xt7qft8dgr82 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7qft8dgr82/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19311120  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, November 20, 1931 text The Kentucky Kernel, November 20, 1931 1931 2013 true xt7qft8dgr82 section xt7qft8dgr82 Best Copy Available

I.

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
UNIVERSITY

FRIDAY EDITION
KERNEL

SEMI-WEEKL-

OF

DEAN RELEASES
ARRANGEMENTS EXHIBITION OF MODERN
COMPLETED FOR
TEXTILE DESIGNS SHOWN CALENDAR OF U.K.
SOCIAL EVENTS
FALL FESTIVAL Creations by Ruth Reeves, Henrietta Reiss, Donald
Des-ke-

College of Agriculture to Hold
Annual Event at 7:30
'Clock

Tonight

TWO NEW BUILDINGS
WILL RE INSPECTED

Program Includes Livestock
Exhibition, Pledging, Music and Dancing

'

With the preparations practically
completed, the College of Agriculture
will hold Its annual fall festival at
7:30 tonight at the livestock Judging
pavllllon on the experiment station
farm. The program has been increased over those of previous years
by the addition of the inspection of
the new Dairy and Agricultural Engineering buildings.
The festival, sometimes known as
the "little International' Is held
each year before the livestock of
the experiment station farm is shipped to Chicago for the International
Live Stock Exposition. These animals are exhibited at the festival in
order that people may judge for
themselves the work that the farm
is doing.
The exhibition of the livestock,
together with the main program of
the evening which will be held In
the judging pavilion, will follow the
general Inspection of the new buildings. In the Dairy building all the
machinery that Is Installed there
will be In operation and Instructors
and guides will be stationed to furnish explanations. The divisions of
dairy processes to be shown will Include pasteurization, cooling, churning, the printing of butter, and testing. Butter will be served to those
who desire it.
In the Agricultural Engineering
building the machinery has been
placed conveniently in order to explain more explicitly the development of machinery in farm use
today. The development of the plow
is 6hown by one of the first mule
plows used in Kentucky in contrast
to the modern riding and tractor
plows. Other machinery will be
shown and guides will attempt to
answer any questions asked about
it. Some machines will be in operation, the hydraulic ram and the

blue print maker. Another important phase of agriculture to be
shown Is the work of the College
of Agriculture on land drainage,
an Important work of the college.
The main program, of which
will be
Levy is
divided into two parts with a IS
minute intermission between the divisions. Music will be rendered by
the university band, whose performance will open the program. There
will following the pledging of Phi
Upsllon Omicron, honorary sorority
of the home economics department,
and Alpha Zeta, honorary agriculture fraternity. There will be a solo
by a Block and Bridle pledge which
will be followed by the livestock ex
hibit and tap dancing. The second
part of the program will feature
the sheep exhibit, the announce
ment of winners of the state fair
Judging contest, a lesson in nutrition,
pledging by Block and Bridle, a
Rhapsody in Black, the exhibit of
the beef cattle, and the presentation of a medal to the freshman
who made the highest standing In
the College of Agriculture last year.
There will also be numerous displays from dlflerent departments,
such as inagronomy, meats, entomology, horticulture, farm economics, chemistry, feeds, vetinary
and poultry. Refreshments will be
sold by girls of the home economics

By LAWRENCE HF.RRON
Extolling, belittling, or ignoring,
students of the university, reviewing the field of American art Judging from expressions of Individual
opinion have too often limited its
scope to the art of the brush and
the mallet The field of designing
has been overlooked.
The display of modern textile de
signs now showing at the art center
offers a new angle of consideration.
Exhibiting creations by Ruth Reeves,
Henriette Reiss, Donald Deskey,
and other recognized leaders In
the field, this collection of American cotton textiles, sponsored by
the American Federation of Arts,
was opened to the public last Thursday and will remain at the university until Monday, November 30
Selections on view at the art center gallaries are materials lately
featured as part of the third in
ternational Exhibition of Industrial
arts. This assemblage of textile
works was exhibited in museums
throughout the country. According
to Prof. Edward W. Rannells, head
of the department of art, they attracted widespread attention.
The current grouping of textiles,
ranging in execution from hand
prints to machine weaves, from
draperies to dress goods, offers a
most complete survey of the craft
Modernistic abstractions vte with
forms for atten-tio- a
conventionalized
Forceful, "mannish" designs,
romantic, feminine designs, period
designs developed In the manner of
today, conservative designs, disturbing designs, all offer the reviewer
every mood of emotion.
Preeminent among the gallery's
attractions are the prints of Ruth
Reeves executed by W. and J.
Sloane. Probably the most outstanding, surely the best known, of her
designs heme of the display is
"Green Pastures." In yellow and
shades of green on airplane cloth,
a very fine, flat textured stuff, it
is drafted in the pictured abstractions typical of modern designs. The"
rural forms of sheep, barns, trees,
and flowers are clearly present but
fade into the forcefulness of the
design Itself.
As a design the presentation is

perfect The abstraction and expanse of the design unit allow the
inevitable folds of a drapery or

Hy-m- an

ring-mast-

department

Pan Hellenic Council,
Y.M. Plan Fraternity
Banquet for Pledges

PERSHING RIFLES
HOLDS INITIATION
Honorary Basic Military Fraternity Also Conducts Fall
Pledging Exercises at Regular Drill Period
Pershing Rifles, national honorary
basic military fraternity, held its
annual fall Initiation Thursday, with
the initation of H. E. Blerly, J. K.
Keys. J. R. Nunnelly, F. C. Dye,
and J. E. Hocker. Membership in
the organization is based upon
proficiency In military work.
Wednesday, November 18, formal
pledging exercises were held at the
regular drill period. A. J. Stokely,
H. G. Crowden, W. H. Bryant, J.
L. Richards, C. Johnson, J. J. Wheat,
C. A. Payner, J. L. Carter, L. H.
Cloyd, H. O. Boldrick, F. M. Baker,
S. E. Langfltt, W.
W. Hornhorst,
K. Massie. J. W. Piatt, H. E. Clo,
J. A. Styles, J. M. Crain. T. A.
F. L. Longley, R. P. Fulcher,
T. C. Wagner, D. V. Weddle, R. W.
Gum, D. Gordon, and J. E. Campbell Initiation for the new pledges
will be held at the beginning of
the next semester.
From now until the Regimental
drill meet next Spring, the drill
periods will be spent In preparation
for competition in the annual competitive drill of the national organization. This meet is held at
the University of Illinois.
An Invitation has been extended
to all the members of Company C,
of the university, by Company A,
University of Ohio, to attend Its annual fall formal which will be held
tonight. The 12 members expecting
to make the trip will be the guests
of the Ohio chapter at the
game Saturday.
n,

Ohio-Illino-

is

Professors Select
Delegate at Meeting

er

'

I

Dates Eor 78 Student Entertainments are Named by
Committees

hanging without destroying the ef
fect. But to him seeking an association between the name, "Green
Pastures," and the design the present color scheme Is unfortunate.
Visualizing the refreshing tones of
a country heath, he finds a sere
yellow and a brackish green. However, this piece, as are most of those
on exhibition, is planned for execution in other colors as well. Apart
from this
for association
the design must be more pleasing
to the average student.
"Play Boy," rivaling "Green Pastures" in Importance, in black, red,
and gray on a rugged Monk's cloth,
flaunts in striking colors and modern angles figures from the world
of sports. Carrying a strictly masculine air, and suitable for drapery or hanging it is adaptable only
for the haunts of men.
"Homage to Emily Dickenson" is
controversal in effect; approval or
disapproval lies with the reviewer.
A cotton velvet In dark blue and
shades of blues and pinks, the hues
and figures create a hazy impres- (Continued on Page Six)

House Dances, Dinner Dances
Tea Dances and Guest
Dances Included

Seventy-eigevents have been
scheduled for the uslverslty 1931-3- 2
social season. The calendar,
which was composed by the student social committee and passed
by the faculty social committee,
was released yesterday from the
office of the dean of men.
The dates for the events were
chosen by selection of one out of
three dates petitioned for by each
organization. The calendar includes
21 house dances, 12 dinner dances,
14 tea dances, and 31 guest dances.
The organization house dances
are: November 28, Lambda Chi
Alpha; December 12, Triangle, Phi
Kappa Tau, Kappa Alpha, Sigma
Chi; January 9, Delta Chi, Phi
Delta Theta, Campus Club, Kappa
Sigma; January 18, Sigma Beta Xi,
Phi Sigma Kappa; February 6, Phi
Kappa Tau; February 27, Pi Kappa
Alpha; April 9, Phi Psi Phi; April
16, Campus Club, Sigma Beta Xi;
April 23, Triangle, Kappa Alpha,
Lambda Chi Alpha; May 14, Delta
Chi; and May 21, Sigma Chi.
The dinner dances Include:
November 20, Sigma Alpha
Special Music,
November 27, Alpha Gamma
Feature Program in PatRho, Pi Kappa Alpha; December
terson Hall; Students
4, Pershing Rifles; December 11,
Omega Beta Pi; January 8, PI KapShow Models
pa Alpha; January 15, Sigma Alpha
SILVER COINS DONATED Epsilon; February 6, Kappa Sigma;
February 19, Sigma Alpha Epsilon;
The Charm School, led by Mrs. March 18, Alpha Gamma Rho;
April
Frank L. McVey, one of the three Sigma 1, Kappa Sigma; April 29,
Alpha Epsilon.
Y.W.C.A. interest groups, entertain
The 14 tea dances are:
ed with a style revue and silver tea
November 21, SuKy; November
from 4 to 6 o'clock yesterday after
noon hi Patterson hall recreation 28, Catholic Club; December 4,
rooms, as a culmination of its work Cwens; December 5, Delta Delta
Delta; December 12, Cadet Hop;
during the last six weeks.
Outstanding feature of the tea January 9, Cadet Hpp; January
was a revue of models from a num- 16, Chi Omega; February 6, Kappa
Delta; February 1),
ber of Lexington shops, worn by the February 20, Alpha Cadet Hop;
Delta Theta:
following members of the class:
Nell Montgomery, Edith Marie March 4, Boyd Hall; March 12,
Delta Zeta; March 19, Cadet Hop,
Bell, Elizabeth Ann Ewlng, Billie
Maddox, Louise Barton, Frances and April 9, Cadet Hop.
The guest dances are:
Dye, Rita Wathen, Cora Wesler,
November 21, N. C. P. A.; NovemMarjorie Fleber, Justine White, Bet
ty Davis, and Martha Lowry. They ber 26, Alumni; November 28,
displayed the last word in fashion Strollers; December 4. Kentuckian;
Febru
for sports, afternoon, dinner, and December 17,
evening clothes, riding habits, furs, ary 6. Alpha Gamma Delta, Delta
Tau Delta; February 13, Kappa
and lounging pajamas.
Delta;
Included in the program were Alpha, Alpha XI Alpha; February
February
two
numbers by four 20, Lambda Chi
26, Military
Ball; February 27,
girls selected to represent the
class conducted by Geor-gian- Campus Club, Zeta Tau Alpha;
Weedon. The girls were March 5, Sigma Beta Xi, Triangle;
Virginia Ruffner, Mildred Schaff-ne- r, March 12, Phi Sigma Kappa, Sigma
Delta
Florence Kelly, and Linda Wil- Alpha Epsilon; March 19, Alpha
son. They were accompanied
by Chi, Kappa Kappa Gamma,
Delta Sigma; April 71, Junior Prom;
Marjorie Hemlepp at the piano.
Special music for the program April 2. Alpha Gamma Rho, Pi
was arranged by Lois E. Neal, music Kappa Alpha; April 9, Delta Theta;
30,
director of the Y.W.C.A., with Flora April 16, Sigma Nu; April(May Sigma
Day
Knight, pianist, Frances Penn Mil- Chi; May 6. 7, SuKy
May
Strollers; May 14,
ler, violinist, and Jessie Wilson, so- Dance);
Phi Kappa Tau; May 21, Delta
loist.
Mrs. Frank L. McVey, Miss Sarah Sigma Pi, and Kappa Sigma.
G. Blandlng, dean of women, Mrs.
Sarah B. Holmes, assistant dean of
women, Eleanor Smith, president of
the Y.W.C.A., and Augusta Roberts,
university Y.W.C.A. secretary, were
in the receiving line.
Invitations were extended to all
women students, members of the
university faculty, and wives of
members of the faculty. The silver
favorable vote
By a three-fourtcoins, donated by the guests of the
the Men's Student Council of the
revue, will be used to further the
university repealed a clause of Its
work of the university Y.W.C.A.
constitution which prevents the
freshman representative from voting at a meeting which was held In
5 the Administration building at 4 o'
In the
clock Thursday afternoon.
rjast
the freshman
Measurements
of Entrants class the president of on the council
has held a seat
Must Be Submitted to
but has not been permitted to vote.

National Collegiate Press
Association Assembles at
UK for Annual Convention
PROGRAM
:30

ht

10:00

12:30
1:30

3:00

Frosh Member
Of Men's Group

Is Granted Vote

Beauty Winner May
Be Announced Dec.

The winner of the Kentucklan
beauty contest probably will be an.
nounced at the Kentuckian dance
on December 8, Jimmle Lyne, feature editor of the annual said Wednesday. Proofs have been submitted to the photographers and when
the prints are returned they will be
sent, together with the measurements of the contestants, to Florens
Zlegfeld, judge of the contest
Measurements of the contestants
must be submitted either Monday
or Tuesday to James Lyne at the
Kentucklan office. It is essential
that the measurements be submitted by that time in order to complete the material that must be
mailed to the judges. The candidates must also bring the measurements to the office personally in order to give other necessary information to the editor.
The following measurements are
necessary:
height, weight, neck,
bust, waist, hips, thigh, calf, ankle,
upper arm, lower arm, and wrist.
Forty-si- x
entrants are In the contest. Eight of these will have full
page pictures in the book. Of these
eight, one will be chosen as winner
of

6:30

n;

na

the contest

AG. SOCIETY TO MEET

The Agriculture society will meet
at 7:30 Monday night in the Agriculture building. Prof. W. 8. Webb,
head of the physics department of
the College of Arts and Sciences,
will be the principal speaker.

To change the constitution a
three-fourtmajority of the participating councilors Is required. The
change goes into effect immediate
ly, and as a result, James Barney,
recently elected iresnman presi
dent, will vote on all questions
which comes before the council.
Other matters which came before
the council Thursday afternoon
were the problems of drinking
among undergraduates and theater
rushing. It was decided that the
most stringent penalties would be
imposed on all students guilty of
disobeying the regulations against
drinking at university social functions.

The matter of theater rushing
was discussed and It was decided to
bring future offenders before the
council for disciplinary measures.
Freshman regulations were con
sidered and it was voted to bring
any first-yeman violating re
strictions before the council for acar

BEGIN

Call to Order, Room 54 McVey Hall
Address of Welcome President Frank L. McVey
Introduction of Delegates
Roll Call of Members

8:30

President's Report

Meeting

LATE REGISTRATION
MAY INCREASE TOTAL

Program

Includes' Business
Assemblies, Luncheons
and Dinner-Danc- e

More than 35 delegates represent.
Ing 20 different college publications
have arrived in Lexington for the
annual convention of the National
Collegiate Press association, which
will be held at the university today
and Saturday. Notices have been
received from many others who have
not arrived, as yet and the late registration Is expected to swell the
enrollment.
program
Plans for the two-da- y
have been completed under the di
rection of Prof. Enoch Orehan and
Prof. Victor R. Portmann, of the
Journalism department.
Members
of Alpha Delta Sigma, professional
advertising fraternity, Sigma Delta
Chi, honorary Journalistic fraternity, and Theta Sigma Phi, women's
professional Journalistic fraternity.
are assisting In the presentation of
the program.
Early returns indicate that the
east, middle west, and southern
section of the country will be well
represented, with the western delegates being fewer In number. Ver

Saturday, November 21
Call to Order, Room 111, McVey Hall
Business Meeting
Shall the NCPA continue?
Report of Committees
Unfinished Business
Election of Officers
Selection of 1932 Meeting Place
12:30 Luncheon, Kentucky Kernel, University Commons
g
1:30 Blue Grass
tour, visiting the famous stock
farms, Man O War, etc.
4:15 Tea at Maxwell Place'
6:30 Dinner Dance, Lafayette Hotel Gold Room (informal)
9:00

mont and Tulane represent the
farthest points north and south,
while Creighton University, Omaha.
Nebraska, and the University of
North Dakota are sending delegates
from the west.
rptvwta lnrttratj
that the meeting will be largely
masculine, since only three schools
have sent feminine delegates to
KentUCkv.
MlsslsslDni. Iowa, and
North Dakota are the three states

Sight-seein-

Kentuckian Orchestra

Head of Department of Political Science at Rockford
College Will Talk on
Norwegian Politics

Rockford College, Rockford, Illinois,
will be the speaker at a meeting
sponsored by the International Relations club, an activity of
in conjunction with Alpha Sigma PI, honorary political
science fraternity which will be
held at 4 o'clock Tuesday afternoon
in room four of the Administration
building. Dr. Janson 's subject will
be, "Political Systems of Norway
and Sweden."
The address by Doctor Janson on
Tuesday Is a continuation of the
program of
for the
year. Her talk Is in keeping with
subject, Scandinavia,
to be
the
studied by that organization this
session.
Doctor Janson has studied extensively In Scandinavia countries,
and is especially prepared to deal
with the government of those countries. She received her Ph. D. at
the University of Pennsylvania.
Miss Janson is one of the three
speakers to be brought to the university by
this year,
who are from other states. The
others are Sir Ben Blessum. head of
the Norwegian railways In the United States, and Ole Sings tad, designer of the Holland tunnel in
New York City.
Mr. Blessum has been in the
United States for several years, and
hat lectured extensively on Norse
topics In the largest colleges, by
universities and museums throughout the Untied States. He was
knighted by the King of Norway
for his outstanding work In the Interest of Norway, In the United
States.
He will speak December 9 at a
general convocation in Memorial
hall.
n,

Holds First Meeting

of the University of Georgia
football team, is a member of
Sigma Chi. "Catfish" is an
athlete and is captain-eleof the 1932 basketball team.
Bob Zupke famous University
of Illinois football coach, is a
member of Kappa Sigma.
George C. Butte
of the Phllllplne Islands, is
a member of Alpha Tau Omega.
Alpha Delta Theta ranked first
in scholarship at the University
of Southern California last year.
Herble Kay whose orchestra
Is heard dally over WGN, Chicago, is a member of Sigma
Alpha Epsilon.
Alpha Gamma Delta was the
first sorority at McGill University. The Installation took place
ct

Dr. Florence Janson, head of the
department of political science of

El Ateneo Castellano

so represented.
The meetlmr will own at 9 nvinrk
this morning with an address of
welcome to the visiting members by
Pres. Frank L. McVey. The remainder of the moraine will be devotpd
to the business of the convention.
Dr. Arthur Braden, president of
Transylvania College, will speak to
the assembly on, "The Press In the
Changing World." Other speakers
on the nrocram Include Tnm Wal
lace, editor of the Louisville Times,
who will speak on "The Coming
Newspaper,"
and Prof. Enoch
Grehan, head of the department of
Journalism at the university, who
will discuss "Editorial Responsibility." Prof. Victor R. Portmann will
lead a discussion on "Typography

"Catfish" Smith star
all-rou-

ONE OF THREE SPEAKERS

on

Brethren! Sistern!
Vernon

in

1930.

(Copyrighted.

1931)

RADIO ARTISTS
WILL PERFORM
Four Musical Organizations
to Appear on Charity Program at Kentucky Theater
Tuesday Night
The performers on the staff of
radio station of WHAS will appear
In the charity program given at
the Kentucky theater for the bene
at 10:30
fit of the unemployed,
o'clock Tuesday night, November
24.
Among these are the Blue
and White orchestra with Hilda
s,
Cooper, soloist; the Mountain
composed of James Gate-wooBob Atcher, and Ed Harrison;
the Ace and Deuce string band ; and
the Four Horsemen quartette.
Besides these, others from the
city of Lexington will perform on
the program, according to Herman
Bamberger, manager of the Ken
tucky theater. Dick Garland, will
be the master of ceremonies.
The Ada Meade theater plans to
take part in the unemployment
benefit by offering a show Tuesday
night, November 24. The Opera
d,

house will also give
benefit per
formance.
El Ateneo Castellano, the Spanish
All the money taken in at the
club of the university, held lis first performance at the Kentucky will
meeting at 3 o'clock Tuesday af- go directly to charity, and the perternoon, In the recreation hall of formers from the university will
Patterson hall, for the purpose of not receive any pay for their serorganization.
vices. E. O. Sulzer, director of the
giving.
The officers elected for the com- band, states that it is the desire of
ing year were Banker White, presi the university to offer Its services to
PAINTINGS ARE EXHIBITED
charity.
dent; Emily Hardin,
Many excel lent reproductions Hal Bencomo, secretary, and Dave
The Strand theater gave a special
were among the works on exnibl- - Welsh, treasurer. The club will meet show for the unemployment benefit
tion at the print show held In the every two weeks. All students who Thursday morning, November 19.
art center Tuesday and Wednesday, have completed the first year of The Ben All also plans to give a
November 17 and 18. The works collide Spanish are eligible for show for a similar purpose lu the
were loaned by the International membership in the club. The next near future, although no date has
been announced.
Art Publishing company, Detroit, meeting will be held December 1.

tion.

Other routine matters came be
fore the council, which adjourned
at 5 o'clock. The next meeting of
the organization will be held in the
Administration building at 4 o'clock,
the second Thursday after Thanks-

SESSIONS

Representatives of 20 Colleges Arrive for Two-Da-y

Report
Business Meeting The NCPA
Appointment of Committees
Luncheon, by the University, University Commons
Call to Order, Room 111, McVey Hall
Address Editorial Responsibility
Prof. Enoch Orehan
Address The Coming Newspaper
Tom Wallace, Editor, Louisville Timet
Discussion Typography and Make-u- p
Prof. Victor R. Portmann, Leader
Address Advertising and Layout
Clinton Cleveland, Lexington Leader
Sectional Meetings
Newspaper Editors William Artery, Leader
Room 54, McVey Hall
Business Managers Coleman Smith, Leader
Room 50, McVey Hall
Annuals Frank Stone, Leader, Room 53, McVey Hall
Banquet, Phoenix Hotel
Lexington Leader and Lexington Herald
Theater party Courtesy Kentucky Theater
Charles Farrell and Madge Evans in "Heartbreak"

JANSON TO SPEAK
AT U. K. TUESDAY

TO

THIS MORNING

Secretary-Treasurer- 's

IIELDBYY.W.C.A.
Tap-Numbe- rs

JOURNALISTS

Friday, November 20

STYLE REVUE IS

James Lyne

NEW SERIES. NTMHER 19

1031

LISTINGS ARE FOR
ENTIRE SCHOOL YEAR

ng

The second annual lnterfraternity
pledge banquet will be held at 6
o'clock Tuesday night in the Training school cafeteria. Pinal arrange- a
ments are now being made by
committee composed of William
Shafer and Cameron CofTman, representing the senior cabinet of the
Y. M. C. A.
The banquet is being sponsored
council
by the Men's
and the cabinets of the Y. M. C. A.
year a similar affair was sponLast
sored by the Y. M. C. A. and was
held In the Training school cafe.
teria which was attended by approximately 60 pledges and members of the Y. M. C. A. Arrangements are being made for approxiThe American Association of
mately 85 pledges of the different University Professors met at 7:15
fraternities and Y. M. C. A. mem- o'clock Monday night in room 129
bers at the banquet this year.
of McVey hall. The members were
Pres. Frank L. McVey will be the addressed by Prof. J. W. Martin and
principal speaker of the evening. Prof. R. H. Clyde. Dr. O. T. Kop-piu- s,
secretary-treasurof the orThe topic of his talk will be on "The
Ideal Fraternity." Negotiations are ganization was selected as the delnow under way to secure some oth- egate to attend the national coner speaker to speak on The Ideal vention to be held November 27 and
28 in Chicago.
Fraternity Man."
The Kentucky branch of the association, which is open to all memPITKIN CLl'B MEETS
bers of the university teaching staff,
The weekly meeting of the Pitkin has a membership of 85, 50 of
club was held at 13 o'clock Wed- whom were present at the mee'ing
nesday in the Maxwell Presbyterian Monday night.
Professor Martin and Professor
church under the direction of Dr.
Howard M. Morgan. "What the Clyde both spoke on the functions
Bible Has to Bay about Everyday of committees of the national asProblems" was the subject of Doc- sociation and their connection with
academic freedom and tenure. Iltor Morgan's talk.
lustrative material for both speeches
'Rutgers and Princeton were the was taken from the H. II. Miller
first colleges to play football and case at Ohio State University. FolColumbia was third, with Yale four- lowing the addresses, an open discussion was he'd.
th and Harvard fifth.
ic

y,

and Other Artists Are on Display at University Art Center; Will Close Monday,
November 30

NEXT WEEK

KENTUCKY

LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY, FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 20,

VOLUME XXII

SPECIAL KERNEL
ISSIE WEDNESDAY ONLY ONE

and Make-up- ."
Other features of the program
include a banquet at the Phoenix
hotel, which will be given by the
Lexington Leader and the Lexington Herald, a theater party through
the courtesy of the Kentucky theater, and a dinner-danc- e
Saturday
night at the Lafayette hotel. Saturday afternoon the delegates will
g
be taken on a
tour
through the Bluegrass, where they
will visit scenic and historic points
of Interest.
Members of the committees who
have charge of the convention pro
gram are:
sight-seein-

(Continued

on Page Six)

The Blue and White
Orchestra Will Play
For SuKy Tea Dance
The Blue and White orchestra,
WHAS radio artists, have been engaged to play at the SuKy tea
dance November 21, it was announced Tuesday at a meeting of
SuKy circle held in the university
gymnasium.
The dance, which will be the first
of the year, will be held in the af
ternoon from 3:30 until 6 o clock in
the Alumni gymnasium, according
to an announcement Issued by Lou
E. Neal and Alice Lang, who are
in charge of the arrangements.
That the football fans will not
have a wildcat to Incite them to
cheers at the Tennessee game was
decided at the meeting. The animal
which the circle intended tr nnr- chase Is In Arkansas and would not
arrive in tune for the Thanksgiving
classic. Because of this the organization decided to do without one
until the beginning of the next
gridiron season.
Plans for the sale of refreshments
at the last home game of the year
also were discussed.
In order to
accommodate the record crowd that
is expected to attend, an additional
refreshment stand will be erected
on the north side of the stadium.
This, according to the committee in
Limine oi me sales, wm neip to relieve congestion usually experienced
during the halves of the football
game and will also enable the
ts
for the circle to give better
service to the fans.
try-ou-

* Best Copy
Pftpre

THE

Two

The Kentucky Kernel

ed generally

that

Kentucky

CAN

defeat the Volunteer.
said that
Conch Oamase ha
on Torday and Friday
Fnhltsbed
Kentucky can defeat Tennessee, as
have many other close observers of
MMitbff
Pre Amorlatlon
National Colic
the Wildcat team. If Tennessee Is
Iinron Board of Commerce defeated It will be due to the Rplrit
Member K. I. P. A.
which the team has. May every
Official Newspaper of the Student member of the student body acquire
of the University of Kentucky,
the snme attitude toward the game
Lexington
with the powerful Vols, and, when
Subscription $2.00 a year. Entered the two teams meet on Stoll. field
Thanksgiving Day, may we offer all
at Lexincton, Ky . Postofflce as
necoiid class mall matter
the support and enthusiasm which
can be wrought up for the team.
HERE SHALL T1IE KERNEL
It generally is accepted that a
PRESS ALL STUDENT
RICiHTS MAINTAIN

WILLIAM ARDKRY
DANIRL W. GOODMAN
LOUISE TH0MP8ON

Kdltor-ln-Chl-

ManMlni Mltot
Asst. M(rr. Editor

ASSOCI ATE EnlTOU8
rinch Hillmrd
Frnnfc Stow
Rnbfjr
Billy Huhblf
Martin To nley

Jl

ASSISTANT
Wm. A. Shufrr

John

M

EDITORS

Mnrrln Wacht
Kane

-- Sport Editor
RALPH E. JOHNSON.
Special 8port Wrltr
VFRNON D ROOKS
WRITERS
Bill Luther
Korbrt Campbfll
DouglM Webb
J. D. Adm
Stanley Bach
Red Dty
John St. John
-- Art

JOHNNIE CRADDOCK

Editor

SOCIETY EDITORS
ELEANOR SMITH
EMILY HARDIN
ASSISTANT SOCIETY EDITORS

Ellrabeth Hardin

Lillian Oooch

SPECIAL WRITERS

Jamea CurtU

Derek Sraythefleld

-- Feature

Editor

--Dramatle

Editor

Literary

Editor

A. A. DAUOHJSRTY
EUOCENII BECK-

-

nOROTHY TANNER

Newi Editor
LAWRENCE HERRON
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITORS

John Watti
Qilbert Kingsbury
Robert Baxter
Mary Alice Salyerj
Mary Alice Salyeri
REPORTERS

Marjorie Hoagland, Robert Kearney,
Ray Stark, Joan Carrlgan, Scott O
Osborne, Robert H. McOaughey, Mary
C. Terrell, Betty Watklna, PhU Ardery,
Oeorge M. Spencer, Sharlton Wallace, Vir
ginia Pitzer, Edith Marie Ben, Burnam
Pearlm&n, Leonard Rowland, Mary Jo
LalTerty, Carol Ollley, Jane Hamilton, Ann
Coleman. Korothy Bishop, Marjorie Welst,
Carl Howell, Herman Graham, Earl Car-ra- n,
Dorothy Smith. Madlyn Shlvely, Leon
Cozswell, Betty Dimmock,.
COLEMAN R. SMITH.
Evelyn Treabess
John Good

Business Manager
Nell Dlshman
Oscar Halght

ADVERTISING STAFF
Advertising Mgr.
JAMES MORGAN
J. Proctor Randol
H. P. Kirlcman
Bh&s Warrrn
Mary Edwards
CAMERON

COFFMAN, Circulation Manager

GREETINGS
is with a great deal of pleasr
ure that The Kernel expresses its
happiness over having as the guests
of the university department of
journalism the delegates to the
convention of the National College
Press Association. We are indeed
honored in having the editors and
business managers
of so many
collegiate publications in attendance
for this convention, and we hope
that it will be within our power to
make their stay in Lexington an
Interesting and delightful one.
Many times have we expressed
our belief in the value of conventions, but, upon this occasion, we
are able to appreciate even more
fully the benefits which cannot but
accrue from such a gathering. We
are sure that we, who are respon
sible for journalism at the university, will profit from those with
whom we will come in contact, and
we know that (the standards of
our own campus publications cannot but be raised as a result of this
meeting. The knowledge that the
delegates to the convention hold
something of this same attitude is
ail that is necessary to our complete

It

satisfaction.
We are sure that those who will
attend this meeting have heard of
Kentucky

hospitality

many

times,

and it is our Intention to make
story of southern
this
graciousness a reality. Plans have
been drawn which should make the
convention an enjoyable one for
every delegate, but, if there is
desire
something
the delegates
which has not been planned, we
hope that It will be within our
power to arrange it for them. We
ed

hope

that

every guest will feel no

hesitancy in asking any service of
any of his hosts, and we are positive that no one of the hosts will
fuel any hesitancy in fulfilling these

defeat over Tennessee makes any
football season a success. The season thus far, although It can not be
termed successful, has not been bit
Until now the
terly disappointing.
Cats have played a more or less
mediocre game against more or less
mediocre teams. The Kernel be
lieves that the Big Blue has a great
deal more than it has shown, and
that the spectators at the game
Thanksgiving Day will see a rejuvenated, powerful Kentucky eleven
in action against an ancient, honored opponent.

BENEFIT SHOWS
Students of the university un
doubtedly are ardent theater-goer- s,
and, at present, this love for the
cinema may help a great deal in
relieving the suffering of thos