xt7qrf5kbd67 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7qrf5kbd67/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19580321  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, March 21, 1958 text The Kentucky Kernel, March 21, 1958 1958 2013 true xt7qrf5kbd67 section xt7qrf5kbd67 TigMing Five' Battle
For 4th NCAA-- Crown
Hj LARRY

VAN HOOSE

Kentucky, returning to tlio
ranks of the nation's cage powers after a four-yea- r
absence,

battles Temple tonight

in Free-- "

dom Hall with a "Pride of the
East" tag and a ticket to the
NCAA championship match rest-ln- e
on the 7:30 clash.
The "Wildcats' newly annexed
Mideast regional crown has stirred
up an epidemic of basketball fever
reminiscent of those lush days of
the late forties when Kentucky
rose to the top of the "cage world.
y
Coach Adolph Kupp's 28th
edition, not blessed with the
likes of a "Fabulous Five", struggled through its SEC schedule with
a 12-- 2 record and captured the
NCAA regional title to win a
Ken-tuck-

"Fighting Five" monicker. The
Cats carry a 21-- 6 slate into tonight's meeting.
Coach Rupp said earlier this
week. "It would be a shame to let
it go now that we are so close. I
want to win this thing worse than
anything."
University season-boo- k
holders
and students gobbled up 1.000 tickets Tuesday, last of the 18.500 put
one sale months aso for each session. The 1958 finals will mark the
first time the meet has ever been
held In Kentucky In the NCAA's
20 years of existence.
Various student organizations
combined for a gigantic sendoff
rally yesterday as the team boarded a plane at Bluegrass Field. The
Cats held practice in the spacious
auditorium after arriving In Louisville. Suky
(the student pep
club), the
(lettermen or- K-Cl- ub

April 2 Set
As Pharmacy
Dedication
The dedication of the UK
Pharmacy Building will take place
at 2:00 p in., Wednesday, April 2.
Dr. Fraak G. Dickey, president
of the University, will preside at
the d e dl c a t i o n. The $664,460
Pharmacy Building was completed
last year.
Before the dedication ceremony
there will be a luncheon in the
Bluegrass Room of the SUB. Dr.
Herman L. Donovan, president
emeritus cf the University, will
preside. Dr. Richard A. Deno, professor of pharmacognosy at the
University of Michigan, will address the luncheon group on "Careers In Modern Pharmacy."
After the dedication, the College
of Phamacy will be open for
visitors. Guided tours will be conducted through the .building and
demonstrations will be given in
the laboratories.
Scholarships
is the deadline for
March
applying for the $100 Tri-De- lt
scholarship. Women students
who wish to apply may do so in
the office of the dean of women.
26

Dr. Gladys Kammerer, center of
recent controversy involving
academic freedom, has resigned,
effective Sept. 1, to accept a
teaching and research position at
Florida State University.
The political science professor
was Distinguished Professor of the
Year for 1956 in the Arts and
Sciences College.
"
The controversy started last year
when Dr. Kammerer charged she
was denied a 'salary Increase because she criticized the Chandler
administration. At that time President Frank G. Dickey denied that
any political pressure was involved
but he said Dr. Kammerer's statements over a period of years had
raused "bad public relations" for
the University.
At a March 10 faculty meeting,

f

'

Vol. XLIX

ties and sororities took part in the
demonstration.
The Kentuckians, rated ninth In
the final Associated Press poll,
swept through their regional task
with spectacular victories over
Notre Dame and Miami in the

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With Temple adding to the tournament list of
its
uncanny guard Guy Rodgers, Kentucky enters the meet as the only
team without a super star to dot
its lineup. Leading the Cats is the
Mideast regional's most valuable
player, Vernon Hatton, whose driving, twisting crips and deadly jump
shots disposed of Notre Dame Saturday night. Mountaineer sharpshooter Johnny Cox also nailed
down an
berth with his
(Continued on Tage G)

KOYD

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NCAA

Hound

I'K basketball fans braved an overnight snow to stand in line at the
Coliseum ticket windows to get ducats for the Kentucky-Templ- e
gam
tonight at Louisville. The line which formed early in the morning
quickly gobbled up all available seats for the battle.

all-tourn- ey

University of Kentucky, Lexington, Ky., Friday, March 21, 1958

Military Ball
To Be Held
On March 28

2

The annual Military Ball hai

Number 20 the Student Union

Ballroom.

The dance, which lasts from 9
Charlie Blair and his band. Late
permission will be given to women
students.
Members of Arnold Air Society
are in charge of arrangements for
the dance. Scabbard and Blade
and Pershing Rifles memebrs are
also working on plans for the
event.
The Military Ball queen will b
SGA has accepted a new plan of organization which consists of representation by colleges, presented during the dance. 6ha
will be selected from 16 candidates
organizations, fraternities, and sororities.
nominated by military groups on
The plan is a modification of one of the six presented to SGA for consideration last week. It campus.

SGA OK's Reorganization;

Greeks Get Five Delegates

features representatives from cajor campus organizations, and one representative from each
fraternity and sorority, with

one- -

fifth of a vote for each of these
representatives.
The original of this plan had
the same representative system, but
each fraternity and sorority rep- resentative had a full vote. The
purpose of the modification to one- of a vote for each of these
representatives is to prevent one
group's having an absolute ma- jority.

President Dickey said he felt "information which guided me in the
determination of salaries last year
was in error,"
In a statement released to the
press last Friday, Dr. Dickey said,
"Various facts brought out in the
comstudies of the faculty-truste- e
mittee have convinced me that the
full text of statements madeTby
Dr. Kammerer give a different
picture of discussions than those
previously available."
Dr. Kammerer said she knew of
Dr. Dickey's statement before she
resigned. She said her resignation
had nothing to do with the controversy. She said she accepted
the position at Florida State because it offered a greater challenge, more time for research and
a substantial salary increase.

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Coliseum.

The major campus organizations

Monday night
k
to Stylus, the
pus literary magazine. Margaret
representing the Stylus staff,
appeared beforetheAssemblr to
ask for the grant,
The Assembly stated that in
view of the need for a good liter-fift- h
ary publication on campus thoy
would grant Stylus the $350. SGA
granted Stylus the same amount
at the first of this school year.
SGA also voted

to be represented are the SUB, to grant
Y M C A,

Cooperstown,

Y W C A,

Shawoeetown,

the

House

dent's Council, the Men's
"

Presl-Or- r,

Resi-

-

dence Halls Governing Council,
and the football houses.
Under this new plan, the total
membership of the SGA will be
56 and the total vote will be 32.
The plan was accepted by SGA by
a vote of 13 to four.

$350

ALL.' WOMEN'S DIVISION

J

Contest Voting
Students may pick up ballot
for the Kentucky Kernel
d
Glamour Magazine
Contest at the voting booth in
the SUB. , Voting will be from
5
today. Voters must have ID
cards.
Brst-Drew-

9--

Dean M. M. White has told the faculty of the College ol
Arts and Sciences that today's college student has the right "to
hear the truth as a professional scholar sees it."
Speaking at his college's annual dinner at the SUB Tuesday
night, Dean White said "opportunity for a scholar to teach the
truth as he sees it is periodically questioned." He added that
the University "has long main- - part of the, students," and to contained and continues to maintain stantly ask himself how he caa
with full vigor" that opportunity.
better educate his students.
Illustrating the need for critical
Dean White said academic free- dom and academic responsibility thinking, the dean cited a recent
.

Richard B. Freeman has been
named as head of the UK Art Department, effective July 1.
He will succeed "Clinton Adams,
who resigned lasTyear. Clifford
Amyx has been acting head of the
department since Adams' resigna-

-

tion.
Freeman has served as director
of the San Fransisco Museum, the
Flint Museum, Flint, Mich., and
the Fogg Museum, Cambridge,
Mass. At present he is visiting pro-fesof art at Hamilton College,
Clinton, N. Y.
Freeman did undergraduate

-

-

article In a local newspaper. "It
said some 17 or 18 professors of
music taught 135 students," Dean
White said, "but I thought I knew
'
dom.
and still think I do that tho.se pro- The dean said a professor's ob- - fetors teach some 1.023 students."
f rro"
"In
t"1' sort
Jective should be to create "crl- (Continues on Iage 11)
on the
tically thoughtfurattitudes

"cannot be separated," and pointed
out that every university "must
constantly fight to maintain Its
autonomy" in protecting that free- -

or

work at Yale.

Sing

All-Camp- us

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Freeman Dean Says Student lias
Is Named A Right To Hear Truth
Art Head

Boyd Hall, BSU, Sigma Nu Are Winners In
s':--

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ganiration), and several fraterni-

IS.

Dr. Kam merer Resigns,
Accepts Post In Florida
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KENTTCKY KEUNtl.. Iiid.iv. March 21.

Tlir.

M.18

Award

UK. Journalism
Won

Y-Aciivi-

They were
graded on the basis of general
news coverage, writing, makeup
and reflection of interests of readers and school.
A total of 429. students from 34
schools across the state attended
clinic, which was
the one-da- y
sponsored by the Kentucky High
Sch(ol Press Association.
The students and their faculty
advisors received instructions on
news writing and editing, photoJournalism School.
graphy, feature writing, advertisSigma Delta Chi is a profesional ing, yearbook planning, layout and
Journalistic fraternity. The UK management.
chapter originated the award last
year, when Lexington Henry Clay
won the
High School's
plaque.
Entries in the contest were sent
Sigma Delta Chi
to an

Unlvrrsitv of Kentucky's
tindergraduate chnpter of Bicrrm
Delta Cht has Rlvm Its annual
0t.vtanr1inK High School Newspaper Award to Lexlneton Lafa-ett- e
Hlsth School's student newspaper, The Times.
Chapter President David G.
Altemuehle presented the plaque to
Times Editor Mary Bazzy last Friday, climaxing a student publications clinic at the University's
The

Hi-Tim- es

out-of-sta-

te

KENTUCKY
TYPEWRITER
SERVICE
Adding Machines

Typewriter!,

Sales

Service

and Rentals
Repair service, adding machines,
new and used portable, carbons,
ribbons, and office supplies.
PHONE

387

07

ROSE ST.

Cordcr Given
Chairmanship
Of 4-- Group

Prof. George D. Corder was appointed chairman of the Kentucky
Extension Program last Friday
by the executive committee of the
UK Board of Trustees.
Prof. Corder. a member of the
agriculture extension staff since
1940. will assume his new duties
April 1. He will direct the state
program and will work with
the county agriculture and home
demonstration agents in
activities.
4--

4--

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The Christian Faith and Herit-- !
aee Group will hold a session of
the denominational series at 4 p.m..
Tuesday, March 25 in the "Y"
Chapel. Dr. Virginia Bellamy, in- -,
structor in Literature of the Bible,
will present the doctrines of the
Episcopal Church. Discussion will

'

the scholarly
DRUG STOR- E-

All You Can

I
'

Silver Survey
The YWCA and the Dutch
Lunch Club groups are sponsoring
p.m. to- -'
a silver survery from
day in the Jewell Hall Lounge. A
silver company will have one of its
designers show new hand designed
silver patterns.
Women students are asked to
stop by Jewell Hall and vote for
the patternof their choice. This
survey will help to determine what
new silver patterns will be manu-- j
factured.
1- -5

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FOLDED

in bag will be finished

SHIRT

15c

on request for only

EACH Additional

KHAKI PANTS

In bag will bo fin-

27c

ished on request
for only

EACH Additional
"

in bag will be fin- ished on request
for only

JC'

EACH Additional

Free

vy Lr Lr

Service

11
OPEN

LAUNDRY AND CLEANERS
7:30-10:0-

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Use Either of Two Convenient Locations for This

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Wonderful Bargain Offer:

Drug C

606 SOUTH BROADWAY
529 SOUTH LIMESTONE

LIME AND MAXWELL

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PRODUCTIONS PRESENTS

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SSH001-005- bwssrSa late

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fsAy WINSTOnY UKEA
TASTES

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HANDKERCHIEFS

COSMETIC ITEMS
o SCHOOL SUPPLIES

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ENTIRE CONTENTS

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FOUNTAIN SERVICE

SUPER-WINST-

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YMCA Flections
Voting for officers of the YMCA
for next year will be held from 9
a.m. to 5 p.m. on March 25 in the
YMCA office. All members who
have paid dues are eligible to vote.

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Cramjnto the Bag

This service is designed especially for
students. We furnish the bag to you
for only 50e (less than actual cost).
This bag is good for as long as you
care to use it. Put as much laundry
as you can stuff into the bag, includ
Go in to- - p i
ing colored pieces.
gether with your room mate's laundry
to fill the bag and cut the cost in

Delivery

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Student!: SpeciaB

follow.

H

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BAG

Religious Series

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35

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5-31-

825 EUCLID AVENUE

9--

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r.lectlons
Voting lor the YWCA officers
will bo today from 5 in the SUB
ticket booth. The following slate
of officers are: President, Joan
Rtadleman: Vice President. Sue
Dav ni)ort: Secretary, Joyce John-'soand Jean Kuhn: Treasurer
and Finance Chairman. Rebecca
Carluss and Jayne Wheeler.

chapter for Judging.

Coll

COMMUNITY EMPLOYMENT
and Services

ties

High

By-Lajayell-

When You Need a Job

CIGAR'EITE)

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away
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Purchase Prize Won
By Formosan Artist
Tot as long an he can remember,

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'Career Days'
Are Planned

purchase
m a show at Kentucky
first-plac-

$200

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By Home Ee

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Depart"
Day" for high
"Career
school seniors In the state will be
.
d Wcdnesd,v
nei T
ot the program is to
P
acquaint high school students with
the advantages and opportunities
'
which (n UK Home Economics
Dcpaftment h to offer
,.
.
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the Home Economics building, the
home management houses, and the
campus in general. These will also
be a series of lectures Dertainine to
the different fields of Home Eco- "omics.
Some of the topics to be
cd are public health, interior
brothers and a sifter are "too oration, and dietetics. The lectures
young yet to decide what they will be given by the staff of the
want to do."
Home Economics Department.

Now a sophomore at the Uni- - Wcsleyan ColI,Pp in Owensboro.
versity of Kentucky, Chou is be- - 1116 canvas ls presently on exhibi- pinning to achieve the first glim- - ,Q" thJ'n aou Vth otners cn
tudcTntj from Kentucky
merinos of success in his chosen
colleges.
field. The son of a Taipei. Formosa. and
Chou. who is working as a stu- imporcr has had his work recog- assistant in the Department
nized in Kentucky exhibitions and
Art- started taking art instruc- has already sold a number of
tion at the age of 15. Before that.
paintings.
His latest painting to be exhibit-- , he said, he ."Just drew pictures."
He is now working chiefiy in
abstract art. He has also done
vpi'some work ln
Pture, but his
"
is
r j first lovewhoPainting.
Ti"'.
lh: Chou.
has been at the Uni- ja11
i
vrrsitv tiiir thp fail tnrm rst ifirl(;
is the only painter in his' family!
A sister is studying library science
in Louisville, a brother is studying
in Formosa, and two

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(Missouri Synod)

EAST HIGH

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47' TfN W'CE

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Only $495 down, $51.78 Monthly

A&

John W. Israel, Pastor

8:30 A.M. Worship Service

MOBILE HOME SALES

We Have New Line of
15' & 16' Deluxe Outboard Fiberglass Boats

88

The Church of "The Lutheran Hour" and "This Is the Life'

Chou

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Guignol Tryouls
Set For Sunday
Tryouts for the major spring
production of Guignol, "The Happy
Time", will be at 7 p.m. Sunday,
in Guignol Theater.
The play is based on the story If
of a French Canadian family and I
son whotts. growtheir
ing up.
Eight men and four women will r
be chosen for the cast. Anyone
t o tr
TI"
f lO r f Of fic f flrl
ftf rut
uiy 1c IlittlLOltU lllUJ fLljr UUv.

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a 1017 In- dust rial Desijrn draduato of Prntt
Institute, Urooklvn, tw York. He

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Furniture'

Good Used

RICHARD MONTMEAT

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Phone

CONTACT: ALLEN McCAIN OR RAY CLARK
OPEN SUNDAY AFTERNOON
EVENINGS 'TIL 8 P.M.

Transportation furnished students who call

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Northern Belflinc

11:00 A.M. Worship Service

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9:45 A.M. Adult Bible Class
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$3,895

Saint John Lutheran Church

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26

Distinctive Gifts at
Moderate Prices
Imports From All Over

the World
Jcwclcry
Slippers

Sweaters

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Toreador Pants

Mexican Skirts

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oofc Store
McVeyHoll

BALFOUR
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With The New
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ORDER NOW
(2 Months for Delivery)

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company that plans far ahead gives
me flhe chance So work out my future"
A

TV
."Pleasing desigu is no accident," says
set designer Richard Montmeat. "It takes creative
planning. At General Electric, we're constantly deincluding some for
veloping new product designs
products which won't be on the market for several
years. Ever since joining General Electric, I've had
the opportunity and challenge of working toward the
designs of the future. As I see it, a company which
plans ahead gives me the chance to work out my own
future, too."
32-year--

--

The creative accomplishments of Richard Montmeat have already brought him widespread recognition. He was awarded design patents in 1950 and
1955; he won the Industrial Designers Institute
Award in 1955; and his design for the 1958 General
portable television receiver was se
Electric
.

17-in- ch

lected for showing in an international design exposition in Milan, Italy.
Progress in pleasing design making appliances
is an important
more enjoyable to own and use
factor in our nation's growing use of electricity and
in our constantly rising level of living. Planning now
to satisfy future customers is important not only to
the continued growth of the electrical industry, but to
individual progress as well. Opportunity for long-ranplanning is part of the climate for
which is provided for General Electric's more
employees.
than 29,000 college-graduat- e

ge

self-developme-

nt

Thgressfs Our Most Important Product

GENERAL

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Student Lodges
His Complaint

The Kentucky Kernel
tntered

UNTVEnSITY OF KENTUCKY
lecond clM matter under
at the Pout Office t Lexlnrton. Kentucky
the Act of March 3, 1879.
Published weekly during irhoot except holiday! and exama.
THREE DOLLARS A SCHOOL-YEA- R

JAMES BLAND, Editor
ANN SMITH. News Editor
DAVE ALTEMUEIILE, Managing Editor
ED FORD. Sports Editor
JOHN EGIJRTON, Makeup Editor
FRANK C. STRUNK. Associate Editor
Andy Epperson, Makeup Assistant
Tracy Waldcn, Society Editor
Jim Hampton and Norma Shelton, Feature Editors
Bill Tully, Assistant Sports Editor
Ray Cravens. Cartoonist
Charlotte Bailey, Exchange Editor
NORMAN McMULLIN, Adv. Mgr.
PERRY ASHLEY. Bus. Mgr.
JOHN MITCHELL, Stall Photographer

SGA

To The Editor:

This is an invitation for you and
your .staff to grow tip.
The Kerr.fl has come to a srul
state or arfdiff "Shcnron one hand,"
it devotes a column to a childish
pleading for permission to print
"cheesecake," and on the other,
completely ignore a si?nino:int
educational event in the life of the
1
r
University.
The case In point Is the vrry
rude and deliberate omission of the
I
u
i.
organizing of a new, promising,
and worthwhile society; The Society for Advancement of Management.
After the organizational meeting, a short, informative article
I
"FREgmTIVESV MXti
COLLEGES
was given the Kernel for publication. The editor explained that it
probably would not be printed for
there were not enough people interested. The editor failed to explain how people could be inter-e.-te- d,
if they didn't know about
S.A.M.. nor how they could know
y
COS
if the best media of telling them
refuses to print anything.
To inform the campus about the
charter meeting, we decided not to
Will Tins Bridge The Gap?
co direct, but to use the facilities
of the Public Relations Department. We are grateful to that department for the fine coverage we
cot through the Lexington papers.
The release was given to the Kernel
but vou refused to print it. IF
THERE IS EVER A TIME WHEN
AN ORGANIZATION NEEDS
To The Editor:
PUBLICITY, IT IS DURING THE
Lock the doors! Sut the winSince nearly everyone nowdays INITIAL LAUNCHING PERIOD
dows! Nail down anything that
seems to be commenting on the TO KEEP IT FROM BECOMING
can be moved!
words A UNIVERSITY-TYP- E
"VANWhy? Well, it's State Tourna- Kernel Kutie, I have a few
GUARD."
University. to add.
ment time again at the
As far as the Kutie ieature itTo paraphrase you, "It's time
Thousands of high school kids and
its
their parents will have worked self is concerned, there doesn't that the Kernel
themselves up to a feverish pitch .seem much to say one way or the standards of service to this instiby now and the real climax comes other we can have it, or we can tution or we. the tax payers and
do without it.
supporters, of the Kernel will detomorrow night.
to mand that the Kernel staff be recampus veterans of past
As the
My comments are in reference
invasions can tell you. the tour- your editorial in the March issue. placed with a more competent force
nament presents a hectic week.
When a campus newspaper de- from some of the monkeys from
torn between
Students are classes or go to cides to run the dean of women Funkhouser."
whether to attend
If you have space and-- , aren't
out of town, it should have a
see old alma mater play and the reason (which it doesn't). It afraid to print this. Jt won't be
latter usually wins. Professors go should report facts, and not un- necessary to print the name of the
berserk from talking in empty founded rumors (to which it re- 32 signers of this letter.
classrooms. Restaurant and other ferred in the editorial). It should
Fred Paxton
concession owners are on the run use its memory, or if none, its files
President, S.A.M.
continually, but never complain, (therehas been objection to the
naturally.
Kernel Kutie by the Administra- (ED. NOTE: Take off your dark
The campus gets a real going tion in previous years).
glasses and read with some intelliover as high school kids comb it to
gence and you might see that there
Besides all this, if first hand resee what a University campus looks
is more to the editorial than a plea
are
like and what it has to offer them. ports from women students
Our "very decorrect. Dean Seward has been a to run cheesecake. omission" is on
Thousands of kids get their first most cooperative, helpful and
liberate and rude
look at the campus and that justi
of the Februpage 7, column
addition to the adminis- ary 21 issue andone
fies the tourney location being here
runs four and a
tration of the University
if for no other reason.
half inches long. The editor did
Could it be that the Kernel not see the copy or make the stateweekend will be
The week and
murder for the College students, doesn't have much to say this se- ment you quoted. The Kernel
professors, campus cops, adminis- mester, and so is creating fiction never received the release as you
trators and countless others, but I rather than commenting on fact? claim. The Kernel Is not a pubthink most of them will admit they
I've read the Kernel for six years, licity agent for campus groups.
wouldn't want the tourney any- and this controversy (?) is worse Neither the tax payers nor the
place else.
than Ronnie Butler's battle with students support the Kernel, it is
M&O about a fence.
self supporting. As to the monkeys,
I think you have made yourself
Sincerely,
A Word Of Thanks
Young Gregory, '56 look like one.)
Anne
To The Editor:
Thanks for the fine advance
coverage of the Highway Conference.
Those who have given themselves the most concern about
James W. Martin
the happiness of peoples have made their; neighbor miserable.
Commissioner
Anatole France.
Department of Highways
Commonwealth of Kentucky

IS.

r

I

I

I

lS

Face-Liftin- g
so as to better

SGA has seen fit to vote in a

the communications between itself and the student body. The
resolution was passed last Monday night.
The adopted plan is a modification of those previously considered and it is a definite improvement over them.
Under the new plan, each fraternity and sorority will be
of a vote. With a total of 30 representatives,
allowed
this means an aggregate of six votes for the Greeks. That's a
much more sensible proportion than the original proposition
which called for one vote for each fraternity and sorority, or
a total of 30. That total outweighed the combined votes of the
organizations and colleges.
(a working communiThe idea behind the
cation with the student body) stands a much better chance
of becoming a reality with the new plan.
Fraternity and sorority representatives will be representing
other 10 organizations will represent
about 1S00 students.-Th- e
and can communicate with the majority of the student body.
The college representatives, once again, appear to be nothing
more than a decorative element as they can hardly expect to
get across to the students.
A Greek representative can go back to his or her house and
explain the issues or interests of SGA to the members. Organization delegates can do the same as they represent the
married students in the housing developments, the residence
halls and such groups.
On paper the plan looks effective, but whether it will work
practically is another question. The answer should be
shortly. Certainly, the idea is worth a try. And the
Kernel will reserve judgment until it has been tried.
one-fift- h

,

Tournament
Time Again

Coed Berales

Kernel Edilor

"

well-receiv- ed

1

A Real Man

Dr. Dickey's recent admission of error in the case of Dr.
Kammerer showed some of the outstanding qualities of the
man.
It took a lot of fortitude for the president of a university
to stand up at a faculty meeting and say he made an error
in judgment. Especially is this so in a case which has had so
much publicity.
Fortunately, Dr. Kammerer has resigned her position here
closing an unfor one in Florida, thus easing the tension-an- d
fortunate incident.
But certainly, it has been informative and educational for
everyone involved, including Dr. DicTtey And
through withying colors, thanks to his humility and
fortitude. To err is human . . ."

--

McTavish was the proud owner of
a new cash register. One day when
an old friend came into the shop
cigar, the
and bought a
customer noted that McTavish
pocketed themoney instead of
putting it into the drawer.
"Why, not ring it up?" he asked
"You'll be forgetting it."
I'll not forget it," replied
the Scot. "I keep track in my head
until I get a dollar, and then I
ring it up. It saves the wear-- r
and tear-- r on the machine."
(The Reader's Digest)
six-pen-

It was encouraging to see Dean

M. M. White of the College

of Arts and Sciences take up the subject of "academic freedom"'
at the Arts and Sciences faculty dinner last Tuesday night.
Now that academic freedom is more than just an "aca- demic'' question, it would be interesting to see something done
about the professors who violate freedom of thought in their
classrooms.

Reason always means what
someone, else has got to say. Elizabeth Gaskell

I'll not listen to reason

...

ny

,'bh,'

What is a minority? The chosen heroes of this earth have
been in a minority. There is not a social, political, or religious
pihilege that ou enjoy today that was not bought for
by the tears and patient sullering of the minority. It is the
minority that have . . . achieved all that is noble in the history of the world. John P. Cough

)u

UNIVERSITY SOAPBOX

IFC Spokesman Explains Shortage Of Pledgee
(ED. NOTE: This article was submitted by a spokesman for the Interfraternity Council and discusses the
problem of securing pledges for fraternities. The opinion's
herein expressed are solely those of the author.)

There has been a good deal of speculation lately concerning the decrease in the number of rushees out for
rush this past fall. The Interfraternity Council is not
alarmed or particularly worried about this. In the first
place, an organization is not good, or bad, simply because
it has quantity. Secondly, the reasons for thisdecrease
are known, and can be combated.
The primary explanation of the decrease Is found in
a rule passed last spring by the Interfraternity Council,
popularly known as "the 37 percentile rule". It states
simply that any new student who makes 37 percentile or
lower on his Kentucky College Battery test will not be.
allowed to pledge a fraternity until be has made a standof
ing or 2.0 or better. Thua, approximately one-thir- d
the sew student are eliminated aa potential rushees. '
In the lall of 1855, 5C0 men came out Xor rush. This

past fall, 340 men signed up. The latter figure is almost
d
cf the rush class in 1956. Further, 334 men cf
the 560 in 1956 eventually pledged, compared with 232 of
Some have said that
the 340 this year, again
since this rule seems to present a block to the growth of
fraternities, it should be dropped. However, as was implied above, quality, rather than quantity, should be the
essential consideration of any organization1. Also, by not
allowing these men to pledge, the Interfraternity Council
feels that the men are given a better chance to make
their grades.
Simple economics supplies a second answer to the question of why the number of rushees dropped this year. We
don't need to tell you that the country is presently experiencing a tightness" of money. What effect this has
on a man when he considers pledging a fraternity is difficult to determine statistically. However, it is known
that to be a member of a fraternity costs more, on the
There are exceptions,
average, than to be a
cf course, and you can find a good number of them.
Nevertheless, many men felt that they simply couldn't
one-thir-

one-thir-

non-memb-

er.

d.

bear the financial load at the present time, and fraternities lost more rushees.
Second semester rush this year produced an Unusually
large number of rushees. The same was true for the
193tj-5- 7
school year. In fact, we feel sure that the trend
is away from a rush period at the beginning: of school
(the busiest time of the year), and toward the type of
ruh that is "delayed" until later in the school year.
Combine this with the 37 percentile rule, and fraternities
haen't fared so badly as many think, or would like to
think.
The University of Kentucky is a growing institution,
and fraternities, if they ore to remain worthwhile contributors to the University, must grow too. The Interfraternity Council knows that many things stand in the
ay of this'growth one of the main things being the
fraternities themselves. They must realize their proper
relationship to the campus. With this realization, the
)ther obstacles will be easy. We are