xt7qnk363z55 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7qnk363z55/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19690402  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, April  2, 1969 text The Kentucky Kernel, April  2, 1969 1969 2015 true xt7qnk363z55 section xt7qnk363z55 HUE

11

EMTHJCECY EClEMRIIEL
V

Wednesday Evening, April 2, 1969

Vol. LX, No. 122

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON

J Board Rules Juul
--

'Technically Eligible9
For SG Presidency
By FRANK COOTS
Assistant Managing Editor
Thorn Pat Juul was declared "technically eligible to run" for
Student Government president at a hearing before the UK Judi
cial Board luesday night.
The SG elections will be held tide 2 section 2.02 of the Student
on April 9 as scheduled and Juul's Government Constitution calls
name will be on the ballot.
for an accumulative grade point
The hearing before the
standing at 2.5," he said. "We
was requested by Juul after the felt we should take both grades
SG elections committee declared
into account to make the grade
him ineligible to run.
point standing truly accumulaThere are actually three juditive."
cial boards: an undergraduate
Crucial to Juul's argument
male board, an undergraduate
was the testimony of Merrily
female board, and a graduate Orsini who ran for SG represenboard. Although the three boards tative last year after transferring
sit separately on disciplinary
from Louisiana State University.
cases, they met together at last
Miss Orsini attempted 70 credit hours at LSU and completed
night's hearing.
The only other
57. She had a 2.3 g.p.a. for the
case the
has heard 57 hours she completed. This
(and the only other which the did not include the 13 hours
three boards have sat together
Continued on Pagre 8, Col. 1
on) was that concerning last
year's contested Student Government presidential race.
The debate at the hearing
centered on whether Juul's unBy ANGELA MUELLER
dergraduate grades should be
Kernel Staff Writer
combined with his graduate grade
The University Senate appoint standing in determining if
he had the required 2.5 g.p.a. proved Tuesday the section of
to run for an SG office.
the proposed Student Bill of
Juul achieved a 2.33 in his un- Rights calling for a faculty omdergraduate work here, but has a budsman although Acting Pres2.75 after a semester of graduate
ident A.D. Kirwan and Acting
work. When combined, his g.p.a. Vice President for Student Afdoes not meet the 2.5 requirefairs Stuart Forth spoke against
ment.
it.
The Senate met Tuesday afJuul insisted that the two
grades should not be combined ternoon and evening in the Law
since "undergraduate and gradBuilding courtroom.
Dr. Michael E. Adelstein
uate records are totally separate.
As far as the academic commun(English), chairman of the Senity is concerned, I am a graduate ate Advisory Committee for Stustudent with a grade point standdent Affairs which wrote the Bill
of Rights, called the vote "overing of 2.75."
Scott Richmond, chairman of whelming" and expressed surthe elections committee, claimed prise that the majority of faculthey should be combined. "Ar-- ty present did riot share theopin- ry

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Thorn Fat Juul, a graduate student in library science, (right) argues
before the University judicial board that he should be eligible for the
Student Government presidential race. The
chaired by Scott
Richmond, to Juul's right, voted later Tuesday night that Juul was
Kernel Photo By Dave Herman
"technically eligible."
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Stating

His Case

Senate Approves Of Faculty Ombudsman
ions of Dr. Kirwan and Dr. Forth. that he would have enough presArticle IV, Section I of the tige to be effective. "Unless he's
bill states, "The University Omthe president himself," Dr. Forth
budsman shall be a tenured faculsaid, the ombudsman would be
member selected by the Prestold not to meddle in the afty
ident of the University with the fairs of the classroom.
advice of the President of Student
"The idea of an ombudsman
Government from a list of at is fraudulent," Dr. Forth conleast three candidates nominated cluded. "It won't work; we are
by the Senate Council."
conning our students."
Dr. Adelstein explained that
Dr. Kirwan said that in talkthe office of ombudsman would ing to students he heard more
be a clearinghouse for problems complaints about advisers than
listed in the Bill of Rights, parabout any other subject. "If they
had good academic advisers, they
ticularly problems between students and faculty.
wouldn't need ombudsmen," he
Dr. Forth called the proposal said. "I do not think there is
"a con job" and "a strong as- a need for both (a vice presisertion of no confidence in the dent for academic affairs and an
student affairs office." He said ombudsman)."
A faculty member suggested
no faculty member would be so
well known in all departments
that the office of ombudsman be

absorbed into that of the dean
of students. Dr. Adelstein replied
that the dean is traditionally a
disciplinarian and that he might
not have students' confidence
as their representative.
Dr. Carl Cone (history) said
he thought an ombudsman would
separate students and faculty
even more. "Why can't a student
go straight to his teacher?" he
asked. "I don't like to think a
student has to go to an ombudsman to get justice out of me."
Dr. Robert Sedler (law) said
he was "surprised at the philosophical objection to an ombudsman." He said "professors
are unofficial ombudsmen when
students com; to them with problems," and added that he thought
Continued on Page 8, Col. 1

Election Circuit:

Campaign Pace Quickens; Air Thickens
Bright Blasts
Futrell Plan

Williams For
Here, Now

Futrell Says
Plan Feasible

JIM MILLER
Associate Editor
Thorn Pat Juul made an appeal to Greeks, Tim Futrell outlined his Dynamic Executive
plan, and Steve Bright told why
Tim Futrell shouldn't be elected
in a debate last night, part of
the Sigma Phi Epsilon Speaker
Series. '
The 30 students in the audience heard Bright call Futrell
"a proposer and producer of
nothing" and "a political hack."
Bright is a candidate for Student
Government vice president, and
Juul and Futrell are presidential
candidates.
Bright's running mate, presidential candidate Bruce Carver,
is in University Hospital with a
cold and did not attend the debate. Joe Maguire, vice presidential candidate on Juul's Students for Action and Responsibility (SAB) ticket, was also absent.
Bright charged Futrell with

By RICK FALKNOR

By TOM HALL
Kernel Staff Writer
Candidates of the three major
slates in contention for the Student Government presidency and

By

dodging
Continued on Paf e 7,

"consistently

the

CoL 1

STEVE Bill CI IT

Kernel Staff Writer
Jim Williams, the fourth
candidate to enter in theStudent
Covemment presidential race,
stated Tuesday night during a
discussion at Elanding III that
he wanted Student Government
t'to come to the students" and to
establish issues that the''avefage
student could indentify with."
During the discussion, which
at times became quite heated,
Williams and his running mate,
Rodney Tapp defended their
stand for the "average" student.
Williams said, "We are unconventional in that we have no
organizations to work for" and no
set "plat fonn promises." He explained this by saying, "The
platforms are nothing after election day."
Williams later stated that he
was basically concerned with the
"here and now hing," but that
his cabinet would plan for the
future.
Continued on Pace 3, CoL 4

vice presidency

JAMES WILLIAMS

gave short

speeches to an assembly at
Holmes Hall Tuesday night.
About 75 women heard presidential candidate Tim Futrell
andhfs running mateJlmCwlnn,
Steve Bright, vice presidential
candidate on the Bruce Carver
ticket; and Thorn Pat Juul of the
SAR (Students for Action and
Responsibility) ticket.
Bright, speaker of the SG assembly, advocated a new "life
styles program for the women's
dorms" wherein "each girl could
decide with her parents what
'style' she wanted to live under."
"This would be far better
than having 49 percent of women unhappy with their hours."
He foresaw such a possibility
If "51 percent" voted for liberal
hours in all donns in a survey
Continued on Fa e 2, Col. 4

* 19
Project

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, April 2,

2

Outlines

Dcdford-Stnyvcsa-

nt

Thomas Depicts Poverty, Restoration Of N.Y. Ghetto
By ELLEN ESSIC
KcmcJ Staff Writer

To date, several separate programs are underway. An Economic Development Program
helps local residents start new
businesses, helps existing businesses, and encourages national
firms to locate in the area (as
IBM did when it opened a plant
there in 1968.)
"The important point here,"
Thomas commented, "is that for
the first time in a community
like this, a portion of the people are producers as well as
consumers."
A Mortgage Pool of $100,000,-00- 0
has been established by 80
New York lending institutions
to provide "low costs" for housing.
A home renovating program
conducted in the summers of
1967-6saw about 1,000 buildrestored and employed about
ings
800 previously unemployed peo-

There, in the nation's second-largeblack community (after
Chicago's South Side), 450,000
people are crammed in 653 blocks,
stretching over ninemiles, Thomas said.
The infant mortality rate is
nearly twice the national average
and Juvenile delinquency more
than twice the New York City
rate as a whole. Seven of 10
high school students are dropouts. The unemployment rate is
6.2 percent compared to 3.7 percent nationally.
Complete with turtle races, a carnival and the music of Henry
On Feb. 4, 1966, the late
Mancini, this year's Little Kentucky Derby will beheld April
Sen. Robert F. Kennedy took a
The LKD festivities are sche
t
walking tour through
duled to get under way at noon chestra are to appear in
and saw and disfor the cussed the
April 17 with the traditional turtle cert April 25.
plight of the commund
race on the Student Center patio. event will be on sale to
ity with its residents. Within
staff April 11 months, Kennedy returned
Then, at 1:30 p.m., UK stu- dents, faculty
dents will help with the pro- 11 and 12.
with an idea which ultimately
duction of the Jim Lucas televiTickets may be obtained at became "The
from
sion show to be video-tapeProject."
the central information desk of
the SC patio. The show will be
"That idea," Thomas exthe Student Center for $2.50 and
segpresented in two
plained, "was to take a group
$3. The general public may purments on WAVE-TLouisville, chase tickets
of people who live in
14 at $3 and
April
at 5 p.m. April 9 and April 26.
and have commit$3.50.
ments to it, and join them with
Voting for LKD queen will be
held April
The annual bicycle and scoobusa group of Manhattan-base-d
d
carni- ter races will dominate the LKD inessmen, and have those two
The
val will operate between the Stu- daytime events April 26 with the groups work together in a partdent Center and the football sta- traditional "Blue-Whitgrid nership towards the redevelopdium April
clash scheduled for Stoll Field ment of this area.
Henry Mancini and his or that night.
"By redevelopment,'.' he con-- ;
tinued, "I mean redevelopment;
"""""
t
in every facet of life: housing,
education,
job development,
health and sanitation."
The
Project was under way by May 1967.
Directing the experiment in urban
redevelopment are two nonprofit
corporations, The
Restoration Corp. andThe
Bedford- - Stuyvesant
Development and Service Corp.
I
,
The Restoration Corp. and its
t
board of directors consists of local
residents and its function is to de
termin ei the' needs " of trie com- -'
munity and design programs intended to meet those needs.
The Development and Service
Corp. has a board drawn from
the nation's business establishment, and it assists in marshalling resources to help carry out
the programs developed by the
local corporation.
of the colloquia on "Working
Solutions to the Dimensions of
"The
Poverty."
in
Project" an
Thomas, president of the
experiment
businessmen and com- 1x3 a rd of directors of the
grouping
Restoration
munity members together to help
solve the problems of a com- Corp., began by giving some
munity was explained by Frank- background information on the
lin A. Thomas Tuesday as part area in Brooklyn.

st

Bedford-Stuyvesa-

Bedford--

Stuyvesant

LKD:

Races, Carnival,
Henry Mancini

17-2- 6.

Bedford-Stuyvesan-

con-Ticke- ts

stu-an-

Bedford-Stuyvesa-

8

nt

d

Bedford-Stuyvesa-

"This was one of the best

investments we were
able to make in order to establish credibility and have the
people willing to await some of
the long-terdevelopments,"
Thomas added.
A television series, "Inside
has been
short-ter-

nt

22-2- 3.

student-organize-

e"

Bedford-Stuyvesant-

;

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ML

Bedford-Stuyvesa-

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nt

,

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,"

Continued from Page One
now being conducted in cooperation with Associated Women
Students.
Bright also said that he and
Carver have promised no cabinet post to any student as inducement for campaign support.
;
JFutrell later replied to
Bright' s allegation that his Dy:
namic ExecutivePlan wasa"Dis-astrou- s
Bureaucracy plan." He
said he wants a "fleet of administrative helpers" todo"feas-ibilit- y
studies." He also said that
he has been assured that a
r
meal plan can
be effected for the dorm cafeterias next year.

'

r

two-mea- l,

lunch-dinne-

Holy Week

Services

472 ROSE STREET
Maundy Thursday, April 3 Holy Eucharist and
Stripping of the Altar, 7:00 p.m.
fen
GOOD FRIDAY, April 4 Litany,
and Meditation, 12:05 p.m.
(Private meditation and prayer in
chapel until 3:00 p.m.)
Stations of the Cross, 5:30 p.m.
HOLY SATURDAY
Lighting of the New Fire and Choral
Eucharist 11:30 p.m.
EASTER DAY Holy Eucharist, 8 a.m. and 10:30 a.m.
Ante-Commu-

Illustrations enlarged to show detail.Trade-marPond Co.. Inc.. Est. 1892.

Ij

HOW TO PLAN YOUR ENGAGEMENT AND WEDDING
Please send new
bookletHow To Plari Your Engage
ment and Wedding" and new
full color folder, both for
Bride's Book.
oniy oc. Also, send special offer of beaotiful
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Bedford-Stuyvesan- t.

Bedford-Stuyvesa-

Juul, learning just before the
debate that he was a "technically eligible candidate," said
is favorable . . .
"the
as to whether we're on the ballot, that's our next problem."
Juul claimed that his SAR
party has been labeled with the
tag "radical." "If radical is for
student services, we'll accept the
label," Juul said. He added that
SAR proposed "over one half
of the legislation in student government," adding, "without our
30 bills, 80 to 95 percent of the
legislation would have been
amendments to the constitution
and not students' services bills."
Juul said that Gwinn,
running mate has proposed
only three bills and Bright has
"mostly amended the constituFu-trel- l's

UK Team
Wins Trophy

For Debate
The UK debate team won the
sweepstakes trophy last weekend
in the Kentucky
Forensics Conference. The trophy
was awarded for accumulating
the largest number of points in
individual events.
Individual team winners were:
discussion-Lind- a
Buff, first place;
extemporaneous speaking John
Nelson, first place; Scott
second; oral inteqireta-tioHoward Enoch, second
place.
Schools participating in the
conference Friday and Saturday
other than UK were Asbury,
Inter-Collegia-

n

FINE JEWiURS

....

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159 E. MAIN

George-

town, Berea, Centre, Transylvania and Cumberland Colleges,
Eastern Kentucky University,
Murray State University and
Western Kentucky University.

The Kentucky
CoW

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.

v

I

in UK Ve,o

'

State
N. Y. 13201

said,

We
job in
have developed a system by
which the private sector and a
local community can join together in an effort to revitalize
that community with the proper
control and power resting in the
hands of the people whose lives
are to be affected by the program."
Thomas was born and attended school in
and is a member of the
governing boards of Columbia
College, Columbia Law School
and the New York Urban Coalition.
The colloqui series is sponsored by the Department of Political Science and Social Work.

Bellarmine-Ursulin-

RINGS

DIAMOND RINGS, BOX 90, SYRACUSE,

Thomas

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KEEPSAKE

In summary

"For the first two years of this
effort, we have scratched the surface . . . we've only begun the

Wene-delsdor-f,

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ST. AUGUSTINE'S CHAPEL

Being with each other, doing things together . . . knowing that your affection is growing into precious and
enduring love. Happily, all these cherished moments
will be forever symbolized by your diamond engagement
ring. If the name, Keepsake, is in the ring and on the tag
you are assured of fine quality and lasting satisfaction.
The engagement diamond is flawless, of superb color,
and precise modern cut. Your Keepsake Jeweler will
assist you in making your selection . . . He's in the yellow
pages under "Jewelers." Rings from $100 to $10,000.

nt

Futrell Defends Plans
At Holmes Meeting

Bedford-Stuyvesa-

v

m

m

24-2- 6.

Bedford-Stuyvesa-

-'

ple.

te

broadcasting local news, interviews and talent four times a
week.
has no
radio or TV stations or newspapers of its own.
An education committee is
developing new concepts of education for disadvantaged residents. A community college is
scheduled tentatively to open this

Iernel

The Kentucky Kernel, University
Station, Univertity of Kentucky, Lexington. Kentucky 40506. Second class
pottage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Mailed five timea
the
school year except weekly duringexam
holidays and
periods, and once during the summer
session.
Published by the Doard of Student
Publications, UK Post Office Box iatitJ.
liegun as the Cadet in im and
as the Kernel
published
since 1015. continuously

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, April

2,

1900-

-3

Williams, Tapp Seek
'Average Students'
7

-

'r
4

y

Regarding the Creeks Williams commented, "He (Juul) is
leading you around like a herd
of sheep. If they (SAR) can bulldoze the Creek system they can
control the government."
Tapp 'said they would set up
a "cabinet that specialized in
going out and finding out what
the students wanted."
Williams told his audience
that he "would fight for student
rights" and take their wants to
the Board of Trustees. But he
continued that he could not do
it on his own.
"Student power is where all
the students get in it," Williams
said. "You have to have people
go places or you will be chattel
of the University," he continued.
Minor debates broke out
among those attending the discussion. Several led to questions
for Williams on how he could
get students involved.
The problem, Williams said,
is "nobody wants to be the first
ant off the hill."

Continued from Pajfe One
Williams commented, "Juul
and most of them are reaching
too far into political matters."
He continued by saying he was
more concerned with issues like
"breakfast shouldn't be too
greasy."
Both Williams and Tapp expressed concern over the lack
of communications between the
students and the Student Government and "inefficient dorm
governments." To alleviate this
situation, Williams and Tapp
suggested that "dorm government presidents could be on the
Student Government Assembly."
Several of the women present
voiced concern over what would
happen to the sororities and
fraternities, since Williams seemed to be centering his interest
on the dorms. Williams countered these questions by saying the
"Greeks have different problems"
and his cabinet would be just
as interested in them.

s

Karen Ann O'Reilly, education senior,

can't quite believe she has been named
the new Miss Lexington (above) in the

11

Tuesday night contest in Haggin Auditorium,
Transylvania College. Miss O'Reilly will
represent the city in the Miss Kentucky contest this summer.
Majoring in special and elementary education, she has been active on the University
campus as an officer of Kappa Delta sorority,
a member of the UK Troupers and of the
Student Activities Board.

rA

0

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ft

DELICIOUS, TENDER, JUICY

Steak
Baked Potat
Salad and Bread

Kernel Photos by Dick Ware

u

I

BSU To Hold Service

ay

SMITH-CORON-

DEALSiS

A

SALES SERVICE
393 WALLER AVE.

The Black Student Union will hold a memorial service for Dr.
Martin Luther King Jr. at noon Thursday in the Student Center
Theatre. The service will commemorate the civil rights leader
on the first anniversary of his assassination.
Dr. King was killed April 4, 1968, in Memphis. Brenda Mapp,
vice president of the BSU, said the service was planned for Thursday, April 3, because some students would be leaving Friday for
the Easter weekend.
Tributes in the Thursday service will honor the late Dr. King
in song, as well as through spoken eulogy. "Precious Lord,"
said to be a favorite hymn of Dr. King's, will be played, and his
speech "I Have a Dream" will be presented.
A silent prayer will end the service, when the audience will be
asked to consider "Where do we go from here?"
Plans for the King memorial service were announced in the Black
Bullet, a publication of the BSU.

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* U Of L Censor
The suspension of the University of Louisville Cardinal for the use
word in a headline providesone more example of current
of a four-lettof Kentucky college students.
repression
The Cardinal has used the word in question before, though not in
headlines. The fact that action would be taken against the paper
because it used the word openly in an April Fool's edition reflects
the unenlightened hypocrisy reigning at U of L, as well as at other
Kentucky colleges and universities.
The use of the word can be justified as a matter of principle. It is
ridiculous for anyone to get excited over any mere word. Something
is terribly sick in our society when it can get upset over the appearword meaning sexual intercourse but which hardly
ance of a four-lettreacts to this nation's napalming of primitive villages.
It is about time that somebody put the issue on the line. The
Louisville Cardinal showed where it stands . . . and so, once again,
did the college officials.
er

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er

AAUP Censure
It was comforting in some respects to read of the state American
Association of University Professors (AAUP) official censure last week
of recent actions at two state universities. The AAUP repudiated
Morehead State University's newly-adopte- d
speaker ban and Eastern
censure of its student body president, Steve
Kentucky University's
VVilborn, for passing out copies of "The Student As Nigger."
The fact that the AAUP's censure demonstrated that reactionary
university officials cannot repress students with complete impunity
despite the current atmosphere of dismal negativism toward students
was comforting. But the fact that a mere slap on the wrists is all that
unenlightened officials receive for their attempts at repression is rather
unsettling.
These same officials are in the forefront of those who are calling for
expulsion of dissident students and for the cutting off of their financial
aid on the grounds that their activities have no place in an academic
environment. The argument is that when these students violate the
"rights" of other members of the university community, their presence
can no longer be tolerated.
Even if this evaluation of the situation were correct, which would
be saying a lot, how much more so should this line of thinking hold
for college administrators? These men are actually being paid to deprive
students of their rights. This is the sort of thing that stirs student
rebellions and this is the sort of thing that should not be tolerated.
If our hypocritical society were true to its ideals, it would place
just as stringent, if not more so, codes of conduct on university officials as well as on students.
Sure, lawnorder for "students, niggers, hippies and yippies" . . .
but not for college officials.
.

'I Was Just Following Orders

The Kentucky

University of Kentucky

ESTABLISHED

1894

To the Editor of the Kernel:
Recent a flagrant violation of free
speech and academic freedom was committed by President Martin and the Board
of Regents at Eastern Kentucky University. The action by President Martin in
censuring the student government president, Steve Wilborn, for distributing
copies of "The Student as Nigger" was
a clear violation of the First Amendment
guarantee of the right to disseminate
ideas, no matter how unpopular they are
to the president of the university or
anyone else.
According to Webster's definition of
a "university," it is "a body of persons
gathered at a particular place for disseminating and assimilating knowledge
in advanced form." This is not restricted
to book knowledge, but includes the
dissemination of ideas. As one of the
more conservative members of the Judiciary has explained "The First Amendment's basic guarantee is of freedom
to advocate ideas. Its guarantee is not
confined to expression of ideas that are
conventional or shared by a majority . . . .
And in the realm of ideas, it protects
expression which is eloquent no less than
that which is unconvincing." The law
of our land has long been that "The freedom to distribute information to every
citizen wherever he desires to receive it,
is . . . vital to the preservation of a free
society
President Martin's action violated the
right of students on campus to receive
information, which the Suprane Court
has observed, is necessary for the preservation of a free society. By his conduct,
he hindered the right to circulate information and stifled the right to criticize,
which are protected by the First Amendment. Expression in a free society becomes
valuable when it stimulates rethinking

of our values and inand
stitutions. Accordingly, the Supreme
Court has noted that "a function of "free
speech" under our system of government
is to invite dispute, and "free speech"
may best serve its high purpose when it
induces a condition of unrest, creates
dissatisfaction with conditions as they are
or even stirs people to anger."
The right of academic freedom has
been held by the courts to be protected
by the First Amendment and this freedom
is not limited to, the administration or
the faculty at a university, but includes
the right of students to voice their dissent
to university policy. The Supreme Court
has stated "The vigilant 'protection of
constitutional freedom is nowhere more
vital than in the community of American
Schools."
President, Martin's rationalization for
the censorship was that the leaflet was
"extremely obscene." Having examined
the article in question, the obsurdity of
President Martin's characterization is
quite obvious to me, but even if he were
correct in so characterizing it, that does
not excuse censoring its publication. The
Supreme Court has noted "The protection
given free speech and press was fashioned
to assure unfitted interchange of ideas
which bring about political and social
changes desired by people, and all ideas
having even the slightest redeeming social
importance have the full protection of the
guarantees of the First Amendment." The
leaflet, "The Student as Nigger," is provocative of thought and therefore has
redeeming social value. Accordingly, it has
been published in school newspapers
across the country without Invocation of
administration censorship.
The circulation of "The Student as
Nigger" on the Eastern campus was not
a threat because it is obscene. It was,
nevertheless a threat. It was a threat

!'

ernel

WEDNESDAY,

APRIL

2, 1969

Editorials represent the opinions of the Editors, not of the University.
;

Lee B. Becker,

Editor-in-Chi-

ef

'

.......

Darrell Rice, Editorial Page
III, Managing Editor
Tom Derr, Business Manager
Jim Miller, Associate
Howard Mason, Photography Editor
Chip Hutcheson, Sports
Jack Lyne and Larry Kelley, Arts Editors
Frank Coots,
Dana Ewell,
Janice
Terry Dunham,
Larry Dale Keeling,
Assistant Managing Editors
Guy M. Mendes

Kernel Forum: the readers write
Flagrant Violations

...

because it focused attention on deficiencies in the administration of university
campuses; on the hypocrisy of such common inconsistencies as preaching the glory
of American democracy to students held
by the administration in the bondage of
second class citizenship. It poses a threat
to university officials who prefer the comfort of administration by autocratic fiat,
to the challenge of serving a community
dedicated to the search for new knowledge, new ideas and new institutions.
William Wobbekind
Law Student and
Alumnus of EKU

Kernel Critics
In my first year as a student at UK, it
is interesting to me that the Kernel has
so many

critics.

I am reminded of a

Editor'
Editor
Editor
Barber

0

been accused of being biased. Any individual, whether he works in a sewer,
or on a newspaper, will undoubtedly have
opinions on various issues. The Kernel
staff expresses their individual beliefs
through editorials and news analysis articles. News analysis articles, for the uninformed, are "news" stories which allow
personal comment and interpretation from
the author. They are easily identifiable,
for they always bear the author's name.
All newspapers have an editorial position.
However, as long as news stories are impartial and the reading public is given
the opportunity for rebuttal, a newspaper
is not, in the true sense of the word,
biased. The Kernel gives both.
In short, I believe that the real complaint of the Kernel's critics is that they
aren't in it more. Fortunately, it has
never been the responsibility of any newspaper to reinforce someone's diminishing

situation which plagued my high school
paper. Students were upset because the ego.
paper stopped publishing crossword puzIn
the area of
Journzles, gossip columns, and trite cartoons. alistic any event, has been proper which
one in
techniques
At least that's what a few said. Others
Kernel critics have never concerned their
Just said, "The paper is lousy," and let
I
it go at that. Similarity, students at UK arguments. doubt they ever will.
Larry Kielkopf
are upset because the Kernel doesn't
A&S Freshman
and because
represent "campus opinion,"
"certain groups and people are always in
the news." At least that's what a few
say. Others just say, "The Kernel is
Overlooked Info
lousy," and let it go at that.
To begin with, it's the Kernel's job,
It appears that the election committee
like any newspaper's, to report news!
Since it is a college newspaper, it must has forgotten to average inThom Pat Juul's
restrict itself primarily to that news which highly significant kindergarten, grammer,
and high school grades. I do not undercan, or does affect the campus. It matters
stand how such vitally relevant infonna-tio- n
not who creates the news or how
often
they do so. Likewise, the Kernel is not
obligated, simply because it is a student
publication, to give publicity to any student merely because that student so desires it.
The Kernel has alsoton occasion.

has been overlooked.
Where was this valuable committee
when Richard Nixon was declared eligible?

Robert M. Packard

Graduate Student

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, April 2, l9-- 5

Faculty Labor Union Seeks Benefits

AFT Joins Higher Education Struggles
FHANCISCO (CPS)-Dur- ing
most cum pus confront
the students and administrat