xt7qnk362663 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7qnk362663/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19380614  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, June 14, 1938 text The Kentucky Kernel, June 14, 1938 1938 2013 true xt7qnk362663 section xt7qnk362663 J

W

9 A. M.

HE l&ENTUCKY JrkERNE

II

GENERAL CONVO
THURSDAY

SUMMER EDITION
OUT EVERY TUESDAY

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY

VOLUME XXV

III

LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY. TUESDAY, JUNE

Z 2M

Greetings To The Summer Students

'World Events' At Convocation
In Memorial Hall On
Ik Dismissed
Tor First Central
Student Meeting
Of Term

All Classes To

ASSEMBLY PLANNED
FOR NINE O'CLOCK
Doctor Adams Will Preside
And Introduce
Speaker

Thursday

CONVO SPEAKER
i

n-

7

'

-

.9

President McVey will address stu-

dents of tlie Summer Session at the
first general convocation of the
fuieler to be held at 9 a. m. Thursday. June 16. in Memorial hall.
AU classes will be dismissed at
t .SO a m so that the summer students mill have an opportunity to
hear the president of the University.
World Event" will be President

McVey's topic. He will be Introduced by Dr. Jesse E. Adams, director of the Summer Session, who
will preside at the convocation.
Thurxday morning's meeting will
be the first of six general convocations to be held in Memorial hall
during the summer school. Three
of these convocations will be held
each semester.
Tlie program for the second general assembly which will be held
Tuesday. June 2t. has not yet been
A presentation of the
announced.
Hansel and Oreat operatta under
the direction of Prof. Carl Lam pert
will constitute the program of the
third convocation to be held on
Tuesday. July 12.
The three general meetings of the
second term will be held Ft' Jay.
July 22; Wednesday. August 3. and
Friday. August 12. The programs
for these three convocations have
not yet been announced.
which
Thursday's convocation,
will be held at t a. m.. was originally
scheduled in the cataloges for I 50
a. m. It was later found necessary
to advance tlie time of the meeting
Mi minutes.

Tlodes Was Greatest
UK Football Player,
Ro Tells Optimists
William "Doc" Rodes was the
greatest football player ever turned
out at the University of Kentucky.
That is what Alvin "Bo" McMil-lin- .
head football coach at Indiana
and member of the Summer Ses-

sion coaching school faculty, told
members of the Lexington Optimist
club when he (poke at their
on-meeting
last week.
McMillin. former Centre college
grid star, related his youthful ambition to be as good a player as was
Rodes.
Also selected for special mention
as University of Kentucky football
"greats" were John O. Heber. head
coach at Henry Clay High School,
and the Downing brothers. "Oip."
"Dad" and Dewey.
on the strenuous
Commenting
schedules booked by college teams.
McMillin expressed tlie opinion that
it was impossible for any team to
remain constantly on the winning
side. He praised Ab Kirwan, Bernie
Sluvfly and Frank Moseley. members of the university coaching staff,
and asked members of the club to
with them.
Burt Ingwersen, line coach at
Northwestern, also made a short
McMillin and Ingwersen
address.
mere Introduced by Kirwan.
lunche-

Driving: Courtesy
Will Be Stressed

In Safety Course
Sportsmanlike automobile driving
will be taught during a course in
safety education offered during the
first term of the. Summer Session.
Tlie course is under the direction of
Prof. J. S. Mitchell.
The work in courtesy will occupy
the first two and a half weeks of
the session, while the second half
will be devoted to problems of general safety in the school, home, industry and street. Miss Mary May
Wiman. director of safety for the
Louisville public school system, will
have charge of the last portion of
the work.
The University will be one of 40
institutions offering teacher-trainin- g
courses in safety education during the 1938 summer session, it was
said. Twenty-sevestates now have
required courses in this subject in
their high schools.
n

Hammonds Speaks
At Iowa Conference
Dr. Carsie

Hammonds,

head of

the department of agricultural education, took part in the program
of the annual state conference of
instructors in vocational agriculture
at tlie University of Iowa, Thursday, at Ames. Iowa.
Doctor Hammonds discussed

"De-

termining Course Content" at the
morning session, and spoke on
"Making Supervised Practice Vital"
at the alternon meeting.

A

far

'

I

v

for students of the
will be held from 9

State Hiffh School Players
Will Meet On University

In Great Hall Of New
Student Union
Building

Annual

Net

High school tennis players from
all parts of the state will meet on
University courts Thursday to take
part in the annual Kentucky tournament to be held) Thursday thru
Saturday.
Prof. H. H. Downing, for 17 years
varsity tennis coach at the University and chief tennis authority in
Central Kentucky, will have charge
of the tourney. .
The event is being held under the
supervision of the department of
W.
extension of the University.
Gayle S tames, assistant director of
that department, said that 12
schools have already entered the
meet and that more entries are
expected.
Entries Listed
Already included on the list of
entries are Asbury college high.
Danville. K. M. I.. Lexington Junior,
Louisville Male. Stanford. Wilmore.
Breckinridge
training school of
Morehead. Henry Clay of Lexington,
Holmes of Covington. Mt. Sterling,
and Shelbyville.
This is already the largest list of J
entries in the history of the tournament.
In 1931. only doubles matches were
played. This title then was won by
the Woodford school, represented by
J. Nathan Elliott Jr.. and Meyers
Whitaker.
The 1932 crowns were
won by Highlands high of Port
Thomas in singles and by St. Xavier
of Louisville in doubles. Tlie Highlands representative was Joe O'Brien, a leading Kentucky player who
was afterwards enrolled at the University of Kentucky for a short
time. Warfield Donohue, 1937 U. K.
tennis captain, and George Trakas
composed the St. Xavier team.
Coleman Won In "33
Charles Coleman of Danville high,
won the 1933 singles crown and the
St. Xavier team of Donohue and
Trakas again triumphed In doubles
play. Robert Noll, of Somerset high,
won the 1934 singles title and Robert Mefford and Vincent (Dick)
on page four)

t

turday night, June
room of the New

lie liest Summer

COACH

for students of the
Summer Session will be given by
members of the faculty at 8 o'clock
Thursday night, June 16, in the
Great Hall of the new Student
Union building.
(
In the receiving line at the reception will be President and Mrs.
McVey, Dr. and Mrs. Jesse E. Ad
ams, Dean and Mrs. Paul P. Boyd,
Dean and Mrs. Thomas P. Cooper,
Dean and Mrs. James H. Graham,
Dean and Mrs. Alvin E. Evans, Dean
and Mrs. M. E. Ligon, Dean and
Mrs. Edward Wiest, Dean and Mrs.
W. D. Funkhouser, Dean and Mrs.
T. T. Jones, Dean Sarah Holmes,
and members of the visiting faculty
of the Session.
Refreshments will be served on
the mezzanine floor of the Union
building, according to Mrs. Holmes,
chairman of the committee in
charge of the affair. Music and
other entertainment have been
planned.
All students enrolled in the Summer Session are invited to attend
the reception.

Coaches' Influence

Seniors Hear Adams
At Paducah, Paris
Summer Session Head Gives
Two Commencement
Addresses
An overnight Journey from Jack-sen'- s
Purchase to the Bluegrass enabled Dr. Jesse Adams, director of
the Summer Session, to deliver two
commencement addresses in widely
separated parts of the state Jast
week.

On Tuesday night Doctcr Adams
spoke on "Needed Emphases in
in Present Day Education" at the
McVEY'S TEA JUNE 11
graduating exercises of the Paducah junior college.
President and Mrs. McVey will
Immediately
after his address,
Doctcr Adams left for Paris. Ky entertain the students of the SumDr.
L. McVey. accompanmer Session with a tea from 4 to ied by Frank
where he delivered the commencea number of Lexington
6 p. m. Wednesday,
June 22, at interested in writing and book men
ment adaress for the Paris high
colschool seniors Wednesday morning. their home Maxwell Place.
lecting, recently completed a week's
tour of libraries in several cities in
Ohio and Michigan.
Among those accompanying Doctor McVey were Dr. Thomas D.
Clark, assistant professor of history, and Dr. J. S. Chambers, head
of the hygiene department

Doctor McVey Visits

Northern Libraries

RECREATION CLASSES OFFERED

i
i

will have a campus home in this
building..
"At the same time the possession
and enjoyment of the new building
brings some obligations to respect
the building and its furnishings.
The furnishings were provided by
funds raised by the ODK society
for the use of the students. They
are the best that could be bought.
Careful use of the building and its
contents will bring a feeling of
pride to all of us.
"The management of the Student
Union carries responsibilities
that
will rest upon a board of directors
and a manager. All of the board
and the manager are inexperienced
in union management,
but the
board and the manager are receptive and cooperative, so that the
Union should go along well from
the beginning, especially if the student body takes the Union into
their hearts and rejoice in its possession."
T Serve As Center
Designed to serve as a center of
student activities, the Union is located on the northwest part of the
campus, be wee a Frazee hall and
Alumni gymnasium. It was constructed at a cost oT $242,443.73. Of
this amount $133,344.05 was obtained from University funds, with the
remaining $109,099.68 being obtain

ed from a Public Works Administration grant.
Actual work on the building was
begun April 6, 1937 when ground
breaking ceremonies were held. Lt.
Gov. Keene Johnson, the presidents
of the senior class and ODK, and
representatives
of Mortar Board
i and AWS
took part In the cere
monies.
strucPlans for the three-sto- ry
ture, which contains approximately
1500,000 cubic feet of space, were
drawn by members of the College
of Engineering, including student
engineers and draftsmen.
Building Is Fireproof
construcOf
tion, the building is fireproof, only
the Inside doors being of wood. The
structure contains 65,000 square feet
of floor space and is lighted by 50
windows. Twelve of the windows,
the ones in the great hall, tower
the height of both second and third
floors.
Oeorge H. Rommels and Sons
were general contractors for the
work. Ten contracts were let, involving 21
The 12
months of activity needed to finish
the building required the work of
50 men a day.
All work on the building
was
done in collaboration with the off-Iof the building program with
(Continued on
Three)
J

--

ce

Pt-g- e

60

Students desiring to registrar for
the recreational courses offered by
the Physical Education department
may do so by calling at the department offices in the Oym Annex.
These courses, which are offered
free to all enrolled students, include social dancing, folk dancing,
tap dancing, archery, badminton,
tennis, golf, and volley ball.
Students are urged to sign for the
courses as soon as possible as class-worbegins today.
k

WINS PHOTO CONTEST
Mack Hughes, 210 South Hanover, University student, was one
of the winners in a recent weekly
snapshot contest conducted by the
Lexington Leader. A photograph of
an acrobat snapped at the University May Day exercises by Hughes
was awarded a prize.
CARPENTER SPEAKS
"Coccidiosls of Poultry" was the
subject of Dr. Cliff D. Carpenter of
the animal pathology department
when he was the guest speaker at
an informal dinner meeting of the
Central Kentucky veterinary medical association at the Lafayette
hotel recently.

141 Number
Signing On First Day
Of 19.17 Summer

School

SESSION DIRECTOR
EXPRESSES OPTIMISM
Short

Courses Will Delay
Final Total Until
Of June

1.704 students, the largest number
ever to register at the University
on the opening day of a summer
school, filed past the registration
The Kentucky Kernel will
be published weekly during
booths in the basement of Alumni
the summer school to give
gymnasium yesterday to sign for the
the students news of the sesfirst term of the summer session.
sion. The paper will be ready
This number topped by 141 the
for distribution by 8:30
record set last year when 1.565 stuo'clock every Tuesdya morning.
dents registered the first day for
Papers may be secured at
the initial term of the 1937 session.
the following places: EducaDr. Jesse E. Adams, director of the
tion building; Patterson hall.
session, expressed delight at the
Administration.
Boyd hall.
high number registering and wm
Frazee hall. Law building.
White hall. McVey hall. Enoptimistic that the summer enrollgineering building, and Sciment record would be broken when
ence building.
the final figure for the session w3
University library. Agriculknown.
ture building. Art center,
Kastle hall. Neville hall. Men s
However, this will not be until
dormitories. Pence hall. Dr.
the last of June as the vralous
specialized short courses starting at
Adam's office and Memorial
hall.
different times will delay the final
figures until then.
Doctor Adams yesterday expressed
a belief that when these courses
were signed for the final registration
figure would be 1,900.
Registration for the regular courses will continue until Monday
Students may register today between
11 a. m. and between 2 and
10
ballad Collector Will Present 3 p.and in the basement of the Ad
m.
Broadcasts To Kentucky ministration building. After today
Mountain People From UK registration will be held only in the

Tickets For
Outdoor Party Cost
Fifty Cents
Keeneland, one of America's most
beautiful race tracks, will be the
scene of the annual All University
picnic to be held at 4 p. m. Tuesday,

June 21.
The picnic was originally scheduled for June 28 but it was necessary to advance the date of the
outing a week. Therefore it will be
one of the earlier social functions
of the Summer Session.
Tickets for the picnic are 50 cents
a person and reservations must be

I

Figure Tops By

Tuesday

PROGRAM AND GAMES
ARE BEING PLANNED

all-st-

McMillin Discusses

ALL-U- K

Tuesday. June 21, Is Chosen
As Date For Outing
At Famous
Track

WELL ATTENDED

A reception

Kernel Will Be
Published Every

SUMMER PICNIC

SCHOOL

Summer Session Students Are Entitled
To Use Of New Student Union Building
Students attending the Summer
Session will automatically become
members of the Kentucky Student
Union and therefore will be entitled to use of the new Student
Union Building during the summer,
James S. Shropshire said yesterday.
Those attending the 1938 Summer Session will not be charged
any fee for use of the building, but
as members of the Union they will
be expected to abide by the house
Director James S. Shropshire said
yesterday.
A copy of these house rules, as
drawn up by the constitution committee and now in effect, will be
found elsewhere in today's Kernel.
Costing more than $240,000. the
Student Union building, the result
of seven years of work, planning and
hoping, was officially opened Saturday night. May 14. with appropriate ceremonies and a gala dance.
Commenting at the time on the
McVey
new building. President
said. "The new Student Union
building should bring the student
body into closer understanding and
appreciation.
"New friendships
should ensue
and new enthusiasms for university
life come forth. Organizations will
find In the new building adequate
meeting places, and the student, especially the commuting student,

SCENE OF

hop"
Summer Session
to 12 o'clock Sa18. in the ballStudent Union

building.
Music for the dance will be furJtsst E. Adams,
nished by 'Smoke" Richardson and
Director of Summer Session.
his orchestra, one of the outstanding
colored bands of Central Kentucky.
Admission to the hop will be 25
cents.
Tlie dance is being given in an
effort to get those attending the
summer session acquainted with
their fellow students, according to
Dean of Women Sarah Holmes,
chairman of the social committee
of th esummer school.
Mrs. Holmes urged that women
students who are unacquainted on
the campus attend the dance. Mrs.
Holmes and Mrs. Mary lee Collins,
hostess of the Union building, will
serve as a committee to make infor those who are unIngwersen, McMillin, Kupp, troductions on the campus.
acquainted
Hinkle, Kirwan Compose
If the dance Saturday night is
Faculty For 6 Day Net, well attended and if Summer students are sufficiently interested,
Football Course
dances will be held in the
50 high school Union every Saturday night during
Approximately
football and basketball coaches at- the Summer Session.
Saturday night's bop will be spon
tended the six day athletic coach- sored by the Kentucky Student Uning school held at the University ion. This will mark the first time
Monday through Friday, June
that the Union has sponsored
as a part of the Summer Session dance since the opening of the new
The high school mentors were in- building.
The hop Saturday night will be
structed in football and basketball the third dance to be held in the
coaching methods by an
Union.
faculty.
Visiting Instructors included Alvin "Bo" McMillin, Indiana university head football coach; Burt Ingwersen, line coach at Northwest-re- n They Aid Moral Development
university .and Tony Hinkle.
Of College Students.
head coach and athletic director at
Bo' Tells Clubmen
Butler university.
,
The influence of a coach on the
Ab Kirwan, new head football
moral development of college stucoach at the University, and Adolph dents was stressed by Alvin N. "Bo"
Rupp. head basketball coach of the McMillin. head football coach at
Indiana university and member of
Wildcats, were also on the staff.
University summer coaching
Football was taught daily at mor- the
school staff, when he spoke at
ning and afternoon sessions,' and luncheon-meeting- s
of two Lexingbasketball was taught nightly.
ton service clubs last week.
McMillin, former Centre college
Coaches from several states. Including Ohio. Missouri. Kentucky, grid star, spoke at a meeting of
club
West Virginia, Tennessee. Virginia, the Klwanis Liens' on Tuesday and
club meeting on
Mississippi, attended the school. addressed a
and
Wednesday.
In his talks McMillin paid tribute
COMBS TO COACH
to the character and ability of Ab
Kirwan, head grid coach; Bernie
Charley Combs, Happy. Ky., for- Shively, athletic director,
and
mer University net and track star, Adolph Rupp. head basketball
basketball coach.
appointed
has been
coach for the coming year at HartMcMillin also urged alumni
ford high school. Combs was a groups to support the new athletic
member of the June graduating set-u- p
at the University.
class at the University.

Affair To Be Held At 8 P. M.

For

KEENELANDTOBE

Faculty Will Welcome Students
At Reception Thursday Night

OPENS THURSDAY
Courts
Event

Committee Will Introduce
Students Who Are
Unacquainted
On Campus
An informal "get acquainted

J

TENNIS TOURNEY

rn

:

'Get Acquainted Hop' Will Be Held
In Union Ballroom Saturday Night

students and an out
standing faculty, I feel assured of one of
Sessions in our history.

.'

(7 j

take tlm
of
to you best
wishes for a happy Summer Session? I hope it
may be most profitable
and that your stay on
our campus this summer will bring you many
rewards in tlie way of
accomplishments,
and
that you may return to
your work in the fall
having greatly benefited
by your enrollment in
the University.
With the record enrollment of high grade

May

NEW SERIES NO.

j. n
i
nrn
up ening uay Qiiiuiinitiiii rceuuiu raus
As 1,706 Students Register For Term;
Adams Believes Total Will Reach 1,900

In

President McVey To Discuss

11. 1938

NILES TO GIVE

FOUR

made before 1
o'clock Tuesday
morning, June 21, according to
those in charge of the picnic.
Tickets may be secured at the
Dean of Women's office in the Administration building.
Doctor
Adams' office in the Education
building, or Mrs. Lebus' office in
the Student Union building.
Students not having cars will be
provided with free transportation
to and from Keeneland. Those de- siring this transportation are asked
to meet on the porch of Patterson
hall by 3:30 p. m. the day of the
picnic.
A gala "program of entertainment
is being prepared for the outing,
according to C. W. Hackensmith,
chairman of the committee on arrangements
for programs
and
games.
Included on the program will be
a dance revue by the Mar jorie Hall
school of dancing. Softball games
and dart throwing and horseshoe
pitching contests are also being
palnned.
The annual All University picnic
in past years has proved one of
the most popular affairs on the
Summer Session calendar. Approximately 500 students attended last
year's outing which was also held
at Keeneland.

PROGRAMS

Radio Studios

nationally
known collector and interpreter of
southern Appalachian ballads and
folklore, will present four more
broadcasts in the poular "Salute to
the Hills" program from the University radio studios of station
WHAS. Louisville.
The programs, presented on consecutive Wednesdays, will conclude
the last of June. Listening Centers
which were not similarly honored
last summer in Mr. Niles' series of
broadcasts will be featured in the
programs
to be presented
this
month.
In presenting Mr. Niles the University is making what is possibly
the first organized effort to restore
a rapidly vanishing form of American musical culture.
Each broadcast of the series presented last summer and again this
spring has been dedicated to one of
the University's group of 29 radio
listening centers located in remote
sections of the Kentucky mountains.
Each week Mr. Niles takes up a
new ballad and rehearses it carefully with the people sitting around
the radio set at these listening centers. The verses of the ballad, constituting a word sheet, are distributed each week to the centers, and
A tea honoring
women residing in this way it is hoped that a form
may be
in the dormitories will be given of musical .
from 4 to 6 p. m. Wednesday. June effected.
15. in the Recreation Room of Patterson hall. Mrs. ' Sarah Holmes, OBSERVATORY OPEN MONDAY
dean of women; Mrs. Eda M. Giles. ' The University observatory will
manager of the residence halls, and be open to Summer Session stuMrs. Ethel R. Lebus, hostess of the dents from 7:30 to 8:30 o'clock every
woman's building, will be hostesses Monday night during the first term.
Prof. H. H. Downing, said yesterday.
for the tea.

John

Jacob

Niles.

Plan Tea Wednesday
To Fete Hall Women

Noted Authorities To Give
Reading Course Lectures
Noted reading authorities will be
on the faculty of the Summer Session for the first term to assist in
the instruction of a course in "Problems in Diagnostic and Remedial
Reading."
This course, offered daily from 10
to 12 o'clock, gives three credits and
may be counted as either graduate
or undergraduate work.
Among those who will take part
in the instruction of the course are'
Laura Zirbes, Ohio State university;
Authur I. Oates, Columbia; Marion
Monroe. Pittsburgh. Pa., reading
clinic; Emmett A. Betts, Pennsylvania state college; E. A. Taylor,
American Optical company, and
May K. Duncan, associate professor
of education at the University.
In addition to the general lectures, the group will be divided into
sections of approximately 25 each
to experiment with the various machines designed for the improvement of reading. These machines
include the opthalm-o-grapwhich
is devised for the diagnosis of reading difficulties, and the metron-o-scop- e.
a device used for remedial
measures.
Besides the clinical work In the
use of machines, each group will
be expected to observe the teaching
of reading as carried on in the Uni
versity training school.

LECTURER

afternoon.
More than

875 courses have been
scheduled for the two terms of the
Summer Session at the University
of Kentucky, Lexington, under the
direction of a resident faculty of
150 scholars and a large and prom
tnent group of visiting Instructor.
All seven colleges of the Univer
sity will be open both terms of th
summer school and courses have
been scheduled for both graduates
and undergraduates.
The two terms of the Session consist of five weeks each, and the
second term enrollment will be held
July 18. with the last date for registration for the second term set
for July 25. Commencement exercises for students completing their
college course in either of the two
summer terms will be held Friday.
August 19.

Vocal, Instrumental

Music Classes Start
At University High
Directed

by Alexander

Capurso.

instruction in vocal and instrumental music was begun last week at
the summer session of the Univer-

sity high school.

course for junior
A seven-wee- ks
and senior high school pupils
of individual lessons and orchestral training in standard band
or orchestra instruments was begun
ronr-sistin- g

Tuesday.
Regular public school music will
be taught to elementary school puks
course that bepils in a
gan Friday.
Mr. Capurso. a member of the
faculty cf the music department,
will be assisted by four student
teachers.
five-wee-

Former UK Student
Given Radio Award
It. T. 'Bob Anderson Honored
For Work Purine;
1937 Flood
R. T. "Bob" Anderson, termer
University student, was recently
honored by a radio testimonial program in recognition of his distinguished service during the 1937

i

flood.

The program was part of a presentation luncheon at the Waldorf-Astori-

i

f
f

a

hotel in New York where
he was awarded Praley's annual
amateur radio operator's award.
The progrm was broadcast over the
Columbia Broadcasting System.
During the 1937 flood. Mr. Anderson's work in Shawneatown. Ill .
and the surrounding flood area received national attention, and he
was named by a committee of five
men as eligible to receive the distinguished service award.
Anderson now lives at HarrisbuTg.
111.

CARSNER ATTENDS CAMP

L
lai'ba riasts

M. O. Carsner of the physical education department attended a recent camp at Camp Glenartney on
the Kentucky river held as a training period of Lexington playground
directors.
Several University students who serve as playground directors were also on the camp.

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

Page Two

Tuf-rfidy-

June

.

11.

FW

j

TOE KENTUCKY KERNEL
nmrni, kfwspapfr of thf ptttfn'T8
THE UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
FntrHI

crap Irony

of

4 to Mtoaoa
. MIM

CMC MM

AviRrv C. F.rKnAHi
Thomas W. Spnrard

Welcome,

Summer
Students!

Vo. N. T.
Fwmfl

Hew
tM NHM -

v

Editor
Business Manager

flHF krnri
at

wishes
this lime to

welrome

the
he students
10

1

I'ni-versit-

v

of tlte Summer Ses
sion.
To those of you who previously have attended
the University we sav, "Welrome home." To
those of ou who are coining to the campus for
the first lime we extend a s)erial welrome.
When the registration is finally complete it
will le found thai there are students here from
piacii-allall the counties of Kentut ky and from
manv of the other slates.
These students, no matter what their particular desires and ambitions, are all drawn 10 the
Summer Session with one general aim 10 furv

ther their education.
Tliey have come to ilie right place. At the
I'm'versiiy of kentuiLy they will find a symfaculty, an adequate
pathetic and
laliora-toiies- ,
and comfortable library,
and above all, a scholatsic atmosphere.
Summer Session students will find that the
L'niveisity is tiulv stub a place as President
McVcv was thinking of when he made his
statement that "a university is a place;
ii is a spirit. It is men of learning; it is a collection of bK)ks; it is laboratories where work in
science goes forward; it is the source of the teath-inand leauiies of literature and ilie arts; it is
the center where ambitious youth gathers 10
learn; it protects traditions, honors the new and
tests its value: it lelieves in truth, protests
against error and leads men bv reason rather
than bv force."
well-traine- d

well-equipx- d

d

g

A

Return

n a RrcrvT article.

I and

somewhat ear
lier in a series of lec-11 r es.
Dr. RoIkti
Studies
Mavnard
Mutrhins.
president of the I'niversiiv of Chicago, advocated a return to the classical (ourses of study
for large number of college and university stu
dents.
In an article in the Current Atlantic on his
experiences as a student at Oxford. Mr. I.ogan
rearsall Smith, one of the ablest of living masters of English, said, speaking 01 the Oxford
Sthool of humane letters, "it seems to im mature
judgment the best scheme of education that I
have ever heard of. It is based upon an accurate
knowledge of Greek and Latin texts. esecially
the texts of Plato and Aristotle, and of Tlwry-dide- s
and Tacitus, and the subjects studied in It
ate the eternal problems of thought, of condui t,
and of social organization. These are discussed
not by means of roniemoiary catchwords, but
by translating them bak into another world and

To Classical

Y f wfrf leading the other dav alout an iron-lioard no ordinary ironing board, understand. This was a soil of combination ironing
Ixiard and card table. A chap came home and
found that his wife had purchased the thing at
an auction and he wanted to know what it was.
She pushed a button thai was concealed under
the table and it leaped three feet in the air.
straightened out. and came clown as an ironing
board. The husband was jierferily willing to accept the inevitability of the situation until the
thing became so highly sensitized that it would
change with the slightest pressure anvwhere on
the surface of the table. After it had caught
him under ihe chin a couple of limes whilst he
was playing eucre, he took the thing to the attic
and left it there. And now on windy evenings
it can be heard flopping about, changing from
a card table to an ironing hoard, from an ironing
Ixiard to a card table, etc. The utter futility of
its existence struck us as one of the saddest stories
we've heard in months.

"

"l t
MiMmm o tiom.
National Advertising Service, Inc.

another language."
It may le well, as the schools are closing, to
puisne ihis theme a little further. Sir Richard
Jebb long ago wrote as follows: "T he creative
literature of Greece from Homer 10 Demosthenes, had a course of spontaneous development and natural growth throughout which it
was in constant touch with life; and it has left
a series of typical standards in prose and poetry
. . . No one can comprehend the history and
development of English literature, or any literature of modern Europe, without a knowledge
of the ultimate sources of Greek and Latin literature . . . The greater and more fruitful is the
progress of science, the greater the need for humane letters, 10 establish and maintain a harmony between the new knowledge and those
profound, unchanging instincts of our nature."
Huxley wrote that "culture is something quite
different from learning or 'technical skill. It
implies the possession of an ideal, and the habit
of critically estimating the caloes of things by a
theoretic standard."
In his Essav on the Idea of a I'niversiiv, Newman wrote that "this process of training bv
vhkh the intellect, instead of being formed by
or sac rificed 10 some pat tit ular or accidental
purpose, some specific trade or profession, or
some study or science, is disciplined for iis own
sake, for the perception of its own prcer object,
and for its own highest culture, is called liliejal
education."
Mill oinied out that while the scientific discoveries of the great Greeks have leen far surpassed by the researches of the moderns, and

while as much of what the learned still has
value is capable of being inororaied in current
scientific woiks. "what docs not admit of leing
so well transferred lodily, and has leen very
impel fectlv carried of! piecemeal, is the treasure that thev accumulated of what .mav be
called the wisdom of life: the rich store of
exjierience of human nature and conduct, which
the acute and observing minds of those ages,
aided in their observations by the greatest simplicity of manners and life, consigned to their

1

pseudo-verit-

y

REVIEWS

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Monday
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13
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20

Wednesday

June'

22

Fridiiy

June

24

Sutuitlay

July

2

Monday

July
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4
16
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Saturday
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July 22

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July '25

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July 29

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Ihe situation

July

Friday

SIMILE OF THE WEEK: It made a shrill
sound, like the pulling of a dry handkerchief
through clenched teeth.
in Germany has. we think,
readied crucial point. Mr. Hitler mtlst make a
decision. He can no longer keep the world at
bay. The world is tired of all this shilly-shalling. After all, the man is either going to have
a moustache or he isn't going to have a moustache. Why must he go about with that little attemp