xt7qnk361v5g https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7qnk361v5g/data/mets.xml Lexington, Kentucky (Fayette County) University of Kentucky 1967 yearbooks ukyrbk1967 English Taylor Publishing Company, Dallas, Texas This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. University of Kentucky Yearbook Collection 1967 Kentuckian text 1967 Kentuckian 1967 2012 true xt7qnk361v5g section xt7qnk361v5g  SSj i .
    1967 KENTUCKIAN
 a a
 1967 KENTUCKIAN
BOOK I
SAM ABELL EDITOR AND PHOTOGRAPHER     
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  10 II 12
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SENIOR THESIS MODEL, SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DECEMBER
14
 THE GREAT WALL, APRIL
15
m Pw s i p 

16 THE YEAR OF DIALOGUE
LEFT:
BRAD WASHBURN'S SOCIALISM SPEECH, OCTOBER
TOP:
BILL TURNER, THE "BITCH IN", APRIL
ABOVE:
JAY ALLEN WHITE, DR. FRANK MARINI, BRAD WASHBURN  FOLLOWING THEIR
DEBATE, OCTOBER
17
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VIET NAM PROTEST DEBATE, SEPTEMBER
18
 HBHBHHHHHHHH
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VIET NAM PEACE VIGIL, DECEMBER
19
HUB FOUNDER'S DAY BALL, FEBRUARY
20
 HENRY WARD JAM SESSION, APRIL
SO JACK'S A DULL BOY, AND ALL BECAUSE HE MADE WORK OF HIS PLAY. WITH COMMITTEES FOR THIS, COMMITTEES FOR THAT, AND OF COURSE, FOR THE OTHER, IT'S    NO   WONDER    THE    BIG    EVENTS    TURNED    OUT    TO    BE    THE    SMALL    ONES.
THE TOWER
WHEATON COLLEGE, 1966
21 22
 FOOTBALL, UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
23 SOCCER, 1967
24 FIELD HOCKEY, 1963
25 OPPOSITE:
KEN HARPER, MISSIONARY TO RHODESIA, 1948-1953; DEAN OF MEN, UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, 1964-1966; DIRECTOR OF COLLEGE TRAINING, VISTA, WASHINGTON, D.C, 1966-
BELOW:
JACK HALL: ACTING DEAN OF MEN, 1966-1967; ASSOCIATE DEAN OF STUDENTS
1967-
26
 
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27  29 BACKSTAGE, OPERA THEATRE, NOVEMBER
30 HERMAN CHERRY, REYNOLDS BUILDING, NOVEMBER
31 STREET CORNER, SATURDAY NIGHT
32 
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STUDENT CENTER GRILLE, SATURDAY NIGHT
33 EVENING CLASS, CHEMISTRY BUILDING, APRIL
34
 I
AFTER SEC SWIM MEET, MEMORIAL COLISEUM, MARCH
35  END OF BLUE WHITE GAME, NAT NORTHINGTON  (CENTER), APRIL

BATON EXCHANGE, KENTUCKY RELAYS, MARCH
i
I.
37 FRATERNITY MAN AND HOUSEMOTHER BUILDING SAND CASTLES, TKE HOUSE PARTY, 1967
38
 CHARLES WEBB WITH FRIEND, JORGE, BUILDING SCHOOL, COLOMBIA, SOUTH AMERICA, 1964
39 OPPOSITE:
JAMES MEREDITH, OCTOBER
BELOW:
GENERAL MAXWELL TAYLOR, NOVEMBER
40
 41 THE YEAR'S GREATEST PARTY
A LAST GET-TOGETHER AT
42 THE OLD SIGMA NU HOUSE

I
43 OCTOBER, 1964
44 OCTOBER, 1966
45 POLITICAL APATHY (ABOVE) IN 1965 HAD TURNED INTO POLITICAL ACTIVISM BY 1967 AS STUDENTS STOOD IN LINE TO VOTE.
46 
LEFT:
ELECTION EVE, STUDENT CENTER
BELOW:
ELECTION EVE, FIJI HOUSE
 CENTRAL KENTUCKY
 
BEFORE ME PEACEFUL,
BEHIND ME PEACEFUL,
UNDER ME PEACEFUL
OVER ME PEACEFUL,
ALL AROUND ME PEACEFUL
NAVAJO INDIAN
STAN GETZ
49
Si MAN-MADE LAKE, BUTLER COUNTY, OHIO
50
 STORE, RENFRO VALLEY, KENTUCKY
51  53     58
 THE ACTIVES' RUSH
It was just a year ago that most sorority members stood on that same sidewalk imagining the ease   and   security   of rush from the inside. Only after having been through rush as actives do   sorority   members realize that they, themselves,    behind    those huge white doors, feel more  tense  than any rushee.
59 60 To the actives, rush involves hours of practice and preparation, tired feet, last minute  instructions,  clowning to   release   tensions,
61  the   all-out   effort   and   enthusiasm
during    the    parties,    the    silence
that    occurs    only    after   the    last
rushee has left the house,
63 theme parties,
with the real theme going deeper,

64
 65
  m v     
late hours,  exhausting  cut sessions,
66
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wondering at the real significance, but knowing the outcome is   so   important.
67
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 I
The   final   parties,
when the  mood  changes from   one  of questioning and hoping
,.-
69 70
 to  one of inexpressible emotions.
71 And yet the mood changes still.
72
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73 The Wildcats didn't go to the NCAA this year, but a significant victory was scored at Carnegie Hall by the University Choristers and the Lexington Singers. Together with the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra and the LaSalle String Quartet, they performed Wilfred Josephs' "Requiem," which won first place in international competition at the LaScalle Opera House in Milan. The event had marked significance not only for the Music Department, but also for the entire University, as evidenced by President and Mrs. Oswald's attendance at the New York performance.
74
 PERFORMANCE AT CARNEGIE HALL
75
i m
9EKS Carnegie Hall, the symbol of musical excellence, inspired the University participants. Four operatic stars were also in the program, including Norman Treigle, bass-baritone (left); the composer himself was there (lower left); Max Rudolf (right) led the orchestra and chorus through the monumental work. It was an exciting moment for the University. Hours of strenuous and demanding practice resulted in a performance of high professional quality, as indicated by the audience's response.
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'UPON EACH CURTAIN CALL, THE AUDIENCE RESPONDED WITH AN INCREASING CRESCENDO OF APPLAUSE."
Dick Kimmins, Kentucky Kernel.  THE UNITED NATIONS SEMINAR

They went for many different reasons. To see New York ... visit friends ... go night-clubbing ... to attend the U.N. Seminar. After a sixteen-hour train ride and all night bull sessions, the fifty University of Kentucky students arrived in New York more fatigued than excited.

81 The purpose of the annual YMCA-sponsored Seminar is to further acquaint the students with the functioning of the U.N., and to provide contact with international representatives. The discussions with delegates from India, Thailand, France, and United States centered on the immediate question under debate in the General Assemblythe admittance of Red China. The stimulating sessions produced spontaneous discussions between delegates and students. Many questions were askedsome showing a lack of knowledge and understanding, but more showing intelligence and comprehension. Although they went for many different reasons, they returned with a realization of the significance and function of the U.N.
82
 83 84
  SOCCER TEAM FINISHES
86
:
    .    h THIRD IN SEC
87 
I
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 Lacking University support and a coach, with soccer balls for their only equipment, several interested students banded together and created the most exciting athletic team at the University. The cosmopolitan aspect of the team and a mutual love for the game closely united the players. They were a rare group of athletes working together and playing hard, communicating and understanding, representing athletics at its best.

89 Soccer is both exciting and physically tax-
ing. Outbursts of genuine joy were not unusual during the matches. And always the team competed strenuously.
90
 91 Lack of University support made it impossible for some members to attend the SEC tournament in Knoxville. Those who went paid their own expenses, and Kentucky was unfortunately one man short for the first match. After winning the consolation match the following day, UK's first soccer team ended its season. This was true athletics.


92
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93 FRANK BROWNING, Associate Editor
RICHARD WILSON, Advisor
 The KERNEL staff at the meeting in which they decided to endorse William Murrell, SDS candidate for president of Student Government.
HELEN McCLOY, Staff Writer
THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
TERENCE PROCTOR HUNT, Managing Editor

95
 
96
DDOCK
PHIL STRAW Sports Editor
STEVE ROCCO Editorial Page Editor
DICK KIMMINS Arts Editor
i--..  ,s GENE CLABES Associate Editor
WILLIAM F. KNAPP Advertising Manager
LEE BECKER Staff Writer

\
 
  100
 THE FORWARD PASS
THREE MOMENTS OF THE SAME PLA Y
101 I
102
 THE FOREHAND VOLLEY
103 I
104
 THE FAST BREAK
FROM RIGHT TO LEFT, KENTUCKY'S MOST CLASSIC MOMENT
105 106
 THE HIGH JUMP
107 THE PUTT
ACROSS DEW AT DAWN

108

 109 110 THE MOMENT OF VICTORY
ii i   WALTER GRANT
for the past two years has
been editor-in-chief of the Kentucky Kernel and from that post
launched drives that revolutionized not only the Kernel, but the
way this university regards the student press. Under him the paper
turned from a campus calendar into an expanded five-days-a-week
forum of news and opinions on significant campus, state, regional,
national and international events. This type of coverage put it in line
with the top papers in the nation and placed Walter on the National Executive
Board of the U.S. Press Association. In his first year as editor, he placed
third in the William Randolph Hearst National Editorial Writing Competition;
this year he was second. As Walter leaves to direct the Collegiate Press
Service from Washington, D.C., he can take satisfaction from the fact that the
students on his staff have gained considerable capability in the difficult
business of news reporting and judgment, and will continue to probe and pursue
significant issues in higher education. He can also take satisfaction
that on a campus unused to his way of thinking and acting, he probably
caused more thinking and acting among students than any other student.
14
 WILLIAM GRANT
in league with a handful of fellow journalists, most notably
David V. Hawpe, presided over the pivotal year at the University as far as
student activism and journalism are concerned. It was 1964-65, and the impact of
the Kernel's shift into significant questioning of equal rights,
student freedom, and the position of big-time athletics in the academic community
are still felt in 1967. Between those dates Bill served as the most effective
director the Collegiate Press Service has had, and then returned to the University
as the first graduate assistant in the Kernel's history. Thus, under the
combined influence of the Grants, the concerned student coming into the University
Community found the Kernel to be the most provocative student operation in existence.
115
 I 16
 JOY GOCKERMAN
committed herself
two years ago to a dual role that few students attempt and fewer accomplish. Now entering her senior year, she has earned the deserved respect of both the University academic and activity communities.
Unlike others at the University who glibly rise to and ride on high office, Joy's hallmarks are relentless efficiency and refreshing candidness. Joy follows Nancy Fitch as Mortar Board's second consecutive superb president.
117 18 BOB O'TOOLE
was counselor to two different communities of people during his senior year. One was the predominantly freshman floor in Haggin Hall where he was Corridor Advisor. Having won an Outstanding Corridor Advisor Award the previous year for his work in Cooperstown, Bob stepped on the floor of Haggin B-2 in the fall of 1966 and deservedly captured the respect of his advisees and his colleagues. It was widely acknowledged by the other advisors that Bob was the best in the system; his fellas thought so too. Bob carried with him into his second community the consistently quiet self-confidence which brought him success in the dorm. In fulfilling the requirements for his degree in social work, Bob did field work at Kentucky Village, working directly with the children as a case worker. To Bob, this experience was the most educational aspect of his four years at the University. While to most these two communities may seem very different and totally dissimilar, it is to Bob's credit that he approached them equally and consistently, imparting to both his interest, concern, affection and understanding.
19 JACK REEVES,
Associate Professor of Political
Science, felt that this year the object of a two
decade crusade had its best chance of approval.
The object he felt so strongly about, and worked
so strenuously to see achieved, was the proposed
constitutional revision for Kentucky. When, after
a year of severe effort and work, he witnessed
the revision measure decisively rejected, he was
sharply disappointed and conjectured
that perhaps the proposed constitution was too
advanced for the state. Later, a somewhat more optimistic
Reeves was charting strengths and weaknesses, and it was
felt he wouldn't be quiet long when his voice was still
needed.
120
 BEN EISEMAN, M.D.
came to the University of Kentucky Medical Center when it was an empty architectural colossus on the edge of the agricultural experiment farm. When, last fall, he announced he would resign as chairman of the department of surgery and return to the University of Colorado, the University, and particularly the Med Center, felt a deep sense of loss. Leaving was a man who had learned medicine at Harvard and practiced it in Bangkok in 1951   and Viet Nam in 1966. Leaving was the man who had been president of the Society of University  Surgeons,  and Moynihan Lecturer at the Royal College of Surgeons of England. Gone, at last, was the man who, more than any other, instilled a pride in medicine and a pursuit of excellence among his colleagues at Kentucky.
121 BONNIE COX
was one of the best
undergraduates UK persuaded
to stay in Lexington to
finish graduate
work. For the University
this effort has paid off
remarkably: Bonnie was
one of the most highly regarded
graduate instructors in the English
Department for two years before
she received a $7,000, two-year
NDEA grant for research and writing.
HARRY LANCASTER
is the other coach of basketball at the University of Kentuckythe freshman coach. This was never so evident as this year when his team surpassed the varsity not only in record (not uncommon considering their inconsistent schedule) but also in excitement. But beyond that, and beyond this year, it is evident that Lancaster annually sends boys to Adolph Rupp who have yet to reach their potential as athletes, but who have somewhere in their freshman year gleaned considerable maturity and dependability that characterizes Kentucky basketball players for more than just four years.
122    ELLIS BULLOCK
(preceding spread) has articulately addressed himself to three areas of campus affairs:
In AFROTC he twice received the Merkel Award for Outstanding Leadership;
by founding an Alpha Phi Alpha chapter at UK he was named APA's Outstanding
Undergraduate in the Nation for 1966; more recently he, with
Bill Turner, was predominant in efforts to recruit top
Negro athletes to UK. With these achievements, it can only be expected that
Ellis, as founder of ORGENA, will guide this group to its goal of
improving race relations among the students at the University, and
insure ORGENA'S existence after he leaves next year.
126
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KATHY TABLER
committed her talents in horticulture not only to the
classroom, but also to national competition where her
project placed in the top three. She also revitalized the
Horticulture Club and made it one of the most enjoyable
clubs at UK.
"LINDSEY
is good because he does what he says he will . . . lots of the art students talk and plan but never do anything That quote from a friend of sculptor John Lindsey sheds light on a person who was active in and concerned with the growth of the art department. Lindsey, shown working with torch and scrap metal for sculpture, is also good not only because he said he would create, but because he created with imagination and taste.
127 JOHN ALEXANDER
came to the University just two years ago from
Oberlin College. In that short period he
remolded the Men's Glee Club into an
excellent music ensemble. He also built the
Chamber Singers into one of the finest vocal
organizations in the University's history. In a
year characterized by staggering losses of
faculty and graduate personnel, John Alexander
is foremost. In the fall he leaves for the
University of Illinois.
THE BAND
had more spirit and determination to be good than ever before. They practiced a week before school started in the fall. They drilled in the rain, marched in the snow. Volunteers played at every home basketball game. A young band, a good band, they could achieve their goal of greatness in this student generation.
WALLY SCHMIDT
is accruing wide acknowledgement as a promising tenor. This year his solos in "The Messiah" and the Men's Glee Club Concert ("Yonder, Yonder") were nearly unsurpassable. Besides directing a church choir, he is a member of the Choristers, Men's Glee Club, Chamber Singers, and Chorus.
CECILE MOORE
gave the most memorable Senior recital of the
year. Because she combined excellent
musicianship with a flair for music education
and leadership, she was the logical choice for
the Fine Arts Festival Representative from the
Music Department.

128
 129 130
 "MISS B"
Jane Batchelder, was the driving force behind an increasingly ambitious Student Center Board each of her three years on campus. As she leaves Lexington for a new life and job in Indiana, Jane also leaves a legacy of friends among students and administrators, proving that she was one of the most successful liasions between these groups at the University.
WALLY BRIGGS
this year takes on one of his most important roles: he is the first director of the newly-founded
Theatre Arts Department. In previous lead roles, Wally has excellent reviews by the students
he has taught and by the actors and actresses of Guignol Theatre he has directed. These same
two groups of students, as well as the University community at large and the city, can only
continue to expect the same dedication to the Department that Wally has always given to
drama.
131 JOHN O'BRIEN
knows Lexington and knows how to get the things done he sees no one else
attempting. As only a sophomore he and Willis Bright founded an embryonic
Tutorial Program at the 2nd Street "Y" and the Manchester Center. Two years
later, after trying to make Student Government relevant and being a free
lance writer for the Kernel, he could visit any of eight locations in Lexington
and talk with the people about a tutorial program that had sprung from his
original two locations.
RALPH WESLEY'S
finest trait is that he is always Ralph Wesley. Ralph was a dorm herd at LR Complex 4 because of his frank and candid manner. He published the Rogue and praised SMOC-4, always with wit, humor, and clear visioned satire. His healthy involvement was most evident in his work in Student Congress where he spoke with refreshing and unusual veracity, maintaining a clear perspective with his humor, insight, and constancy.
132
 133
 THE FRESHMEN:
A GIFTED CLASS FOR
GENE WARREN
(left) put the Donovan-Quadrangle Government on the first firm footing that it has ever had. The government successfully sponsored jam sessions to raise money for a dormitory library and stimulated other freshmen to become active in campus affairs.
STAN FORSTAN
(below) demonstrated on the field and in the classroom the kinds of qualities the University should be looking for not only in quarterbacks but in all perspective athletes. He is the most promising student athlete in this generation.
134
 
JEAN-PAUL PEGERON,
who came to the United States two years ago from
France, quickly established himself at the
University. He was a member of the Honors
Program, the Pryor Pre-Med Society, a leading
scorer oh the soccer team, and a member of the
winning Quiz Bowl team.
BOB HOWELL
(left) is representative of the promising scholarship
of the freshman class. He was the key member of
the winning UK Quiz Bowl team and was a member
of the GE College Bowl team. Bob is a history
major with special interest in Ancient History. He
plans to teach at the college level.
A FINER UK
JOAN RUE
sensitive and mature lead in Chekhov's difficult
"The Seagull" introduced the most promising
actress in this student generation and keynoted
the establishment of the Department of Theater
Arts.
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135 In an expanding university there are many areas which are never seen by most students. Three such areas are minor sports, fine arts, and graduate research. Representing these three areas are a swimmer, an actress, and a chemistry graduate student. The Kentuckian presents them as  its
HIDDEN STUDENTS
 >%t^^^^*i
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x

 HIDDEN STUDENTS/I
MINOR SPORTS
A 11 universities are trying to build up their minor sports," believes the University's first full grant-in-aid swimmer, Ed Struss. This is the story of a minor sportsman who may signify an emergence: the emergence of the lesser hero whose efforts do not win many dollars, and the emergence of a University which may have sensed the value of an excellence less blatant than is screamed through the cheerleader's megaphone.
138
  140
 141
 142
 The coach comes early to give special help.
143 144
 .       ni-
oach Paul tries to get us to do most of the helping out, keep score, make posters. We're happy to do it. We know the team doesn't have money or facilitiesso somebody has to do it."
145 :We don't have a work crew.
".
146
 147 
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149  ^truss wore neither badges nor beanies to distinguish him from other class-going, pillow-fighting, pledging freshmen.
151 Pi'
The coach clowns to break monotony
152
 . . . but wants to win at everything he does.
153 . he SEC championship meet is the high point of the season. Struss and his father have a sign: "Thumbs up means, 'go! let's move! let's do the best you can!''
154
 155 .INobody knows you're a swimmer. If you wear a K-jacket or something, people ask you where you got the letter. There're just a very few people who notice." Struss knows there are few who notice the sport of swimming; opposite, he sits alone and unnoticed after winning the SEC meet.
156
 157 Jfl
"GUIGNOL IS LIKE A HOME YOU
158
 HELP   TO   BUILD"
Home? Home is mostly a place to sleep. Guignol is my home. I have a homemuch more than my apartmentand a second family here.
I've taken tickets, scrubbed floors, been an usher, sewed, served coffee, typed, done publicity, drawn, designed sets, gossipped, wasted time, studied, been a stage manager, been on the light set, been on the sound crew, been on the props crew, done carpentry and painting and wiring.
And so after the shows when the girls come down with their dates and say, "Oh, how neat it is," they only see a fraction of what it takes to make that moment.
Susan Cardwell, junior drama major
HIDDEN STUDENTS/II
FINE ARTS
159   he Lesson" was produced in early season. Susan was leading lady: "It didn't have the magnitude of The Good Woman of Setuan,' but what it lacked in magnitude it made up for in intensity."
161 162
 HBHB
/."..-',,.'..-
/\uditions are excruciating! That's all I can say. You're sitting there, and you look at your best friends, and they aren't your best friends anymore. There's almost nothing I wouldn't do to get a part I wanted. "When you see you didn't get a part, you realize it's total. The chance to play Nina or Madam Markadee is gonenot forever, but for now, and that seems like forever. And that tears me up."
Occasionally a Lexingtonian, or "townie," gets a part. "I could get on a soap box for days about it ... We pay dollars to come here to learn, not to entertain," Susan says with no uncertainty. "The only thing in my whole life that I wanted desperately that I didn't get was Blanche Dubois in 'Streetcar Named Desire.' And when you lose something you want that bad for the wrong reason you are really upsetit's been two years and I'm still upset." A "townie" got the part.
163 ime: early arrival to think in the dark, or spare minutes to feel a man's role, or hours to run through grueling technical rehearsals.
164
   XV ay Smith, who directed "The Good Woman," holds a reputation for extremely intense drive toward perfection. "Ray is very important to this department. A lot of the things he does are painful and ugly, but they make people think, and that's exciting."
"It usually takes a week to block the play once; that's basic. Then reblock, rethink it again. They're long and tedious sessions. Hard, hard physical work."
167 "To me the drama majors
the ones that are really in it
are   really   exciting,   warm,   happy  people.
168
n
 169  fter I get a part, everything changes. I imagine it's like finding out you're pregnant and from then on everything you do is not only for yourself but for somebody else." Like not doing dances and parties, but making TV and radio spots or researching a character or fitting a mask.
170
 11     Is*
171 e cook and eat well." A place to sleep and learn lines with roommate Dawes Miller.
172
  -L ire broke out in the prop room dress rehearsal night. "After the fire, when we were sitting outside under the trees, someone started playing the harmonica and singing. We just got a tremendous boost of energy; we'd been through half of it but by now we had stopped many times and it was 2:30 a.m. ... we felt it shouldn't open tomorrow." Had rehearsal not continued till four o'clock it would not have opened. "It's the kind of spirit you read about."

174
 
175 'Then before you know it, before you're ready, it's there.
176 177 pg night of "The Good Woman." There are three men (500 pounds) on 200 pounds of solid wooden box. They are the gods. "They fly away from me on piano wire. I'm down center stage alone, my arms up in the air watching them; they're saying good-by. It got 10 or 15 feet off the floor, then fell. All I could see in front of me was legs, arms, boards, and nails." But the gods arose, sang their exit song, and the show closed as rehearsed. Director Smith rushed backstage to his players. "Drama always makes you close, but there were so many crises in this play that we were seemingly closer than ever."
178 179 "Afterward, you feel warm, you feel significant, you feel proud.
Then you feel empty because it's all over. It's time to study."
180
  182
 HIDDEN STUDENTS/III
GRADUATE RESEARCH
T,
he fellow gazing thirteen-eyed down a light pipe above,  and studying,  adjusting,  leaving,  then re-checking his wire-draped equipment opposite, is Steven E. Hannum, a 25 year-old chemistry graduate student who sees and is involved in the most important transition the University of Kentucky Graduate School has made. When he came to the University four years ago from Wheaton College, Illinois, Steve found a school and a department less research oriented than he had anticipated or wanted. Now he and a team of associates and authorities in the Department of Chemistry are engaged in high level research which has implications as theoretical as understanding the very nature of matter and as practical as controlling the catalysts which are the backbone of the chemical industry. In the white walled, win-dowless room 40 of the Chem-Physics Building,  Steve and three other men are studying the structure of molecules chemisorbed on the surface of pure metal. The project, nearly five years old, has recently taken a large step forward due to major financial commitments from the University administration for advanced equipment. Yet it is at this same time that the University must find itself lacking in the Graduate School. With the phenomenal increase in the importance of the university in society, and particularly to the technological community, this condition should never have been allowed to exist and should be quickly erased by increased financial commitments, a still increased change in attitude toward research, and lastly, the finest possible recruitment of undergraduates.
183 T
1 e
earn effort, the pooling of minds and methods around the same materials, is as important to modern research as it is to athletics. Steve is part of one such team. Working together, they achieve results impossible individually. Glen Possely, B.S. Western Illinois, is also a fourth year graduate student. Bill Smith, a UK graduate in 1962 and Ph.D., Princeton, has returned for a year and a half of post doctoral work under Dr. H. C. Eckstrom, opposite, originator and director of the project.
184
 185 
\ !
' 90,000 in sophisticated electronic and chemical instrumentation surrounds Steve in a 20 x 30 foot lab. The price and precision of the equipment is exceeded only by its delicacy: in order to use the instrumentation at highest accuracy and sensitivity levels, it must repeatedly be tuned and maintained at the very highest tolerances. Consequently, the slightest maladjustment from man or machinery cuts deeply into its effectiveness and slows or ceases the research of a half dozen people. Nucleus of the research is a small metal box engineered to maintain a high purity metal surface under vacuum. This year it rarely did. Steve (top and right) spent a great deal of time combing the cell, trying to locate and seal minute leaks which if left unchecked would contaminate the experiment. Vacuum leaks were not the only problem: because of its complexity, new equipment had to be finely tuned several times by flown-in specialists like Mr. Clair Baesler (above), from Nor-walk, Conn. This year, the result of all the work could not always be measured in research output, but rather it was in the necessary business of mastering the "personality" of complex instrumentation that is the backbone of modern research.
186
 
187 I
 i
113Al. The letters are the hallmark of an entire burgeoning society of technology and research, just as the insignias of guilded craftsmen were the hallmark of another age. And as a center for change and development in all areas of this new society, the leading universities are and must be relying more and more heavily on computer oriented programs. Already at M.I.T. one department divides its instruction into "B.C." and "A.C." before and after computers. In Washington, the President's Science Advisory Committee estimates that 75% of all undergraduates are enrolled in classes where computers would be "very useful." At Kentucky, computer capability has increased steadily. For Steve, what happens in that room is as important to the research as anything that has taken place previously. In only a small spectrum, a staggering 30,000 or more calculations are required. The results, printed and plotted, take twelve minutesby computer. But as Steve commented, "You don't just walk over and say 'I want to use the computer.' It has taken months to learn the best way to have the data analyzed and presented." During those months there was constant adjustment and one major overhaul of his program. It was only in the late spring and early summer that, with the help of the 360-50 computer, the program began to yield meaningful results.
189
Us! "YOU CAN CALCULATE REAMS OF DATA, BUT IT MEANS NOTHING UNTIL IT IS INTERPRETED."
Research has its most decisive moment following experiments and accumulation of data. The first phase of interpreting the computer output occurred as Steve   (below)   compared  two spectra to  determine if there were any meaningful correlation. If there were, further experiments would be run in the lab to guarantee the preliminary findings. If not, there are several alternatives, one of which (right) is recomputing the same data in order to study it in a different presentation.
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 If it were easy it would have been done a long time ago." That is Dr. Eckstrom's way of stating a basic given of research: frustrations are inherent. Of chief concern to him are the financial and theoretical problems. Each September he must make a thorough presentation of progress and needs to the Atomic Energy Commission which then decides whether to continue its funding of the $30-40,000 a year research program. Last November, the team received word from AEC that the project was set for another year. Yet due to the year-to-year existence, the pressure to produce grew as winter turned to spring. By then an additional pressure was mounting: Drs. Eckstrom and Smith were pushing to complete publication of the over-all concepts of the program. At last accepted for publication, their papers were published in the summer. Meanwhile the nagging day-to-day equipment breakdown, design problems, and the continuing p