xt7qjq0srz84 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7qjq0srz84/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19601130  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, November 30, 1960 text The Kentucky Kernel, November 30, 1960 1960 2013 true xt7qjq0srz84 section xt7qjq0srz84 Fort Knox Coeds Compile 3.2 Average
'

The women students at UK's Ft. Knox Center
arc scholastically "leading the league" with their
3.13 grade point average. No other group in the
University's five lower division centers can apgirls.
proach the record of the Army-town

This is one ef the many facte which will be revealed
when a report on University centers Is presented before
the University Faculty Dec. 12.
The written segment of the report feature the major
policies of the centers and relates various statistics pertaining to each renter.

Arts and Sciences Is the most popular college amonf
center students, claiming an enrollment of 633. Next, la
descending order,' are Education, Commerce, Engineering,
and Agriculture and Home Economics (23 students).
This semester 78 courses have been offered by th
centers. Of that number 59 were Included In the Arts
and Sciences curriculum.
Fifty-thre- e
scholarships, totaling $8484, have been)
awarded to center students.
The University currently operates centers at Covington. Ashland. Ft. Knox, Henderson (Northwest), and
Cumberland (Southeast).

The section on policies stipulates that no student
may earn more than 67 hours of credit at the University
centers. Basic courses are taught, and adequate library
and laboratory space must be provided by the centers.
The financial support of the centers Is the responsibility
of the University.
The Northern Center at Covington has 511 students,
making It the largest of the centers. The smallest. Ft.
Knox, has an enrollment of 218. The Ashland Center
e
students.
has the greatest number of
The centers have a total faculty population of 98 to
serve the needs of their 1.G43 students. Fourteen of the
professors hold doctorates.
full-tim-

'T77

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University of Kentucky
LEXINGTON, KY., WEDNESDAY, NOV. 30,

Vol. LI I

u

Union Executive
To Speak Friday
Eta Kappa Nu. national engineering society, are
from left to right, front row, Lynn W. Coe, Louisville; Fred D.
West, llopkinsville; Robert T. Edwards, Shelby vllie; Billy Ray
Lutes, Lexington. Back row, Michael J. Kelly, Paintsville; Michael
II. Lowry, Bethesrda. Md.; William Yousey, Lexington; Denis
Lowry, Bethesda, Md.; Calvin R. Libby, Anchorage, Kentucky.
New pledges of

noon in Room 205 of the SUB.
Those planning to attend must
make reservations by 5 p.m. today.
Reservations can be made by con- tactlng Don Armstrong at exten- sion 2242 or 3345.
The executive director, a native
of Joplin, Mo., graduated from
University of Pennsylvania in
ing and be in the upper one- - 1921 with a B.S. in economics.
Malln's work has involved much
fourth of the Junior engineering
travel in Britain, continental
class or in the upper one-thiof
uropc
ssia
ine
"lclu,Qine
the senior class, show exceptional
Canada and Latin
traits of character, and be adept
f51,
in their professions.
c
uwmucr ui
miuiku
Eta Kappa Nu sponsors a slide- rule course for freshmen electrical on Foreign Relations, of the Ad- eneineerine students. Other ac- - visory council of the American
tivities include suDervlsion of Branch of the International So- Engineer's Day projects, mainten- - clal Service, and treasurer of the
ance of an electrical equipment American Friends of Toynbee Hall.
As a lecturer In 1954, he spoke
display on the first floor of And- erson Hall, and an annual picnic, in England and Scotland on Amer- New members are selected twice

.

.

'

rd

n
They are Ray Lutes and William
Yousey. Lexington:
Lynn Coe.
D. West. HoDtlns- Louisville: Fred
ville; Robert T. Edwards. Shelby- vllle: MichaelJ. Kelly, Paintsville;
Calvin R. Lib by, Anchorage;
Michael II. Lowry and Dennis
Lowry, both from Bethesda. Md.
Students must have a 2.8 stand- - annually.

Fighting White Mothers
Lose Joust With Police

I he Mate

commit- -

f

NEW ORLEANS, Nov. 29 (AP) Fighting-ma- d
white mothers
vowing a boycott blockade of integrated schools to the finish Jousted
with New Orleans police today. The mothers lost.
Reluctantly, amid yells and screams, the mothers broke their
mass picket line under pressure from shoving police. A young white
daughter Into William
Protestant minister escorted his
Frantz school.
ld

Operation Lease Demanded

COMCO

UNITED NATIONS, N. Y.. Nov. 29 (AP)-- The
Soviet Union de- manded today an end to the vast U.N. operation in the Congo on the
Dag Hanrmarskjold had bankrupted the
grounds Secretary-GenerUnited States in order to pay for it.
The demand came in the U.N. Assembly's budgetary committee
the United States announced it will contribute about 14 million
dollars more than its normal share of the Congo operation, and ap- to all U.N. members to help shoulder the financial burden
al

involved.

rfPre
t,onaI

i

i

Kernel Staff Writer

The Kernel's crusade for new
lighting and air conditioning
in the Margaret I. King Li
brary will become a reality
when the remodeling and con- siruciioii nf mt ntw auuuion
is completed.
Lawrence Thompson, di- rector of the University libraries,
describes the new lighting which
will be installed in the present
building and the new addition, "as
good as anything that can be
found today,"
Dr.

:

j
"

It'

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1

groups,

the English-Speakin- g
the Royal Institute of
International Affairs, and the
British Broadcasting Company,
He holds honorary degrees of
LL.D. from Swarthmore College
and Howard University and a
L.H.D. from Dartmouth College.
Union,

Malin served as a member of
the Department of Economics,
Swarthmore College, from 1930- g0 w h
fa
became executive di- Trector of the American I,,,. Llb- Civil
erties Union. From 1940-4he
was on leave serving as vicedirec- tor of the Intergovernmental com- mittee on refugees with headquart- ers n London.
An English Quaker rieoenrtanf
he hfl, KrvH . virp nuairmari
of the American Friends Service
Committee and as president of the
national council on religion in

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higher education.

-

OtllCleiltS
v

T

laUgllT
,-

JLreaKlIli5 III Hall

Two
men students,.
- . sopuomorcs, t
i
nave oeen sus
oot"
pended indefinitely from the Uni
versIty toT breaking into White
HalL
The pair was caught at 11 p.m.
Thursday by campus police as they
out-of-sta-te

a. i-

a

sought entrance into the commerce building through a ground-flowindow. Their names were
not released.
The students, one a commerce
major and the other enrolled In,
the Colleee of Agriculture, tnlrf
ot other classifications must apply University officials they were
directly through the national mm. lookinz for name si?n.i tnr cnn.

u,u""re "Sl oluuc"La

remaining four aDDlicants

uoxarsnip

er

-

deans of the Colleges of Com- merce and Agriculture, Dean of
Men Leslie L. Martin ordered the

suspension,
According to Kenneth Harper,
assistant dean of men. the two
will be permitted to apply for re- admission next semester although

"thev will nnt nco-n,- ,
admitted."

Combs Expects Settlement
On Veteran's Bonus Suit

mittee will not represent the statg
in competition, but will be con-aftsidered by the national committee,
Seniors and first year gradu-peale- d
ates are the only ones considered
Gov CrilOr Rfrf f"?nm1ic
in the state competition. Students
pressetl hope this

Air conditioning will be Install- Government documents, manu- ed in both the present building and scripts, and rare books will be
kePl tnere- The working areas will
rge addition.
'
be used to process and bind In- The other big Improvement, ac- - coming books.
cording to Dr. Thompson. Will be
jo Insure no books r lost, a
the change to the open stack sys- - turnstile will be built in the lobby.
A,i tud'nt will have their books
library works under checked there before they leave
Tne PrMen
a tlo&ed sUck Bystem presently the library. The only entrance and
only students with permits are al- - exit will be the one that goes
lowed to enter the stacks and look through the turnstile.
The circulation will remain sub- for books. But under the open
stack system, students will be al- - stantially the same. A larger and
lowed to enter any part of the - better desk will be put on the
brary except the basement of the second floor, but its position will
present building and the working be changed so that it will face the
arras of the addition.
Continued on Page 8
11-

or

the Kentucky colleges must have
Kenneth Harper, chairman di:nated the country in which
they
the committee, said today that thtf wou,d ,ike
stdJ
rules of the Na" "J!? b W dif,erent countries.
flccorfin
thJ
right Committee the
tIonal
The committee consists of 20
names of the students cannot be representatives from colleges
released.
throughout the state. Members
Efcht students from Institutions were chosen on the basis of knowl- In Kentucky were interviewed in- - edge and experience with foreien

who were not chosen b

J

PATRICK M. MALIN

7,

Dr- -

t":;'

-

-

"y fa
ulhnght competition,

Library Addition Will Have
Better Lighting, Stack System
By JUNE GRAY

V'--

Fulbright Group Selects
4 To Compete Nationally
Fulbright

World Meics Briefs

five-year-o-

'':
t

Patrick M. Malin, executive director of the American Civil
Liberties Union, will speak here Friday at a Political Science
Club luncheon.
to businMS
can clvi,
The luncheon will be held at labor, educational, and professional

Engineering Society
Names 9 Members

Nine students have leen se- Iccted for membership in the
.
Beta Upsilou chapter of Eta
Kappa Nu, national electrical

No. 36

1960

bonus. Tf. nrae filH Hi? nr T),i
ing Green dentists, who contend
ft
Pynic"i oi a veterans' Donus
Ytw suit against him and other
not a public ppose qUaufymg
state officials, preventing pay- - for state funds.
The Warrtn circuit court ruled
ment of the veterans' bonus
alnst
would be settled as soon as torney, the denUsts- - but their
Paul Huddleston of Bow- ling Green. Is appealing' to the
Pssible.
"We are most anxious." he re- - Kentucky Court Anneals. Huddles.
peated. "to get this thing moving, ton has until Dec. 4 to file his
The checks are ready to be writ- - brief, but in a telephone conveten."
sation with Breckinridge agreed
Attorneys on both sides of a to file within the week.
court case testing the constitution- The Attorney General could tak
alitv of the Kenttirkv Vtr0n' 40 davs thereafter tn file a rnl
Bonus Act have agreed to cooper- - brief, but Breckinridge said his
ate to get a final judgment from offiee would file within about
the U.S. Supreme Court as soon three days.
as possible, Attorney OeneralJohn
The Attorney General said he
B. Breckinridge announced.
would file a motion to advance the
A decision must be made by the case on the docket and Huddles
courts before bonds can be sold for ton will not oppose it.
bonus payments.
The two lawyers agreed that
The suit against Combs and whoever loses In the Court of Ap
other officials challenges the cons- - peals will appeal to the U.S. Su- titutionality of a legislative enact- - preme Court promptly, not using
ment providing for payment of the the 90 days allowed by law.
v

.

...

.

,

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.

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.

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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, Nov.

2

30,

10

by Dick Biblcr

UTTll MAM OM CAfAPUS

Procedure Staled
For Late Permits

Palsy Institute.-- . Meets
At Medical Center

state and regional cerebral palsy institute is
being held today at tho University Medical Center.
A

one-da- y

The session, to feature speeches
by nationally known professional
cerebral palsy workers, is sponsored by the United Cerebral Palsy
of the Blue Grass.
The meeting will open nt 1:30
p.m. and recess at 4:45 p.m. Asec-on- d
session will begin at 7:30 p.m.

The Institute will hear addreMes
Sherwood A. Messner, New
York City, program services director of the national United Cerebral
Palsy organization, and Airs. B.
Quincy Ilaynes, New York, assistant program services director for
by

ju iTX

national L'CP.

Plowed Corn Field
Conies In Handy

and an invocation by the Rev.
Steadman Baebv. minister of the
for Flrst Methodist Church. Messner's

Not everyone Is thankful
plowed corn fields on Thanks- - (oplc wlll be "Organizing for
but Ivan Morgan was this bra Paisy programs."
yearRabbi Joseph R. Rosenbloom,
Morgan, a senior AFROTC stu- - Lexington UCP president, will
dent from Lexington, was on a .peak on "Services on , Local
flight to Evansville, Levels."
Ind., Thanksgiving Day and ran
Miss Joy McCuddy of cardinal
Into some bad luck.
nm Convalescent Hospital. chair-H- e
was flying at an altitude of mjm of the nurslng subcom'mlttee
1,500 feet, when a piece of plexa- of the ProfessIonal services
flew by his ear, he glanced ...
nnmm,ttptt nr th ttpp will
up to discover his windshield was preside at the sessions.
gone. He looked around, found
a corn field, and landed.
.
Three boys that were driving
along the highway when he came
Cere-givin-

g,

-

cross-count-

Every group or organization desiring late permission for female
members must submit a letter to
the House President's Council one
week before permission Is necessary.
Included in the letter should
be the following Information:
1. Names of the specific glrU.
2. Their residence units.
3. Where they will be.
4. The time they will be returning.
All letters should be sent to

ry

New Fishing Method

FLORENCE. Ore. (4V Hale Kilmer, a hefty cattle rancher, dived
from his float at Lake Sutton
bordering his ranch. Th spUoli
shot water into the air and landed
a black bass on the float.

Ad-gla- ss

Art Students' Work
In Cincinnati Show

Art works by two University faculty members and eight
students have been included in the Cincinnati Art Museum's
15th Annual Exhibition of works by artists of Cincinnati and
vicinity.

Prof. Raymond Barnhardt's
"Typography," a
and "Still Life," a woodcut by
Janis Sternb'ergs, instructor in art.
are included.
Students with entries in the collection are:
Galaor Carbonell, a graduate student from Havana, Cuba, "For
Kavarro," an oil painting, and
"Pegasus," a walnut sculpture;
David Webb, Lexington, "Structure
of Trees," a drawing; Gwyn
Lexington, "From the Sea,"
oil painting; Ada Gail, Lextin
ington. "Turbulence," an oil painting; Carolyn Kelley, Williamson,

wnat ne was aoing
He replied. "Oh. nothing, I do
this all the time."

is

NOW SHOWING!
DAILY

0

Kuclid Avtnut
STARTING

1:30

P.M.

Chevy CtiM
TODAY!

"IT STARTED IN NAPLES
Clark Ga!le

Sophia Lorcn

"SINK THE BISMARCK"
Kenneth More

Dana Wynter

'MYRXA LOT RODDY IScDCWALL

college-constructio- n,

Mc-Gow-

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--

Va., "Siblings," a wood sculpEvelyn Elton, Lexington,
"Telon Pyre," an oil painting; and
Donna Rhew, Ketlchkan, Ala.,
"Compulsion," a woodcut.
Sally Hopper, an art department
graduate, now. on the staff of the
UK president's . office, is represented by "Bullfight," an oil paintV.

ture;

ing. The exhibition, which was
opened Monday, will remain on
view through Tuesday, Jan. 3.
.

How To Do It

CLASS

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Tareyton
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DES MOINES, Iowa (&) A steel

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bank, has prepared a booklet about

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The title: "How to Hold Up a

Bank."
;

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OhAMS

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Here's how the

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EDDIE FISHER
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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, Nov.

Under Fire
But Can Prove Helpful Aid
Society Page

By TONI LENNOS
to pledges of other sororities only
There comes a time In the life However, we've never heard of
cf every Rociety page when some them driving the boys away.
cf the male population begin to
Jam sessions at the SUB are
permit their glance to stray, to Its likewise open to all (and by the
headlines and even to skim way, there's one from 5 p.m.
through Its copy . . . even on the today, In the SUB Ballroom.)
days when their names aren't
Fraternities may hold open
to 'those of fair damsels houses
after football or basketfor the umteentlt time.
ball games. Theoretically, they are
Dut, a portion cf the male pop- open to all, but generally, only
ulation here has gone us one bet- the fraternity members, their
ter, and we're proud of them. The dates, and any invited guests
rociety page has been much under attend.
lire this year, especially in the
Sorority openhouses follow the
Jetterto-the-edltcolumn. And, same type
rufprisingly enough, most of the specifically of code, unless It is
announced otherwise.
letters bore male signatures. At
The problem of having "no
least, If they don't like the society
page, they read It; and what more wheels" may prore a definite impediment to a male's social life.
can we ask" from our anti-lovAt times, however, it may be posk,
anlt-foci- al
sible to latch onto a friend blessed
readers.
with all. Including a car and
However, one true male sup- arrange a
double date.
porter of the society page does
If it becomes embarrassing to
exist. Lonesome Jim, a freshman constantly beg a ride, find a nice,
In Haggin Hall, was kind enough homespun girl (and
there are a
to write us a letter. In it, he exfew still around) who is more inpressed the opinion that the soyou than your worldly
ciety department could do much terested in
assets. She won't mind an octo prevent many of Its freshmen
male readers from falling Into the casional brisk walk to the down
hidden pits of embarrassing social town movies. Definitely stop for at
least a cup of coffee on. the way
ntuations.
Although some of the questions back, if time permits,
he asked us to answer may seem ' The Guignol Players, the Central
Kentucky Concert and Lecture
rather elementary to our more Series provide Interesting
and
sophisticated antl-- ? readers, for
enterall the freshmen Lonesome Jims, easily accessible
tainment. Some local pubs are
we present our solutions.
even within walking distance.
Frequently during the year,
But, to
tororities and fraternities sponsor spun girl, really impress this homeinvite her to the library
Jam sessions at their various
chapter houses or elsewhere. Gen- for a study date. This will show
erally, announcement of such ac- her you are a sincere, industrious,
boy, anxious to succeed
tivities are printed In the society capable
and someone worth bothering with.
page. On occasion, many fraterniSo. you see Lonesome Jim, all
ties and sororities may Join tois not lost. As far as how to meet
gether to
Jam sessions
as those held over the homecoming the right girl, Just look . . . everywherein front of you walking to
weekend. Anyone and everyone is
classes, beside you in class, beInvited to these
hind you on the way home. If all
parties.
else fails, she may be that blind
At times, sororities may limit
you have planned for this
female attendance at Jam sessions date
weekend.
2--

en-Join-

ed

or

e,

anti-Gree-

nt,

us

Miss Milward
Still Leading
Lucy Milward. Arts and Sciences
f ophomore, representing- Kappa
Kappa Gamma Sorority, is still
leading in the "Miss Christmas
Seal" contest by three votes.
As the contestant enters the
third week of the Christmas Seal
campaign, Trudy Webb, Kappa
-

Delta. Is in second place, followed by Ann Evans, Delta Delta
Delta, in third place. "Cookie"
Leet. Alpha Gamma Delta, and
fonla Smith. Chi Omega, are tied
for fourth place.
Other contestants are only a
few votes behind the fourth place
contestants. They are Nancy Hall,
Alpha Delta Pi; Norma Jean
Snapp. Alpha XI Delta; Diane
Abney, Delta Zeta; Susan Blount,
Kappa Alpha Theta; and Mary
Jane Clark, Zeta Tau Alpha.
The contest will close at midnight, Dec. 15. Students desiring
to vote may get Christmas Seals
and ballots from the contestants
or from the tuberculosis associa-

Dec. 2, at Tates. Creek Country
Club. All alumnae are cordially

MEETINGS
Blue Marlins

Recent Wedding

Blue Marlins supples will meet invited to attend.'
6:30 p.m. each Tuesday at the
SDX CONVENTION
Coliseum swimming pool.
Three Journalism students and
Marlins will meet at 7:30 each
a professor are attending the. naTuesday at the pool.
tional Sigma Delta Chi convenCwens
tion in New York City this week.
Cwens, sophomore women's hon- The annual meeting of the proorary, will meet Monday, Dec. 5, fessional Journalistic fraternity beIn the basement of Keeneland gins today and ends Saturday. '
Hall. Mrs," Havens, former Cwens
Attending the convention are
adviser, will speak on Anglo Saxon Rex Bailey, president of UK
SDX
literature.
chapter; Bob Orndorff, Kentuckian
Dr. Thompson To Speak
editor; Bob Anderson, editor of. the
Dr. Lawrence Thompson, direc- Kernel; and J. A. McCauley, astor of the University libraries, will sociate professor ofjournallsm.
speak Thursday at Lincoln Memorial University, Harrogate, Tenn.
It Tays To Advertise
He will speak on the "Relationship of .the Teaching Faculty and
In The Kentucky Kernel'
the Library."
SUB Jam Session
,1
The Student Union Social Committee is sponsoring a Jam SesMRS. T. S. BLANKENSIIIP
sion from 5 p.m. today in the
Student Union Ballroom. The
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas S. Martin,
"House Rockers" will provide the
Nashtille, Tenn., announce the re- music. Admission Is 25 cents.
Typewriters, Adding Machines
cent marriage of their daughter,
Variety Group Entertains
Safes
Service
Mary Glenn, to Thomas S. Blank- Members of the Boyd Hall
and Rentals
enship, son of Mr. and Mrs Variety Group recently entertained
Repair service, adding machines,
Thomas A. Blankenship, Nashville, the patients at Eastern State Hospital.
new and used portable, carbons,
Tenn.
ribbons, Olivetti printing calcuAlpha Gamma Delta
The former Miss Martin Is a
lators.
The Alpha Gamma Delta Silver Phone
freshman majoring in home eco. 387 Rose Sr.
Ball will be held at 8 p.m. Friday,
nomics. Mr. Blankenship is a
sophomore transfer to the College
of Commerce.

at

-

KENTUCKY;
TYPEWRITER
SERVICE

2--

07

the
one
and
only

RECENT PINNINGS
Nell Vaughn, Chi Omega, Jiyiior,
major from
home
economics
is pinned to Bobby
Franklin
Broadbent, Sigma Alpha Epsilon,
senior, agriculture major from
Cadiz.
Pat Cody, Alpha XI Delta, sophomore, English major from Louisville Is pinned to Dave Cox, Phi
Kappa Tau. sophomore, commerce
major from Lexington.

Sandy

Parham,

Delta

Zeta,

sophomore Journalism major from
Wickllffe, is pinned to Dave Purdy,
Lambda Chi, Junior, engineering
major from Paducah.
Becky Groger, Kappa Delta,
Margaret Caddie, Zeta Tau freshman, speech, drama and
Alpha, senior, home economics ma- English major from Erlanger is
jor from Campbellsville is engaged pinned to Harold Jetter, Lambda
l Don Fuller, senior majoring in Chi, junior, engineering major
engineering.
from Erlanger.

Si

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WHY NOT READ FASTER?
EVEN I KG

PRIVATE

Speed leading Courses
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nationwide Permanent Value Plan.

Now Being Offered for College Students

ond Business or Professionol People
By

The Reading Improvement Service
CALL

OR

ANYTIME

21

Free booklet tells
how to tour Britain
on a budget

Association, 1410 Forbes Road, or
given to the contestants.
The winner. Miss Christmas
Seal, will be presented an engraved
..
irupny irom me tuberculosis

24 pages packed with facts: Free booklet
"Travelling Economically in Britain" tells

I

how you can tour the British Isles for just a
pittance. Includes map; photographs; details
on transportation, accommodations, tours,
customs, and currency. Mail coupon below
and see your travel agent before you go.

Fitzgerald Appointed
To Mational Committee
Prof. R. Bernard Fitzgerald,
head of the University Department
of Music, is one of eight music
educators appointed to a nationwide committee to choo.se school
systems where 20 young American
composers will spend a year or
more writing music for school ensembles.
The project, which was begun in
1P53 under the Joint administration
of the Ford Foundation and the
National Music Council, will be
continued for another three years
under an appropriation of $302,000.

I'M -- 1

Social Activities

RECENT ENGAGEMENTS
Cora Nell Freeman, Zeta Tau
Alpha, Junior, home economics
major from Lexington is engaged
to Larry Dixon, Junior, engineering major from Lexington.

tion by phoning
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* The Kentucky Kernel

Honors Program's Beginning
(EDITOR'S NOTE This is the
second of a scries of three articles
prepared by Dr. Stephen Diachun,
director of the University's Honors

The committee and director licgan
to implement the program. The basic
assumptions and purposes were stated
in a published leaflet entitled The

Program, in which the background,
purposes, and operation of the Honors Program arc discussed.)
According to the Sulcommittec
on Gifted Students, "Any significant
effort to provide appropriate opporT
WEDNESDAY NEWS STAFF
Merjutt Dan, News Editor
Michele Fearing, Associate tunities for gifted students will reStewart IIedcer, Sports
quire substantial investment in faculty time, facilities, scholarship support, and other program elements.
It may require in some cases a shift
With prcclassification now conclass cards would make way for in emphasis from quantity to quality
of services.
suming so much of a student's time jocular souls at the cashiers' win"It should be stressed that proand energy, and causing so many dows who would laughingly look at
gripes along the way, it is necessary the winning tickets of the fortunate visions for gifted students have an
to reevaluate the entire procedure.
and note sagely, "Really cleaned up, impact far beyond the benefit to these
students alone. A university's strength
We are sure that studies have didn't ya?"
Students would no longer wonder is derived from the nature and quality
been made of the prcclassification
program and we are equally sure about their chances of obtaining the of its teachers, its material resources,
that suggestions for improving the favored class. All doubts would be and its students.
"Able faculty are stimulated and
resolved by a glance at a brightly
system have been advanced. No matter how ; smooth classification may winking tote board which would note attracted by able students. When facbecome as practice leads to more skill that the odds of getting into History ulty can choose between positions,
strong and secure will
in preclassifying more than seven, 104 stood at 1 after having been those who-arusually select a university which is
15-- 1
on the morning line. Realizing
thousand students, there, will still be
those who will be disappointed and that the odds were slightly favorable, known for its superior students. Prothe student would pull his Tyrolian grams for gifted students provide an
disgruntled with their schedules.
hat down over his eyes, slide into academic climate which should favor
It is for those students that we
line at the ticket window, and say, and encourage the development of
now advance our recommendation
"Gimme History 104 in the fourth." higher standards for all students."
for bettering the registration proFurther in the report the comLess favorable odds might evoke a
cedure. To arrive at our system, we
request for the course across the mittee said, "It is our conviction, supmerely had to determine what makes
board with a side bet on 105 in ported by the experience of others,
students happy. Our answer Keene-lanthat the strongest argument for the
the fifth.
Win or lose, students are happy
Frivolity would reign as students existence and increased financial supat Keeneland.
pitted their skill and luck at class port for the University is a strong
therefore, is to selection against the odds calculator university which can interpret its
Our suggestion,
IBM of the tote machine Registration program in a proud and positive way
scrap the chromium-plate- d
monsters which ruin registration for would be the favorite time of the ami can be appropriately aggressive
so many students and install those year as the sporting set made its way in its pursuit of the means to achieve
pleasant devices so typical of Kefrom the Coliseum to the Grill with the highest quality and standards.
track tote machines.
ntuckyrace
class cards Strength attracts strength. Greatness
a bunch of
Along with the tote machines clutched in each student's sweaty breeds greatness.
"The program for gifted students
would come barred ticket windows hands.
And us? Well be under the west recommended herewith can be truly
peopled by professors wearing green
eyeshades and arm garters instead concourse operating a handbook for effective' only when it is developed in
of the medieval caps and gowns. The those who still don't care to buck an atmosphere of positive strength
and aspiration."
many harried secretaries who deal out the registration lines.
Still later in its report the committee said, "A large number of both
state and private universities have
established programs for their gifted
It would put papa back in his students. Emphasis is laid on identifyUK's Army ROTG unit recently
ing them early, starting them out in
decided to imitate its rival, the Air rightful position as head of the familyperhaps he would be affectionally research and the habit of wide readForce ROTC, by instituting a sponsor program. Upon learning this, we called "chief of staff." The demerit ing, use of the interdisciplinary
methods, colloquia, seminars, and
were at first inclined to attack it as system could be used to regulate fambeing ludicrous and superfluous. But ily affairs. How little J. Patriot Gung-h- o independent study."
Finally in the report the comJr. would tremble when mamma
suddenly we remembered that Cub
shouted, "You better be a good boy or mittee said, "There are many plans
Scouts have den mothers so what's
I'll have Daddy gig you when he at different institutions. . . . The conwrong with ROTC units having sponsensus is that the bright must be
comes home!" (For our uninitiated
sors. After all, cadets might benefit
challenged; they should be kept toreaders, "gig" is a military term meanfrom the influence of feminine intugether to stimulate and encourage
ing "to give demerits.")
ition, too.
each other; rigorous examining should
With this in mind we have deThe fortunate kiddies of a Milicided to inform our readers of the tary Family would not be subjected be pursued; and, while this group
possible blessings American militar- -' to barbarian slaps and spankings. No, needs guidance and the best faculty
ism might receive from an Army they would have a choice of doing persons, they must have considerable
ROTC sponsor program instead of defive pushups for each demerit or freedom and independence in order
nouncing it.
polishing Daddy's brass, shining his to develop intellectual excellence and
We notice that there will be eight shoes, or pressing his uniform to work leadership."
In