xt7qrf5kbd7t https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7qrf5kbd7t/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19491118  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, November 18, 1949 text The Kentucky Kernel, November 18, 1949 1949 2013 true xt7qrf5kbd7t section xt7qrf5kbd7t rJ

Kentucky Kernel

rHE

Congratulations
Veep

UNIVERSITY

VOLUME XL

Cloudy, Cold
High 47

KENTUCKY

OF

LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 1949

Z246

NUMBER 1

Wildcats Favored Over Tennessee Volunteers Tomorrow;
Overflow Crowd Of 38,000 Expected To Jam Stadium

Ten Seniors See Action
Last Time Against Vols

Noted Folk Singer To Open
Literary-Dramati- c
Series
J. J. Niles To Give

New Foreign

Two Concerts Here
Br Bill Simon
John Jacob Niles. noted
collector, and composer, will
open this years literary-dramatseries when he appears here on
Monday at 3:30 p. m. to give a comin studio A
bination lecture-conce- rt

Scholarships
Announced

folk-Eing-

'

ic

V

McVey Hall.
' One week later on Nov. 28 at 8
p. m. Mr. Niles will give his conballads,
cert of
carols, street songs, work songs, and
nursery rhymes in the new Guignol
In the Fine Arts Building. He will
be pie first to perform in the new
f

Anglo-Americ-

By Earl Conn, Asst. Kernel Sports Editor

r

1

-

an

Graduate students interested in
study in Latin American countries
may now apply for fellowships fori
the 1950-5- 1 school year, according to
Dr. A. E. Bigge, foreign student adviser and head of the German department here.
The Convention for Promotion of
Cultural Relations
arranges the program, under which
graduate students are exchanged by
countries belonging to this association.
Persons interested in attaining
the scholarships, and who have an
acceptable plan of study and a satisfactory knowledge of the language
of the country in which they desire
to study, should send in their applications to the Division of International Educational Relations, U. S.
Office of Education, Washington 25,
D. C, before Feb. 15, 1950.
Inter-Americ-

theater.

Is Kentuckian
..John Jacob Niles is a native Kentuckian and one of the most celein the world.
brated
He will lecture on the nature of
folksongs, their possible origins,
routes, and methods
of transfolk-singe- rs

mission.
Mr. Niles seems to have inherited
John Jacob Niles
g
his
interest. His father
c,
a caller
was a singer of
at square dances, an operator of a
as well as sheriff, farmer, and builder.
By the time John Jacob Niles
was nine he had learned 17 verses
of "Barbary Ellen" and soon after -ward a number of revival and wcr
songs. He began his collection of
folksongs early in his teens. Today
his field book is one of the priceless
By Bob Fain
items in folksong archives. All the
Crowning of the King and Queen
material on his program is taken
of the College of Agriculture and
from his personal collection.
,
Mr. Niles accompanies himself on Home Economics and the awarding
dulcimers which he makes himself. of five scholarships will highlight
the Block and Bridle Fall Festival
life-lon-

folk-musi-

King And Queen
Crowned Tonight

Jug-ban- d,

Features listed

tonight.
Both king and queen were selected by popular vote of the student body at a special convocation
of agriculture and home economics
students last week. Names of the
two students will not be announced
until tonight.

Some of the features on the Niles
concert of Nov. 28 are "My Little
Mohee", "Black Is The Color of My
true Love's Hair", "Go 'way from
My Window", "Frog Went
--

Koffee Klub To Hear Niles

Bridle, will open the program tonight in the Livestock Pavillion.
His topic will be, "The Aims and
Purposes of the Block and Bridle
Club."
Classes Show Livestock
Following this will be a showing
of sheep-- , and hogs by members of
the livestock management classes.
Harold Barber, shepherd of the
flock, will exhibit the sheep which
are to be taken to Chicago later in
the year for the International Livestock Exposition.
Members of the livestock, poultry,
and meat judging teams who will
compete at the Chicago contest will
be introduced.
A trophy for the
grand champion showman will be
presented .
The Lexington Center of Country
Dance Society will sponsor folk
dancing from
p.m. Tickets
2
for the event will be on sale at the
door. Admission is 50 cents.

Five Scholarships Given
Five scholarships
are to be
Niles, Kentucky folk awarded on the basis of ability and
John Jacob
singer, will appear for a Koffee need to members of the various
Klub student discussion at 4:30 livestock judging teams.
p.m. Monday in room 128 of the
Block and Bridle will give two of
SUB.
the scholarships, and the Kentucky
The session is open to all stuAberdeen Breeders Association, the
dents. Refreshments will be servKentucky Purebred Association, and
ed. .
the Old Kentucky
Hereford
j Association will give Polledeach.
one
An address by Prof. W. P. Garri-gu- s,
in"", "The Seven Joys of Mary",
faculty advisor to Block and
"I Wonder as I Wonder", "Jack O'
Diamonds", and "Barbary Ellen".
The concert and lecture are open
to students, faculty, and the general public without admission charge.
They are sponsored by the English
department of the University.
Other artists in this year's literary- dramatic series include the per-- :
The World Student Service Fund 4
formance of Julius Caesar by the drive, underway on campus
this
Company, Dec. week, will end with a collection at still present," he said. Mr. Gleason
stated that "lasting peace is built
9. and The Taming of the Shrew the half of the Tennessee game toon a common cultural heritage and
by morrow.
on Dec. 10; lecture-recitaWSSF, in connection
with the
Robert Frost the second week of
WSSF began its annual drive for World Student Relief organization,
December; Bernard DeVoto in
funds with a rally in the SUB Ball- has done much work creating una symposium of Kentucky room at 6:30 p.m. last Tuesday.
derstanding among students all over
writers In late February; Archibald
After a brief message by Bruce
MacLeish in early May, and A. B. Ferguson, campus solicitation chair- the world."
Urges Cooperation
Guthrie and Jesse Stuart on dates man, a movie titled "This Is My
Bob McCowan, in charge of soliStory" was shown to the gathering
to be determined.
of approximately 140 people, most citation at the game, told those presof whom were University students. ent at the rally that some 200
persons would be needed to pass
The movie emphasized the important work being done for underpri-vilige- d money-boxat next Saturday's
students of Europe and Asia game. He urged everyone to coby the World Student Relief or- operate and emphasized the imganization
in cooperation
with portance of having each container
UNESCO. WSSF is the American
distributed.
Everyone soliciting for
Pictorial highlights of U. S. Army branch of the WSF.
Signal Corps activities are on disWSSF next Saturday will wear a
Secretary Speaks
play at the Buell Armory drill hall.
.
Next, Mr. Ferguson introduced WSSF
Signal Corps cadets have constructed a special display case for WSSF's southern regional secretary,
Mr.
Mr. Gleason
All pictures to be gave John Gleason.
the pictures.
shown were taken by Signal Corps tance aofshort outline of the imporemphasized the
WSSF.
photographers and illustrate the many difficulties He which
students
Corps' activities in all parts of the
abroad are, and have been, encounworld.
'
are
Students, faculty, and staff mem- tering. He said that they and often
lack
bers are invited to inspect the dis- hungry, cold,
many of the other physical comforts
play Mondays through Fridays from
which we enjoy.
9 ajn. to 5 p.m. The pictures, shown
"The WSF, working since the end
In color and giving a
II,
effect, are changed every of World Warmany has met many
problems but
vital needs are
two weeks.

r

ii Miniii'n

rmnr-n

Candidates far the

y,

Annual Contest To Be Held Tuesday
For Kentuckian Queen, Attendants
Queen To Be Named
At Coronation Ball
The annual Kentuckian Beauty
Queen Contest, sponsored by Lamp
and Cross, senior men's leadership
honorary, will be held Tuesday at
7 p.m. in Memorial Hall. The Queen
and her six attendants will be featured in the 1950 Kentuckian.
The judges, whose names will be
revealed Tuesday evening, will
choose seven girls from the 31 candidates. The candidates will be
judged on the basis of poise and
beauty.
Nichols Presides
Fred Nichols, president of Lamp
and Cross, will serve as master of
ceremonies.
The order of appearance of the
candidates will be determined by lot
the night of the contest. All candidates are asked to be in the basement dressing rooms of Memorial
Hall at 6:30 p.m.
Queen Named At Ball
The Queen will be named at the
annual Coronation Ball on Dec. 3
in the SUB Bluegrass Ballroom. She
and her six attendants will reign at
the ball.
Mike Mills and Ike Rouse are
of the contest committee.

Cheer Contest
Will Precede
WSSF Collection At Game Big Pep Rally
its
Tomorrow Will End Drive test at
tonight at

re

;

ls

y;

Signal Corps
Work Shown

es

arm-ban-

d.

i

'50 Kentucky

10-1-

Webster-Shakespea-

i

iii i
nm
m
TnTwumrninnM
in i ft iiiiiiiin---iriiMiiri
Beauty Queen pose in the SI Ballroom. (Left to right seated: Nell
Blair, Carolyn Critchlow, Mary Ann McQuaid, Louisa Wilson, Cora Frances Saffell, Jane Barnett, Spencer
McClure, Carolyn Carte, Mary Ruth Jones, Mary Lou Caywood, Doris Wafter, Kathy Carter, Helen Heits-leMartha Swofford.
Standing: Marna Perry. Pat Moore, Frances Go'dstein, Jane Stum, Dorothy Neal, Harriet Russell,
Jane Chitwood, Jane Basham, Janet Taylor, Kay McCabe, Gaylen Hansbrough, Mary Odell, Murray Tilton.
Not present when the picture was taken were Jane Hunter, Dorothy Bedford, and Betty Compton.

T

SUKY will hold
Cheer Con
6:45.
Stoll Field
The contest will be followed with a
pep rally and a torchlight parade
downtown.
All campus organizations are eligible to enter the Cheer Contest and
if possible all entries should have
four typewritten copies of the yells
to give to the judges to help simplify the judging. The winning
organization will be judged upon
the suitability, originality, adaptability, and presentation of the
yells. SuKy will present a trophy
to the contest winner.
The pep rally will begin immediately following the contest and will
feature a parade downtown.
From the campus to the railroad
south of Main Street the parade
will be in the form of a snake dance.
Torches will be provided for the
torchlight ceremonies at the railroad crossing. All students are asked to participate.

,

Ohio State Graduate Is First
Sunday Musicale Guest Artist
Miss Nell Stuart Foster, soprano,
will be featured in this week's Sun
day Musicale at 4 p.m. in Memorial
Hall.
A native of Richmond, Miss Foster, who now lives in New York,
will be the first guest artist to appear in this year's series. She is a
graduate of Ohio State and has
studied in New York and at the
Conservatoire Nationale in Paris,
France, where she studied under
Madame Yvonne Brothier of the
Paris Opera. Miss Foster plans to
return to Europe after completing

r

Dr. Donovan Issues
Thanksgiving Statement

To the Students of the
University:
The Thanksgiving holidays will
begin at the close of classes on
Wednesday, Nov. 23, and classes
will not again be in session until
8:00 a.m. on Monday, Nov. 28.
It is my hope that most students
will have an opportunity during
this period t visit with their
families and to observe this holiday in the true spirit of thanksgiving. Youth in Kentucky and
in America does have a great deal
for which it can be genuinely
grateful.
May you find your families and
friends in health and happiness
and may you enjoy to the utmost
your visit with them.
H. L. Donovan

President
University

regulation

requiring

extra credits for graduation for
students who absent themselves
from classes before or after a
holiday vacation period is still in
effect. One extra graduation
credit will be required for each
class missed on Wednesday, Nov.
23, or Monday, Nov. 28.

Cincinnati Exhibit
Includes Local Art

Prof. Raymond Barnhart of the
art department, and Ellen May
Hamilton, John Gordon, and Virgil
Espenlaub, art students, have had
work accepted for the annual exhibition of the artists of Cincinnati
and vicinity.
The exhibition

will be held from
3 in the Cincinnati Art Museum.
Nov. 28

through Jan.

al

Pathologist To Address
UK Bacteriology Society
'.

.

Dr. L. G. Montgomery, director of

the Department of Pathology Laboratories of the Ball Memorial Hospital, Muncie, Indiana, will speak
to the Bacteriology Society, Monday,
at 7:30 p.m.. in room 124 of the
Funkhouser Biological Sciences

Building. His topic for discussion
will be "The Work of the Board of
Registry."
Dr. Montgomery is a native of
Deloraine, Manitoba, Canada, and
ud his pre-mwork at the University of Manitoba. He received
his MJ3. from the Medical College

at the University of Manitoba.

He is a fellow in Pathology, Mayo
Foundation, Rochester, Minn., and
also a fellow of the College of American Pathologists and the American
Society of Clinical Pathologists. He
is also chairman of the Board of
Registry of Medical Technologists
of the American Society of Clinical
Pathologists.
Dr. Montgomery
is
chairman of the Board of Registry
of Medical Technologists of the
American Society of Clinical

i

her present concert tour.

Accompanist for Sunday's concert
is Miss Ruth Cumbie, also of New
York, a graduate of the Juilliard
School of Music.
Miss Foster will be guest of honor
at a dinner party tomorrow night
at the home of President and Mrs.
H. L. Donovan.
Sunday Miss Foster will be the
dinner guest of Alpha Xi Delta sorority, of which she is a member.
Program Listed
The program, which is divided Into five parts will include in part one,
"Hark, Hark the Lark" by Schubert:
part two, "Chanson D'Ophelie" and
"Chanson D'Amour" by Ernest
Chausson. "Orpheus and His Lute"
by William Schumann, and "Sigh
No More Ladies" by Arthur Sullivan; part three, "Madame Butterfly" by Puccini.
Part four will include "Les
c,
by Faure. "Phydile" by
"Cinq Melodies Populaires
Greques" by Ravel; and part five,
"The Lass from the Low Countree,"
"If I had a Ribbon Bow to Bind mv
Hair," "The Nightingale," and "Frog
Went a Courtin'."
Alpha Xi Delta sorority members
will serve as ushers.
Ber-ceau- x"
Du-par-

This may be Kentucky's year in one of the bitterest rivalries
in all the land the Kentucky-Tennesse- e
game to be played tomorrow at 2 p.m. at Stoll Field.
Kentucky has never defeated a Tennessee team under Coach
Boh N'eyland but if the chance ever presented itself, this is it.
Good word for Kentucky fans was
the news that Benny Zaranka would
be back in action for the Cats after
missing the Florida game last Saturday. Zaranka has been sidelined
with a bruised shoulder but will be
ready to go this week.
The Wildcats take an eight and
one record into the game while
Tennessee will bring along a total
of five wins, two losses, and one tie

Educator
To Speak
On South

Members of the state committee
on elementary education are meeting today and tomorrow at the College of Education to hear a report
by Dr. Harold Drummond of George
P e a b o d y College, Nashville, on
southern progress in elementary
education.
Dr. Drummond is executive secre
tary of the Southern Association of
Colleges and Secondary Schools' cooperative study in elementary edu- cation. Fourteen southern states
have appointed committees which
are working together on the study,
Dr. Drummond s report will deal
with progress made by the various
state committees in a series of ele- mentary workshops held throughout
the past year.
Lyman Ginger, director of the
University training school, said the
state committee is expected to select several Kentucky schools at
which evaluative methods developed
in the southern study will be put to
practice.

from Knoxville.
It was announced Tuesday that
CBS will include the game in its
Saturday round-u- p
of the nation's
important games. Reports will be

presented at intervals during the
round-u- p
about the progress of the
game.

In 17 meetings between the two
clubs since Neyland took over the
reins of the Tennessee club in 1926,
the Volunteers have won 13 games,
lost none, and tied four including
last year's 0 tie between the two
teams at Knoxville.
Tennessee, however, appears all
primed to defend Neyland s record.
0--

j

Hal Littleford. the great running
back, and Norm MeseroU. the Allconference right tackle, will be
ready for action in the game after
being out with injuries. Littleford
missed last week's Tennessee-Ole- "
Miss game with an attack of bursitis while Meseroll was out with
torn ligaments in his right knee.

However. Tennessee showed plenty
of power last Saturday even with
its two stars out of action. The Vols
ran over Ole' Miss 35-- 7 with a sensational halfback. Hank Lauricella.
filling in for Littleford and
all of the power needed to
humble the Rebels.
sophoLauricella, a
more, displayed a brilliant brand of
ball for the Vols as he passed three
time for touchdowns and set up a
passes were
,
.
Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity and fourth. His touchdown .
.,
Delta Delta Delta sorority continue
Vhi season
t.TA..- holds wins
;
i
ln .tuu fui uic sttt-bu
Mica u
viik
over Mississippi State, Chattanooga.
announced early this week.
Tennessee Tech. North Carolina, and
Sigma Alpha Epsilon is second and Mississippi. They lost to Georgia
Delta Chi is third in the fraternity Tech and Duke while tieing
Alpha Xi Delta ranks sec-- 1 bama
The Vols have scored a
ond and Zeta Tau Alpha third in : total of 182 points this season to
the sorority division.
j their opponent s 91.
Kentucky, meanwhile, has won
Monev collected from the taa sales
at the Tennessee game will not be
Mississippi, Georgia.
turned In until Monday, Nov. 28th. Louisiana State.
The Citadel. Cincinnati. Xavier, and
Ryburn Weakley, ODK treasurer, Florida while losing only to Southannounced
ern Methodist. They have scored
283 points while limiting the opposition to a mere 41. Also the
Wildcats are unscored on in conference play holding LS.U.. Georgia,
Mississippi, and Florida away from
the final chalk line on each occasion.
However, just about anything
can be expected in a Kentucky-Tennessgame. And the Volunteers have displayd their old-tipower lately. They were only favored by a couple of points over Ole'
Miss last week, but went on to
slaughter the Rebels by 28 points.
Meanwhile, the mighty Wildcats
began to flash
from Kentucky
The Future Teachers of America their
n
form again last
will hold a state executive meeting Saturday in their 35-- 0 shut-oof
tomorrow at 10 ajn. in room 204 of
Florida. The Wildcats tackled hard
the SUB.
very impressive with
The purpose of the meeting is to and looked
plan a state FTA program for 1949-5- substitutes carrying most of the
and to present suggestions on load in the final half against the
developing more clubs in the state. Gators. What was even more imMary Jane White, freshman in pressive to Kentucky fans was the
the College of Education, will re- improvement shown in the Cat pasj
port on her study in leadership defense with Jerry Claiborne alone
methods at American University in intercepting three passes.
In opposing the club of Gen. Bob
Washington.
(Continued on Page Four)
Others participating In the program will be Mr. Henry Chambers,
president of the Kentucky Education Association; Dr. John Brooker.
executive secretary of KEA: Dr. E.
F. Hartford, professor in the ColThe Library Guide, a handbook on
lege of Education; and Mr. Henry J the use of the UK Library, is ready
Hale, principal of the Nicholas for distribution, according to Miss
County High School.
Norma Cass, reference librarian.
pro-ridi- ng

LX And DDD

In Tag Lead

,,

i.j

u

ls

I

on

7-- 7.

Candidates Are Named
For 'Ugly Man' Contest
Fourteen candidates have already
entered Alpha Phi Omega's "Ugly
Man" contest which will be held

from Nov. 28 to Dec. 2.
The contenders for the Ugly Man
crown and their sponsoring organizations are Dudley Saunders, ASP;
Ryburn Weakley, AGR; Bill Hall,
ATO; Chuck Hendricks, DX; Lee
Brewster, DTD; George Griffin, KA;
Tommy Taylor, FDT; Bob Clemson,
PKT; George Rybolt, PSK; Jimmy
Long, PKA; "Squeaks" Clay, SAE;
"Mr. Z", SX; Fred Nichols, SN;
Harry Daugherty, SPE; and Charles
Tyroler, ZBT.
The contest is open to all fraternities and campus organizations according to
Votes Sold
Pictures of the candidates will be
mounted on containers and placed
in the SUB voting booth during the
contest. Votes will be sold at one
cent each. The proceeds will be used
to finance service projects by Alpha
Fhi Omega.
The organization is placing pencil
sharpeners in various buildings on
the campus with proceeds from last
year's initial contest. Multigraphed
social calendars have also been
placed in University residence halls,
sorority, and fraternity houses as a
result of last year's contest.
Trophy Awarded
The winner will be presented with
prizes, and his sponsoring group will
be the recipient of an engraved
trophy. The runner-u- p
will also receive an award. The service organization pointed out that the contest
is in reality a popularity determiner.
The "ugly" aspect is all in fun, they
added.
Rupert Stivers, Kappa Sigma, was
last year's winner. Jack Carpenter,
Alpha Sigma Phi, was runner-uWilfred Lott and Harry Cooper
are
of the contest.
p.

ee

FTA To Hold
Slate Meeting

early-seaso-

ut

0,

Library Guide Ready

ROTC Leaders Named
For This School Year

The list of unit commanders of
the University ROTC cadet corps! NewlV aPPlnted company
re- for the 1949-5- 0 school vear
'
Cadet First Us., are
Mac- - m""!"
leased this week by Col. O.
rf
d
professor of military science
kenzie.
Waltw L Roy Arts
ana tactics.
ge,,, cemor; William B. Carlton.
Commanding tne school's Ground commerce senior; Boyce B. Buckncr.
Forces ROTC units will be Cadei j Engineering sophomore; John D.
Major Darrell E. Sessor, Engineer- - peehan. Engineering junior; ai.d
ing junior, with Cadet Major Ray- - Wellington
Moore. Agriculture
mond P. Holbrook, Arts and 3ci- - senior,

J

ences senior, serving as wing com- mander of the Air Forces units.
YM-YWCGround Forces batallion com-- !
A
are Cadet Capts. John A.
Pedigo. Law senior, and Mack J.
junior.
Air
Morgan,
Commerce
Thanks- Force group commanders are Cadet
The annual
giving worship service will be held Capts. Anthony F. Rotunno. Arts
at 7 pm. Tuesday in the Music
Sciences senior, and Harry
Ullnski, Education senior.
Room, SUB.

'

j

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Announce
Thanksgiving Service

Clai-mand-

A

New pledges of Omlcron Delta Kappa, senior men's honorary, are seated (left to right) Bob McCowan,
Charles Patrick, Singleton Cagle, John Jerald Johnston, Richard Crafton and Jerry Claiborne. Standing:
Bob Coleman, Davis Fields, Jr., Waller Cooper, Bill Lawson, and George Reynolds.

Squadron
recently
commanders
appointed are First Lts. Jerry
bovne. Education senior: Eugene
Spencer. Agriculture senior; Paui
Dillingham. Commerce senior ; C. A.
McClain. Arts and Sciences senior;
d
Harold G. Fleenor. Arts and
senior; and Unis Savior. Ed- ucation senior.
Sci-an-

I

* THE

1ic

KERNEL

KENTUCKY

Friday, Novemripr

As Expected

i

Most of tin answers to
Kernel's new weeklv feature.
ter's Poll", were niiieii as tlie nieinlxTS of tlie staff expected,
klv publication of tlie Kernel.
the semi-vv- We weren't surprisetl tliat some students want a "good"' paper
once a week first. lnt failed to give anv world-shakinsuggestions
for journalistic improvement.
The Kernel could as well demand
"good" readers without anv further comment.
Tlie spicv gossip column came in for the usual complaints, hut
try to drop it! This summer, with a shortage of spies. Spice of
Life was not run. The result was terrible, and onlv promises of
its resumption this fall could pacifv the irate students. Experience has shown onlv too well that it is one of the best-reaparts
"For- -

tin1

con-ceniin- g

1,.

$

f4f

g

V.
j

.le--

of the paper.
One piece of propaganda, pure and simple, should lo cor-rected, however. The statement that the Kernel acts as a spokes-- '
man for the administration is one that we do not Itelieve can
and is more a slogan than a truth. We cannot find anv
part of the paper which expresses the views of the administration
rather than those of the students. We doubt seriously that, alter
carefully reading anv issue of the paper this year, the student w ho
made that statement can defend his position. The letters column
is open to anv such proof he can offer.
The "don't-careattitude of others was not suqirising, either,

'

d

"

Sowhatitis has Ix'en a chronic campus disease here, and it would
seem to ie incurable.
Ccrtainlv the question at hand, whether
the Kernel should make two appearances a week, will not be
answered during such an illness.

'

A Room Full Of Roses

Vols!

w

w

J;

w-

-

me ban7.
jest acuse tLyVer thet the best
band has gotta be a combenatshun
cirkus, karneval an buiiee-show.
Then a lotta backwards thinkins is
did and a hull flock of ditto letters
is writ to the Kernel.
Jest when the cheering section
gits tuh improoving an the kampis
seams tobe arisin. sum feller
what calls hisself a sportswriter gits
sidetracked outin his feedin paster
and starts atendin to biznes what
haint hissin by sum openionatin
in a local paper.
Q

Speekin of reeforming letters, last
they was reely an onusual
disnumbered amount writ. Every- body and his leetle
cou- sin had a idee how to improove the
kampis. If all tham suggestshuns

'

funeral processions. The team was
sent off by a few SUKY members,
returned victorious to be welcomed
Again, on the eve of the Tennessee game, it is not necessary by the same bunch.
This is certainly a sorry situation,
for either Sukv or the Kernel to drum up student spirit. This
noted by many visiting sports writweek-en- d
to lie UKs second homecoming of tlie year,
promises
ers and spectators, one that can be
More is at stake in tomorrow's clash with the Vols than at any rectified.
Students say they just don't know
time in our memories. Add that to the usual
frenzy
what to do with a winning football
and its surprising the place tloesn t rip wide open.
team. All they had to do last year
It has been so long since Kentucky possessed that beer barrel was grab their best coat and a botboo
Stoll
tle, troop out
that even the oldest and dustiest boxes of Kernel cuts don't have George Blanda. to Spirit, field tobeen
it has
a picture of it. Therefore, even though the Kernel is over the said, just can't be found at a big
limit on pictures this year, we are assigning a photographer to state university.
Rot.
snap a picture of Harry Ulinski and Dick Holwav with their feet
The University of Illinois, with
planted on said barrel immediately following the game.
its 25,000 enrollees, has one of the
Mid- Staring the jinxing general and his single-win- g
in the face, we best cheering sections in the
join the rest of the campus in the traditional demand: MAUL
THE VOLS!

D0ESJHEJ0B'

LETTERS

io the Editor

"Cheers, Not Jeers'
Editor, The Kernel:
To have such a good team, Kentucky has the lousiest spirit ever
seen or heard.
At the start of the season and up
tn tli RTTT Damn a four fir'lrlciH
rooters did shout around a bit, even
drove out to the airport, counted up
47 when the team returned from
Mississippi
By Josef
But' following the upset defeat
to Southern Methodist, the low miit- terings of the skeptics, the second
had ben took UK would bee any- - guessers, a rose to loud cries that
jeering section of their
formed
thane but a colledee.
Hit was about the time thet the
Five straight victories, and people
local Fence and Post Committee
ruz aholdin
sum purty fearse
muren fense
la u
meetings, an stewdents was com- nlantn rirp smart ahnut ha f fin t.nh around that nine peepul, three
dawgs two squarrals an sum feller
keep of the"grass.
tawnn
to gl
SumathaliUck major
j
rooi up an ine siaewaiits anu put in
Be seem ol ye.
a menature streetcar shuttle service
tuh tote everybody around to class- esThere was one gal what wanted
to ether completely tear down and
rebuild all the kampis buildings in
O. K. GRILL
arkee-spirr- it
sum spachel
tecture, or else plant so mutch lvey
Cor. Rose & Euclid
thet hit would kiver the old ones
up an I sorta beleeve she favored
the wreckin projeck. Then there
was a kupple of stewdents that
FEATURING
wanted tuh pull up steaks entirely,
ani move the hull dadblastid
over next to Joyland.
STEAKBURGERS
Buildin fenses reminds me ov thet
worker that started building early
one Winsday mourning
and by
AND
time he ended up at five that eve- -

who have been watching hapless
Kentucky teams flounder on football fields for years, think they have
at last got an outfit that should
run over Notre Dame; when it
doesn't, they're disappointed.
Even wins are accompanied hy
open critism of the
s.
In the Wildcat's last home appearance,
disgusting
d
line
plunges were sneered at. Derisive
snorts were quics io loiiow every
PIav t!lat d.'dr, t
tlle scrimmage
une- - L0'm sugge.-a.onas to sub-t- o
.stitutions and plays were proffered
from tne grandstands. Tlie cheer- 'g fe" off to a few scattered, em- arrasseu yens nom i:;e iaumul
Pre-gaFep Rallies dribbled
through the streets wish the spontaneous gayiety and enthusiasm of

rqi I
M
HI I

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Editor
Managing Editor
News Editor
Sports Editor
Tom Diskin
Business Manager
Harold Fleenor
Society Editor
Jobie Anderson
Head Feature Writer
Joe Lee
Wilfred Lott .... Advertising Manager
Assistant Managing
Joan Cook

lac

iwWM N. V.
Haw Yonit.

420

George Reynolds

00

mmciw

-

Earl Conn. Kent HoUin?sworth
Asst. Sports Editors
Herbert Allen Moore. Gene Phillips
Cartoonists
Bob Fain
Xews Dpsk
Ben Williams and Ralph Slieil

Bob Cox
Nell Blair

Phof'.eraphers
Corotr.y A.ien
Irwin Kiegs

Jean

,

Mr.

C.rculat.on

r.

Librarian

I.t

Neal. Henry
Simpson
Trr.pl'.in.s. Bill
Al:en- - Bob G Fam- Shirley Por-an- d
tfT- M,'lvin M'tchell. W. J. Bough-BrueJ: fLT13
F:an?r
yn
estl
ner, Julie Blunienthal. Joyce
ey. and Mary Swetman
Alh-o-

loay,
James Eddleman, Betty Botrgess.
Copy Desk
Dick Macke
Dunlap. BUI Benjamin
- Advertising Staff
Hilling and Bill Mansfield
Assistant News Editors

Ma-Edit- or

-

ce

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npfi:on-

.

'

.ov....

.o
.o. .r,o..u
National AdvertsingSertrce,

-

ry

Reporters

known members of teams gone by.
Comments on the morrow's game,
l,
delivered by people who know
would be listened to avidly by
Tommy
Re:'
Harmon.
students.
Grange. Chuck Bednarick all speak
at their old school's pep rallies. If
there isn't more interest aroused

in these rallies, they should he dropped al' together.
Block sections could he 2.ven to
fraternities, desirable spots shif'ed
around from one wr"-- to he ne:t.
One of the bi!ce.'. n. Levies for the
cheeiieaat rs ar the dolts who feel
"Continued on Pase 3

loot-bal-

Everybody can win

CONTEST!

r

I

Ps

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1

What Scores Do You Predict?
Kentucky vs. Tennessee
Alabama vs. Mississippi Southern
Tulane vs. Virginia
(Contest closes with games ployed Set.,

19th)

No.

'mmmmaay

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For Sale in Lexington by
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Phone 21 or 640
Open until 2:00 week nights
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On all Gasoline sold

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tailsplus

Laundry

second rl;ss

Corner of High and Woodland

Drive In Service

opposite stadium

s

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ENTUCKY

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