xt7qrf5kd56d https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7qrf5kd56d/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19670404  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, April  4, 1967 text The Kentucky Kernel, April  4, 1967 1967 2015 true xt7qrf5kd56d section xt7qrf5kd56d Tie

MTHJCECY

Her NEIL

Tjc South's Outstanding College Daily

Tuesday Evening, April 4, 1967

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON

Vol. LVIII, No. 127

TRUSTEES DEFER RIGHTS CODE
PENDING A COMMITTEE REVIEW
k

ir it ic

&

it it ir

Four Professors, Alumni Die In Air Crash
9 Killed

In Worst
Disaster

'
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hi

:
,

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i
&'

By FRANK BROWNING and

s

p.m.

The plane was reportedly built
to hold only five passengers but
had been remodeled to carry nine.
One passenger had been seated
position.

Mr. Hager said there were
four witnesses to the disaster.
Continued from Page 7

Kernel Photo

LEE BECKER
Kernel Staff Writer
By

The Athletic Board is no long-

considering Coldstream Farm
as a possible site for the new
football stadium, Sheryl Snyder,
a candidate for Student Government presidency, said last night.
The decision to eliminate this
site from the list is the result
of student referendum held last
fall, Snyder said.
Snyder made his disclosure
at a debate for Student Government candidates sponsored by
the government of Donovan Hall
and the Quadrangle.
Three University vice presi
er

dents denied this morning that
any decision about the elimination of the Coldstream Farm
site had been made. Vice President for Student Affairs Robert
Johnson said no decision to this
effect had been made and Vice
Glen wood Creech said that they
too had received no such infor-tohad received no such information. However, a usually reliable source in the Athletic Department said that Snyder's
statement was substantially correct.

o

The candidates used Monday's debate to restate many ot

before he could leave for Western
Kentucky rallies.
Monday, he discussed his
campaign at the University's Law

By JOHN ZEH
Kernel Associate Editor
Jefferson County Judge Mar-loW. Cook is basing his campaign for the COP gubernatorial
nomination on a little logic.
"Good government," he says
simply, "is good politics."
He says his successful record
as chief executive of Kentucky's
largest county, an administrative
job he says is second only to the
governorship, is one of the main
things he has to offer the voter.

w

candidate
The
wants the chance to solve at
the state level some of the local
problems he's handled in the
Louisville area.
He was elected in 1961 by
the largest majority for a county
judge on record.
Believing that primaries are
won only by effective organiza- -

AIR CRASH

Coldstream Site Dropped
For Stadium, Snyder Says

Cook Bases Campaign On Logic

Primary Profiles

TERENCE HUNT
In a surprise move this afternoon the University Board of
Trustees deferred approval of a
Students Rjghts Code pending a
report by a specially appointed
review committee.
This was the second time the
Board postponed action on the
rights code. At its March meeting the Trustees included the
code on the agenda as a discussion matter whereas many had expected it to gain approval then.
Acting on a motion by Louisville Trustee Sam Ezelle for more
time for deliberation and study,
the board directed Chairman and
Gov. Edward T. Breathitt to ai
point a committee which will report before the beginning of the

r

FIREMEN BEGIN TO REMOVE THE BODIES OF VICTIMS OF YESTERDAY'S

ington consulting engineer and
UK class of '38.
Max C. Horn, of St. Louis,
a McDonald Aircraft engineer
and a member of the class of '36.
The cause of the crash has not
yet been determined, according
to Civil Aeronautics Board officials on the scene.
The bodies were not removed
from the plane until late last
night after CAB officials had
gone over the wreckage. Fayette
County Coroner Chester Hager
released the names at his Whitehall Funeral Home after 11:30

ts

P

ft

cell biology.
Dr. R. C. Simonini, a professor of English education.
G. Reynolds Watkins, Lex-

in the

-

".

II

Four University professors
and two alumni were among;
nine killed Monday afternoon in
what was described as the worst
air tragedy in Central Kentucky
history.
Beach-crae
The small
went down at 4:34 p.m.
just after takeoff from Blue Grass
Field.
The UK dead were:
Dr. Silvio O. Navarro,
chairman of the Department of
Computer Science.
Dr. Jerome E. Cohn, an
assistant professor of medicine.
Dr. Richard S. Schweet,
chairman of the Department of
twin-engin-

"-

'

Action
Now Set
By Fall

Forum.

I'll

'

"I enjoy government very
much," he said quietly, "But
sometimes I don't enjoy politics
as much." He was referring to
recent trouble over the firing
of the Louisville safety com-

fall semester.

Committee members are Sain
Ezelle, Mrs. Rexford Blazer, Ashland, and Smith Broadbent Jr.,
Cadiz, who was named chairman.

The University Senate had

their platform promises before
the Thursday election.
"We agree with the other
candidates" on many of the issues, Martin Wheeler, running for
vice president with William

previously endorsed the code after lengthy discussion covering
four meetings. A Senate advisory
committee has worked on the report for nearly a year. Student's
were on the committee.
In introducing the item on the
Trustee agenda, Executive Vice
President A. D. Albright indicated his uncertainty as to what
the board might prefer to do, not

Mur-rel- l,

said.
Most of the campaign has
been characterized by "mediocrity," he said. "We are asking
more important questions," however.
"I think there are some really
important issues," he said. For

strongly asking approval but stating the Board might even wish
to devote this session to discus-

example, "Why can't students
own a book store?"
Student Government should
go about "getting some good
Negro students here," he said.
They should start "really facing
up to some of the national issues
that Student Government must
face if it wants to be dynamic."
"Are parking problems the
most important issues facing students?" he asked.
Wheeler charged that the
teacher evaluation program
from

I'ae

sion as well.
Mr. Ezelle noted the importance of the document and the
need for reaching a decision
about it, but added "I think it
deserves closer scrutiny on the

part of the board."
He indicated an interest in
discussing the recommendations
with faculty and student representatives.
Mr. Broadbent concurred with
him and noted a responsibility
for the board to seek the
On Page

2

v

-

8

i

missioner.

L

u ti

.

-,,,

MARLOW COOK

tion, his forces have been at
work in the counties and precincts for several months.
His campaign pace is quickening, but conforming to the demands of the Jefferson judge-

million business,"
This morning, for example, Mr.
Cook had to hold fiscal court
ship, "a

$17

Judge Cook charged that the
commissioner, Joseph Class, was
"used" by his Republican opponent in the primary, Louie B.
Nunn of Glasgow, to make
charges of vice and political payoffs in Jefferson County. He called
Cook "a young fellow . . . who
was fair game" for Mr. Nunn,

and said the controversy contains
a lesson for young lawyers and
others going into politics.
Mr. Cook also charged that
Mr. Nunn's forces were using
Continued On Page

6

Kt'l'iu'l rtiolo

Steve Cook, O.K. Currie, Kendall Threlkeld, and Sheryl Snyder
got into a heated discussion following last night's deb te over the
nature of the Student Government speakers' forum.

* 2--

KENTUCKY KERNEL. Tuesday, April

TIIE

1,

17.

Candidates Restate Their Platforms At Final SG Debate
Continued From Page 1
posed by Snyder "really doesn't
have any rationale."
"Is our interest to find out
who the easy faculty members

are?"

Murrcll said that wc need
a Student Government in which
"student needs might be heard

fund if they got i"to legal trouble.
The second is a student cooperative in which "every student has a stake."
This cooperative would deal
in areas such as the lxok store,

housing, dormitories, and cafeterias.
and actually acted upon."
Steve Ook, enumerating on
In order to accomplish this his
platform, said that he wants
he proposed
two "pragmatto form an "entirely new conics."
of what it means to be a
The first is the formation of cept
Student Government Representaa "legal fund" which will be
tive."
formed by contributions from private sources as well as Univer"Undoubtedly many of you
don't even know the
sity funds.
Students could draw from this

Through such programs as
the advisory committee which
would "advise on the feasibility
and advisability" of proposals,
he wants to create a "functioning Student Government with
functioning representatives."
Through the activities coordinating committee Student Government will "get the groups
together so that effective programs and services to the students are increased," he said.
Rafael Vallebona, Cook's running mate, said that there is a
lack of communication not only
between the student and Student
Government, but also between
the student and the representative.

"We would like the people
ev erything Student Gov

to know

UK Bulletin Board
Dr. Joseph Engellerg will
Apspeak on "The
proach to Human Problems" at
a luncheon at noon Wednesday
at the Baptist Student Union. Dr.
Engelberg is adviser to Students
for Democratic Society.
Non-viole-

The Campus Committee on
Human Rights will meet at 7:30
p.m. today in Room 307, Student
Center.

tucky Concert and Lecture

As-

sociation.
The schedule for the 1967-6season will be announced.
Wednesday night's program,
like all Concert and lecture Association presentations, will be
open only to University students
with validated ID cards and to
holders of season memberships.
8

Lances, the junior men's
rary, is now accepting applicaLeaders of Saturday morning tions for membership. A 2.5 overdiscussion groups for the High all grade-poistanding and a
School Juniors Conference will junior classification are required.
have a short orientation meeting Mail applications to Charley
at 6 p.m. today in Room 119,
410 Rose Lane.
Student Center.
hono-

nt

Rea-so- r,

The Ballet Folklorico of Mexico will be presented at 8:15
p.m. Wednesday at Memorial
Coliseum by the Central Ken

pUf
l-

-

CINEMA
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APPLY NOW!
Applications for the Board of
Student Publications are available in the Program Director's
office in the Student Center.
Applications should be returned
to the office of the Vice President for Student Affairs in the
Administration Building not later
than April 14.

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through pamphlets.
Snyder agreed to this

prob-

lem.

"Most people at the Univerdon't know what Student
Government does," he said.
He plans to solve this problem through a newsletter and
through referendums.
"Students need to be heard.
I can't know what everyone
wants me to do" as a representative, he said.
At present Student Govern
sity

ment isn't effective, Snyder said,
but we must ask "why" and
"what can we do alxnit it."
The main reason is "because
of the apathy of every Ixxly at
UK," he said.
Even if the apathy were not
a factor, however, "it doesn't
make any difference unless Student Government has the power
to do something alxnit the other
problems.

Much of this will be corrected
by their proposed form of repre-

sentation, Kendall Threlkeld,
Snyder's running mate, said.
"Our representation is endorsed by the student congress
representation committee," she
said, and this makes it different
from the type proposed by the
other candidates.

64 Candidates In Race
For 23 Government Seats
By TERRY PARSONS
"Anyone can gripe about inefficiency, inconvenience,
practices, or unfairness, but
no one really has a right to complain until he is actively trying
to do something about it."
This is the reason Laura Mul--:
likin, one of 64 candidates, gave
for entering the race for Student
Government representative in
Thursday's election.
Twenty-thre- e
will be elected.
This year's number of candidates is little more than half of
last year's record 117.
Of those entering, there are
43 men and 21 women. Greeks
outnumber independents 49 to
15. Eighteen have had some previous experience with the Stuout-of-da- te

dent Government.
Most candidates simply expressed a desire to take a more
active part in campus life, and
to "get things done" as their
motives of running. Others had
more defined goals.
Beth Paulson, a SPER candidate, said she wanted to "create
a campus of surfs." Jeffrey
hopes to "subvert the campus with
theory, and to start a sexual revolution as well as having AWS
infiltrated by Lesbians."
There are eight candidates
who have served on Student Government during the past year.
The four running for
as representatives are: Joe Rolin,
member of Lambda Chi Alpha
and a committee chairman; Phillip Patton, a political science
major; Tom Sweet, member of
Theta Chi; and Joe Westerfield,
a member of Phi Kappa Tau.
Four members of the Executive
Board running for representative
are: Bob Abrams, a Fiji and
Director of the Department of
Public Relation; Stokes Harris,
an SAE and current head of the
Department of Interschool Relations; Jimmy Joe Miller; a
Sigma Chi, has served as director
of the Department of Physical
Environment; and O.K. Curry,
member of Lambda Chi Alpha,
Crad-doc-

Antonio ni's

ernment finds out," Cook said.
This includes not only what is
brought up before the congress,
but what is found out in committees, he said.
Cook said that this can be
dcsolved through the use of the
in The Kernel, and
Soaplx)

OF THEATRE ARTS PRESENTS

THE GOOD WOMAN OF SETZUAi

k

was director of the Department
of Academic Affairs.
The Student Party for Equal
Representation (SPER) has 12
candidates in the race including:
Rick Bryant, a junior English
major; Jeffrey Craddock, a junior
Political Science major; Cheryl
(Clancey) Downs, junior member
of ZTA majoring in Russian Area
studies; Pat Fogarty, a Tri Delt
who served on the Student Senate
at Ohio Wesleyan; Jim Cleason,
who is studying special education; Tom Juul, member of TKE:
Joe Maguire, a history major;
(Miss) Taft McKinstry, a Tri Delt
who has served on the Student
Traffic Appeals Board; Brint
member of this year's U.N.
Steering Committee; Miss Paulson, a junior Political Science
major; Stoddard Pickrell, ATO
studying architecture; and Les
Rosenbaum, currently a member of the President's Council
Mil-war-

d,

Two candidates, Roger Freeman, an SAE, and Ben Harper,
a Fiji, are running for a second
time after being defeated last

year.
All but four of the women
candidates are in sororities.
Diane Brown, who has served on
the advisory council of Boyd Hall
and is a corridor advisor,; Laura
Mullikin, a math major; Marsh
Nestor, WRH representative;
Jane Robinson, a histoTy and
education major; and Kathleen
Wall, a political science and psychology major are all members
of Alpha Gamma Delta. Two
members of DZ, Rosemary Cox,
a
major, and Janie
Barber, member of the Student
Center Social Committee, are
cy

candidates. Sharan Hudson, majoring in business administration,
and Cathie Sackfield, who has
worked as office secretary for Student Government this year are
members of Gammm Phi Beta.
Sally Sherman, an AD Pi worked
with Student Government last

of Students.
d
of the candiOnly
dates are independents yet they
include a wide range of exyear.
Pat Carpenter, a Tri Delt, has
perience. For example: Michael
been a member of the AWS Senate
Fowler, a freshman, has served
on the student government in and served on the AWS ElecHaggin Hall; Frank Geminden, tions Committee as vice president. Betty Ann Carpenter, a
a major in Agricultural EconoChi Omega, has worked on the
will work with the Bogota
mics,
Student Center Board Hospitalie
Project tl lis summer; Mary
is the current president of ty Committee and the Forum
Committee.
VRH; Linda Manning, member
There are 32 candidates who
of SDS, is editor of the Bourbon
are members of fraternities.
s
and Tobacco Gazette; Mike
stuis a
student; Aubrey Brown, a
T. Rankin Terry is a mechanical dent, William Fisher, an electriengineering student; and Jane cal engineering student, and
David Ratterman, majoring in
Tier nan has served in the AWS
Senate and House as well as electrical engineering, are all
on the Forum Committee.
Fijis. Sigma Chi members include Wally Bryan, member of
Three candidates list experience in student government the Student Referendum Comat other colleges. William Franmittee; Jon Chellgren, an enan SAE served as president gineering student; and Todd
cis,
of student government at
Horstmeyer, a political science
major. Jim Eaves, a math major,
Community College,
Carolyn Jackson, a Tri Delt and Allen Youngman, a political
served on student government at science major are members of
Endicott Junior College and has LXA.
Four Delts are candidates.
worked on the Student Activities
They are: Charles Goodman, maBoard, and Linda Waddle was
vice president at Somerset Comjoring in anthropology; Robert
Goodman, an English major;
)
munity College.
Mike Gordon, a chemistry major; and Bruce Reynolds, a
The Kentucky Kjernel who major. Michael Hawkins,
has worked with the DeThe Kentucky Kernel, University
Station, University of Kentucky, Lexpartment of Interschool Relaington, Kentucky 40506. Second class
tions, and Bill Moss, a
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Published five times weekly during
student are members of SAE.
the school year except holidays and
exam periods.
Gregory Hume, who has served
Published by the Board of Student
in Haggin Hall student governPublications, UK Post Office Box 4986.
Nick Pope, chairman, and Patricia
ment, and Dennis Perkinson, a
Ann Nickell, secretary.
math major, are members of Phi
Begun as the Cadet in 1894 and
published continuously as the Kernel
Kappa Tau.
since 1913.
Advertising published herein Is inMichael Davidson of Phi Deltended to help the reader buy. Any
false or misleading advertising should
ta Theta is a political science
be reported to The Editors.
SUBSCRIPTION
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major, Eliot Hammer of ZBT
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Editor, Managing Editor
ics is from the Farmhouse. Pike
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one-thir-

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Curtain: 8:30 p.m.

Call

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Ext. 2411

The Guignol Theatre

A FESTIVAL OF THE ARTS EVENT

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tuesday, April

Dr. Mangalam Sees Good Chance For
"it",
Beginning with a definition
of violence and power, Dr. Man-

By RON CHOLSON

Stressing the fact that the proponents of the philosophy of nonviolence in human affairs can offer no pat formulas for restructuring
institutions,
Dr. J. J. Mangalam, assistant
professor of sociology, said he
feels that "prospects for the
in a
practice of
democratic world are good."
But this is a wish, which is
presently not documented by
facts, he said.
Though the traditional institutions for teaching values, the
church and the home, seem to
be breaking down, there is no
magic solution to setting up a
system to teach values relevant
to the
progress of
human affairs, Dr. Mangalam
value-teachin-

galam proceeded to isolate manipulation as the fundamental
ethical problem in human interaction. Violence, according to
Dr. Mangalam, is the "participation in power." Power is "the
capacity to manipulate an individual or a group of individuals for our own ends."
"Any time we violate the
autonomy of an individual by
knowingly or unknowingly manipulating him, we have committed violence," he said.
Dr. Mangalam suggested a
system of "active
in which an effort would be
made "to invest resources to
achieve mutual ends without manipulation" whenever two
groups confront each other at
odds upon some issue.
according to
Dr. Mangalam, is "a highly rational idea" even though "the
amount of rationality we arc
capable of is very little." This
idea was developed more or less
in spite of its own proponents.
The analogy used was the development of the doctrine of inalienable human rights, life, liberty, and pursuit of happiness,
by the
founding
fathers of this country.
The large scale
experiments such as those of
Gandhi and Martin Luther King
have three characteristics, said
Dr. Mangalam. They are clear
goals, consensus of common values, and lack of available alternatives. But
ought
to become a sought after and
valued means itself, even if the
alternative means, violence, is
available, he said.
The difficulty with social science innovations, such as nonviolence, is that they are slow
to be internalized, that is, they
are slow to be incorporated into

g

non-violen-

non-viole-

said.
Dr. Mangalam last night presented the seventh and final seminar in a series spoasored by
The Committee on Peace Educa-

Non-violenc- e,

tion and Research. The subject
was,
Prospects for
a Democratic Society.
Non-violenc- e:

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slave-ownin-g

non-violen-

non-violen-

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DR. J.

J. MANGALAM

Kappa Psi
Pharmaceutical
Fraternity
Presents The
1st

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Pr5Lfy
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This view sees all organisms as
complexes of "need systems."

an object to be manipulated. This
relationship
is common in the University,
in the business world, and may
even extend into the home, he
said.
"We have become a nation
of 'its'. The personal dimension
has been exploited to the point
. . . We
that we enjoy the
don't have time to meet our fellow man, but we have time to
use him," he said.
"The important thing is to
internalize the whole idea of
the
relationship," he said.
Discussion following the lecture centered on social and ethical problems involved in manipulation.
according to
one audience member, may be
manipulative in itself in that it
represents an attempt to gratify
personal needs. Such manipulation is not ipso facto bad provided that both parties in a situation are aware that the other
and himself have basic needs
and both realize that each meets
his needs at the expense, but
with tlc consent of the other.
an

it

The recommended solution was
a frankly recognized and mutually manipulative "symbiotic"
relationship.
However,

we live in a

fewer, simpler needs a sort of
"blessed are the poor" system,
he said.

Another speaker suggested
that all material progress inevitably requires manipulation. How
does one determine the threshold
separating violence and active

Non-violenc- e,

e,

he asked.

further difficulty is that
"some societies cherish violence
itself more than others"; violence
in such systems may be taught
as a positive value.
There must be a minimum of
commonality whenever two sides
are opposed: the willingness to
tolerate dissention rather than
resorting to violence for resolution, said Dr. Mangalam.
A

ST.

LAWRENCE HOSPITAL IS
CONDUCTING INTERVIEWS WITH
NURSING STUDENTS
ON TUESDAY, APRIL 11, 1967
IN THE PLACEMENT BUREAU
We have excellent opportunities available in our Pilot Station and
Comprehensive Mental Health Center. Contact the Placement Bureau
or call the Personnel Department collect, St. Lawrence Hospital, Lansing, Michigan.

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ciety which creates needs other
than the purely biological ones,
said another. Perhaps the solution to the problem of manipulation is to create a society with

it

Dr. Mangalam mentioned
modes of human
In the former rerelationships.
lationship, the self sees another
as a similar person and responds
by considering him so. In the
latter, another is seen as merely

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the value and belief systems
which govern behavior. Natural
science discoveries, by contrast,
are quickly assimilated and put
to use in popular culture.
"My own basic contention is
that technology is at the root of
a lot of violence today. By technology I mean tools that help
us manipulate our environment.
What happened is this: we became successful in manipulating
our environment we became
technologically oriented, and
slowly absorbed technology into
our ends. Manipulation became
a value in itself. In this manipulation slowly we incorporated not only the
environment, but also the other
fellow. The most insatiable value
for man seems to be power to
manipulate his fellow man," Dr.
Mangalam said.
"Technical efficiency should
not become our new deity. It
should be practiced within limits," he said.
Emphasizing the necessity of
open communication to the sucmovecess of the
ment. Dr. Mangalam said that
the U.S. and Russia are in a
moral dilemma"
"collective
which demands a dialogue to
establish a common system of
shared values. But any attempt
to implement such a dialogue
would be smothered by each
camp's perception of the other
as an ideology of evil. On the
American side, for example, the
perception of "atheistic" communism as an evil force which
could not be tolerated constitutes
a terrible moral predicament for

Non-Violen-

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* Iernel

The Kentucky
UNiVKnsrnr
ESTABLISHED

or Kentucky
TUESDAY, APRIL

1894

mm

e

The Smith's Outstanding College Daily
4, 1967

Editorials represent the opinions of the Editors, not of the University.

Walteh

M.

Chant,

Editor-in-Chi-

William Knafp,

Steve Rocro, Editorial rage Editor

A

ef

Business Manager

Time Of Sorrow

The Kernel would like to join
the entire University community
in expressing deepest sympathy to

the families of the four UK faculty members tragically killed Monday in an airplane crash.
Certainly the sudden absence

of Dr. Silvio O. Navarro, chairman of the department of computer science; Dr. Jerome E. Cohn,
MD, assistant professor of medicine; Dr. Richard S. Schweet, chairman of the department of cell biology, and Dr. R. C. Simonini, professor of English education, is a
tremendous blow to the University,
felt personally by all.
A violent tragedy, such as was
the airplane crash, is a particular shock to the familes of these
brilliant men. But the tragedy also

is a shock to those who knew and
worked with them to make the

liicrcnsinu Interest
The campus Young Democratic
Club tonight continues its series
of programs designed to acquaint
University students and faculty
with candidates in the May primary. Contenders for the lieutenant
governorship share the podium tonight.
Two weeks ago candidates for
minor state offices were invited to
speak. A similar program for gubernatorial hopefuls is planned.

Especially in this crowded primary free of real issues are such
forums valuable. They provide students and professors a chance to
meet the candidates and to make
the candidates aware of the voter
potential on campus.
that while at the University candidates for lieutenant
We hope

governor and governor address
themselves to important issues of
interest tothe University community and that members of the com-

munity take advantage of this opportunity to listen to the?e candidates and raise questions about
their platforms.
The Young Republicans on this
campus should wake up and realize their party is also having a
primary election, and invite COP
candidates to speak at the University.
In the past gubernatorial election Republican Louie Nunn lost
by only 13,000 votes. It is possible that the Republicans will stand
an even better chance in the 1967
election because of dissention
among Democratic ranks. We find
it strange that the Young Republicans are not any more enthusiastic about the thought of victory.

University a better institution of
higher learning.
We believe, however, that the
families and friends of the four
outstanding faculty may find some
consolation in the recollection of
the services they have performed
in the past some educating the
mind, others striving to improve
the health of the body and better
understand its secrets, or both.
It is not surprising that as these
four men were aboard the doomed
aircraft they were planning to
share their knowledge with others,
for they were en route to conferences and meetings.
Perhaps these scholars passed
from this life in a way in which
they would have been proud, for
they were, as always, preparing
to share their knowledge with
others.

"Ronnie, Boy, I Think You've Done It Again

Letters To The Editor;

Snyder, Threlkeld Records Queried
To the Editor of the Kernel:
As an independent I too am
strongly aware that representation,
as stated in a letter in the March
30 Kernel, is a major issue in the
Student Government election this
year.
The plan submitted by Mr. Snyder to the Student Government is
certainly an improvement over the
present system of representation.
However, as Mr. Snyder noted in
a debate with Mr. Cook on March
27, "there's not a great deal of
difference in our platforms." He
thus seemed to say this was to be
an election based on personalities,
or past records and not on what
the candidates intended to do if
elected.

In regard to Mr. Snyder's resolution which tripled the number of
representatives from the Men's Residence from one to three, therewas
a provision for these seats in the
Student Government constitution
beforehand, and it seems to indicate a bit of inefficiency in the
Government that these seats were
not allocated earlier, especially
since Mr. Snyder wrote the constitution!
In reading the biographies circulated by the campaign committee
for Mr. Snyder and Miss Threlkeld,
I

have seen a list of numerous bills

introduced by Mr. Snyder. However, in Miss Threlkeld's biography I noticed no bills listed, on a
list of committees. This leads me
to one question: "Miss Threlkeld,
what major, or minor, pieces of
legislation have you introduced to

Student Government this year?"

Bill Dykes
S Sophomore
A&
P.S. Perhaps Miss Threlkeld can
tell us if the President's Council
of Students ever decided if freshmen should wear beanies or not.

AWS Avoids Issues
Mary Alice Shipley's statement
that the SDS and YAF Position
Papers dealt strictly with rules and
regulations (Kernel, March 29) is
indicative of AWS total incapacity
to understand the issues. The one
thing the SDS Position Paper purposefully did not discuss was rules
and regulations. We avoid any suggestion of what closing hours should
be, in order to avoid obscuring the
larger issues.
What we did undertake in our
paper was (1) an analysis of the
undemocratic structure of AWS and
(2) criticism of AWS hesitancy to
discuss issues. Of course we have
opinions on rules and regulations,
but these two larger questions must
be settled first, before an analysis
of the rules and regulations can be

worthwhile.
Further examples of AWS' inability to meet the issues head on
were the statements by the incoming president and vice president
on hours. It was reported that their
feelings on hours differed. Indeed!
Jean Ward's startling analysis was
that she is "in the process of discovering new sides and new ideas."
Mary Alice Shipley, on the other
hand, says that she would lean
toward campus feelings. These
statements reflect a complete empti- -

ness of serious analysis of the issues
or proposals for resolving them.
The Staff
and Tobacco Gazette
Bourbon

Time For Art ion
Everyone complains about apathy on campus, but no one gives
any