xt7qv97zpc74 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7qv97zpc74/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19650902  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, September  2, 1965 text The Kentucky Kernel, September  2, 1965 1965 2015 true xt7qv97zpc74 section xt7qv97zpc74 Inside Today's Kernel
Society editor discusses
Poge Three.

DR"lE! IL

University of Kentucky
SEPT.

Vol. LVII, No. 2

LEXINGTON, KY., THURSDAY,

12

2, 19G5

sorority

ru$h:

Privet
company to undertoke UK
housing operation: Page Four.
WBKY, comput rodio ttotion, underrenovation: Page Five.
go
New registration system discussed in
editorial: Page Six.

Pages

New College or Law Building
Pictures Poge Seven.

opens:

Student Center Board sponsors new
campus guide system: Page CigM.
COR foresees more North Carolina
demonstrations: Page Nine.
UK't "Big Four" ready for fall toot-ba- ll
season: Poge Eleven.

Plans Announced
For Homecoming
In Late Octobe
The University's Centennial
office today released the program
tor this year's homecoming and
termed it the "biggest and best
in history."
"Some 11 separate events are
set for the Oct. 0 weekend,"
according to Dr. J. W. Patterson,
Centennial coordinator and director of the Centennial Homecoming.
The gala affair will be built
ar?und the gridiron clash between the Wildcats and the
Mountaineers of West Virginia
University, scheduled for 2 p.m.
on Oct. 30 on Stoll Field.
The weekend's social highlight will be the Homecoming
dance, to be held this year in
Memorial Coliseum. Some 5,000
faculty, students, alumni and
townspeople are expected to attend the dance. Music will be
provided by the noted Sammy
Kaye Orchestra. The program will
begin at 9 p.m. on Saturday
night.
Beginning Saturday morning,
alumni will register at the Helen
G. King Alumni House. Other
activities for that day will be
open houses at Colleges of Agriculture and Home Economics,
Law', Education and Commerce,
Buildand the Chemistry-Physic- s
ing. An 11 a.m. brunch will be
held near Stoll Field.
The weekend activities will
begin on Friday with a 6:30 p.m.
parade through downtown Lexington. Educational, industrial
and civic groups from throughout
the state have been invited to
enter exhibits in the event.
Several dignitaries will view
the event, including Gov. and
Mrs. Edward T. Breathitt and
Gov. and Mrs. Hulett C. Smith
of West Virginia.
A new approach is planned
for crowning
the Centennial
Homecoming Queen at a rally
on campus. Traditionally, the
queen and her court have been
cerecrowned during half-tim- e
monies of the football game. This
year's change, Dr. Patterson said,
is to allow the queen and her
court to reign over all homecoming events.
Acting as a prelude to the two-da- y
program will be an Oct. 16
concert by The Four Preps, in
Memorial Coliseum. Homecoming queen candidates will be previewed between concert acts.
"We at the University are
looking upon this Homecoming

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Food, Glorious Food!

Dinlnr facilities at the University'! Student Center permitted to eat at the Student Center Cafeteria
hare been extremely crowded this week, especially for Jhe first time this year.
at the noon hoar. Students with meal tickets are

Students Sponsor Search
For
Housing
Off-Camp- us

By PHYLLIS COMBS

Kernel Staff Writer
Lots of shoe leather and gas
backed with minimum funds were
used this summer by the
Student Association to
student
provide every
"desirable" housing this fall.
During the summer 15 students canvassed Lexington for the
sole purpose of compiling a listing of housing facilities to be
made available to all students.
In their personal survey of rooms,
houses and apartments for rent,
they inspected with student needs

in mind sufficient storage space,
OCSA is a service organizadequate lighting and quiet for ationand has already received
study and general condition of the approval of the administr-

the facilities.
At no charge to the student
or the landlord, they have provided every student that contacted them with housing. Their
files include housing for men
and women, furnished and unfurnished apartments, houses and
rooms. Their services also include
a roommate wanted file, and
every Negro and foreign student
that contacted them found the
facilities they wanted.

Nobel Prize Winner
To

Instruct At UK

A Nobel Prize winning professor, Dr. Hugo Theorell, will
arrive here today to begin a three-mont- h
stay as a visiting professor
in the biological sciences.
Dr. Theorell originally scheduled to come to the University
last spring as a part of the Centennial observance. However, his
visit was postponed following an
automobile accident.
During his stay at the University he will participate in a
number of lectures and seminars
for faculty and students. He will
present one lecture open to the

L
DR. HUCO THEORELL

general public planned for 8 p.m.
on Tuesday, Sept. 28, in the
University Hospital auditorium.
The program is entitled "Alfred
Nobel and His Frizes."
Dr. Theorell is native of
Sweden. He is director of the
biochemistry department at the
Nobel Institute and currently is
chairman of the Nobel nominating committee, which selects candidates for the world's top honor,
the Nobel Prize.
He received his Nobel Prize
in 1955 for his research in the
mechanism of the action of
oxidative enzymes.
During his visit to the United
States, he will present the Harvey
Lecture in New York City on
Oct. 21. He will also visit the
National Academy of Sciences.
Dr. Theorell is chairman of
the Stockholm Concert Association, is past president of the
Swedish Medical Society and a
past editor of the Scandinavian
Medical Journal.
He took his medical training
at the Karolinska Medical School
in Sweden. After graduation he
studied in Berlin with the noted
biochemist, Prof. Otto Warburg.
Dr. Theorell will be accompanied by his w ife, a professional
harpsichordist and guest solist
with the Stockholm Symphony
during its lour of the United
States.

ationis awaiting approval of the

Board of Trustees when they
present their completed constistutution. A vote by
dents will be necessary later to
approve the constitution.
Plans for the future service of
the OCSA include a weekly newsstudents
letter to keep
informed of campus activities, a
tip book to aid the student in his
selection of housing, and a proposed trailer court to be established on campus near Shawnee
Town.
Providing every UK student
with desirable housing wouldap-pea- r
to be an impossible goal,
but the OCSA still has a complete file of all types of housing
available. Students interested in
housing should contact the association at Room 208
in the Student Center.
A
breakdown of students
placed by OCSA according to
classification or sex was not available, but with a total freshman
enrollment of 3,200 and only
1,950 of these housed in University housing, OCSA has probably done some placement for
these new students.

-

J
SAMMY KAYE

as a special celebration due to
the Centennial Year," Dr. Patterson said. "Special invitations are
being sent to alumni throughout
the nation."
Committees for the event are
as follows: faculty and staff, Col.
James P. Alcorn, Miss Jane Batch-eldeGarrett Flickinger, Jess
Gardner, John Kennedy, John
Kuiper, James Little, Elbert
Bernie Shivley.
Students; Sally Gregory, Sandra Johnson, Sally List, Sharon
Norsworthy, Tom Padgett, Sye
Price, David Rouse, and Miriam
Caitskill, all of Lexington; Mike
Fields, Ashland; Fred Myers,
Madison ville; Winston Miller,
Mt. Sterling.
r,

Ock-erma- n,

Vandals Hit

Prestonsburg
Vandals, broke into Prestons-

burg

Community

College

Wednesday night causing several
thousand dollars damage and
scattering papers and debris
around the building.
Dr. Henry Campbell, director
of the extension center of the
University, said he was unable
The colto explain the break-in- .
cancelled classes today to
lege
clean up.
Telephones were ripped off
the walls, file cabinets overturned
and their contents strewn about.
A safe was broken into but no
money was taken.
Campbell said the safe contained records that were ransacked. Vending machines were
robbed, but there was no estimate on the amount of money
taken.

Grandma Goes To College
CLEVELAND, Ohio (AP)-- A
grandmother will
attend Cuyahoga Community
College this fall on a senior citizen scholarship.
"I want to go to college so I
can improve myself and gain a
better understanding of what is
going on in these changing
times," Rosa Jane Davis said in
an interview. "In so doing, maybe I can help someone else."
Mrs. Davis, a Negro, is the
oldest of 34 persons in Creater
Cleveland recently awarded senior citizen scholarships. The
senior citizen scholarship idea
was announced last spring and
drew about 70 applicants, all
required to be CO years or older.

fees and books are provided by the college and a private firm, Revco Drug Co.
Born on a farm in Madison
County, Ca., Mrs. Davis came
to Cleveland in 1923 after "my
four sisters and three brothers
were married."
"My main purpose in coming
to Cleveland was to attend night
school and further my education,
but my work here was harder
than I had been accustomed to
and I found I couldn't work and
go to school, too," she said.
She retired when she was 65
after jobs in school cafeterias.
She now devotes most of her
time to work in the St. John's'
African Methodist Church and

Tuition,

her six grandchildren. A widow
since 1937, she has lived with
her daughter.
The schools she attended in
her native Ceorgia "were not
graded in my day," Mrs. Davis
said, but she estimated her formal education was about equivalent to 9th grade.

Now she plans to take a liberal
arts course, concentrating on literature and composition. She
hasn't dec ided how many courses
she will take.
"1 have two grandsons in senior high school," she said. "I
might call on them to help me
with my college woik."

* THE KENTUCKY KEKNEU.TJuirlay.

2

Sept. 2, 19fO.

Society Opens Season

Experimental Film Series Set

was so successful the society
continued its showings during the
Kernel Arts Editor
summer with a classics scries.
The Experimental Film SociThis summer the society
ety will begin its fall showings
Sept. 13 with Kenneth Anger's branched out on its own and made
"Fireworks." Film Society presi- an experimental film entitled
dent Harley Heal said season "Love Me Love My Bread." The
tickets for the six showings are idea was conceived by John Fishnow available for $4.
er, a sculptor visiting UK for the
What can you expect to see summer. Fisher sculpts in bread.
in an experimental film? "The
How do you make an experunexpected is welcome," said imental film? "There is an absence of bounds," Beal said.
Deal, "because the artist is aimThis particular film used a
ing for the natural and realistic.
In making an experimental film a technique known as "happening." The artist or director places
script may be used; but if the una few key props on the scene and
expected happens, it will probthe actors then improvise with
ably be incorporated."
Last season's subjects ranged them.
from the motor cycle gangs on
There may be a certain amount
the West Coast to the birth of a of directing or choreography, but
baby, from the myth of Phaedra it is limited since spontaneity
g
to the
of cats. and the unexpected are the goal.
This season the work of filmSome of the props created for
makers such as Bruce Conners, the film by Fisher were bread
Stan Brakhagc, and Bruce Bailey mounds, soft rolls for throwing,
will be shown. Beal said that the a glass case of bandaged bread
work of Ron Rice, a young artist loaves, and figures of a man and
who died last year of malnutriwoman drawn on a large board.
tion, will befcaturcd. Rice's most
What happened at the "hapfamous film is "Flower Thief." pening?" Just what you would
Another featured film will be expect to happen when 20 or 25
"Dog Star .Man" by Stan Brak-hag- student actors are faced with
This film is a classic in the mounds of snow-ba- ll
sized bread
experimental field. Beal said it rolls. "People mostly threw the
incorporates a series of rapidly bread," Beal reported.
produced images. This technique
A few bounds were necessary
g
of
is perhaps the for this
film. "For the
most difficult for the viewer to first five particular
minutes nobody adhered
become accustomed to because to the rules and
the hard bread
the eye must learn to see without was
being thrown as well as the
producing mental strain to recogsoft rolls," said Beal. The only
nize the images immediately.
serious injury was a black eye
The Experimental Film Socisuffered by Mrs. Alvin Green-berety was formed last spring. It
wife of former UK English
instructor Alvin Green berg.
By Margaret Bailey

night-prowlin-

ords as a background. Another
interesting technique is the use
of fragmented dialogue in which
the audience only hears parts of
words.
The films shown by the Society cannot be seen commercially.
They are obtained from the Film
Co-oa group of
headed by Jonas Mekas. Artists
submit their work to the group
for distribution and receive all
profits.
Film showings will take place
in the Student Center Theater
at 7:30 p.m. Season tickets may
be purchased from Harley Beal
and Joe Nickell or at the door up
to the third showing. Tickets for
individual nights will usually be
available at the door for $1. The
dates for showings this semester
are Sept. 13, Sept. 27, Oct. 11,
Oct. 25, Nov. 15, and Dec. 6.

Grecnberg filmed the "happening" for 30 minutes. Some of
the other scenes had been planned
and shot the week before, such
as a gun fight using bread guns
and a car running over a loaf of
bread.
The final film runs for about
16 minutes.
First rushes were
shown this summer at the society's regular meeting. The film
presents a scries of scenes using
bread as the chief symbol depicting the obsession of modern
society with war, sex, and money.
The film cost $200 to make.
The Film Society bought the film
and borrowed the camera. The
other expense was 600 pounds of
bread purchased from Cincinnati
and local grocery stores.
There is no particular trend
in using sound in the experimental movie. "We felt the film wc
made didn't need sound," explained Beal.
Each movie is unique and the
artist himself must decide w hether to include sound. "Scorpio
Rising," a film shown last spring,
ll
rec- used popular

Ceinteir

film-make-

p,

The Student Center
Board would like to
welcome all students

hew

especially

Campus

Christian Life

rock-and-ro-

iudent

CENTER 412 ROSE ST.

and encourage
them to use the fa-

ones

e.

Fountain

(In

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SHOWS
FROM

NOW!

CONT.

University.

FELLOWSHIP

5 Supper Program
followed by evening vespers

HALE'S PHARMACY

A United Ministry of
the Christian Church

MS S. LDOSTONE
From U.K. Medical Center

Aero

(Disciples)
The Presbyterian Church,
and United Church of

K..S.LPI
a

Adventures of

"Walk On The

THE BEATLES

Wild Side"

Sept. 10

Coming

Friday and Saturday

Rex Harrison

Audrey Hepburn

This Weekend

Movie.,..

IS ON THE WAYI
The Colorful

wyww-- www

Christ

OTOP WORRYING!

SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Yearly, by mail $7.00
Per copy, from files $ .10
KERNEL TELEPHONES
Editor, Executive Editor. Managing
Editor
2321
News Desk, Sports, Women's Editor,
Socials
2320
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pate in the activities
and events at the

SEPT.

We Cash Student Checks

12:00

Donuts 10:30 a.m.

partici-

SUNDAY EVENING

The Kentucky Kernel
The

Kentucky Kernel, University
Station, University ot Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, 40506. Second-clas- s
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Published four times weekly during
the school year except during holidays
and exam periods, and weekly during
the summer semester.
Published for the students of the
University of Kentucky by the Board
of Student Publications, Prof. Paul
Oberst, chairman and Stephen Palmer,
secretary.
Begun as the Cadet in 1894, became the Record in 1900, and the Idea
In 19Jtt. Published continuously as the
Kernel, since 1815.

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film-makin-

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cilities and

SUNDAY MORNING
WORSHIP 11:00 A.M.

Sundries

Drugs

''My Fair Lady"

Student Center Theater
7:30 p.m.

NOW
PLAYING

IT'S A BEGINNERS COURSE
IN

EXCLUSIVE! FIRST RUN IN LEXINGTON!

"BOY-GIRLSMANSHI-

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Jam Session

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* THE KENTUCKY KEUNEL, TlHirwIay, Sept. 2.

"It Is Rush Time At UK

f

7

by Gay Gish
"These are the times that
try men's souls" were the open-

ing words spoken by Dr. Doris
Seward, dean of women, as she
meetspoke to an
Charles Dicking last week-a- nd
ens and Dean Seward could not

Feeling Rushed?
To the several thousand women students who have only a
vague association with sorority
rush activity the terminology
passing between sorority women
and prospective members may
sound more like "pidgin" than
English.
However, dismay not, the jargon of the moment needs merely
some definition:
Sorority woman or active a
member in good standing of one
of the 12 sisterhoods and two
colonies on campus. Identified
by a pin or badge representing
her particular sorority affiliation.
Recognized at this time of year
by a constant smile and often
bleary view of the world. Coal
is to make her sorority the most
appealing to the rushee.
Rushee hopeful young woman being collectively wined and
dined by the sororities. She may
or may not have her eye turned
to a particular badge right now,
but by this time next week her
choice will be made. Recognized
by a constant smile and a slightly
glazed v iew of the world.
Pledge what the rusheeswill
be this time next week. A pledge
is constantly smiling, always
cheerful and is learning to spend
her free time in the Grille with
her active sisters. Soon, if she
doesn't spend too much time in
the Crille she will become an
active too, and next year the
circle will have come full around.

14
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.

Friday morning the 13 rushing
sororities literally "flung open"
their front doors, and therushecs
raced from house to house in what
must have seemed to them an unending maze of smiling faces and
constant chatter. The rushecs
attended a total of seven Open
Houses Friday, and six of the
same Saturday.
Sunday morning invitations
were leturned to the various rush
groups, and that afternoon found
the rushees again scurrying to
five First Invitationals that day,
and four on Monday.
Tuesday was a free day for
rushees and considering the deflating experience of Freshman
But rush began long before Orientation, this was a wise time
Thursday night. Sorority women for a pause.
started returning to campus AugWednesday night and tonight
ust 21, and amid moving into were and are the Second Innew houses, redecorating old vitational Skit Parties. These are
ones, and frenziedly greeting always the most enjoyable for
friends, the UK Panhellenic coleveryone: the rushees really seem
ony prepared for its annual "no to relax and the sororities really
sleep, no eat, rush, rush, rush" ham it up.
marathon.
Another day of rest Friday,
In between meetings, a few then evening Preference Parties
of the sororities found time to Saturday, after which preferential
spread a little good cheer and cards will be signed in Memorial
Coliseum. This is a "no date
h
perhaps relieve some of the
tension. The Pi Phi's took Coliseum. This is a "no date"
an evening off and seranaded
night, so for exhaused rushees
every other group, wishing each it should be early to bed.
well with their own songs and
Sorority bids will be extended
those from that particular sor Monday, Labor Day, and all
the hours of hard work on the
those from that particular sorority. The Delta Zeta's and part of each organization will
Kappa Delta's, with their eyes bereqarded when they greet their
more on the lack of chances new pledge classes. There will
to munch, sent cookies and be the usual tears and embraces
candy respectively, to the other and all the anxiety of this frantic
week will be only a memory.
sororities.
more aptly describe the 12 days
of sorority rush which began last
Thursday evening and w hich will
end Monday afternoon.
The Panhellenic Tarty held
Thursday night opened sorority
rush with an informal meeting
of the sorority women and the
approximately 700 girls who are
out for rush. A skit depicting the
more humerous aspects of college
life at UK was presented by
several of the sorority women. . .
and if college living is as uproarious as that little skit, new
and old students alike will find
the year one hilarious adventure
after another.

7

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Problems, Anyone?

Every fall UK's sororities rush, and every fall rushees have a
million and one questions to ask during that time. Becky Caton,
right, gives advice to one of the girls in her rush group as the
first parties begin and also the puzzlements.

Kuiper Gets Post

pre-rus-

JtesxxBLUE

CRASS

11

I'm
Margaret
from the

A UK alumnus, Dr. John B. Kuiper, has joined the Library of
Congress staff as head of the motion picture section of the Division
of Prints and Photographs. Dr. Kuiper, son of Prof. John Kuiper,
head of the UK Philosophy Department, will direct operations of
one of the three most extensive film archives in the U. S.
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IWWMjuUuuiiniiiiiajj..

FASHIONSol
Cover Girl

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can make your
College Dreams
come true

....

Enter the Cover Girl $10,000
Scholarship Contest Now!
As advertised in August
Seventeen . . . Register
Martin's Shoe Salon.

Mart.
The University of Kentucky is believed to have
the best dressed coeds on
ony campus.
The Sportswear Mart
(probably the only fashion
discounter in the Midwest
area) is the most important
factor in helping, the UK
coeds maintain this reputa-

BONNIE
Our Bonnie's not "over
the ocean" - she's right
here. A winsome wee
shoe, hand sewn of softest
Iddsldn, with

II

tion.

The Sportswear Mart carries only the finest in name
brand, famous label, casual
wear and every item in their
tremendous selection is discounted that's right, girls!
every top line in the country has a price tag far lower
than you'll see for the same
garment in other fine stores.
Now there are 2 Exciting
1153
Sportswear Marts
New Circle Road and a new
store just around the corner
from campus onWoller Ave.
in the Imperial Plaxa Shop-in- g
both stores
center
9
daily.
open
Remember too that the
store is all aglow with that
back to school look. Also
you'll be astounded by the
vast quantities of skirts,
matching sweaters, slacks,
shirts, coats, suits and
dresses that will be perfect
for the cool weather ahead.
Marts
Both Sportswear
will be open oil day, Monday, Lobor Day, 9 'til 9.

IW5-- .1

lin-

tricot-on-foa-

ing. Here is a softee that's
right and light for

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FALL

Walnut Brown
Black

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Ybu can feel tlvc difference I

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JOHN MEYCR tailored these fashions with tender loving
care . . . and they are in pure Scottish colors too . . .

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Bermuda Skort

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$13.00
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Downtown, 311 S. Limi; 433 Southland Drivt
T
CmfM t9unt t:)Q
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-

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* 4

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday, Sqt. 2,

1j

Two Former Kernel Editors Private Company
Receive Journalism Awards To Build UK Dorm

all financial responsibilities for
The University Hoard of TrustTwo former Kernel editors this
the construction, maintence, and
ees has approved a request from
week received awards and honors
a private interest to build dormioperation of the dormitory.
in the field of journalism.
tory to house women at the UniThe Trustees' last condition to
William Grant, last year's
versity.
has accepted a posiKentucky Belle was a warning
The site for t lie proposed eight-stor- y that the
I
University might amend
.
tion with the United States StuI
building is across the street its rules and require students to
dent Tress Association as director
from Porter Memorial Baptist
or operated
live in
of the Collegiate Press Service.
Church at 730 S. Limestone St. residence halls.
1964-6Kernel executive
The
The Trustees agreed to buy this
editor, David Hawpe, received a
Plans for the private dormitory
property for $230,000 at their Aug.
$300 award this week in the first
call for a
air cond20 meeting for future campus
intern prize competition of the
-itioned residnce hall to house
expansion.
400 women students. Two stuNewspaper Fund, Inc. Hawpe,
Although the Board accepted
who spent the summer as an indents. Two students would live
the proposal from Kentucky
f
tern for the Louisville Times, w as
in each room. There would be a
Belle Dormitories, Inc., the privone of 15 college journalists to
ate financial concern it required bath for every two rooms.
receive a $500 award.
that the undertaking conform
Plans also include a television
Crant, who graduated with
with UK's "standards of perforlounge for each floor, a snack
a bachelor's degree in journalism,
mance, rules, and regulations." bar and a gift shop, swimming
will direct CPS's nationwide
DAVID HAWPE
All told, the Trustees apWILLIAM GRANT
pool, library, and typing room.
coverage for college newspapers
proved nine conditions under:
and will report on education news
Kentucky Belle did not specify
Belle's request. Other
Associated Press in Lexington,
say he (Hawpe) is the most cap- Kentucky
from Washington, D. C, beginthan the "standards" regulation, any particular fees for room and
able intern we have ever had.
was nominated for the prize comning next week.
board, but a University source
the conditions included:
After a year-lon- g
tour with petition by his editors at the This is partly due to his exindicated that the charges would
Students must be accepted
perience, partly due to his natural
CPS, which sends four new s and Louisville Times.
be about $1,200 to $1,400 a year.
Robert P. Clark, managing ability, and no doubt partly due "without regard to race, creed,
feature releases a week to its
to the fact that he loves his job." or nationality."
member newspapers, Grant will editor of the Times, said Hawpe
This amount would classify
A Louisville resident, Hawpe
"The facilities must not be the dormitory as a luxury resdo graduate work in political is "quick, a good writer, a good
idence hall, since room and board
science at the Univ ersity of Penn- organizer of his thoughts in has received several other writing rented to persons other than Uniawards in national competition
short a good reporter."
versity students as long as stufor all students in UK housing
sylvania.
"We have had an intern pro- and was last year president of dents of the University reside is now $760 a year.
Hawpe, who this year is attending graduate school at the gram for several years," Clark Sigma Delta Chi, professional there." v
In a resolution, the Board said
The ice president for student
added. "I believe it is safe to journalism society.
University and working with the
affairs, currently Robert Johnson, it wished to "encourage private
shall be allowed to approve the undertakings to assist in meeting
to the State
appointments of head residents (UK's) obligations
of Kentucky."
and counselors.
The dormitory must conform
Earlier this year, UK officials
with the University's standards said they would welcome private
of health and safety.
financial help in coping with the
The Board also stipulated that current acute housing crisis at
Two perhaps contradictory results of psychiaHe said he could offer no explanation why
the Kentucky Belle must assume UK.
tric studies, one in Africa, the other in New York, technological change afforded mental trouble to
emerged Tuesday from the Conference on Cultural the African when it was suddenly encountered.
Change, Mental Health and Poverty, concluding
"There are no native words for 'depression
its three-da- y
meeting at the University.
in Swahili," Dr. Margetts said. "The usual psyDr. Edward Margetts, chairman of the Dechiatric treatment of the African patient was used,
partment of Psychiatry at the University of British and the response was not any different from what
Columbia, Vancouver, informed delegates that he would be expected from the European or AmeriFASHION
tesasB LUE CRASS
found "an increasing incidence of neuroses among can
,
patient."
East Africans who were suddenly confronted with
Dr. Margetts said that if psychoses were difcultural change from a primitive to a technologiferent in Africa, it was not usually a cultural or
cal society."
racial factor, but rather that the hospital's apOn the other hand. Dr. Victor Sanua, associate
proach to treatment of the mental disorders conprofessor of the Wurzweiler School of Social Work, flicted with tribal
treatments, which in
Veshiva University of New York City, said his
many cases had been simply the methods of the
studies indicated that the upper class psychiatric
witch doctor.
.
patient, who would be expected to be confronted
Dr. Sanua's study involved four groups: Jewwith more aspects of a technological society,
ish, Protestant, Italian and Irish. He discussed
showed the greatest evidence of improvement
different theories offered for the cause of schizofollow ing psychiatric treatment.
The papers of both conference participants phrenia, but discounted most of them, including
comprised the morning program of the meeting the one that places "all the blame on Mom."
He did say thatjrarental lossjiy the patients
at the University Medical Center.
Dr. Margetts' study was made of 2,500 cases contributed in many cases to their schizophrenia.
The conference concluded Wednesday night
at a hospital in Nairobi, Kenya, with a few cases
at other nearby hospitals, including one in with a talk by Dr. Eric Wittkower fef McCill
Zanzibar.
University, Montreal.
editor-i-

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Technology And Neurosis
Linked By Psychiatry Clinic

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FASHION SecsaJ

U.K. STUDENTS

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The loveliest legs from the quad to the library
this Fall are being caressed by Claussner . . . now,
in a happy new whirl of fashion colors-tend- er
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Is The Price Right?

To the dismay of Susan Roman the price was both right and
high,
when she peered inside the cover of a new textbook in the
Campus
Book Store yesterday. Her only consolation: she has a lot of
students in the situation.

Seven Law Graduates
Selected By Chapter
Seven 1965 graduates of the
College of Law of the University
have been elected to membership in the Kentucky Chapter
of the Order of the Coif, according to Dean V. L. Matthews, Jr.
They are Tommy VV. Chandler, Providence; Larry D. Gar-moGlasgow; Mark E. Gormley,
formerly of Versailles, now of
Denver,
Col.; Paul Edward
Hieronymus, Barbourville; Sidney Clay Kinkead, Jr. , Lexington;
William G. Kohlhepp, Washing

missed hearing
you
University's radio station,
WKBY-FM- ,
since you have returned to campus, your radio is
not broken. The station if off
the air, undergoing a complete
renovation of its audio system.
It will return to the air on
Sept. 12.
The station's equipment, with
exception of the transmitter, is
being rebuilt, according to Don
Wheeler, new faculty supervisor
o