xt7qft8djh7n https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7qft8djh7n/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19610503  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, May  3, 1961 text The Kentucky Kernel, May  3, 1961 1961 2015 true xt7qft8djh7n section xt7qft8djh7n John Itircliism Is

Today's Weather t
Sunny And Cool;
High 62, Low 31

Dangerous Lunacy;
Sec Editorial

I'ase

University of Kentucky
Vol. LI I, No. 102

LEXINGTON,

KY., WEDNESDAY, MAY 3, 19(il

Eight Page

A&S Juniors Pick

Officer Nominees

For '61-'6- 2

Term

Election Scheduled For May 10
At Student Union Ticket Booth
Dick Lowe, Tom Cherry, ami Jack Robinson were nominated at a meeting of the Arts and Sciences juniors yesterday to
class.
serve as president of the 19C1-6The election will be Wednesday,
Anderson suggested that the of.
May 10, at the Student Union ficers could conduct studies of
2

Center
Proposed Agricultural ScienceMcCuIlock

of the Blueprint for Agriculture
Commillre held In Frankfort recently, the above
drawing of proposed buildings for the new Agrl- cultural Rrearth Science Center was presented
At

a meeting

the croup by
and Birkel, architecture
al firm of Louisville. The new center will be built
south of the Medical Center. Work will begin this
fall and will be completed by fall 1963.

Preadvising Setup Uses

Parts Of Past System
n.v

RKIMRD McREYNOLDS
Kernel Staff Writer

The new preadvising pro- l
i.
gram co.nuines features or me
rat ion s stem used last
prcregist
semestor and parts of the regis- ,
' "'c'""" ,c.l
l,v
vious semesters.

.'

Dr. Chailes EUon. dean of ad- missions and registrar, said the
new program is designed to give
the students mere time to spend
with their advisers in deciding on
lor the coming semester,
In order to register for classes
student must follow this pro- the
red u re:
He is to go to the office of his
college dean and pick up a brown
program summary card. He will
then take the card to his adviser
who will list the required courses
the student wishes to take in one
column and alternate courses in
another column.
The adviser keeps the summary
card and returns it to the office of
the college dean.
In September, the student will
go to the office cf the dean of his
college and pick up his summary
card and IBM schedule card. The
of the enrollment process
place in Memorial Coliseum,
On the Coliseum floor the stu- dent will lind a large board that

lists all the courses that are open,
Any course that is not open or
that is closed during registration
will 06 removed from the board.
The studpnt lg to flI, out hU
schedule card by referring to the
Prn sections listed on the board,
nce tne card nas bt'en illed
out bv the student, he then coes
up the left ramp of the Coliseum,
ere ne win una taoies wun
members from every department
8eated ,n alphabetical order of the
department.
The student then goes to all
partments for which he has a
course listed. The department will
approve the class listed on the
schedule card and give the student an IBM card that enables
him to enter the class.
If a course that the student
wishes to take is closed before he
can get to the proper desk to
have it approved, he must then
go back to the Coliseum floor and
Insert one of the alternate courses
that he has listed on his summary
card.
The student then goes back to
the department where he stopped
and continues collecting his IBM
class cards.
This eliminates having the stu-re- st
dent go back to his dean and
viser to have the schedule change
approved,
After the student has gone to

The Student Forum will sponsor an intramural dchate on
the legalization of mercy killing at 4 p.m. toilay in Room 128
of the Student Union lU.ilding.
Uons will
tQ
speaker.s
fae consklem,
the Jud J
making their decisions.

'

WORLD NEWS
AT A GLANCE

classes or raise funds for scholar.
ships in the name of the senior
class.
He also mentioned a social
gram, in which seniors could plan
a class picnic, a dance, or a sen.
lor day.
The committee Is In charge of
next week's general election. It
includes the present .class officers.

Bill Crain declined the nomination lor president.
The election is being held early presldent;'
Ceci,y SparkSi secretary
this year as a departure from past
treasurer; and Oarryl Sipple, Gerl
procedures. Bob Anderson, senior jjenbo
Ethelee Davidson, Wes
Morris, and Charles Woodward.
ily the election was held in the
The voting will be by ID cards
late fall or early spring, leaving from 9 a.m. to 4
p.m. May 10 in the
little time for officers to plan a SUB.
program.
A December meeting to elect
officers nad to
postponed un- til February because of complaints
there had not been enough
that
time for students to think about
the elprfion. Onlv fi5 nersons at
tended that meeting and 21
tended the final election meeting.
America must recognize and
After his election in February,
Anderson appointed a committee understand the threat of comto have elections held in the pre- munism, Countess Alexandra
ceding spring so that officers
Tolwould have time to do something Tolstoy, daughter of Leo
worthwhile.
stoy, said Monday night.
Speaking in Memorial Hall,
Countess Tolstoy said, "The people of America need a real spiritual awakening, a real dedication
to this problem of fighting communism."
Relating her father's idea of
morality to the problem, she said
communism is "absolutely unbearable" for anyone to live under because of the limitations on free
dom.
With 200 million Russians not
Communists and only six million
who are members of the party, the
countess said the "overwhelming
majority" of Russian people are
not sympathetic to communism.
Explaining the dangers of communism to America, she said she
hoped that her lecture tours would
not only arouse an interest in the
'
Tolstoy Foundation to aid refugees
from communism, but she wanted
to create an awareness of the real
peril communism poses.

Tolstoy Says
Communism
Is Menace

t

Student Forum To Have
Debate On Mercy Killing
Allan Todd freshman prelaw
student from Fort Knox, and Al- vln Polk, sophomore speech and
English major from Louisville, will
take the affirmative side.
Opposing the proposition that
the act of mercy killing be legalized will be Bob Patterson, sophomore physical oceanography major
from Tyler, Texas, and Nick Arnold, junior prrinedical student
from Owensboro.
Dr. J.. W. Patterson, assistant
professor of speech and coach of
the intramural debate squad, will
act as moderator.
Judges will be Dr. Paul W. Street,
director of the Bureau of School
Services; Dr. Gilford Blyton, professor of Fueeeh; and Dr. Jim
Scott, Enfeli.sh instructor.
Dr. Patterson said the audience
would te invited to participate in
tlia question and unswer period
following the debate and that the

all the departments for which he
has courses listed listed and has
received all his IBM class cards,
he goes to a section where all
the offices of the deans will
rc.
presented. Final approval of his
schedule will be given at that
point.
The student then toes to the
registrar's desk, the last on the
concourse, to pay his fees. If he
has not had his picture taken for
his Identification card, he also
can do this here.
Once the student leaves here,
he has completed registration.
Continued on Page 8

Building ticket booth.
Nominees for vice president are
Barbara Harkey, Irene Rose, and
David Short.
Kathy Lewis, Byrle
Katy Kirk, and Ann Schwartz
were nominated for secretary-treasure- r.

,

'Spiritual Bigamy

Charles Dickens, instructor in speech and drama. Is caught in a
humorous problem of bigamy in the above scene from the Guignol
play, "Blithe Spirit." The trouble occurs when the ghosts of his
two dead wives (played by Carolyn Stroud, left, and Penny Mason)
return to haunt him. The play, which opened last night, will run
tonight, Friday, and Saturday in Guignol Theatre. Curtain time
is 8:30 p.m.

LKI) Scholarships

Applications for Little Kentucky Derby scholarships can be
picked up May 5 in the Dean of
Women's Office or the LKD office in the SI B.

Astronaut Launching Postponed

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla., May 2 (AP) America's first attempt to
launch a man into space was called off by storms today but within
hours there was a forecast for improving weather by Thursday.
Astronaut Alan B. Shepard Jr. climbed out of his spacesuit for the
long wait in a "ready room" as weather experts studied reports that
skies may begin clearing sometime tomorrow.
The Miami weather bureau said "there should be a decrease in
showers, some decrease in winds and probably a decrease In cloudiness."
Regardless of the weather, Shepard, 37, must wait at least 48
hours before he can again climb into the cramped,
mercury
capsule for a 115 mile trip into space.

Kallmann Defense Asks

1

Ex-Naz- is

Dr. Robert Servatlus legal arguments which appear likely to be
rejected came as almost a jelief In another day of testimony about
Nazi cruelties in Poland. Photographs taken in a Jewish ghetto under
the Nazis and buried until after the war were introduced in evidence.
One witness testified that a guard dog ripped flesh from a woman
boarding a deportation train.

Partial Truce Won In Laos
VIENTIANE, Laos. May 2 (AP) A government negotiator won a
partial truce on the Laotian fighting front and began negotiations
rebels on a nationwide
today for agreement by the
cease-fir- e.

JERUSALEM. May 2 ( AP) Adolf Eichmann's ciofen.se counsel
In a move hailed as one of the few really encouraging signs after
to estify that eight months of civil war. Col. Siho Lamholinthakhoun of the
fought today for the riht to summon four
Eichmann was only an ni.mficaiit piece of Nazi Germany; organigovernment's army arranged another meeting with a rebel
zation fur exterminating millions of Jews.
officer today in
land 45 miles north of here.

* 2 --

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, May

11

3,

'Space Age Challenge' Is Theme 75 Students Obtain
reace corps l orms
Of Alumni Seminar, June 3
2--

Di! mma defense, if our
for- - $
and Challenge" is the theme philosophyaggres- bids an
i 41
of the fourth annual Alumni sive offense, or I
be held at UK June on a control of f
Seminar to
weapons relying
2-on mutual trust
the University or potential en- - I
Sponsored by
Alumni Association, the event will emies?
i
feature speeches
"This is the
by two alumni, dilemma of the
KROGDAIIL
MaJ. Gen. Hugh Space Age and answers to these
Milton, 1919, for- questions will be sought at the
mer under-se- c -- seminar," Dr. Lange said.
retary of the
Gen. Milton, who will speak on
Army, and Virgil "Arms Control In the Space Age,"
is a former president of New MexdireCtor 0f the
and former
Lmmmi
Aim
J Industry office in ico A it M College New Mexico
superintendent of
COUCH
the Office of Military Institute. the
Civil and Defense Mobilization,
He was appointed assistant secBattle Creek, Mich.
retary of the Army in 1933 and
Others scheduled to speak are
in 1958. He was
Dr. Wasley S. Krogdahl, I K as- awarded an honorary doctorate by
sociate professor of mathematics IK in 1953.
and astronomy; Dr. John R.
Couch, a native of Kentucky,
Pierce, director of research of is a nationally-recognize- d
leader
t
Echo and of
in the field of training, personnel
for Bell Teleand management.
administration,
phone Laboratories; and Sen. John As director of the industry office,
Sherman Cooper, a former mem- he
develops and encourages prober of the Board of Trustees.
grams of emergency planning
Dr. Karl O. Lange, chairman of through Industrial relations and
the seminar and director of the other executives of Industry.
AeroUniversity's Wenner-Gre- n
He will speak on "The
nautical Research Laboratory, said
Defense in the Space Age."
has had its challenges
"every age
Dr. Krogdahl, who will speak
find dilemmas, but the Space age on "Our
Changing Concepts of the
and our Universe," is a fellow of the
is our responsibility
Royal
future. What are we to do with Astronomical
Society and author
it?
of "The Astronomical Universe."
-Will we survive In this age of
He has held teaching positions
f.pying satellites and nuclear weap- at
Eipon College. Ripon, Wis., the
ons? Should we depend on a strong
University of South Carolina, the
University of Chicago, and Northwestern University.
Wesley Mayne Gets
In addition to his teaching
duties here, Dr. Krogdahl is a con- IM Tan
Award

'The Space Age

a

Sigma

Arloe Wesley Mayne, mechanical engineering sophomore from Ashland, last week
was awarded the Pi Tau Sigma Sophomore Award for
Scholarship.

sultant to the Air Force Missile
Development Center,. New Mexico.
Sen. Cooper will discuss "The
Impact of the Space Age on Man."
An attorney, he
was a rr. ember of
the Board of
Trustees from
1935-4He served as .U.S. delegate to the fourth
session of the
General Assembly of the United
COOPER
Nations, and as
alternate delegate during the next
two sessions.
After serving as adviser to Secretary of State Dean Acheson at
the London and Brussels meetings
of the Council of Ministers of
NATO in 1950. he was appointed
ambassador to India and Nepal in
1955. He resigned in
January,
August, 19S6,- - to become a candiSenate.
date for the
Dr. Pierce, who wilt speak on
"Research and Technology in the
Space Are," received his Ph.D.
from California Institute of Technology, and went to Bell Telephone
Laboratories the same year.
His first concrete proposals for
satellite comunications were published in 1955 in the Journal, Jet
Propulsion.
Under the pen name, J. J. Coupling, Dr. Pierce has written seven
science fiction articles.
Panel discussions and open forums will be conducted by Col. R.
W. Boughton, head of the AeroDr.
space Science Department;
Douglas W. Schwartz, director of
the Museum of Anthropology; Dr.
Lange, and L. Berkley Davis,
Owensboro, vice president of the
General Electric Co. and president
of the UK Alumni Association.

8k

V.

UK Barristers To Present
Annual Law Day Program

The Annual Law Day program, which is presented by the
held Friday, May 5, in
Prof. O. W. Stewart, faculty ad- UK Student Bar Association, will he
viser for Pi Tau Sigma, national Laf ferty I fall.
heid in the
Both activiUeSi to
mechanical engineering honorary,
The program Is part of the Law
School Court Room, are open
uinounced the presentation of the
award yesterday.
Mayne was selected to receive
the award for attaining a 3.8 overall standing.
He was given an engraved Marks
engineering handbook.
Mayne was also the recipient of
the Tau Beta PI Freshman Award
for Scholarship last year.

j.

program celebrated to tne public and should be
the United States as esting t0 anyone planning to enter
a tribute to the effects of law on jaw scnooi.
our society.
Sponsored this year by the SBA
and the SBA Wives' Auxiliary, the
Impress Your Date
purpose of Law Day "is to give students the opportunity to have
Take Her To . . .
prominent legal speakers and to
have other programs of interest to
law students, their wives and
dates." Dr. W. L. Matthews Jr.,
dean of the College of Law, said.
The day's activities will begin
941 Winchester Rd.
with a convocation at 10 p.m. during which John B. Breckinridge,
"FINE FOODS, LOUNGE
attorney general of Kentucky, will
AND DANCING
give an address. A panel interview will follow at 2 p.m.
Day

U.S.A.

Approximately 75 students have picked up Peace Corps
applications from the University Placement Service since Presi
dent Kennedy initiated the program March 1.

Mrs. Katherine Kemper, director
of the University Placement Service, said, "If you take In consideration all the factors that will
eliminate many of the students,
the response at the University has
been good.
"Many of the seniors," she said,
"were either already employed or
making up their minds about two
or three interviews before the ap
plications were received."
The purpose of the Peace Corps
is to send trained American men
and women overseas to help for
eign countries meet their urgent
needs for skilled manpower.
Some of the specific programs to
which the Peace Corps members
can contribute are teaching In pri- marv and secondary
schools,
especially as part of national English language teaching programs;
in the worlJwide
participating
program of malaria eradication.
In and operating
Instructing
public health and sanitation projects; aiding in village development through school construction
and other programs; and increasing agricultural productivity by
assisting farmers to use modern
implements and techniques.
According to a release from

LKI) Scholarships

In
Peace Corps headquarters
Washington, D.C.. some misconabout the corps have
ceptions
sprung up.
The release stated that college
graduates will not dig ditches In
the Peace Corps. Nor will they ex- plain Locke to the Bantus.
Volunteers will net be selected
from the ranks of the "draft
dodgers."
Sargent Shrlver, director of the
Peace Corps, said a Career Plan
ning Board has been established
to help returning volunteers find
Jobs at home.
The board, he added, will be
made up of top leaders of business,
labor, government, and education,
Shriver said. "These men and
others who will be associated with
the board In the future will give
time, energy, and talents voluntarily to develop appropriate Job opportunities for all Peace Corps volunteers, returning home.
"The Individual board members,"
he said, "already have Indications
from business concerns interested
In hiring returning volunteers.
"These firms reason that the selection and training process, plu
the maturing experience of human- itarian overseas service, will pre- pare volunteers for rapid advance
ment in industry and business.

Applications for Little Kentucky Derby scholarships can be
picked up at the Dean of Women's Office or the LKD office in
the Student Union Building.
They must be turned in by Friday, May 12, at either office.

L

11

m oi o w

m wt m t t

NOW SHOWING

FLOWERS

V

For Any

f

J

I

i

million

J

v

A

""mturzn?

CONE WITH
r T? n ii'iirn

.

iiit e nil

ai.il mOh

J

r

IOMOOIIVIHiJeHaiANO

Occasion
I

PHONI

IT'S WILD!

NOW!

CALL

MICIILEK FLORIST
DIAL

417 East Maxwell

ISA minded
c.proTesp

LA FLAME

RESTAURANT

Starts 7:40
HE

Admission

LEO

75c

SIX LIVES

"THE GREAT IMPOSTER"
Edmond O'Biitn
Curtis
(At f:46 and 11:49)

Tony

WHY PAY MORE?

ALSO

r'ri.1.

SAVE ON GAS AT

"STAGE STRUCK"
Susan Srratberg
Fend
In Color (at
:SS)

CORNER OF MAIN AND WOODLAND

29.9c
32.9c

Regular (94 Octane)
Ethyl (98 Octane)
Admission

24 HOUR SERVICE

90c

'Hi- -

Are You Planning?

Farmer Motor Co.

Henry

Starts 7:40

MmMwM
DANCE
PARTY
DINNER
JAM SESSION
BANQUET
Why Not Try the Smartest Place In Town?

CONGRESS INN
1700 N. BROADWAY
See or call Dick Wallace ot

for Information and Reservation!

AREA PREMIERE
The Bio. One For Everyone

"CIMARRON"

Glenn

Ford
Maria Scneil
Artnur O'Connell
In Cinemaacoe
and Color
Showtime (7:4 and 11:12)
PLUS Meaturette (at 10:2)

Anne Baxter
.

BADERS Z AN DALE

SERVICE CENTER

"THE BATTLE OF

Nicholasville

GETTYSBURG"

"Just

Road and Zandale Drive
PHONE

5 Minutes From Campus"

BOATERS SPECIAL
Starts 7:46

Admission

65c

"JOURNEY TO THE CENTER
OF THE EARTH"
Meton
Pat Boone Jam
In Color (at 7:46 and 12:1)
ALSO

"DESIRE IN THE DUST"
Raymond In" Martha
In Cinoffteacos
(at 101 Si

Mr

Go-Mi- x

A

Outboard

Fuel

fuel scientifically designed to give more hours
of smoother performance per gallon

Featuring
ASHLAND OIL PRODUCTS
"VVe Give Top Value

Stamps"

PUTT-PUT- T

GOLF COURSES
ARE NOW OPEN

Featuring
World's Finest Putting Carpets
League Plcy
Hole In One Contest
Tournament Play
Everyone Can Win
First Game Free Upon Presentation of Your U of K

Card

Located Opposite Gardenside Cabana Club
On the Corner of Maywick and Crosskeys
2:00 p.m. to Midnight
HOURS: Weekdays and Sundays
9;00 a.m. to Midnight
Saturdays

FRANK T. McKEE and LOWELL M. OSBORNE, Mgrs.
"Putt Your Troubles Away At The Putt Putt"

* -

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday,

May 3,

190.1-

-3

Social Activities

Initiations

Pin-Mat-

Till KAPPA TAU

Dorothy Houseal, sophomore education major and member of
Kappa Delta, to Rod Hamilton,
student at the UK Northern Center and member of Sigma Chi.
Jo Anne Booth, sophomore home
economics major from Millersburg,
and a member of Chi Omega sorority, to Clyde Baldwin, sophomore
civil engineering major from
Frankfort and a member of Delta
Tau Delta fraternity.
Nancy Raye Wilson, senior home
economics major from Nlcholas-vill- e,
to Bill Clark, engineering
graduate student from Norton, Va.,
and a member of Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity, Auburn.
Nancy Wltford, Junior education
major at Stephens College, Columbia, Mo., to John Berend, a
freshman mechanical engineering
major from La Grange, 111., and
a member of Alpha Tau Omega.

Phi Kappa Tau recently Initiated 12 men into the fraternity.
The new Initiates are John
Burke, Huntington, W. Va.; Robert Lathrop Jr., Harrodsburg William Mattingly, Springfield;' Eugene MrOehee, Brandenburg;
James B. Noe, Paint Lick; John
Purely Jr., Owensboro.
Dennis Reddington, Florence;
Charles Smith, Lexington; William Sweeney Jr., Simpsonville;
Richard Tresenrlter, Louisville;
Jim Voas, Aberdeen, S. D.; and
Larry Wright, Farmington, Mich.
iim
Mnit.Ai.illM.X.
m
ALPHA TAU OMEGA
Alpha Tau Omega has initiated
New Officers
11 men into the fraternity.
New officer for Omlrron Delta Kappa, senior mrn'i leadership
The initiates are John Berend,
La Grange, 111.; Forrest Calico,
society, are, from left, Dave Stewart, president, and Bill Crain,
Stanford; Jose Garcia De Paredes,
secretary. Deno Currls, vice president, was absent when the picture
Panama City, Panama; Wallace
was taken.
Kayser, Huntington, W. Va.; John
Kohler, Maysvllle.
Steven Peck, Lexington; Robert
Meetings
Radke, Madison ville; Robert Ship-ma- n,
PI SIGMA ALPHA
Georgetown, Ohio; Avery
Robert Tussey
Pi Sigma Alpha, political science
Stanley, Garrison;
Jr., Kirksville; and Gerald Van honorary, will meet at 4 p.m. toDyke, Cincinnati, Ohio.
day In the Music Room in the SUB.
Dr. William Murphy, professor
By The Associated Press
relaxed, but until recently a
in the College of Law, will disNow that most of the nation's woman's riding habit absolutely
cuss federal aid to public and priEngagements
horse power has been leashed to revealed her horsemanship experiJo Ann Woods, a Lexington sen- vate education. All new initiates
a .steering wheel, the fickle Ameri- ence.
in medical technology, to Gre- and prospective members may atcan public wants it on the hoof.
In the strictest sense the West- ior
will be elected for
a
Adults (mostly women) and ern costume indicates the unin gory Mantel, graduate student in tend. Officers
the coming year.
children (mostly girls) in record itiated. However, even In England chemistry from Brewer, Maine.
numbers this spring are gallop- where formal attire has always
ing down bridle paths and racing been de rlgeur, denims, bright
after ylpping hounds, having shirts, cowboy boots, ten gallon
learned from TV cowboys, the hats and fancy neckerchief3 are
cavaliers.
Queen of England and Jacqueline sported by
Kennedy how much fun horse play
Of course, children want nothcan be.
ing else but the Western look,
What's more, the rapidly mul- wearing scaled-dow- n
riding Jeans,
tiplying numbers of youngsters plaid shirts and big hats.
5 to 12 now taking riding lesaged
Gift For President
sons indicate an even greater
The Kentucky habit is usually
future for the horse.
The equine sport evolves from worn when showing gaited horses.
kiddy pony clubs, progresses to A long jacket goes over matching
horse
show competition,
and jodphurs to keep the daylight from
reaches the ultimate, as far as showing between rider and saddle
horse enthusiasts are concerned, during the bounces.
with
Horse showing in evening reLittle League Riders?
quires a formal habit. With white
New England area stable ownshirt, black bow tie or white stock
ers have an explanation for why pants goes a coat tailored like a
more little girls than little boys man's formal Jacket.
emulate screen cowboys by taking
Hunt clothes are styled to take
to the saddle.
rough going through brush. Col"Boys are too busy with planned ors of hunt club members face
athletic activities such as Little the collar. Buttons may bear the
The farther smoke travels
League baseball and football," ob- club crest. Only when a woman
serves Irwin Novograd who oper- is considered master of the hounds
ates a riduig academy in the New is she privileged to wear
tthe milder, the cooler,
"pink"
York area.
(which is actually red.) For proJhe smoother it tastes
Horse show competition and the tection in case of a fall, the velfox and hounds are often popular vet hunt
cap is quite stiff. A vest
with women because of their snob in the hunt club colors, or canary
appeal, admits Mayer Miller, own- or gray, breeches and boots comer of one of the nation's oldest plete the costume.
of horseback
suppliers
riding
As a gift for the President of
equipment.
the United States. Mrs. John F.
"Yet I think riding is very
bought from a New York
democratic, a great leveler. A Kennedy a handwoven Shetland
concern
horse doesn't care what social tweed
a pair of
status his mount has," Miller twill hacking jacket,
hunt jodphurs, a beige turtle
points out. "And he always brings necked sweater and laced riding
out the best or the worst in her." shoes.
Expensive? Hacking (riding for
But as far as anyone knows, she
pleasure as against showing or
been able to get him on a
jumping) averages $5 an hour. hasn't
Cost of a day's fox chasing runs horse.
about $25.
What's Her Habit?
The rarest mammal In America
To some extent traditions have Is the black-foote- d
ferret.

i.. n

Fickle Americans Want

Horsepower On Hoof

'

Gaddie Named
Top ZTA Senior
Margaret Gaddic, home economics senior from Campbellsvillr,
was named the outstanding senior
at Zeta Tau Alpha sorority's Stato
Day celebration recently. Miss
Gaddie served as president of Alpha Chi chapter for the 1960-6- 1
school year.
The State Day celebration Included a luncheon and style shov
at the Campbell House.

Famihf Beauties
LARAMIE, Wyo. (AP) Winning
beauty contests just seems to. run
in the Bonner family but in different ways.
freshAnne Bonner,
man from Powell, Wyo., wa i
named Miss University of Wyom
ing to qualify for the annual Mlsj
Wyoming contest.
A few weeks earlier, her older
brother, Bob, won the university's
"ugly man" contest.

Flowers Flunk Out
Tho
MERIDEN, Conn. (AP)
Board of Education got into trouble when announcements were made
at the two high schools telling
girls not to wear corsages to school
dances. The board received protests from 12 florists.

Kir

DANCE NITELY

DANCE NITELY

Bring The Gang To

BROCK'S

Richmond Road

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT

The Upscttcrs

THIS ONE'S

Phone

gfe,

THE SATISFIES

WED. Thru SAT.

Featuring
with

L-J-

JIMMY BALLARD

This king sets a record for taste. Every satisfying
to enrich the flavor and mako
puff is
it mild. Special porous paper lets you draw fresh
air into the full king length of
straight
Grade-all the way.
d

PASQUALES PIZZA

top-tobacc-

284 S. LIMESTONE

S

SERVING THE FINEST IN ITALIAN FOOD
Chili
Sandwiches
Ravioli
Pizza
Spaghetti
and Fresh Donuts

S

WE DELIVER FROM 5 P.M. TO 12 P.M.
Phone

S

2

Join the swing to

i

* The Kentucky Kernel
of
University

Kentucky

pottage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
week during the regular chool ear exrept during holiday! and cxamt.
SIX DOLLARS A SCHOOL YEAR

8cond-clA-

Published four timet

Bob Anderson, Editor
Newton Spencer, Sport Editot
Managing Editor
Bohhie Mason, Assistant Managing Editor
Lew King, Advertising Manager
Beverly Cardwell and Toni Lennos, Society Editors

Mim Wenninger,

WEDNESDAY NEWS STAFF
Tevis Bennett, Sews Editor

Ed Van1I(K)k, Associate

Bill Martin, Sports

Dangerous Lunacy

The nation's press has branded the
John Birch Society the "lunatic fringe"
of the extreme right wing and Attorney General Robert Kennedy has discounted the society, terming it "ridiculous," but still the Kirch Society
goes ahead with its recruiting program and extends its tentacles
throughout the country.
Led by Rolxrt Welch, a retired
candy manufacturer from Belmont,
Mass., the society has undertaken a
campaign of slander and libel against
many of the nation's political leaders
and in Welch's 1954 book "The Politician" called both former President
Dwight Eisenhower and his brother
Milton Communists and accused the
former president of treason.
The society has assumed many of
the characteristics of the Communist
Party it supposedly fights. It is organmembers. Each
ized into cells to
cell is responsible only to the society's
national headquarters. Cell members
are urged to organize front groups for
the society or to infiltrate existing
groups.
In Wichita, Kari., student members of the society are to report any
instances of "Communist" teaching in
classrooms. Society members in Nashville, Tenn. have conducted telephone
campaigns to warn Nashvillians of
their "Red" neighbors. A nationwide
John Birch aim is the impeachment of
Supreme Court Justice Earl Warren,
who, the society feels, is soft in court
rulings on communism.
From its famous "Blue Book," the
Bible of the John Birch Society, comes
this statement of one of the group's
aims: "Join your local PTA at the beginning of the school year, get your
conservative friends to do likewise
and go to work to take it over."
Another Birthism is: "Nelson
20-3- 0

Rockefeller is committed to trying to
make the United States a part of a
socialist government."
The most notorious pronouncement of the Birch Society, however,
is Welch's statement from "The Politician" concerning the Eisenhower
brothers:
"Milton Eisenhower is actually
Dwight Eisenhower's superior and
boss within the Communist Party. For
one thing, he is obviously a great deal
smarter . . . For (the former president), there is only one possible word
to describe his purposes and his
actions. That word is treason."
Welch has since repudiated his
statements concerning the Eisenhowers and has tried to recover all copies
of "The Politician," but the fact that
the man did make such statements
clearly illustrates the imminent danger of the John Birch Society.
A number of congressmen have
come out against the Birch Society.
Among them are Sen. Gale W. McGee
and Sen Jacob Javits
), who recommended a congressional investigation of the society.
Such an investigation is called for.
A group that so viciously maligns
such national leaders as Dwight
Eisenhower must be made up of lunatics, but the widespread lunacy of the
Birch group constitutes a national
danger.
The Birch group already has cells
in 39 states, including two cells in
Louisville, and is aiming for a membership of 100,000 by the end of this
year. It was with a far smaller group
than this that another lunatic embarked upon a career that began with
fighting communism and ended in the
suppression of the liberty of millions.
The lunatic's name? Adolph Hitler.
one-worl- d

.)

(R-N.-

THE READERS' FORUM
Suppressing News

To The Editor:
Since I can't submit this correspondence in an official capacity as
Tuesday news editor of the Kernd, I
am forced to write to you, Mr. Anderson, as a student.
For two semesters I have been trying to get a story about the two new
sororities, Pi Beta Phi and Delta
Gamma, which have applied for permission to colonize on the' UK campus.
Interviews with Miss Pat Patterson, assistant dean of women, and Dr.
Doris Seward, dean of women, were
all unsuccessful, as w.re attempts to
get reports from Panhellenic.
Miss Patterson learned I had a
lead on the submission of the sororities for approval to the Panhellenic
Council and the Faculty. She wanted
us to withhold the story until Thursday after the Faculty had considered
the matter.
I told her that the story was newsworthy and that our readers wanted
to read about the sororities coining to
the campus.
From the background I heard the
shout, "You tell him 111 call the president (Dr. Frank Dickey) about this."
I hope she did, because I don't
honestly believe the president will try
to remove this one last tradition-freed- om
of the press.

of the steering committee recognize
the importance. LKD plans to award
more scholarships than ever during
the coming year and the contribution
from the Kernel staff is of no little
consequence.
We sincerely express our thanks,
The Little Kentucky Derby
Steering Committee
Dick Lowe
Dee Mills
Trudy Webb
Sue Harney
Wes Morris

Warren Wheat

Norman Harned
Kris Ramsey
Myra Town
Ann Fall

LKD Expresses Thanks
To The Editor:
The members of the Little Kentucky Derby Steering Committee wish
to thank the Kentucky Kernel for its
help and support in promoting the
1961 LKD weekend. We know only
too well the true value of such aid,
and can tr