xt7qjq0srk7g https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7qjq0srk7g/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19270923  newspapers sn89058402 English  Copyright is retained by the publisher. http://www.kykernel.com The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, September 23, 1927 text The Kentucky Kernel, September 23, 1927 1927 2012 true xt7qjq0srk7g section xt7qjq0srk7g mw.

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PNTUGKY KERNEL

COBLBGE NIGHT

i8tji ANNUAL

"Y", SOCIAL WILL
PRECEDE PEP MEETING

UNIVERSITY

ym

fvor.T

KY-- .

CHEER PRACTICE TO BE IN
GYMNASIUM TONIGHT

KENTUCKY

OF

LEXINGTON,

PEP MEETING

SEPTEMBER 23, 1927

NUMBER

1

CATS' OPEN WITH HIGHLANDERS
OJl
p p M ee tini' Will B e neici T onigntiAND maryville
4

f

x--

BLUE tiKIDDEKS

1

1

!

EXPECT WHOLE
STMDENT

BOpY IN

Get Your Kernel ?

I.

Help the Kernel

Paper Will Be Distributed f"
Book Store on Fridays

The Probable Lineups

The Kernel will be distributed from
the Book Store every Friday iflorn-in- g
GYM
this year as in past years. CP8
of each issue will be placed i the
on
Coach Gamage Asks Upper store in the basement of thegj
ertitled
Friday and every student
Classmen to Set tfxample for to call for his or her paperis anl take
Freshmen by Attending
it off the pile which will b( found
Gathering
there.
There is no charge for The Kernel
CHEER LEADERS TRY OUT as subscription to it is in' tfded in
the registration fee of ever tudent.
print
Six ' Wen Will Be Ckseh to However, as it is expensive
the paper each student is fsked by
Lead YeHs at Game
the staff to cooperate witli the staff
and take only his own paper from
"School spirit rests on tradition. the pile.
riF
Fxeshrocn
mist learn school spirit
from upperclassmen. Pep meetings
MAY
j,
are for the purpose of "practicing
enthusiasm. It is
yells and
as important that seniors attend as freshmen. All pep meets
shok! be attended by every student
arid many townspeople." Such in brief

AT 9:45

P.M.

gardmg pep meetings.
Wildcat Mentor, Suky Circle, pep or
ganization on the campus, has called
the first jcp meeting of the year to
be1" held 'l the men's gymnasium to
night Tryovis for cheer leaders will
also be held at this meeting and all
men 'wishing to try out will be given
ithe opportunity at this time.
Big Crawi Is Expected
Natices, posters and signs advertis
ing the pop meeting have been posted
the cairpns, and Suky circle has
rvnotificd the various dormitories and
'.fraternity houses. More interest has
t heen shown this year than" ever be
fore and predictions are being made'that the gym will be packed ,by upjpxla5sn:en as well as freshmen at
o'clock tonight when the pep

re

SHE"

uZ,a-!s- .
,.:n
"Ccll&ge Night"

r:T.l

lltMIS

IS tJlt
Ampi'.M
trv

be- -

cemry ,t

1

e"ct three

ianaors

of .JMt

Rowe

Ar.v .male afiatent
t av fe so

;!

Kfch c4ndidate.will.be

r

ctiw

Will

L ALVIN

adiiei

orjrmevCd
,t6,-th-

chool for tKe

Dr. Evans fills the position left by
Dean Charles J. Turck
to become president of Centre
College.
Ar.other vacancy in the f acuity of
the College of Law, caused"" by-- the

H. Clemons,

aiaoHBt;

The

bardteBben5

fi b.

jy'
e

ITage 6

raise

sui- -

Sectiea 2)

eyn
Yi M. x. Si Y.W.C. A.

Handbooks

ment

fo-ts-

.

--

vxis

v.-

-

.

English Department

Subscription to Quarterly
Be One Dollar a
Year

v

NAMED BY Y. W.
Miss Margaret Lewis, First Full
Time Student Worker Here;
Is Graduate of Maryville
College

OFFICE IN Y. W. C. A. ROOMS
Miss Margaret Lewis, of Knoxville;
Ten., has been appointed to full time
secretary for the Y. W. C. A. This is
the first time in the history of the
university Y. W. C. A. that it has

had a full time student secretary.
Miss Lewis was graduated from
Maryville College at Maryville, Tenn.,
in 1927. During the past summer she
attend-a Y. W. C. A. training school
in New York.
Miss LSvis took an active part in
Y. W. C. A. work during her college
years.
She has been a member of
the southern division of the National
Student Council of Y. W. C. A. for
two years, and was
last
year. She has traveled extensively
stuand is well known by the women
dents in the South.
This step in Y. W. work is expected
to be an important move for the bet
terment of the campus association,
With the assistance of Miss Lewis the
Y. W. is planning to reach more wo- d

Section 2)

"

-

,

vuetters,

Entertainment Given by University Y. TVL and Y. W. C. A.
WiU Be Featured by Races
and Other Sports

GRID RALLY

FOLLOW

TO

College Night"

Tonight
Men's Gyihnasium

At 7:30 o'clock
FREE.
Everybody will be there.
Football Rally.
"College Night"
party,
The annual
for old and new students, given by
campus Y. M. and Y. W. C. A.
the
is expected to have the greatest attendance in its history tonight. During the evening SuKy Circle, pep organization will conduct a football
rally and p'ep meeting to practice
school

yells

which

will

be used

in

the first football game of the season
with Maryville College tomorrow.
Coming, as it does, just before the
beginning of classes, "College Night"
is the finartouch to the excitement
and bustle of registration and classification. No one ever misses "College
Night." Freshmen and upperclassmen
alike, will be heading for the Men's
Gym tonight.
The big event of the evening will
be the Kiddie Kar Polo Game. The
(Continued on Page

6

Section 2)

O

:

O

Lost to Team
o

'

a

literary

Will

magazine

har. of th department of English
and sponsored.'finaneisOly by the de
partment "of journalism audi The
Kernel,

"Letters' will be maintained pri
marily by English students and' faculty of the university and students
of such other departments as may be

-

"

.

2265 ENROLL FOR
FIRST SEMESTER

(CoRtinaed en Page 3

Section 2)

Registration
Officiate Expect President Addresses
Number to Exceed 2,3 by
Student Convocation
End of Week; Breaks
Former Records
Dr. McVey Is Main Speaker
at First Student Meeting
FRESHMAN WEEK SUCCESS
of Year
The largest enrollment ever record"Happiness in one's work is esed at the University of Kentucky took sential in this matter of fact world,
place this year when the number reg- and to be directed into a line of
study that has no interest may
istered totaled 2265 at noon Thursday to an indifferent man or woman lead
who
making an increase of 150 over the plods his way without joy in his
number enrolled last year at this work," Dr. Frank L. McVey, presitime. It js expected that nearly 100 dent of the University of Kentucky,
more will register before the end of declared Tuesday night in the openthe week.
ing convocation of the year.
For the first time in the history of
Time and energy is wasted at the
the university, freshman week was beginning of a college course either
introduced and took place from Sep- because students are being forced into
During this time fresh- a line of study which their elders
tember 15-2- 0.
men were given lectures, physical ex- think they ought to take or because
aminations, and mental tests in addi- they are of the opinion that a college
tion to being made acquainted with degree will in some way or another
the location of buildings on the cam- act in a magic way, Dr. McVey conpus.
tinued, asserting that either of these
Thursday morning, September 15 attitudes is unfortunate.
the freshmen were divided into groups
There are 800,000 college students
after which there was a lecture and today, he added, and the reason
registration. The afternoon was tak- - America leads in industry is because
en up with physical examinations and she believes in higher education and
group tests in English.
when her youths, who have been edu- -

Friday

morning

(Continued

the

on Page 6

rules

and

(Continued on Page 3

Section 2)

Section 2)

o

Work on McVey Hall Is Begun;
To Finish Building By Fall oj '28

Campus Awakens From Summer
Sleep and Receives Its Prodigals

Engli,

Activity

I

Mathematics and Journalism Departments; Book
tore, Cafeteria and Kernel Plant Will Be Located
in Structure Now Being Built on Campus
Across From Kastle Hall

iii

-

Begins With "Freshman Week" in Which: Kernel
Featurist Sees a Tendency to Regard "Rats" as
Human Beings; 'Cats Look Good at

v

ouch, has been filled by Dr. Forrest
H. Black, formerly of Washington
W University,' it. Louis. Mo.
Work has begun 6nNMcVey Hall,
Dr. Evans ana ur. DiacK are notn the new recitation building vwhich is
v
lJieir particular college which has to be the key building in tWuni-versity- 's
building program. The stnvc- -.
years.
ture, which is located at the rear of
Has Wide Teaching Experience
t
the campus fronting Kastle Hall, will
1
Dr. Evans, the new dean has been house the journalism, ."mathematics
Ll' professor of law at George Wash- - and English departments, the univer
jipgton University since 1922, coming sity book store and cafeteria and the
J
there lrom the University of Idaho, offices and press rooms of The Kenwhere he held a similar position. Pro- tucky Kernel. It is expected to be
fessor Evans has had a wide range of ready for occupancy in September,
aachhig experience, beginning in 1908 1928.
when he was assistant prefessor of
McVey hall will be constructed of
brick, fireproof, and of colonial der. Latin in the University of
During the years sign.
iton at Seattle.
It wlil contain 26 class rooms,
,jfrom 1911 to 1915, he was professor 20
professors' offices, a large lecture
,if classics in State College of
room, a large commons room and
Inglon, and directed the summer ses- - space ihr a large cafeteria. It will
ox inac scnooi irom
to consist ot a basement,
1915.
and three stories and will occupy
lie practiced law at Falls City, 800,000 cubic feet of space.
Keb, daring 1916 and 1917 and was The- first floor will be given over
a member of the law firm of Nisbet to tke mathematics department,,
rif Btans at Moscow, Idaho, during
ecture rooms, offices and
othr necessary room. The English
(Continued on Page 6 Section 2)
deparl merit will occupy the second

floor, consisting of five class rooms
of different sizes, offices and accessory rooms.
The third floor of the building will
tsontain the university cafeteria and
thefqculty rooms. The kitchen also
will betnthis floor. The main din
ing hall of tnVcafeteria will seat 400
persons and a
vate dininir room
seating approximately
nersons will
be included.
A room 40236 feet for
large gatherings of the fachjty will
be in one part of the third floor
'
The offices and lecture rooms oi
the department of journalism and the
offices and press room of The Ken
tucky Kernel will be in the basement.
One wing of the basement will be
given over to the postoffice and the
book store of the university.
The building will cost a total of
$254,690. The general contract was
awarded to the J. H. Hardyman Company, of Maysville, for $199,605, the
low bid, by the executive committee
(Continued on Page 3 Section 2)

4

a Distance

Bmgwfe?$?g&mmB

PAUL.JENKINS

H

V-

71' 25

-i
1

1

have been picked if someone

it will

which will fill a long fell need for
such a publication, will make its appearance on the university campus
during the first week of November.
The magazine will be a quarterly and
will be edited by Prof. E. F.'Faru- -

yi

Vafr""

I

SECRETARY IS

(Continued on Page 3

-

Little-Know-

...

could

in .kiuuvr.iwt .
FPstmn Men s UyfmtasiUMrwtgM ut :JU
wv..4fc v-

'

had tried, for the two
the
"Letters," Literarv Periodical of scales almost at the 174lins tip with
mark,
University, Will Be Edited
tha backfield averaging around 158.
by Faculty and Students' of
From this outlay of dope it looks like
f

.

iHtWrYorkd i'
usuyy

h.

G. Crawford, r. hi

H Bird,

ur

tn

NEW MAuAZINE,k.Ee.j",end",,:e
Light
TO APPEAR SOON No two BackfieM Is evenly matched
teams more

TIME OF GAME 2:30 P. M.
OEFICIALS
Referee, Frank Lane; Umnjre,.::
John Head; Headlinesman, Harri esslihg.; ;

luiS?EP?"

ti- -

The 1927r28rhandbook is an attracsize volume, bound
Fills Vacancy in College of Law tive
in blue aiid ccntaining 132 pages. It
Caused hy Resignation or
contains greeting, from the president
Dean Torek; Dr. Black Suc
of theuniver'tvJichooi calendar, ad
ceeds Pref. Scarborough
vice toeshlien,' mfiFmation about
the univrsitf, athletic section, and
WIlM EXPERIENCE a diary containing also reminders of
the impq'rtanf games and events of
Vft?new dhdn has taken up duties the year.
vui the university this faH.He js ur.
ibV? formerly a member of the fac
Washinjton Univer- -

Lh.

1.

k rrrw

Fans Are Awaiting First Game
for Chance to Determine
Caliber of Kentucky's
n
Sqsad

FIRST ISSUE OF

r,

prd,f.b.

82S0,00o to be

E. EVANS IS

itSvf-Ccorg-

t

Portwood, r. h.

reftionof a practice JstA'

vest-jpocl-

i

EUis,

g.

J. Stone, c
T.Gann, r.g.
B. Broch, r: t.
r. e.
J. Davis, q; b'.

Lyons, r e.
Gilb, q. b.

The University iPf Kentucky will
erect two new built fngs on its campus
in the near futue if the plans ap
proved by the board of trustees are
successfully carried out. The buildings which are to I be erected will be
a new educational building and a memorial college.
Thezeneral eaucanon noun oi

sta-den-

NEW LAW DEAN

Drury, r.

1.

IS SPONSORED BY KERNEL

Fresh-meH-we- re

"

M. Dunn,

rt

SAIUKIJAI

blue-cla-

t;

I

CAPTAIN WERT

-

'r

J.Proffitt,

1. 1.

Ross, 1. g.
Dees, c.
Wert, r. g.

Fe Erected
Probably
Vicinity of Agricultural
Buil cing

may
h
"4 Give nit
them to ,the
befcire tayisg ,ut.- Judges will
Inffrmatio iBlbeut University
choose the candidates largely obJSKb
and Diar;
re Contained kk
response they evoke from the
jHnan Bible"
Six men will be selected
Friday night and all of these will be
thopsand
Two
"Y" handbooks,
ftkTiiA the oDDortunity to snow
A&ir.worih in tomorrow's game, jore familirlj' known as "freshman
leen printed and disafter which the judging committee Bibles" havf .he campus by the Unitributed
wiUhoese the' three leaders for the versity Y.on Ar.d Y. W. C. A.
M
'year,
g;ven their books last week
Men and women students will be and 'uppercjassmen received copies
separated at all football and basket- early this vcek.
ball games this year as was done last
Every year the two campus orA committee from Suky will
year.
arVange sections in the stadium and ganizations unite to publish the
handbook. This year's handbook was
- point out the sections to students as
edited by Kiel Plummer, managing
they enter tne stanas tomorrow.
editor of The Kernel, assisted by
arid Penrose Ecton,
Mildred Kjid
assisted by
while Robn (Duncan,
Margaret Gooch and Henry Cravens,
had charge of the" business depart-

yelUi.5andxpt

e.

Twit

University students are asked by
the business manager of The Kernel TEAMS MATCH IN WEIGHT
to patronize those merchants and
firms who advertise in The Kernel. Gamage's Men Are Handicapped
The university paper is supported
by Injuries to Star
largely by advertising and in order
Backs
to continue to publish a large weekly
it is necessary that advertising be
(By Kenneth Gregory)
good.
Coach Harry "Gloomy"
Gamage
The Kernel staff is appreciative of and his eleven
d
Wildcats
che loyal support given it in past may have a trick up their sleeves
for
years by downtown merchants and fans tomorrow afternoon when Kenit hopes that it will merit the same tucky
meets
Maryville
College
support this year. The value, of the in the inaugural football game on
university paper as an advertising Stoll field. Game time is 2:30 o'clock.
medium ha3 often been praised and
Barred from the field by locked'
with the cooperation of tha student gates, fans little know what the Blue
body this value should be increased and White squad
resembles other
this year.
than through the pictures painted by
newspaper men in their daily sheets.
has reached its highest
j Enthusiasm
(point and the season's opener with
- TT?11
J
il
M,ne
is
to pass
recotds a"d

MARYVILLE
M. Hunt, I.e.

MEMORIAL PLANS ARE O. K.

(Cratimi

gi;

1.

Van Meter,

Hope to Build Pi Itice School
for College of Education
ckefeller
With Aid of
Fun4

whereby 'the uiye:

jteht when

rcident H the. pep ergaw
Mk candidateeLlo corned. er--

tfwnrrt.

r The

Mohney,

BUntlNGS

NEW

falfc

KENTUCKY

UNIVERSITY
HAVE TWOIWQRE

Tjast

Students Are Asked to Patronize Paper's Advertisers

1W

The campus, which for a month or
more has been as silent and deserted
as a cotton plantation on the eighth
of August, has again taken on its
customary activity. Eds and co-eonce more throng the walks and cars
whiz around the sharp curves of the
campus driveways. Chatter is heard
in the corridors, whispers in the li
brary, and signals on Stoll field.
For school days are here once more!
And we have not been able to find
Vacaanyone who is not glad of it.
tion is sweet but then vacation is a
transitory thing, something to go to
and come from. And after most va-- i
cations one is usually willing and
waiting to come back to work. Only
one minor note, is heard in the paean
This might he called
of celebration.
the "tragedy of missing faces,'
thoughts of those who will not return
to school. For instance, thore was the
freshman who left in June owing you
r.
?t. bucks. You have a premonition
tnaHhe will not be back. Or the
senior who. borrowed your other dress

i

shirt and neglected to return it. You
are fairly certain he will not be back.
The activity mentioned began last
Thursday, which was the first day of
"freshman week." Great idea, that
of having "freshman week." For the
frosh it is a distinct kindness. While
watching the youngsters being led
around in sections by patrenal-look-in- g
upperclassmen, we had a mean
and secret desire to see them wandering around th campus lost in the fog
as we once were. "Freshman week"
is the result of th2 growing tendency
to regard freshmen as human beings.
Meanwhile the thump of the booted
ball and an occasional booted player
is heard on the gridiron. So far our
only glimpses of the 'Cats in action
have been at a distance of half a
block or more but they looked good
from where we were. "Kentucky's
right and I hope you don't like it."
May that proud challenge of Kentucky teams have a real significance
this year. Yea, Wildcats! This is
your year to eat meat.

be the survival of the fittest.
In the case of the fittest, Kentucky
surely should win the game for if
there is another team in the South in
better condition than the Wildcats the
writer is not aware of it. Condition
is what the Wildcats have heard from
the start of practice until today but
injuries have made their appearance
and it is likely that two or maybe
three intended starting players may
be out.
Paul "Rabbi" Jenkins, forward
passer supreme of Dixie and main-- ,
stay of the Gamage "Midget Backr'1"
field," is out with a fractured ankle
and will jiot see action in the Hirh-- ;
lander contest. Len Miller,
back with the trick i'nee
trouble with his joint
be able to keep it in
therefore may be abst
Gilb, last year's end who
shifted to the fullback pos
been nursing a bad hip and
gettoplay any length of tim
-- Despite all of these injurie.
Gamage has a hard driving
arranged and it looks like M.
will get plenty of opposition. .
the linemen have stood the gaff w
and little will Maryville gain through
the front rank.
Offense Is Good
Gamage seems- - well pleased with
the way his men show up on the offensive but when they take the defensive stand it seems as if they wilt
like a snowball in May. All this
week the Wildcat mentor has drilled
the men on the defensive phase and
they have improved a little but still
are weak in checking the onrush of
the opposition.
The probable startine backfield
will be composed of either Gilb or
Miller at quarter, Ford or Phipps at
fullback; Ellis and Portwood half
backs. In case Len Miller is able to
start Gilb, will go to fullback.

(Continued on Page 3 Section 2)

MILITARY UNIT
GAINS DISTINCTION
War Department Designates U.
of K. as Distinguished College Following Inspection
Here Last Spring
GIVEN

LAST

YEAR

ALSO

For the second consecutive year
the University of Kentucky has been
designated a "distinguished college"
by the War Department of the federal government. This honor was conferred upon the military department
and the university following an inspection of the university R. O. T. C.
unit last spring.
Every year about thirty per cent
of the colleges in the United States
having senior R. O. T. C. combat
units are declared exceptionally efficient by the war department
The
factors considered in rating the coU
leges are as follows: support of institution, facilities for practical and
theoretical instruction, care of equipment, support of faculty and student
body, academic credit given, relative
enrollment of basic and advanced
courses, appointments to reserve
corps, and certificates of eligibility.
The University of Kentucky is one
of thirty-si- x
colleges and institutions
to receive this honor. Officials of the
military department of the university
say that this is the highest honor
that can be conferred upon a R. O. T.
C. unit.
As a result of gaining this
distinction every cadet will wear a
blue star on his right sleeve just
above the R. O. T. C. shield. Colleges
winning the distinguished rating are
entitled to have five per cent of their
advanced course men designated as

'

* Best Copy Available
'

'

PAGE TWO
'

"

.

V

:

THE KERNEL

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION

PLANS FOR YEAR'S

of
THE UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY

WORK ANNOUNCED

James Park, '15

Larger Number of Active Mem
bers in Association Is First
Objective Set for the
Alumni Office

Mrs. Rodes Estill, '21

T

L. Kirk, '24

Raymond

SECRETARY-TREASURE- R

DIRECTORY

-

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
Walter Hillenmeyer,
Wayland Rhodes, '15
W. C. Wilson, '13

11

"

Dr. George II. Wilson, '04
Dr. E. C. Elliott, '02
Wm. H. Townsend, 12

GREETINGS!
A new volumn in the history of the University of Kentucky
With this issue of The Kernel the official
has been begun.
year of the Alumni Association also is begun. It is with real
pleasure that the editors of this page greet each and every
The pleasure
loyal alumnus of the University of Kentucky.
at the start of the year is increased by anticipation of what the
year holds out to us in the line of service to our Alma .Mater.
This year as never before we will have an opportunity to lend
In January the members of
a helping hand to the university.
the General Assembly of Kentucky will determine financially the
course .of the University of Kentucky for the next two years.
Loyal friends of the university will do all in their power to get
for the university a sufficient amount of money to enable the
During the past
school to carry on its program of expansion.
the appropriations have fallen far short of the needs. This
was caused, in a large measure, by a lack of understanding of
the work and service of the university to the state and to educaIt is for us who know our Alma Mater to
tion in .he state.
rs
of out state.
spread the news of her service to the
It is for us to see that they understand it so thoroughly that
they will be not only willing but anxious to give the University
of Kentucky funds sufficient to allow a complete fulfillment

of the program of expansion.
it over this time.

Every shoulder to the wheel.,

We will put

RICHARD SPURR WEBB
that

we extend
to the family and many friends of Richard Spurr Webb our
sincere sympathy over their loss; a loss as well to the community,
In other columns of The Kernel
the university and the state.
.Ever a most loyal
will be found a full account of his death.
alumnus, "Dick" Webb is and will continue to be missed by the
He was
University of Kentucky and the Alumni Association.
always willing and anxious to help his Alma Mater in times
He gave his services to his school year after year as
of need.
He gave financial assistance to a
assistant football coach.
Vst of ambitious students who desired an opportunity to com- mere is no one wno can mi ms
:te work in the university.
"ace and his absence will be felt through the years to come.

It

is with a deep feeling of loss and sorrow

r

WHY BE A MEMBER?
Years ago in one of the elementary school readers there
was a story that went something like this. A farmer coming
upon his seven sons quarreling among themselves called them
to his side and reproved them for their lack of brotherly love.
In demonstrating his point he picked up seven sticks of wood
and broke them one at a time. He then gathered seven more
sticks into one bundle and showed his sons that the seven pieces
This lesson can
when joined together could not be broken.
Standing individually there
well be applied to our association.
Joined together
is little that we can do for our Alma Mater.
in one great jyssociation we can stand against all opposition
and place the University of Kentucky in its rightful place at
the head of education in the South. Kentucky needs every loyal
Send in your check for dues and
son and daughter this year.
get with the loyal ones in an effort to raise the colors of
Kentucky above all others.

RICHARD S. WEBB
CALLED BY DEATH
Wildcat, Member of
of 1911 Succumbs
After Illness of Several
Months

Famous
Class

HELPED

MANY STUDENTS

Richard S. Webb, graduate of the
University of Kentucky with the class
of 1911 with a degree of B. M. E.,
died at his home in Lexington Sunday, August 28 after protracted illness. At the time of his death he
was owner and manager of the Mammoth Garage, vice president of the
Coach Corporation of
Consolidated
Kentucky and had many other business interests. Mr. Webb had been
in poor health for several months.
Soon after obtaining his degree
from the University of Kentucky Mr.

tional attention. At the time of his
death he was knowp throughout the
United States in motor bus circles as
one of the outstanding figures in the
business.
He was the designer of bus bodies
and the present pullman busses used
by the C. C. C. lines was built under
his direction. It also was largely
through his efforts that the Studebaker Corporation entered the bus
manufacturing field and. many of the
designs used by this corporation were
adopted on his recommendation.
During his college years he was one
of the best known men on the campus, and was a leader in college activ- -

find check for $3.00 for. Alumni

' Name

Address for sending Kernel.

Occupation.

Remarks:

IS

PLANNED

FOOTBALL

Sept.
Oct.
Oct.

Dues for

Degree

8.

Class

Series of Articles by Df. A. "M.
Miller to Appear on
This Page
,

at Lexington.

Lexington.
Wesleyan at

tions for the

0- -

Class Personals
0
1877

Ballard Preston Ward still is liv
ing at Rural Retreat. Va.. where he
is a farmer and engaged in the rais
ing of stock. Mr. Ward has long
been a most loyal alumnus and has
een an active member ever since
1914. Something to emulate.
1879

Alumni Assn.

History of Athletics
to Be Run in Kernel

Lexington.
Oct. 15 Florida at Jacksonville.
Oct. 22 Washington and Lee at
Lexington.
Oct. 29 Vanderbilt at Nashville.
Nov. 5 Alabama at Birmingham.
Nov. 12 V. M. I. at Charleston.
Nov. 19 Centre at Danville.
Nov. 24 Tennessee at Lexington
(Homecoming).

Several years ago Dr. A. M. siller.
then dean of the College of ArtWnd
Sciences of the University of
tucky, wrote a history of athletics.
the university. This covered the pcT
lod from the beginning up to and f1
eluding 1917. Dr. Miller wrote tl;II
series of articles for the old alum
magazine. Since nearly half of th
alumni have been graduates sine
that series of articles were publishe
we think that it would be interesting'
to reprint the series. They will be
run in serial form since they could
not be reprinted in any one or even
several issues of The Kernel. This
series is most interesting and will
bring back to many of you "old
heads" memories of the days when
you helped fill the old bleachers on
Stoll field and even before. We hope
that you will enjoy them.
asked for dues at all.
John Theodore Faig, president of
the Ohio Mechanics Institute, is another honor member. He has been
active since 1914. His address is in
care of the institute in Cincinnati.
He went with the Ohio Mechanics Institute several years ago and has been
president since 1916.
The class of '94 has a good percentage of honor men.
Not least
among these is Mattison B. Jones,
attorney of Los Angeles, Calif. Mr.
Jones deserted Kentucky for California a good many years ago but
has been in close touch with his
alma mater since 1914. He has been
an active member of the association
ever since then. He has his offices
in the Citizens National Bank build-- ;
ing.
Note: Why don't the rest of you
members of this class get together
and make yourselves 100 percent.
There are not many of you and it
could be done with little trouble.
Show me a little interest and I will
attend to all the detailjs for you.
Editor.

Charles Graham Blaklev is another
one on the roll of honor. He has
been active ever sinec 1914. He still
lives in Topeka, Kas., where he is
engaged in the real estate and in- 1895
must oe more, mieresiea ;ana active. surance business.
Mary LeGrand Didlake, who is an
1888
Our association at 'present is far beassistant in the entomology and botlow thatt-ojOher. Southern universi-- . Mrs. Charles S. Kav. ( Belle Clem any department of the Kentucky Aglies, as
sianu ent Gunn) belongs on the roll of ricultural Experimnet Station, has
for none to be superior.- honor. She has been an active mem been active since 1914. She has not
Clubs to Be Active
ber, excepting two years since 1914. missed
since then. He address
At the annual meeting this year it She lives i 484 Park place, Springf- now is 248 Market street, Lexington.
vfus decided that the various alumni ield,. Ohio1T;
The class of '94 has a womaii member
clubs in th'ik larger cities and in the
who will be active as soon as she
1890
ordifferent counties in the state be
Dr. Keen R: Forston. who is a reads this and then '94 will have a
ganized into active clubs again. This
woman on the roll.
physician in Washineton. is
is another objective of this office. All
Rufus Lee Weaver, who is with t
He
officers or interested club members numbered among the faithful.
Suffolk Title and Guarantee Comshould communicate with the office also deserves a place on the roll of pany,
of Riverhead, L. I., is another
He has
at once and let us aid in reorganiza- honor. 1914 exceptbeen a member ever honor man. He has been active since
since
one year. However
Active alumni he
tion of the clubs.
paid double the next year. His 1914.
clubs not only can be of great benefit
The class of '95 also claims for its
to the university and the association address is 1731 "P" street, N. W.
own three life members who deserve
1891
but can be a source of much pleasure
Victor Emanuel Muncy another one honorable mention since each of them
and enjoyment to the members as
put
on the honor roll is dean of the School has been active long enough to
welh
them on the honor roll. Here they
The dues for membership in the of Mechanics and Electricity of the
are. John Webb Killmott is an atAlumni Association are only $3.00 a Ohio Mechanics Institute of Cincin torney in Wewoka, Okla. Richard C.
nati. He has not missed a single
year and includes a copy of The Ker
Stoll is circuit judge of Fayette counnel each week during the school year. year since 1914.
ty and also chairman of the executive
1892
The Kernel alone is well worth the
William Seabury Page has been in committee of the board of trustees of
Ours is the
price of membership.
the University of Kentucky. He is at
gives its the United States customs service present standing for
only alumni association that
to
copy of the student publi- and an active member of the associa
members a
Paul Igold
circuit judgeship.
every issue. The Kernel tion since 1914. He is now located in the
cation at
Merrill is a chemical and consulting
gives not only the news of alumni Everett, Wash., with headquarters in engineer and lives at 960 West Sevand the association but also the news the Federal building. Another honor enth street, Plainfield, N. J. He has
member.
of the campus fresh each week.
been a life termer since 1916.
1894
Alumni Directory Planned
1896
Carlton Coleman Curtis is in charcre
This year is the year for publishing
James Wilson Carnahan, who is a
a new alumni directory. Work al- of the San Francisco office of the
ready has been started on this new A. A. Haunman Cnmnnnv. 'RrnVprs publisher with the firm of Lyons and
During the summer He was with this firm in New York Carnahan, Chicago, vj another life
directory.
months we have attempted to locate for sevreal years going to San Fran member who has been active since
all those alumni who have been lost cisco in 1923. He is another member 1914. His address is 221 East Twento us. This has been only fairly suc- of the honor roll and eets a eold star tieth street. Chicago.
Dr. Harry A. Davidson, who has
cessful as a large number still have He paid his dues in 1919 when no on