
and should look like" at the time of
its centennial celebration of 1965.
The committee will be expected to
report through the president to the
trustees periodically and to make
its recommendations on how the
University should proceed to meet
the challenge of the next decade.

In a statement to the Board of
Trustees Dr. Donovan said that "a
phenomenal growth in enrollment
can be predicted for any university
that is prepared to receive it and
the increasing responsibility and de
mand on the University of Kentucky
for the education of personnel to
man industries and commerce and
the professions is a problem that
Dr. Lyman V. Ginger has been
grows more complex and acute with named Dean of the new College of
each passing year."
Adult and Extension Education.
The new school will become efHe further said "A university in fective July 1, as
authorized by the
the future will be much more con- trustees
of the University.
cerned with the continuing educaA native of Ballard County, Dr.
tion of our adults. What adjust- Ginger received the bachelor
of arts
comments will the University be
degree
pelled to make to meet this chal- College from Kentucky Wesleyan
and the master of arts delenge and how can the programs gree
from the University of Kenbe provided? These are but a few
tucky.
of the complex and pressing probIn recommending Ginger's aplems facing the trustees, faculty and pointment
as dean of the new coladministration not only of our Uni- lege.
President H. L. Donovan said,
versity but of every university in the
"I do not know of any person betland.
ter qualified to undertake a proAlready some of our more pro- gram of adult and extension educaas Dr. Ginger.
gressive and alert universities are tion
Some of the functions of the Colappointing committees to take a lege of Adult Extension Education
look at the future and to make will be:
preparations tc meet it with an intelligent program. We must not tension Center at Covington.
2. Direction and management of
drift into the future but plan for all correspondence courses.
3. Operation of the Bureau of
it"

Dr. Ginger Named New
Extension College Dean

.

j

UK To Get Med School
If State Provides Funds

state-support- ed

school."

In answering inquiries as to why
the University "does not take the
initiative and indicate its interest"
in the establishment of a school of
medicine. President H. L. Donovan
stated, "Our response to such in- quiries has been that the Univerfity
is ready to establish a schKJ r

NUMBER 32

Summer Registration
Tops Last Year's Mark

Donovan Predicts

Formal establishment of a College
It Medicine at the University of
Kentucky, to be opened when the
Assembly provides funds for
the project, has been approved by
the trustees of the University.
In 1952, the General Assembly directed the Legislative Research
Commission to make a "careful and
impartial study of the desirability
and steps necessary for the estabmedilishment of a
cal school at the University."
The study was completed and a
report made to the General Assembly this year with this recommendation: "The committee recommends
that a School of Medicine be established in Lexixigton as a part of
the University of Kentucky as soon
as the Commonwealth's finances
permit and assure the construction
of an approved 'Grade A' medical

I&noimIl

IKennttDncBlky

HUa

medicine when the state is prepared
to finance this project.
al
"This response has not been
factory to many people who believe
that the Board of Trustees should
go ahead and establish a medical
ocllege and then ask the next General Assembly to implement it by
making an appropriation to finance
it.
"There is no doubt," he continued,
"but what the Board of Trustees has
the authority to establish officially
a school of medicine at the University, if in its judgement, this is the
proper time to do so.
satis-Gener-

"In view of the attitude of so
many citizens of the state who recognize the need for increasing the
number of physicians to serve the
people of the state, and also to give
young men and women who desire
to become doctors an opportunity to
prepare themselves for this great
profession, I am recommending that
the trustees declare their interest in
this project by formally establishing
a College of Medicine to be opened
when the General Assembly provides
funds for its implementation," Dr.
lonovan said.

Summer session registration has
reached the 2,218 mark according to
Robert L. Mills, University registrar.
This is an increase of 86 over last
summer's registration at the end of
the second day.
A few more students are expected
to enroll late, but the number is not
expected to be significant.
Classification tests and physical
examinations were held for all new
students on Monday, June 21, and
registration for all students was
held on Tuesday.
The new system of registration by
IBM cards seemed to run smoothly
and instructors and students were
insured that once they became familiar with the new system, it would
facilitate faster and more efficient
registration, grading, and accounting.
As students signed up for each
class, they were given a card with

Mr. Curtis Phipps, in charge of
registration for veterans said that
243 Korean veterans had already
registered for the summer term, and
that he expected the number to
double before the term is ended.
World War II veteran registration is
down from 359 in the 1953 summer
term to 178 for this summer's registration.
new stuOne hundred forty-fodents have been tested by the Personnel Office, according to Dr.
Robert North, head of the Personnel Testing Office. This includes
both new students and transfer students, he said. However, this does
not necessarily mean that all students completing the tests actually
registered in the University.
ur

UK May Give

Board Reports
To Newsmen

various meaningful holes punched in
them. These cards will be fed
The Board of Trustees of the UniAudio-VisuMaterials, including through the University's IBM's, and versity of Kentucky has taken under
consideration the question of admitthe management of all film services separated.
ting the press to its meetings and
campus.
both on and off the
after a discussion of the subject the
4. Planning and management of
following policy statement was isall University services to the high
sued on this question:
schools of the state, including music,
"In order that the citizens of the
speech and drama festivals, and
Commonwealth may be fully inother activities of a related char- formed as to the actions of the
acter not previously organized under
Board of Trustees of the University
a different jurisdiction.
of Kentucky and of the actions of
5. Management of club and comthe Executive Committee of the
munity services such as those now
Newton W. Neel, city engineer of Board, the following procedure shall
being made available by the Depresibe followed:
partment of University Extension, Henderson, has been elected
Kentucky
"Prior to each meeting the Presimay seem desirable. dent of the University of
and others that
Association for the coming dent of the University shall prepare
The new college will not have a Alumni was
announced at the asso- and make available to the press an
faculty of its own except for the year, it
and meet- agenda ofthe matters to be taken
e
instructors required at the ciation's annual banquet
up at the meeting.
or in ing on June 3.
Northern Extension Center
"At the conclusion of each meetThe Henderson city official will
any other center similarly operated.
succeed R. R. Dawson of Bloomfield ing the President shall be available
to the press for questioning as to
as president of the alumni group.
New alumni vice president is the various subjects discussed or
acted upon by the Board.
Homer L. Baker of Louisville.
"In furtherance of this policy, the
Neel attended the University from
Louie Pritchett, Morganfield, and 1921 to 1924. He is director of the President may at his option prepare
Hank Mayo, Paintsville, have been Kentucky Municipal League, mem- or have prepared news releases to
of the summer ber of the Kentucky Water Pollu- furnish to members of the press
appointed
edition of the Kernel..
tion Control Commission, member who may not be able to attend the
Donna Villesvik, Louisville, will of the UK Alumni Executive Board, aforementioned press conferences
serve as News Editor for the sum- and a member of the Henderson immediately following the meetings.
mer edition, and John Moremen, County Alumni Club.
Frankfort, will be Chief Reporter
Baker, the new vice president, is
and Columnist.
a native of Midway. He has been
Pritchett served as Sports Editor general sales manager of the Louisof the 1954 Kenturkian, and is a ville Cement Company, Louisville,
member of the Henry Watterson since 1946. He has served as a memDesegregation in the schools will
Press Club.
ber of the Executive Committee of
Mayo, also a member of the Henry the UK Alumni Association and is be among topics to be examined in
Watterson Press Club is a member a member of the Jefferson County a Seminar in Inter-Grou- p
Relations
to be held during the University of
of Sigma Nu Fraternity.
Alumni Club.
A member of Chi Omega sorority.
Richard Cooper of Somerset, one Kentucky's Summer Session.
Miss Villesvik "is also a member of of the new executive committee
The seminar was announced
by Dr. M. M. White, dean or the
Blue Marlin and has served as sec- members to take office this year for
retary of the League of Women terms of three years, was graduated UK College of Arts and Sciences,
Voters.
"with distinction" from the Univer- and Dr. Frank G. Dickey, dean of
Moremen is a transfer from sity in 1938. Currently, he is general the College of Education. Actual
Washington and Lee University.
manager and part owner of the dates of the seminar are June 22 to
August 3.
Somerset Stone Company.
Herndon J. Evans of Pineville, the
Sponsored by the University, with
second new executive board memof the National
the
ber, was graduated from the Uni- Conference of Christians and Jews,
Daniel V. Terrell, dean of the versity of Kentucky in 1921. He has the seminar is designed to assist
University of Kentucky College of worked for the Associated Press and school administrators, teachers and
and moved to community leaders in their efforts
Engineering, has been awarded an the Courier-Journhonorary Doctor of Engineering de- Pineville in 1923 as editor of the to improve relationships among
gree by the South Dakota School of Pineville Sun. Currently he is presi- various groups with different indent of the Sun Publishing Com- terests and backgrounds.
Mines and Technology.
A citation accompanying the award pany, and he is an alumnus memDr. Gordon W. Lovejoy, educaber of the UK Board of Trustees.
praised Dean Terrell for
tional consultant for the National
in the field of engineering,
The third addition to the commit- Conference for Christians and Jews,
contributions through design, and tee, Gerald Griffin of Pikeville, re- will be loaned by the organization
consultation to state and national ceived the AS. degree from the to the University as a visiting prohighway problems . . . and devotion University in 1922. At the present fessor during the summer session
to the furtherance of engineering time he is chief of the Courier-Journal- 's and will serve as director of the
education."
East Kentucky Bureau.
seminar.
al

Newton Neal
Elected Head
Of UK Alums

full-tim-

New Summer Staff
Named For Kernel

Seminar To Study
Desegregation

j'-it-l-

Terrell Awarded
Honorary Degree

al

* i

THE KENTUCKY

Pace 2

KERNEL

Friday, June 25, 1954

Commencement Week Festivities Highlighted
By DOXNA VHAESVIK
Eight hundred University of Kentucky graduates and guests at the
87th annual baccalaureate service
on May 30 paid tribute to the
memories of approximately 1.150
Kentuckians killed during the Korean conflict.
The baccalaureate exercise was
held Jointly with a memorial service
for Kentucky's Korean War dead,
and several hundred relatives and
friends of these men were special
guests at the program.
Dr. Homer W. Carpenter, minister
ecumenical of the First Christian
Church, Louisville, was the principal
speaker at the service. The topic of
Dr. Carpenter's address was "The
Likeness of a King." Voicing the
sentiments of the graduates and
guests, he declared that "we stand
In eternal gratitude in the presence
of the memory of those lofty souls
who gave their lives In the defense
of freedom In the Korean War."
"Some of these would have been
members of this graduating class today except for the accident of circumstance," the minister said, "And,
some of you who sit here, except for
the accident of circumstance, would
be among the marching dead who
so gallantly gave themselves In full
measure of devotion for you and
me."
The Louisville minister likened
the deaths of heroes in Korea to
that death suffered on Calvary. He
quoted a Toronto clergyman In saying:
"Today I see two Calvaries. One
back there In the long ago on a hill
outside a city wall. The other down
here on the crimsoned hills of
Korea."
He offered the graduates four
names which arise today out of the
past. They were Charles Darwin,
"eminent scientist;" Karl Marx,
"eminent socialist;" Frederich

Neitche, "eminent scholar;" and
Jesus of Nazareth, "a name that is
above every name." In concluding.
Dr. Carpenter quoted Rupert Brooke
in saying: "Thank God who has
matched us against an hour like
this."
Names Placed In Coliseum
The names of those who lost their
lives have been gathered by the University's War Memorial Survey and
have been placed in wall cases in
Memorial Coliseum near those containing lists of men killed in World
War II.
The exercise was open to the public and UK President H. L. Donovan
presided.
The music for the program was
provided by the UK choristers and
the University Orchestra. The playing of taps concluded the program.
The baccalaureate exercises formally opened the Commencement
Week activities at the University.
The actual commencement program
was held on Friday, June 4, at 8:00
In the Memorial Coliseum.
Included in the program was the
awarding of honorary degrees to two
Kentucky natives, Joseph Manuel
Hartfield, New York attorney, and
Stephen Augustus Rapier, also of
New Tork City, electrical export
manufacturer.
Among other events which took
place during the week was the annual commencement luncheon. The
principal speaker was Harper Gat-to- n,
University trustee and executive vice president of the Kentucky
Chamber of Commerce.
ROTC Graduates Commissioned
Another major function of the
week was the commissioning ceremonies for both Army and Air
Force ROTC graduates. The principal speaker was Maj. Gen. Gordon
B. Rogers, commander of the Third
Armored Division. Fifty-fiv- e
of the
cadets were commissioned Into the
Army, and the remaining eighty-fobecame Air Force officers.
Dr. Virgil M. Hancher, president
of the State University of Iowa
spoke at the commencement program where 832 students received
degrees.
This year's class, the 87th UK
graduating class. Includes graduates
from 107 Kentucky counties, 26

other states, the District of Columbia and eight foreign countries. He
added that 22 doctorate, 124 masters
and professional degrees, and 686
bachelors degrees were awarded.
Degrees awarded by the respective
University colleges are as follows:
Arts and Sciences, 176; Agriculture
and Home Economics, 122; Engineering, 107; Law, 26; Education,
120; Commerce, 116; Pharmacy, 35;
and Gradaute School, 120.
Communism, Democracy Compared
"The Long View" was the topic
of the talk given by the Iowa educator. Dr. Virgil Hancer. He warned
the 1954 graduates against accepting
the "luxury of a smug complacency."
A portion of his address was devoted to a comparison of communism and democracy. He advised
the graduates:
If any lesson
comes to us from behind the Iron
Curtain it is that we shall need
education in the future more than
we have ever needed it in the past."
In remarks aimed directly at the
recipients of degrees, he maintained
that commencement Is "a good day
for taking stock." It is the end of
one segment of life and the beginning of another and . . Is a fitting
time for the backward glance and
the forward look.

"...

According to Dr. Hancer, there Is
no greater tragedy than that of a
". . . man or woman who Is unprepared when the great opportunity
comes." He also advised this year's
graduates to prepare for ". . . years
of quiet growth and development."
Husband, Wife Receive Doctorates
Among the 20 persons who received Doctor of Philosophy degrees
were Mr. and Mrs. Donald L. Laf- -

ur

The Kentucky Kernel
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
Entered at
Kentucky,
the
Published

the Post Office t Lexington.
as second class mattet under
Act of March 3, 1879.
wekly during school except
holidays and exams.
Henry Mayo and Louis Prit chert

ferty who took their undergraduate awarded the University of Kenat Western Kentucky State College. tucky's 1954 Sullivan Medallion, a
Lafferty graduated with the PhJJ. presentation made annually to "an
degree in physics, while his wife, outstanding citizen of the commonJeanne Payne Lafferty, was awarded wealth".

her doctorate in English.
The doctorate degree recipiants
plan to remain in Lexington through
this summer since Lafferty will be
teaching In the UK Department of
Physics. Lafferty holds two degrees
from UK. He was awarded the B.S.
degree in electrical engineering in
1950 and the M.S. degree in 1952.
Mrs. Lafferty was awarded the M.A.
degree in 1952.

Two Graduates Receive Awards
Two members of the graduating
class of 1954 were also awarded Sullivan Medallions. They are Miss
Elaine Moore and Diogenes Allen,

both of Lexington.

The Sullivan awards were established in 1925 by the New York
Southern Society in memory of
Algernon Sydney Sullivan, New
York lawyer of the post-Civ- il
War
period.

Among the honors bestowed during the commencement exercises
were the Sullivan awards. Mr. Lewis
Miss Moore and Diogenes
F. Allen, part owner of the Farm were both graduated from the Allen
ColSupply Stores in Bowling Green was lege of Arts and Sciences.

COLONUL
The Week

Off

I

':'.

11,

V-'v-

"

."'f'

1

LEXINGTON
YELLOW CAB
Inc.

Dial

2-22-

30

Radio Equipped

LLL
Ronnie Butler, editor-eleof The Kernel, will be
dropping into Lexington almost any day and will be
seen lurking around The Kernel editorial offices to
ascertain that these summer session editors aren't
wrecking the place.
Summer students ought to know Mr. Butler and,
therefore, as a public service, we are hereby printing
a reasonable likeness. A high ranking student, an
amateur scientist, an avid reader of an amazing
variety of fact and fiction, and a columnist of note,
Mr. Butler is spending the summer writing for the
Associated Press in Louisville.
The Stirrup Cup will be pleased to have Mr. Butler
come in and enjoy two of their appetizing meals free.
ct

24 Hour Service
DIAL

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FOR THE

Taylor Tire Co.

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IN
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PINKSTON'S

TRY

WATCH SHOP
Fine Watches
Watch Repairing

Roles Watches $150.00 up
Diamond Rings

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130 N. Limestone Phone
Next door to Chop Suey
Lexington,

AT

KENNEDY
BOOK STORE
405 S. LIME
ACROSS

FROM SUB

iw

1

:45 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.
5:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

11

fine
fee cream

Ky.

TEXT BOOKS
SCHOOL SUPPLIES
ENGINEER'S SUPPLIES

NOON AND EVENING MEALS

yii.ll

GRUEN
BULOVA
ELGIN
PARKER FOUNTAIN PENS

Now Serving Daily

Block from University
820 S. Limestone St.

High St. and Cochran

944 Winchester Rd.

STIRRUP CUP
RESTAURANT
AIR CONDITIONED
MAIN ST. AT ASHLAND

* Faculty And Staff Changes
Announced By University

For Any

Occasion

College of Engineering
Changes In rank: Nathan B. Allison, from associate professor of
electrical engineering to professor;
Karl O. Lange, from associate professor of mechanical engineering to
professor.
Leave of absence: Hansford W.
Farris, assistant professor of electrical engineering, leave continued
while he Is studying toward the doctor's degree at the University of

Michler Florist
E.

Maxwell Dial

29

e

- Damp Dried
Wished - Triple-Rinse-d
Additional Charge for Drying

Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
877 E.

8 to 5
8 to 5 6 to 9
8 to 1 2 noon

HIGH ST.

Thursday
Friday
Saturday

.jl

by

The University of Kentucky's
partment of Physical Education
lected 10 men students and 10 women students as the "top ten
majors" for the 1953-5- 4 school year.
Twenty students in the department are chosen at the end of each
school year on the basis of their
abilities as shown by participation In
the department's program. Dr. Sea-to- n
said.
Women winning departmental
honors follow:
Peggy Drlscoll, Louisville; Ann
Everly, David; Dorothy McPhail,
Irvine; Marilyn Overfield, Henderson; Joyce Stephens, Hitchlns, Helen
Vance Gilb and Pat Honshu!, both
of Lexington; Nancy Lilly, Smith
Evelyn
Mills;
Duncan, Bowling
Green; Mildred Hatfield, Fulton.
Outstanding men were:
Joe B. Hall, Cynthlana; Burt Cox,
London; Cliff Hagan, Owensboro;
Bill Evans, Berea; D wight Price and
Bob Slther, both of Lexington; Ray
Callahan, Lebanon; Miles Willard,
Vandergrlft, Pa.; Wallace Mitchell,
Somerset; and Lou Karibo,
Dese-

of $4,650,114 for the
year Is now In effect.

15

387

Dry Cleaning

Per Cent Discount

and

CASH

Monday thru Friday
Euclid Are (Next to Coliseum)
and 880 E. High
PHONE

3-02-

Any Past Year Available
Official University of Kentucky Ring made
especially to suit your individual specifications. Set with synthetic Spinel, Ruby or
or
Genuine Black Onyx. Any year-dat- e
degree. Use convenient order blank below.
FILL OUT THIS ORDER FORM,

Fountain Service
SWIMMING ACCESSORIES
TOILETRIES-COSMETI-

SCHOOL

CS

SUPPLIES-TOBACC-

ENCLOSE

$5.00

DEPOSIT

AND MAIL TO
CAMPUS BOOK STORE
University of Kentucky, Lexington,

Ky.

to apply on the following

Enclosed is deposit of $
described UK Ring

or Pin and Guard

Year-Da-

.

, Initials

My finger size

, Degree

te

(Check properly below to indicate article wanted)
Onyx

Spinal

Ruby Stones
Encrust in Stone
FRATERNAL EMBLEM

10 Karat
Men's Ring
Ladies' Ring
Pin and Guard

Go!

$30.00
$26.50
$16.50

$5.00 ADDITIONAL

(State whether guard is to be Yr. Date

OS

or

Dergee)

andor

State Taxes EXTRA (present Federal Tax 10
no State Tax)
When manufacturing is complete, make shipment (CO D. for any
balance due) to:
Federal

WILL DUNN DRUG CO

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Class Hings

ROSE ST.

PRESCRIPTIONS

CARRY

at no added cost

One day service

New and Used Portables,
convenient terms.

PHONE

of
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DeBOOR

Carbons, Ribbons and Office
Supplies.

DIAL

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Laundry

College of Education
Appointments: Carl LaMar, instructor In vocational education;
Eddie McNabb, part-tim- e
instructor
in physical education and driver
training and assistant basketball
coach.
Leaves of absence: Ruth Sneed,
assistant professor of vocational education, granted leave for the 1954-5- 5
school year; Betty Beaty, instructor, leave continued while she is
studying at Indiana University.
College of Commerce
Promotions: Herman A. Ellis, from
assistant professor of economics to
associate professor; Eldred C. Speck,
from assistant professor of . commerce to associate professor; John
Johnson, from research associate to
assistant professor.
Leave of absence: Ralph R. Pickett, professor of economics, granted
leave for the fall semester to engage
in research.

56 to 9

new
Boone

4.

Michigan.

af

1954-5-

Holt, a native of Western Kentucky and one of the state's best
This does not include funds for known contemporary novelists, two
operation of the Agricultural Ex- years ago published a novel about
periment Station and the Agricul- the early days of the Jackson Purtural Extension Service because chase entitled "The Gabriel Horn."
Congress has not yet acted on the
The manuscript of "The Gabriel
request of the U. S. Department of
Agriculture for such appropriations. Horn" also Is on display In the UK
library.
Of the money budgeted for educational and general purposes $3,485,-85- 0
the men's and women's residence
will come from state appropriahalls and the University post office
tions. The remainder will be made
up of student fees, sales and services, are expected to yield funds totaling
$339,397, which is a slight Increase
and federal grants.
over 1953-5Auxiliary enterprises, including

Typewriters, Adding Machines,
Sales, Service and Rentals.

8 to
8 to 5
8 to 5

Univer-

of $24,144

SERVICE

Shopping Center

SOAP FREE

UP TO

9IL.

Chery-Chas-

In

In

KENTUCKY TYPEWRITER

Self Service Laundry
Ashland

Trustees Approve Library Displays
UK Selects
FelLx Holt's Novel
Budget Increase
current display
the
Top Ten
increase
the current budget sity of Kentucky Margaret I. King
for
has
features the
Kentucky
Felix
Kentucky,
novel
P. E. Majors the University ofbeenTheapproved the LibraryHolt's Kissed manuscript of
budget "Dan!
Board of Trustees.
full
A

FLOWERS

CALL

Page 3

An

Trustees of the University of Ken- Norway and Sweden.
College of Agriculture and
tucky have approved the promotion
Home Economics
of numerous faculty and staff memChanges in rank and title: George
bers. Appointments, resignations,
and other staff changes also re- B. Byers, from economist in farm
economics to economist in agriculceived board approval, as follows:
tural economics and associate proCollege of Arts and Sciences
fessor of agricultural economics;
Promotions: Gifford Blyton, from Dana G. Card, from professor of
associate professor of speech, De- agricultural economics and associate
partment of English, to professor; economist in agricultural prices to
Joseph B. Cathey, Edmund Nosow professor of agricultural economics
and Frank J. Walker, from assistant and economist in agricultural prices;
geologist, Kentucky Geological Sur- James E. Criswell, from assistant in
vey, Department of Geology, to ge- farm economics to assistant econoologist; Robert D. Jacobs, from In- mist in agricultural economics; Ern-e- rt
structor In English to assistant proJ. Nesius, from economist in
fessor; William H. Jansen, from as- farm economics to economist in agsistant professor of English to as- ricultural economics and associate
sociate professor; Bernard D. Kern, professor of agricultural economics;
from assistant professor of physics Milton Shuffett, from assistant in
to associate professor; Ernest Mey- marketing to assistant economist in
ers, from assistant professor of psy- agricultural economics; James
chology to associate professor; Ar- Thomson, from assistant in farm
thur K. Moore, from associate pro- economics to assistant economist in
fessor of English to professor; John agricultural economics; Earl N.
M. Patterson and Paul G. Sears, Boyd, from assistant professor of
from instructor In chemistry to as- dairying to assistant professor of
sistant professor.
dairying and assistant dairy techAppointments: Lewis S. Rosenthal nologist; Donald W. MacLaury, from
associate in poultry husbandry to
and William B. Hornback, part-tim- e
poultry husbandry; William A. Seay,
instructors in English.
Leave of absence: Sallie E. Pence, from associate professor and assoagronomist to professor and
associate professor of mathematics, ciate
agronomist; William G. Survant,
granted leave for the summer term
to visit schools in England, Scotland, from associate professor of agronomy to professor; Richard A. Chapman, from associate plant pathologist, agronomy, to plant pathologist;
Robert F. Behlow, from assistant
veterinarian, animal pathology, to
assistant veterinarian and assistant
professor; Carl L. Davis, from technical assistant, Dairy Department,
to assistant.
Appointment: Denzll H. Boyd Jr.,
assistant in agricultural economics.

417

KERNEL

THE KENTUCKY

Friday, June 25. 1954

(Name)

LIME AND MAXVELL

Street and No.

City and State

* THE KENTUCKY

Pace 4

The Campi
Registration with its pitfalls of
academic redtape will always be the
topic of conversation at the opening
of a school year and the summer
session was no exception.
This year an experiment in the
IBM mathematical manipulation of
schedules seemed to add to the confusion and it impressed us simply as
a few more cards to lug from one
filling station to another but there
was undoubtedly a reason. The IBM
slogan is not simple like "milder
and better tasting" or "it takes the
sting out of hops" but instead involves the magnanimous
word
THINK.
Well we thought and thought and
thought and decided that they resemble nothing more than a piece
of paper similar to a government
paycheck only without the money
that accompanies it.
The woman situation seems to be
greatly motified not only in numbers but in location for all of the
sororities have settled themselves in
the ADPi house which permits us
to have an excellent focal point.
The girls themselves will be chocked
full of conversation on dates, for
their living conditions prevents gossip about other sororities. The Wednesday night meetings will still be
the same. Each girl meditates in
her room for five minutes.
IT WOULD EE NICE IF: the
ratio of girls to boys was about
three to one . . . beach parties were
credited courses . . . people wouldn't
say "if" when playing golf . . . classrooms were air conditioned . . . we
could smoke in class . . . you could
get sunburned without being out in
the sun . . . UK had the same kind
of architecture for all of its buildings . . . Light Horse Husbandry
was offered at a later hour, it's now
at 7:30 or some such. How can a
person ride a horse at that hour . . .
McCarthy would lose his voice . . .
we were
summer was longer
all millionaires . . .
BEST MOVIE OF THE WEEK:
"A Walk in the Sun," vintage of
about 1945. A TV reissue, it portrayed the story of a platoon of infantrymen in Italy with the wittiest,
saddest, most realistic dialogue we've
heard in the movies. Look around
for it again in about 1968.

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KERNEL

Cincinnati Operas Expect
Outstanding Performances
When the lights are darkened and
the curtain opens in the Outdoor
Theatre at The Cincinnati Zoological Gardens on Saturday night,
season of
June 26, the thirty-thir- d
the Cincinnati Opera Association
will be under way.
The Outdoor Theatre which has
been enlarged and modernized has
been completely sold out for the
first performance which wifl be
"Lucia" starring Roberta Peters.
Robert L. Sidell, managing director
of the company, reports that not
only are all the reserved seats sold
out but the general admission tick
ets as well, however, there are still
good seats available for the other
performances of the first week. He
strongly advises music lovers who
wish to enjoy performances this season to order their seats early, not
only to secure choice locations, but
to be assured of any kind of seats.
The list of performers to appear
in forthcoming weeks contains some
of the most famous names in opera,
concert, and television with the second night of opening week presenting the Opera's most beautiful soprano, Lucia Evangelista in Verdi's
with
"La Traviata."
Miss Evangelista in the musical
version of "Camille" are David Po-le- ri
and Frank Guarrera. "Traviata"
will be presented on Sunday, June
27 and Wednesday, June 30.
On June 29 and July 2, Dorothy
Kirsten, who has thrilled audiences
all over the world in the title role
of "Tosca" will make her return to
the American opera in an interpretation of that dramatic role. These
will be the only two appearances
Miss Kirsten will make during the
season in Cincinnati. Fausto Cleva
conducts with Eugene Conley and
George Chapliski
The spectacular music drama of
the French Revolution, "Andrea

Chenier," which has been produced
only one time before in the last
twenty-fiv- e
years on the Zoo stage
will be presented on July 1 and
July 3. The big stage spectacle calls
singers headfor a cast of
ed by Herva Nelli of the Metropolitan, Joan Francis, George Bardi,
Cesare Bardelli, and the Ballet
starring Lydia Arlova and Lu