xt7qnk364349 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7qnk364349/data/mets.xml Tennessee Tennessee Historical Records Survey 1942 Prepared by the Tennessee Historical Records Survey, Division of Community Service Programs, Work Projects Administration; Tennessee State Planning Commission, Sponsor; Other contributors include: United States Work Projects Administration, Division of Community Service Programs; 134 leaves, map, 28 cm; Mimeographed; Includes bibliographical references; UK holds archival copy for ASERL Collaborative Federal Depository Program libraries; Call number FW 4.14:T 256c/4 books English Nashville, Tennessee: Tennessee Historical Records Survey Project Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. Tennessee Works Progress Administration Publications Inventory of the Church Archives of Tennessee, Tennessee Baptist Convention, Ocoee Baptist Association text Inventory of the Church Archives of Tennessee, Tennessee Baptist Convention, Ocoee Baptist Association 1942 2015 true xt7qnk364349 section xt7qnk364349     ' f""==.·._ ·~r. I l V U ‘ ’ l l ‘ · `
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 I INVENTORY OF TH  CHURCH ARCHIVES
  OF TENNESSEE I
3 TENNESSEE BAPTIST CONVENTION
OCOEE BAPTIST ASSOCIATION
Prepared by
. » The Tennessee Historical Records Survey
g Division of Community Service Programs
T Work Projects Administration
 
S Sponsored by
Q Tennessee State Planning Commission
E The Tennessee Historical Records Survey
_;“ Nashville, Tennessee
j February 1942

 f .
The Historical Records Survey Program
Sargent B. Child, Director
I Madison Bratton, State Supervisor
t
_ 0
p
b
Research and Records Programs S
e
E
Harvey E. Decknell, Director
Milton W. Blanton, Regional Supervisor
T. Marshall Jones, State Supervisor J
A · ”¤
11
C
i
1
1;
G
V Division of Community Service Programs {
C
Florence Kerr, Assistant Commissioner ‘ C
Blanche M. Ralston, Chief Regional Supervisor 5
Betty Hunt Luck, State Director 1
C
C
I
6
I
WORK PROJECTS ADMINISTRATION ~ —
Howard O. Hunter, Commissioner
Roy Schroder, Regional Director
S. Tate Pease, State Administrator

 — iii —
FOREWORD I .
The Tennessee Historical Records Survey has, by the compilation of
this history, rendered a service to our denomination that we ourselves
ought to have done many years ago. Someone has said that the Baptist
people have been so buoy making history that they forgot to write history;
anyhow most of our churches have kept poor records.
Our early churches were not founded by denominational mission efforts,
but the denominational mission efforts were begun by the churches them-
selves to fill the need of A closer fellowship end cooperation between the
existing churches. That was true of the founding of the Ocoee Association
by the churches in the southeast corner of the State.
The Missionary atmosphere was shown at the first meeting when Elder
J. H. Gewood was appointed agent of the Association to cirry the gospel
to places destitute of preaching. That werk has been productive of the
movement from e handful of querter—timc ckurches to the orgonirotion of
churches until our number todqy totals 66 full—time chucohee, 24 hrlf—
time churches ani l$ mission stations — 9 of which will prehtbly grew
into Baptist Churches. It has been prodictive of the teaching of missions
until this your $65,879.64, l5§ percent of the totml revenue of the
churchoe of the Ocoee Association, went to ooptist mission causes.
In the hall of fame or the Ocoee Association there are a few names
that com never be fergotten by our Baytizt Brethren. Rev. Claude E.
Sprague, u real missionary at heart; Mr, W. D. Powell, and Mr. John W.
Christenbury, missionary who laid the foundation for the work his euc—
cessors have been able to 60. These three have pnueed to hear the "Uell
done, thou good and faithful Servent." Mr. William C. Smedloy, Moderator
for 25 years, Mr. J. N. Massey, Irnmeuror for 2 generation, and Mrs.
Claude E. Sprague, Wom&n‘S Missionary Union Superintendent for more than
a decude,still serve. Mr;. W. F. Robinson, lovingly culled "The Mother
of Ocoee W. M. U.“, is retired on account of age und failing health.
The Tennessee Historical Records Survey is due the gratitude of all
Baptists of our territory for the painstaking manner in which they have
arranged our ristoricul material so tlnt it will be xvoileble to ue when~
ever need ariees» After dealing with most of the workers in the Ch1tte—
nooga office; I appreciate them ue indivicunls and friends who feel that
they are contributing something worthwhile to the Amorice of the future,
and something of which that America will be proud.
Rev. John U. Williamson
Clerk end Missionary,
Ocoee Baptist Associution.

 ..j_V..
PREFACE A
The Inventogy gf thg Church Archives pf Tennessee: Tennessee Baptist
Convention, Ogoee Baptist Association is one of a nation—wide series of
inventories of denominational archives being compiled and published by the
i Historical Records Survey Program of the Work Projects Administration.
¤ These inventories are intended to serve as handbooks for the clergy and
r other religious leaders and to form a basis for study by students and
“ A research specialists in the fields of social and religious history and in
sociological and genealogical investigations. Besides inventories of
_ church archives, the Tennessee Survey is engaged in the preparation of
* inventories of county and municipal records, guides to depositories and
collections of manuscripts, inventories of early American imprints, direc-
~ tories of churches and religious institutions, and transcriptions of
· selected county court minutes. A list of publications of the Tennessee
Survey follows the indexes to this volume.
‘ The historical information contained in this book is based partially
¥ upon statements made by congregational officials in personal interviews.
v These sections were thoroughly checked and were supplemented by examination
¤ of the manuscript minutes of the congregations and by reference to available
I printed sources and public archives. Information on the organization of
“ some of the early churches is as definite as the editors could determine in
’- view of the meager sources. All defunct churches of the association on
· which adequate information was available are included in the inventory; the
remaining ones are listed in Appendix B. The arrangement of entries is
chronological under the Ocoee Association; Baptist Bodies and Agencies are
Q included in a separate division. A map showing the location of churches
C, outside of Chattanooga and Cleveland, and appendices listing the sites of
~» meetings of the Ocoee Association, churches which no longer belong to the
*= association, constitutions of the Tennessee Convention and Ocoee Associa-
Q tion, and hy~laws of the Executive Committee of the Tennessee Convention
'; are included. This volume also contains church name, chronological, com-
¤~ munity, and general subject indexes.
·“ The Ocoee Association is one of 65 local associations holding member-
ship in the Tennessee Baptist Convention, affiliated with the Southern
_ Baptist Convention. Headquarters of the association are maintained in
** Chattanooga. A preliminary listing of these churches was published by
=* the Tennessee Historical Records Survey in Directogy pf Churches, Missions,
"* gpg Religious Institutions pf Tennessee: Hg. §§. Hamilton County (1940).
Z? The work of the church records unit of the Tennessee Historical Records
.* Survey and the preparation of this book for publication were under the
supervision of Robert Cassell, Church Archives Editor of the Survey. Check-
ing of field work was done by Reginald B. Martin, Ballard O. Donnell, and
Emma McCown. The original field work was conducted by Lucille Schmidt,
Almeda Anderson, Carolyn Atchley, Annie Cate, Elbert Hunt, Elizabeth
Kimbrell, and Eva Wimberley under the supervision of Arch Faidley, Jr. ,
Typing of the final draft and cutting of stencils were done by Helen P.
Allen, Patsy R. Floyd, and Lois B. Winters. The map was prepared by
Winston Marshall of the Tennessee State Planning Commission staff.

 Preface
This volume was prepared in accordance with instructions from the ‘.
Washington Office of the Historical Records Survey Program; detailed
editorial comments and criticism of the book have been made by Donald
A. Thompson, Assistant Archivist in charge of the Church Archives In-
ventory. Much of the field work for this inventory was completed while
T. Marshall Jones, State Supervisor of Research and Records Programs,
served as State Supervisor of the Survey.
William C. Smedley, Rev. John C. Williamson, Rev. John D. Freeman,
and Mrs. Penelope Johnson Allen rendered valuable assistance in reading
and criticising the manuscript of this volume. The help and cooperation
of many other church officials who in varying measures, great and small,
contributed to the compilation of this volume are acknowledged.
Publications of the Historical Records Survey Projects in all
states are limited in number and consequently are placed in designated
centrally located depositories. Inquiries relating to the location of
‘ the nearest depository should be_addressed to the State Supervisor or
to the Division of Community Service Programs, Work Projects Adminis-
” tration, Washington, D. C., for the attention of the Director of the
Historical Records Survey Program.
Madison Bratton, State Supervisor
The Tennessee Historical Records Survey
Nashville
February l5, 1942

 - Vi -
EXPLANATORX NOTES, ABBREVIATIONS, AND SYMBOLS
Explanatory Notes
The individual entries on the churches and institutions of the Ocoee
Association are indicated by Arabic numerals, while the entries for the
~ Baptist Bodies and Agencies are lettered. The first group is arranged in
chronological order. See references indicate where additional or more
detailed information may be found. Gaps in the records listed for many
churches are due to the fact that the records were not kept, or were lost ·
or misplaced. In some cases, the records were destroyed by fire. The
use of a h phen between dates means from the first date until the latter.
Citations to sources for the history of a church or institution are
given before thc listing of the records in the entry. All printed sources
are underlined; those not underlined are manuscript. The use of ibid.
(ibiden) is designed to refer only to the last of a series of sources cited
V immediately above. Archives cited which are inventoried in this volume
are not listed in the bibliograpky, but only in the entries pertaining
thereto. Citations to deeds and charters of the churches and institutions
are also given in the entries. All such records cited are in the custody
of the register of the county where the church is located.
The full names of persons mentioned in this Inventory are given
wherever the information is available. The exact location of each organi-
zation is given according to the latest available information; these may
be checked on the map in this volume. Membership and property valuation,
where ascertainable, are the most recent given by church officials.
The bibliography is arranged to show the location of sources and the
symbols used are those of the Union Catalog of the Library of Congress.
Following the bibliograph  are church name, chronological, community and
general subject indexes.
Appendices to this volume list the sites of meetings of the Ocoee
Association, and all churches which have been in the Ocoee Association
and are nor in other Associations, or which have become defunct while
belonging to the Ocoee Association, but upon which no other information
was obtainable. The constitution of the Tennessee Baptist Convention and
the Ocoee Baptist Association, and the by—laws of the Executive Board of
the Tennessee Baptist Convention are included..
Abbreviations
Acts ............ .... ...... .... . Acts of the General Assembly of
Tennessee of
bdl., bdls. .................... bundle, bundles
ch. .. ....... ... .............. .. chapter
Q3 §§Q· ···........... ......... . gt secuentes (and the following)
f• b• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••   box

 — vii —
Explanatory Notes, Abbrevietions,
and Symbols
ff. ................ .... . ..... . and following pages
. hdw. ........................». handwritten
j` ibid. ...... .. .... ». ....... »..... ibidem (in the same place)
L.A. ................- ....... ... Local Acts of the General Assembly
of Tennessee of
l no. ...........».......- ........ number
gp. git. .....».»...».......... opere citato (in the work cited)
p., pp. a......»...»........... page, pages
` P.A» .................. ..... ... Public Acts of the General Assembly of
‘ Tennessee of
Pr.A. .......................». Private Acts of the General Assembly
G of Tennessee of
J pt. .......».»................. part
‘° Rt. ........».................. route
sec., secs. ................... section, sections
‘ ses. . ...... ........ ...... 4 .... .. session
` vol., vols. ................... volume, volumes
Symbols
. —— ............ .... ..., ........ to date or current

 >
.. -1-
A TABLE OF CONTENTS _1
_..niI_ Foreword ........ .......... . ....... . ......... . .............. ... iii
.~h Preface .... ......... .... ...... ..[ ........................... .. iv
...0 { Explanatory Notes, Abbreviations, and Symbols ...... . ......... .. vi
!yC;g*' The Baptists in the Ocoee Region ......... ........... . ...... ... 2
J1_I»~1 Map ..... ................ . .................. . .......... . ...... . 15
" I Baptist Bodies and Agencies ............ ................. . .... . 14
Ocoee Association of Tennessee Baptists . ..... ,... ............. 20
_’V, Appendices ... .... . .................................. .... ...... 95
A Bibliograpky . .................. . .............................. 104
Church Name Index .......... ....... . ..... . ..................... 110
Chronological Index ..... .... . .... . .......... . ..... . ........... 114
Community Index .. ............ . ..... . .......................... 118
General Subject Index ....... ........ ................. . ....... . 121
List of Publications ..... . ....... ...... ........ . .... . ........ . 155

 A (First entry, p. 14)
THE BAPTISTS IN TH  OCOEE REGION
The region of lower East Tennessee was settled later, in comparison, ’
than other portions of the State. Hamilton County was created by the
Tennessee General Assemkdy on October 25, 18l9, out of the southwest
portion of Rhea County, south of Bledsoe County and east of Marion
County.l In 1820, there were only 821 persons in the county.? The terri-
tory south of the Tennessee River now part of the county was annexed in
1855 by an act which extended the boundaries of Hamilton County eastward
approximately to its present limits.5
Part of the area comprising Hamilton and Bradley Counties was
occupied until l858 by the Cherokee Indians.4 In 1819, the United States
acquired lands north of the Hiwassee River from the Cherokees,5 and the
Tennessee General Assembly erected the Hiwassee District in that region.6
Land north of the Tennessee River which was erected in the same year into
Hamilton County was also ceded,7 and the Cherokee Agency was transferred
to the site where the present town of Charleston, in Bradley County, now
stands.
The earliest activities of a religious nature in this region were
carried on by missionaries among the Indians. As early as 1754, the
Moravians attempted to introduce Christianity among the Cherokees.8
In 1784, Brother Martin Schneider visited the towns on the Little Tennes-
see River to establish a mission, but because of the troublous times on
the frontier, he was unable to gain the consent of the Indian Council, and
it was not until 1801 that a Moravian mission school was opened at Spring
Place, in present Murray County, Georgia.9
About 1800, Daniel Ross began a school in his home on the site of
present—day Chattanooga for the instruction of his children, one of whom
l. §;.A, 1819, ch. 41, sec. l. The county was named in honor of
Alexander Hamilton.
2. United States Census Office, Twelfth Census pg ppg United States, l900,
Population, I, 59.
5. Qg.A. 1855, ch. 16.
4. Nineteenth Annual Report pg ppp Bureau_p§ American Ethnology, pp. 152,
155. During the Revolution, the war party of the Cherokees was allied
with the British. Retaliations by the Watauga settlers of upper East
Tennessee between l779 and 1794 resulted in the burning of many Indian
towns in the neighborhood of present Chattanooga.(John P. Brown, Qld
Eyggtiggp, pp. 175-175, 200, 425-427).
5· lkid., p. 477; Fifth Annual Report pg ppg Bureau pg American Ethnology,
pp. 219~22l.
6. §.A. lplg, ch. 59; Q.g. lpgp, ch. 26.
7- Eighteenth Annual Report pj ppg Bureau.p; American Ethnology, p. 754,
ond plate 115; Brown, pp. pgp., pp. 447, 552.
8· Levin T. Reichel, QE Moravians   North Carolina, p. 152.
9•   p•  

 - 5 -
The Baptists in the Ocoee Region (First entry, p. 14)
was Joh  Ross, the future great chief of the Cherokee Nation, and the '
1. children of other prominent Cherokee families in the neighborhood.1O In
_ 1805, the Council of the Cherokee Nation consented to have a public school
,._. in their country, and superintendence of the institution was given to Rev.
=_ Gideon Blackburn, a Presbyterian minister living at Maryville, Tennessee,
_°` who had been appointed to devote part of his time to missionary work among
Ai.`, the neighboring Cherokees.ll Rev. Mr. Blackburn opened his first school
,_.._;i in February 1804 at the Indian town of “Highwassee“ which lay along both
U` ` sides of the Hiwassee river at the crossing of the Great War Path in
_ present Polk County.l2 He also took charge of the private school main—
,§ l tained by Daniel Ross, and supplied it with a teacher. Difficulties arose
fl . between Ross and Robert Dinnon, the teacher sugplied by Rev. Mr. Blackburn
YJ in 1806, and Ross asked for Dinnon's removal.l Dinnon was sent to the
]l Fields settlement at the mouth of Sale Creek to begin a school in the home
. _. of Dick Fields, powerful town chief, who wished instruction for his chil-
_,_ dren.l4 Rev. Mr. B1ackburn's labors continued until 1810, when due to ill
JJ health and lack ofrmeans, he retired from the mission field and removed to
Middle Tennessee.l°
,r' M In 1816, the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions,
`Yl representing a cooperative committee of Congregational, Dutch Reformed, and
J..» Presbyterian churches extended their missionary work to include the Cherokee
Qe .1 Indians, and in 1817, a mission named “Brainerd" was established on Chick-
‘Q _`_t ` V amauga Creek, 10 miles east of present Chattanooga.lG From this parent
Q" station, missionaries were sent out to various places in the Cherokee
J`. I- Nation, and branches were established at Willstown Creek Path, Hightower
(Etowah), Candy's Creek, Amohee, and other p1aces,i7 where the work was con-
J _ tinued until removal of the Indians to the West in 1858. The missions at
vf_ . Candy‘s Creek and Amohee were located in that part of the Cherokee country
‘"` later formed into Bradley County. Preparations for a mission on Candy's
'·__ ,`1 A 10. Mrs. William P. Ross, Thg Life png Times gf gpg. William P. Ross,
".f p. 188; Chattanooga Times, Sept. 14, 1919.
`Y"i ll. William B. Sprague, Annals gf the Ameriggn Pulpit, IV, 45.
" “", 12. Office of Indian Affairs, Cherokee Journal of Return J. Meigs, 1801-9,
illyf . pp. 116, 129.
_j**I" 15- William L. Lovely to Return J. Meigs, Feb. 24, 1806, in Meigs Papers,
‘· jr in possession of Penelope J. Allen.
‘_b 14- Office of Indian Affairs, Cherokee Journal of Return J. Meigs, July 25,
‘Q’, 1806; Dinnon to Meigs, Jan. 26, 1807, in Meigs Papers, in possession
1.,. of Penelope J. Allen.
"`Z` p 15- J- E. Alexander, A Brief Qigtgry gf the Synod gf Tennessee, pp. 44,
=.~~* --—» _ 87, 88.
AM. A 16. Brown, gp. git., p. 468. The mission, first known as "Mission on the
>j*j Chickamauga in the Cherokee Nation," was named in honor of David
L·;· ·»1“ “ Brainerd.
‘p‘ I' 17- lhs American Missionary Register Fg; Thg Year 1825, p. 65. Present
s ““l Spelling of Candy’s Creek is now Candies-

 - 4 -
The Baptists in the Ocoee Region (First entry, p. 14)
Creek were made in 1824, and the school opened in February 1825 by John I
Vail and William Holland with 74 pupils. It was located l0 miles west of
the Cherokee Agency.l8 A church was organized here which in 1825 was under
the care of Union Presbytery of the Presbyterian Synod of Tennessee.l9
The mission at Amohee was operated from 1851 to 1855 by Rev. Isaac Proctor,
and was closed when Rev. Mr. Proctor departed.2O The missionary work was
encouraged by the Indian Agent Return J. Meigs.2l
The Methodists also sent missionaries to the Cherokees, but did not
place emphasis upon the building of missions. Rev. Richard Neeley of the
Tennessee Conference began preaching in the Cherokee Nation in 1822. In
1824 the first Methodist mission school was established.22 There were
5 missions maintained by the Methodists in 1825, and 7 in 1827. Appoint—
ments were made in 1828 to Wills Valley, Oostanalla, Coosawater, Mount
Wesley, Ashbury, Chatoogaé Sullacooie, Neeley's Grove, and Conasauga by
the Tennessee Conference. 5
In 1817 the Baptists turned their attention to missionary work among
the Cherokees and by 1820 were operating a successful mission at Valley
Town, near the present site of Murphy, North Carolina. In 1822 a second
station was opened.24 The first native Baptist minister among the Indians
was Kanecda, a ful1—blood Cherokee, converted at Hiwassee in 1829 and given
the name of John Wickliff. Rev. Mr. Wickliff began preaching in 1851 and
was ordained in 1855. Another leading Baptist minister was Jesse Bushyhead,
son of a prominent ha1f—blood C erokee family, who organized a congregation
in his neighborhood after his conversion. Rev. Mr. Bushyhead was ordained
in 1855. He had a circuit of 240 miles on which he was assisted from 1851
to 1858 by another Cherokee minister, Rev. Mr. Bear Carrier.25 Oganoyah was
 
18. One of the advanced scholars from this station, Stephen Foreman, was
sent to Princeton to prepare himself to preach the Gospel to his
countrymen, and others were qualified as instructors in the common
branches of 1earning.(Peter Force, The National Calendar gpg Annals Qi
Lhg United States, Tg; 1855, p. 241; Robert Sparks Walker, Torchlights
@9 Lge Cherokees, The Brainerd Mission, pp. 89, 512, 515).
19. Alexander, gp. ggt., p. 152. ”
20. Walker, gp. ETL., pp. 70, 508.
21. Circular of Meigs, August 22, 1817, in Meigs Papers, in possession of
Penelope J. Allen.
22. Emmet Starr, History QT thg Cherokee Indians, p. 259.
25. Ibid. John Ross himself joined the Methodist Church in 1828.
· 24. Improvements on the Valley Town Mission amounted to $2,884.15 between
1822 and 1825.(Office of Indian Affairs, Report of Return J. Meigs to
Secretary of War, 1825, photcstat copy in Meigs Papers, in possession
of Penelppe J. Allen; Starr, History QT the Cherokee Indians, pp.
255, 258 .
25- Emmet Starr, Early Histegy Qi thg Cherokees, pp. 77, 78; Starr, §;§—
IQLZ Q§_§§g Cherokee Indians, p. 256. Rev. Mr. Bushyhead was one of
the captains of the detachments of the omigrant Cherokees in 1858.

 - 5 -
‘ The Baptists in the Ocoee Region (First entry, p. 14)
i another full-blood Cherokee and Baptist minister, a contemporary of
Rev. Messrs. Bushyhead and Wickliff. In 1855, the Baptist church numbered
227 members in the eastern Cherokee Nation.26
The Hamilton County territory south of the Tennessee River and pres-
ent Bradley County constituted a large part of the Ocoee District, erected
from the territory of the Cherokees taken by the United States under the
Treaty of New Echota in 1855.27 The vast majority of the Cherokees were
opposed to the treaty, but it was ratified by the United States Senate,
and the Indians removed west of the Mississippi River by 1858.28
Bradley County lies east of Hamilton County in the central past of
the original Ocoee District, between the Hiwassee River and the Tennessee-
4 Georgia 1ine.29 The county was established by the General Assembly on
" January 2, 1856, and organized early in May 1856.50 A survey of the Ocoee
District was ordered by the General Assembly in 1857,5l and Jolm B. Tipton
appointed surveyor-general. The county court chose in 1857 a central loca-
‘7 tion for the county seat to be known as Cleve1and,52 and an entry-taker's
‘ `__` office was opened there in November 1858,55 with Luke Lea as entry-taker.
· Tradition has it that two Baptist Churches were gathered in East
Tennessee about 1765, one located on the Clinch River, but both were broken
cj up by the Indian Wars about 1774.54 The first Baptist association in East
Tennessee was the Holston Association organized in 1786.55 In 1822 the
Hiwassee Association, consisting of 10 churches, was organized,56 covering
_ the region ceded by the Indians in 1819, just north of present Bradley
‘* County. In 1850 the Hiwassee Association was divided and the Sweetwater
i" Association formed.57
l" 26. Starr, Histogy p§ ppp Cherokee Indians, p. 257. See also entry 5.
l 27. Eighteenth Annual Qppppp pj ppg Bureau pg American Ethnology, p. 754;
Brown, pp. pip., p. 498.
28. Ibid., pp. 499-504.
" 29. §.A. 1856, called ses., ch. 2.
' 50. L.A. 1855-56, ch. 52.
·‘ 51. £.A. 1§5§, called ses., ch. 2.
“· 52. L,A. 1855-56, ch. 52, secs. 5, 7; Acts 1857-58, ch. 189, sec. 1.
.' 55. Ibid., ch. 2, sec. 5.
“· 54. David A. Benedict, A General gistorv pi ppg Baptist Denomination in
I America ppg Other Parts pg ppp Eppld, II, 214.
" 55. James J. Burnett, Sketehps pg Tennessee’s Qippppp Baptist Preachers,
V’ P. 565; Goodspeed Publishing Company, History pg Tennessee, East
Egngggggg Edition, p. 687. Th  Tennessee Association was established
in 1802, and in 1817 the Powell's Valley Association was organized.
l (Philip M. Hamer, Tennessee — A History, II, 815).
56- QQQQ.; Goodspeed Publishing Company, pp. pip., p. 688.
A 57. Hamer, pp. pip., II, 815; Goodspeed Publishing Company, pp. pip., 917.
$tute Line Association was established subsequently.(MinutcS QQ Lge
Qggge Baptist Association, l§§§, p. 1).

 - 5 -
xi The Baptists in the Ocoee Region (First entry, p. 14)
xr As early as 1815, there were Baptist churches in lower East Tennes-
,»»i see above present Hamilton County, and in that year Sequatchee [sic] Valley
Q:. Church, evidently located in Bledsoe County immediately to the northwest
of what is now Hamilton County, reported 147 members, the third largest in
· the Tennessee Association.58 Records of Luminary Baptist Church in Rhea
ir. County, also just north of present Hamilton County s