xt7qv97zpd0k https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7qv97zpd0k/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19640410  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, April 10, 1964 text The Kentucky Kernel, April 10, 1964 1964 2015 true xt7qv97zpd0k section xt7qv97zpd0k Today's Weather:
Fair Ami Milil;
lli-- li
62

Editor Discusses
Trimester System;
See Pace Four

of
University fRIDAY,Kentucky
APRIL
LEXINGTON,

Vol. LV, No. 101

WA

KY.,

-

-

I

....

-

1

"'

I

I

x

-

Ei'lit

10, 19(il

J

Time

Cincinnati Symphony
To Perform Sunday
The Central Kentucky Concert and Lecture Association
19(53-6series with the appearance of the
Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra featuring pianist Lorin Hol
lander as soloist.
1958.
estabchestra

will complete its

...

'o;

W

f-

Named to head the Kentuckian yearbook staff for
1965 academic year are Robert Young:, assort- ate editor; Carolyn Cramer, managing editor; Sam

....

y

r;.s

Abelt, assistant editor;

and Ted Kuster,

Kuster, Carolyn Cramer
To Head '65 Kyian Staff
Ted Kuster, junior agriculture major from Fan's, lias
been named editor of the 19C5
Kentuckian, the University
yearbook. Carolyn Cramer, a
junior English and Latin major from Lexington, has been
appointed managing editor.
Robert Young, a premed sophomore from Lexington, has been
named associate editor and Sam
Journalism
Abell, a freshman
major from Sylvania. Ohio, has
been named assistant editor for
the '65 yearbook.
Kuster has served three years
the Kentuckian staff. He is
corresponding secretary for
na Alpha Epsilon; a member
. Alpha Zeta, agriculture
fraternity; Lances, Junior men's honreceived the Dunforth
orary;
freshman
scholar
agriculture

ship; and Is a member of Brock
and Bridle.
lie has served as assistant fraternity editor, Greek editor, and
is managing editor of this year's
Kenturkian.
Miss Cramer has served three
years on the yearbook staff. She
is recording secretary of Delta
Delta Delta sorority, a member of
the Senior Board of the Student
Center, Mortar Board, Eta Sigma
Phi honorary, ACU Convention,
and Scholastic honorary. She is
currently serving as beauty and
residence halls section head.
Young is a member of Delta
Tau Delta fraternity; Phi Eta
Sigma, freshman honorary ;
Alpha Epsilon Delta, premedical
honorary; Keys, sophomore honorary; the Honors program; and
Young Republicans.
Abell serves on the photography staff for both the Kentuckian and Kernel. He is also

Block And Bridle Club
To Hold Clinic, Show
The Block and Bridle Club of the College of Agriculture
will present a combined "Practical Horseman's Clinic" and
Quarter Horse Show this weekend.
The clinic will be tomorrow at
Horse Show
American
the Livestock Pavillion (across Association Quarter
.
from Haggin Hall). Registration
Halter classes will begin at
and will
Is open to the public,
8:30 a.m., and carry a 12 entry
begin at 0:30 a.m. at the Pavilfee. All horses are required to
lion.
be registered with the AQHA.
Topics discussed will be equine
Three races will be run startgenetics, problems with lameing at 1 p.m., two restricted to
ness and foot and leg care,
quarter horses, and one open to
for horses, nutrition, inthoroughbreds as well.
ternal parasites, foal handling,
Performance classes will start
problems with pregand breeding
n
at 2 p.m., entry fees $5. There
nant mares and the
will be cash prizes and ribbons
foal.
Prominent horse people from
the Lexington area will be Invited to speak. There will also
be a doctor from Ohio State University, and professors from UK.
Sunday's quarter horse show
will be held at the Lexington
Trotting Truck on South Broadway, and is approved by the

awarded winners.
Classes will Include a flag race,
Western pleasure
registered
horse, pole bending, rescue race,
Junior horsemanship,
registered
reining, registered barrels race,
musical chairs, open Western
pleasure horse, stake race, and
registered cutting.

'

editor-th- e

a member of the Baptist Student
Union.
was reMarty Gegenhelmer
named layout editor. She is a
junior psychology major from
Bradfordwood, Pa.
Beverly Fryman, a sophomore
business education major from
Cynthiana, was named business
manager. She is publicity chairman of Delta Delta Delta sorority, on the Student Center
and has
publicity committee,
worked on the organization,
senior, and Greek sections of the
Kentuckian.
Elizabeth Riefkin, a freshman
education major from Ft. Mitchell, was named assistant business manager.
Jimmy Parrott, a Junior education major from Louisville, was
named senior editor. Peggy Parsons, a junior psychology major
from Ft. Thomas was named fraternity editor. Linda Lnmpe, an
A&S sophomore from Louisville,
was named sorority editor. Sally
Gregary, a sophomore from Lexington, was named beauty and
residence halls editor. Named culture and administration editor
was Kathy Ware, an education
Junior from Covington.
Dave Carter, an Arts and Sciences junior from Ashland, was
named sports editor, Sandy Johnson, an A&S sophomore from
Lexington, was named index editor. Judy Gettelfinger, an education sophomore from Louisville, was named organizations
editor.
Perry Ashley, yearbook adviser, announced that the '65
yearbook will contain about 32
more pages bringing the total to
400. The '65 Kyian, the 67th University yearbook, will Include an
expanded Student Life section
to tie-i- n
the historical background with the current University in the Centennial issue.
The '65 staff Is busy now presupparing a special eight-pag- e
plement to the '64 yearbook. The
to be mailed out
supplement,
dining the summer to all Kyian
purchasers, will feature the highactivities.
lights of the year-en- d
Tliis will include the President's
and the
Inauguration
aiHuvities.

The concert will be held at 3
p.m. Sunday at Memorial Coliseum.
Of Lorin Hollander, the New
York Times has said, "He is a
brilliant and formidable talent."
The young pianist is 18 years old.
Already he has performed with
more than 35 symphonies, and he
has Riven over 100 concerts in
the United States and Canada.
Hollander's television appearances include the Perry Como
show, on which he has appeared
nine times, and four performances on the Bell Telephone
Hour.
Hollander playDuring 1962-6ed with the Boston Symphony in
Boston and at the Lincoln Center in Pittsburgh. He also performed in Detroit, San Antonio,
Columbus, and a reengagement
with the Cleveland Orchestra.
The Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, directed by Max Rudolf,
is the fifth oldest in the country. The orchestra began in 1895
with 48 men who presented a
series of three concerts a year.
Today the orchestra consists of
100 members and presents nearly
100 concerts a season.
Mr. Rudolf was the administrator of the Metropolitan Opera
until he became the director of
the Cincinnati
Symphony Or

in
He has
lished new records for symphony
attendance not only in Cincinnati, but in each of the cities
In which the orchestra has appeared on tour.
Each year nearly a quarter of
a million people attend the performances
of this orchestra,
which has presented a total of
more than 4,100 concerts.
Each season, since its first tour
In 1901-0the orchestra has performed throughout
the United
States, playing over l,300aout-o- f
town engagements in hundreds
of cities in 35 states.
Students will be admitted to
the concert by ID cards.

LORIN HOLLANDER

20 Finalists Selected

In LKD Queen Contest
The annual Little Kentucky Derby Queen contest is beginning to reach its final stages. At the talent elimination
phase of the contest 20 finalists were chosen from a field of
45 women.
Ists from the combined cateThe 45 contestants represented
the teams as they are paired for
the activities of the "biggest college weekend." On Tuesday, in
the Student Center Theatre, each
of the contestants performed for
the judges and a student audience.
The 20 finalists will next enter the beauty phase of the contest.
On the evening of the Debutante Stakes, April 17, the finalists will be judged on beauty,
While the
poise, and bearing.
judges are deciding the 10 final- -

Norman Chapman
To Play Monday

Norman Chapman, noted pianist and teacher of piano at the
University, will present a recital
at 8 p.m. Monday in Memorial
Hall. The concert will consist of
"Aria with Thirty Variations"
Variations) by
(The Ooldberg
J. S. Bach.
A native Canadian, Chapman
has been a soloist with major
music symphonies, and has played solo recitals on the C.B.C.,
Canada's national radio network.
Four of his performances were in
concert with the Winnipeg Symphony.
won the Aitklns
Chapman
Award one of Canada's highest
musical honors in 1952. He holds
an ARTC degree from the Royal
and
of Toronto
Conservatory
studied under Rosina Lhevinne,
and James FrLkiu of Julliard,
und Egon Petri.

gories, the top Ave finalists from
the talent phase of the queen
contest will perform for the audience.
The 20 finalists for the LKD
queen contest are, Bonnie Lindner, Mary Lee Hines, Suzanne
Ziegler, Sharon Smith, Jo Ellen
Welch, Judy Stevenson, Betty
Zaring, Penny Cole, Pam Mitchell.
Terri Weddle, Cecelia Jones,
Dorothy Bartlett, Betty Chancers, Lynn Clark, Debbie Delaney,
Lynn Kessack, Annette Westphal,
Fontaine Kincaid, Naomi Brown,
and Micky Levy.
These 20 finalists will be guests
at a tea next Thursday. At this
time they will be Introduced to
the judges, and to each other,
and will be given any directions
necessary for the next night's activities.

The University Cosmopolitan
Club will present a program of
International songs and dances
at 7:30 p.m. Friday In Memorial Hall.
University students from
India, Latin America, Korea,
Indonesia, Taiwan, Germany,
Iran, and other Middle East
countries will participate in
the program.
Tickets, priced at $1 for
adults and SO rents for children, may be purchased at the

I

K

International

(

rntrr,

House of Treasures,
Shackle-ton's,
Ranrser Pharmacy,
and Kennedy Bookstore.

* 2 -- THE KENTUCKY

14

KERNEL, Friday, April 10,

7)is. Peak, Probst
Accept Positions
As Dept. Heads
Two members of the
Modern

SPECIAL LUNCH
For Students andStaff

University
Language De-

Foreign

partment have accepted posts as
department heads at other col-

leges.
Dr. J. Hunter Peak, assistant
professor of Spanish, has been
named professor of French and
head of the department of foreign languages at Eastern Kentucky State College, Richmond.
Dr. Gerhard Probst, instructor
at Transylvania College and at
the University, will be the new
chairman of the foreign language
department at Transylvania.
Dr. Peak Is a graduate of
y
Hampden-SydneCollege in Virginia and holds M.S. and Ph.D.
degrees from the University of
North Carolina.
He taught at the University of
North Carolina and Davidson
College, and served with the
State Department in Peru and
Argentina for three years. He
is from Louisville.
Dr. Probst Is from Lepzig, Germany and studied at Leipzig
University and the Free University of West Berlin. He received
his Ph.D. degree from the Free
University in 1955.
He came to the United States
as a Fulbright scholar.
Dr. Peak will assume his new
duties, Sept. 1, and Dr. Probst's
appointment will be effective In
the fall.

mm
TIM

Cntr

HAWKS

SATURDAY" Rififi"

avorite

Sport?

KENTUCKY THtATRt
FIRST

NOW!

MISS JONES YOUR UPPERS
j ARE IN PERFECT Shape!"

DEAN

.

fJ

Kf

7:30

252-449- 5

Sleeping to MyBed?"
THE HOTTEST

0

QUESTION

I

i

fJ

1

STARTS

AN UNUSUAL
LOVE STORYI

MS

--

JL

tLVif

mPmmir

OPEN

EVERY

No.

NIGHT

Admission

1

NO. 2

'ti rj
"THE EXPLOSIVE
STARTS

r

Debbie
MtEYlJOlDSm

TifrSnr

lOVES"
TlCHHKOlO

fiii

JAKSSEH

PLAY
BANKO

i

rrr

GENERATION'

the
FUNNIEST
FIX A GIRL
EVER

if

A

'

60T

INTO I

v

liflh

SUNDAY

Mn HL'ckart

ROBERTSON

DAVID

SINATRA

90c

'The sexual side of
marriage chills me!

.$."

CLIFF
PLUS

COMING SUNDAY- -

TONIGHT AND SATURDAY
3 Big Hits

No. 3

FRANK

REVERSIONTO SAVAGERY!"

wmfniFfiitsm

WJMJ

H"

'Come Blow Your Horn'1

DJMD&LiSA

REMARKABLEI7 f&

Dial

yumJurrL

ADMISSION

J&

Your Comjius 1'lorist

('Jacfciemmorv'

7:30

Plus

While Onliiils
I'm j. It- - Onliiils sf
( mi hill i ii ui OuJiitls

WED. - SAT.

NOW!

'ru

PRESLEY.

K SPECIAL
i
$10
50
$1

Lime

0" CH

7:40 AND 9:35

JtU

I

'just smj charge

"(Airf

PANA VISION

ifM

ORCHIDS

212 S.

IIW

SUN.

PICTURE THAT DELIVERS... Fl-?- J

A '1

tlQ

2 for

SAT.

OF THE DAY

MARTIN

A seJT of 1964
FOR SALE
whir wheel coversor all
and Cheiy
l's with 13"
Wheels. Cost
will sell fo
$40.00. Call
FORTsALE 1960 Fiat 1200con-vertibl- e.
Call
Iter 5
j
7A4t
p.m.

7

Srr AT

TOMIil

I

BALSAM ST. JOHN

i MONTGOMERY

CLASSIFIED

DENTIST
IN) THE CHAIR

P

"Who's Been
TECHNICOLOR

AT LAST! A MOTSO

75

ADM.

IN THE KERNEL!

IT PAYS TO ADVERTISE

STARTS

j Ph.

"Imitation Of Life"

FRI. and SUN.

SHOWING!

OUTDOOR

STARTS SUNDAY

Regularly

student
center
theater

I

50c FrI.
Sun.,
60c Saturday
Showing at 6:30 and 9
Fri. and Sat.; 8 Sunda

Admissions:

HOWARD

Row
At
Llm

1 PERKINS PANCAKE HOUSE

I

Mental Health
Association Lecture

WHITE OHC1IIUS
PUIU'LE oncylDS
CYMBIDIUM OlfCIIIDS

Always under $1.00

Oppotll
'SIYEKWA"

ASKS

"The
Law and Mental
Health" will be the topic of a
leeture by Judge Lawrence S.
Grauman at 8 p.m. Tuesday in
connection with the program
of the Mental Health Association of Central Kentucky.
of the Jefferson
Judge
County Circuit Court in Louisville, Common I'leas Branch,
Judge Grauman has presided
over mental inquest cases for
the past 14 years.
The lecture will be held in
the auditorium of the Medical
Center, and will be open to the
public.

Served weekdays 1 1 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Selection changes each day

Hans Conried

wmi butt

MO MM)

Mary

HtuHN 'A

UcCarly

il,

and Thursday
JACKPOT TUESDAY
$300.00
Every Tuesday

Dhos

RLUA'

i

"THI

2nd

FACTS

Of

LIFC"

Wnlten and PioJuced
by JOHN KENLO
A0CIAIt MWWAU - AKN6L0 JACK ROitNIHAU
ALL STAR CAST
JMNf NfHFR
RffDHAWfY
SOXDRA FISHfR.
606 LARR UH tUIOIf
t.10 KVL

75c

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Friday, April

Social Sidelight!
The count clown lias started, it's only three weeks until
finals, but who can tell with the majority of the campus
nonchalantly going about their business playing bridge until
all hours, partying full blast, and going to the races afternoons.
If you don't believe me Just
look around. Take the card room
Center for example, It's always full of card
tharks and chatter. Then, If you
happen to be out for a stroll and
Botanical
pass the Infamous
Gardens you're sure to know
Is here. It's spring?
that spring
They haven't told the little man
at Blue Grass Field yet but the
young at heart think so.
As the professors put on that
last minute rush to cram all those
valuable little facts into those
solid heads, the campus Is busy
the social calendar.
cramming
Oh well, we benefit from each.
This Is a big weekend here
abouts with the Lambda Chi
Push Cart Derby being the highlight of the activity. This tradition features a quern contest,
we haven't had one in a while,
an ugly man contest, a parade,
a dance, and a derby. What more
could yon ask for in two days.
The voting for the ugly man
will be In money, a penny a vote.
The proceeds will go to the Easter
Seal Fund. The voting for the
queen will be by ID and both
are taking place from
p.m.
today in the basement of the
Student Center.
Tonight there will be a dance
at Joyland with the Carnations,
and the Monarchs.
Trendels,
Tickets are on sale at the ticket booth in the Student Center,
60 you all come.
To start this TGIF off right
the residents of Bowman Hall are
having a Jam session from 5
p.m. today in the Quad. It's
free and the Torques will be
there to play.
If you are In a formal mood,
and a few people seem to be,
the Kappa's are having their
spring formal at the Phoenix
and this should be the key to lots
of fun and good times.
If you are a Chi O this is your
night to shine as the Tates Creek
Country Club will play host to
this group's spring fling.
The Christian Student Fellowship will be on retreat at Blue
Grass Camp and the Social Work
Club will be having a tea In the
Lounge of Erikson Hall.
Topping off the day the children's hour will be the order of
the evening as the most notorious youngsters, or rather I should
say pranksters, on campus will
be holding forth with the equally famous social event heretofore known as the Law School

Danre. All manner of rases will
be tried, verdicts rendered, and
dissenting opinions heard as the
amateur Tarzans participate In
a little outside recreation.
One of the more sober moments of the evening will be an
address by retired Justice Reed.
Saturday morning should dawn
bright and clear if the Lambda
Chi's keep their fingers crossed
and bribe the weatherman. At
noon the parade will assemble
at the frat house and move down
Rose to Euclid and then to the
race course in front of the Administration Building.
Immediately following the
derby there will be an
Jam session at Holmes Hall.
The KA's will dash away from
the Derby and back to the house
for a jam session and then in
the evening they will be camping
out or having a hay ride or some
such, anyway they will be off
campus.
Of course no weekend night
is complete without at least one
formal and the ZTA's are doing
their share to keep the image
going by giving their formal at
the Holiday Inn. It's definitely
formal time and they should be
having a blast.
The DO's also felt it their
obligation to help fill the evening with fun and dancing so they
are formaling at the Imperial
House with the Classics in attendance.
The Fiji's will be making it
casual as they have a quite Informal party at the house.
On the very formal side, the
military will be having a day of
it. If you are brave enou;h to
risic rising at dawn, well almost,
drag over to the drill field and
watch the AFROTC Honors Day
program. This will be followed
by a coffee for the honored
cadets and their guests. To cap
off this day in grand style there
will be a Military Ball, the combined effort of the Army and the
Air Force. The function will be
formal, but not too formal and
the Temptashuns will play in the
Student Center Balhoom.
That should about wrap up the
weekend if you add a few hours
of study and work on a paper
or two. See you at the Derby.

UNITARIAN

ciwncii
Higbe Mill Road
Clays

J
Orange Blossorrj
Diamond Rings

Brooches

Fraternity Jewelry

10:45 A.M.
Service and
Church School

Subject:
"CRISIS

IN LIBERAL

LEADERSHIP"

Yclcrinary (Irani

1

3

April 10 TUIF
April 10 Research Conference, Chemistry-Fhyslc- s
Building
Cancer Teaching Lecture Series, Medical Science Rlclff.,
8:30 p.m.
Spindletnp Hall Dance, 9 to 1
April 10 Coxmorama, 7:30 p.m., Memorial Hall
Lambda Chi Pushcart Derby dance
April 10 11 Central Kentucky Faculty Conference, Student Center
April 11 AFROTC Honors Day Parade, 8 a.m.
Pushcart Derby
Army-AForce Military Ball, 8 p.m.
April 12 Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra 3 p.m.
13
Musicale, Norman Chapman, Pianist, Memorial Hall, 8 p.m.
April
April 12 Concert, Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, Memorial Coliseum, 8:15 p.m.
April 15 Theta Sig dinner
April 15 Musica.l I K Choristers, Memorial Hall, 8 p.m.
English Department Movie, "Hamlet,'' Laboratory Theatre,
4 and 7:30 p.m.
Art Gallery Talk and Reception for Carl Ilolty, Fine Arts
Blilg., 7:30 p.m.
April 16 Kernel Dinner
Memorial Hall,
April 16 Audubon Film, "Kiwi Commonwealth,"
7:30 p.m.
April 17 LKD

It's the newest waxy
neutral under the sun
and it comes in a pile of
sunny Sandler styles.
What color is it? Well,
Haystack's a warm golden tan
. . . no, a
beige . . . well, more a .
oh, it's indescribably pretty.'
d

127 W. MAIN
OPEN

MONDAY

TILL

9:00 P.M.

DOWNTOWN LEXINGTON

petti
II

W

gees down to the
sea in stripes of flog

V:.'

Come see it!

(Euei prettier than it hiked in Glamour!)

V

Charts

Mill Road

Speaker:
REV. DAVID JOHNSON

6:30

The t'niversity has received
a S3.B00 grant from Shell
Chemical Co. to be used for research by the Department of
Veterinary Science.
Dr. Harold Drudge, acting
chairman of the department,
said the fund wil bt employed
of parasites
in investigation
which prey on horses.

9(i

Campus Calendar

Delta will meet
p.m. Monday in Room 115
the Student Center.

Alpha

Mrs. Josephins Riggs McMillen,
from the Tobe'
representative
Coburn School for Fashion Careers in New York City, will
speak at 10 a.m. today In Room
303, Erikson Hall. Anyone interested is invited and personal
interviews may be arranged.

1

i

Ph.D. Orals

The final oral examination
of Mr. Lewis R. Llcberman,
candidate for the Ph.D. degree
in Psychology, will be held at
3 p.m., Friday in Room MS
415, Medical Center. The title
of Mr. Liebennan's di.stertation
Is "The Active Gap: An Application to the Incremental Veril
sus
Learning Controversy."
Members of the faculty and
student body are invited to attend.

of

Careers In Fashion

By NANCY LOVGIIRIDGE

cf the Student

Alpha Lambda Delta
Lambda
at

10,

mm

r

SHOES FOR YOUNG MODERNS
804 Euclid
Chevy Chase

1

redsailor blue.
This suit of water-lovin- g
cotton duck is just
as at home on land where
its short boy bottoms flatter
all sea-leg14.98
Think Young, Tldnk , . .

IMS'

236
OPEN

E.

MAIN

MONDAYS

ST.

TILL 9!

Park One Hour Free in Lot
At Rear of Store

* The Kentucky Kernel
The South' s Outstanding College Daily
Univebsity of Kentucky

second clas matter under the Act ol March 8. 1879.
Entered
trie port office l Leiinfrtrm, Kentucky
week during the regular sc hool year escept diirini holidays ud
Published four times
school year; 10 cents a copy from iilea
Subscription rates: 17

nun.

Sue Endicott, Editor in Chief
Carl Modech, Camput Editor
David Hawpk, Managing Editor
Associate and Dally Editors'.
Richard Stevenson, Sandra Brock, William Grant, and Elizabeth Ward
Departmental Editors:
Sid Webb, Cartoonist
Nancy Loughudge, Social
Wallt Pacan, Sport
Tom Finnik, Circulation Manager
Manager
Jos Curry, Advertising
Phone: News, extension 2285 and 2302; Advertising and Circulation, 2306

Trimester Offers
Greater Advantages
For Use Of Facilities
With enrollment surging every
year the University should consider
acthe advantages of a year-roun- d
ademic calendar.
calendar would have
the advantages of better handling of
the student load, better use of physical facilities, and a shortening of the
undergraduate
training period for
Students who desire it.
A

year-roun- d

Students complain of difficulties
in scheduling classes they need and
overcrowdedness of classes, especin
requireally sections of
ments. A year-roun- d
program, by adding another term, could help eliminate these problems. Many of the
courses hard to schedule and overcrowded are freshman courses, and
many of the students entering the
summer term would be incoming
freshmen.
Better use of dormitories, classroom space, and laboratories would
calendar pro-praresult from a year-roun- d
Now, many of the physical
facilities of the campus go virtually
unused during the summer period,
though the University must pay main- -

Kernels
A recent article in a Czechoslovak
youth magazine explained why the
Western press is censored. Following
are excerpts: "It is difficult to persuade a person that certain information is not good for him. The teaching
profession regards it as extremely
harmful when a pupil learns one thing
about the substance and laws of the
world in his school lessons and the
very opposite in lessons of religious
instruction. We would be practicing
the same contradictions if we were
to explain events to the best of our
ability and then disseminate the capitalist interpretation that is often arbitrary ami malicious. The capitalist
propaganda machine is widespread
and well organized. If we were to
leave free room to all its activities, we
would have to respond in one way or
another. We would have to discuss our
every action with those who are unfriendly to us. And we just do not
feel like doing this. Therefore, we do
not distribute bourgeois newspaper
which are clearly biased against us,
even though we do not hesitate to use
ccr tilting in them that is right and
interesting and that we can find space
for in our press."

"These days no one expects Congress to devise important bills. . , .
This is all wrong. Making laws, not
just scrutinizing them, is the job of
Sen. Abraham Ribicoff
Congress."
(D., Conn.)

tenance costs during this period. Also,
use of buildings would
bring more return on the investment.
Acceleration of the undergraduate
training program would be an advantage for those who plan lengthy
graduate education. Also, many students who leave school before graduation might be encouraged to stay
and graduate if the curriculum were
shortened from four to three years.
The new calendar in operation this
academic year lends itself well to a
trimester system with three
terms.
Immediate financial increases
would be offset by greater and quicker return on capital outlays. If the
summer session could be built up to
the same proportions as the other two
terms, increased tuition and other
fees would increase the total nicome.
Since the University is located in a
fairly well populated section of the
of students
recruitment
country,
should not be too difficult. Many
high school graduates might prefer to
begin college training immediately
rather than to wait a summer.
Next September the University
will set up the calendar for the two
following years. A trimester plan
should be given consideration at this
time.

ewe Of those eupp&t bvw& of

Wisconsin Primary:
AntidoteTo Complaceny
The showing of Alabama's Governor Wallace in the Wisconsin Presidential primary should be an antidote to complacency in the civil-righmovement. By polling about
h
of the total vote, the Alabama Governor reveals that segregationist sentiments exists in the North
as well as the South, and he can
be expected to capitalize on this prejudice in the forthcoming Indiana and
Maryland primaries.
However, upon reflection, Mr.
Wallace's performance in Wisconsin
is not really so surprising. The assumption that racial prejudice does
not exist in the North never had any
foundation in reality. Countless examples of racial clashes in the North
have been recorded clashes usually
touched off over housing. The question is one of degree.

Monsieur X.
At Home, Abroad
Perhaps not as many as he would
wish, but many people nevertheless,
now know who Monsieur X is. He is
Caston Defferre, the first challenger
of de Daulle to appear since 1958.
Defferre has added to his
in the last couple of weeks
by paying a visit to President Johnson at Washington and by returning
to France to renew charges that the
French Government is keeping a close
watch on him, tapping his telephone,
placing sentinels near his house who
take the names of visitors, and so
forth.
All this is not bothering Defferre,
apparently. lie says he will gain more
from it than the government will. Uy
such actions, as it must be clear to
everyone, the government is admitting that it is taking his candidacy
seriously.
Defferre in America avoided the
error of criticizing de Gaulle among
foreigners, yet made clear that the
Defferre style of dealing with allies
would be different from the general's.

w.'

Like de Caulle, Defferre disagrees
with American policy makers on many
things. But he adds that when one
gives reasons, the "Americans understand and appreciate them. What
they do not understand is when one
refuses to discuss questions with
them."
Obviously there are aspects of the
present French regime which Defferre
would change if he came to power.
But it would be easy to exaggerate
his opposition to Gaullist achievements. It should be noted that he has
accepted the present Constitution
which was so much a product of de
Gaulle's own thinking.
So far, however, there is hardly
a possibility that Defferre can win
the presidency unless de Caulle vanishes from the scene or names a successor among his ow n followers, none
of w hom can approach the great leader in the esteem of the French nation.
From The Christian

Science-Monito-

r

In the Wisconsin primary several
factors mitigated against a precise
measurement of sentiment on the civil-righissue. Clearly a number of
Republicans crossed over and voted
for Wallace in the Democratic primary in order to embarrass the party
nationally. Then, too, there were tax
and reapportionment issues in Wisconsin that could have accounted for
some of the votes cast against Wallace's opponent, Governor Reynolds.
But let's assume that the vote was
strictly a referendum on civil rights,
as it was billed, and consider all of
the votes for Walace votes against
civil-righlegislation. Then it would
follow that in Wisconsin the result
was an endorsement of civil rights,
for not only Governor Reynolds, but
the Republican candidate, Represenadtative Byrnes, are both civil-righvocates. Together they ourpolled the
segregationist by about a three-to-on- e
margin.
Nevertheless, the outcome should
serve as a reminder that the battle
against racial prejudice will not be
won easily. No section of the country
is immune to the virus, and in the
North a segregationist such as Wallace mutes his racism and directs his
appeal to "conservatives" who can say
they are not voting for segregation but
against the extension of federal authority.
It was never realistic to consider
the North monolithic on the race issue. It wasn't, even during the Civil
War. Such naive assumptions permit
a candidate like Wallace to go into
any state, deliberately set his sights
low, and claim a great victory whin
his vote exceeds the pre-se- t
figure.
That Wallace got as many votes
as he did is depressing, but it is not
shocking and despite all the claims
the segregationists will make it cannot be interpreted as a rejection of
s
legislation. After all, Wallace lost by a substantial margin,
Covemor Reynolds got the most votes
ever won by a Democrat in a Wisconsin primary, and he won as a supporter of the most controversial piece
of legislation to come before Congress
in this generation.
-- From The Courier-Journ-

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Friday, April

MacArthur Never Revealed
He Knew Meaning Of Fear
By RELMAN MORIN
Associated Press Writer

land that sits in the harbor like
a cork in a bottle. Fires still were
In July, 1945, during the burning on both, and occasionally there was gunfire as the Maallied attack on Balikpapan,
rines mopped up.
the great Borneo oil center,
Adm. Arthur
Struble,
of the Naval task force
Cen. Douglas MacArthur and
an Australian officer were that supported the landings, or,.
dered up his barge. Mr.
'standing on a hill studying a
stepped into it with him.
Several correspondents piled In
terrain map.
behind them.
Suddenly, a concealed JapanWhen they retreated, the North
ese machine gun chattered.
Koreans almost Invariably left
Bullets began kicking up dust,
snipers behind. Using the Japaround the spot where they stood
anese trick of the Pacific War,
and clipping leaves from the
the snipers hid In "spider fox
trees nearby.
holes" that is, a hole covered
General MacArthur continued
with a trap door. Their special
to stare at the map. Moments quarry was an American officer,
he folded It carefully and
later,
especially a high ranker.
handed it to the Australian ofGeneral MacArthur a.sked to
ficer. As they walked down the
be taken close to the sea wall
hill, he said:
at Inchon, and then at the
barge cricle near Woimi-DLast of a Scries
He came whithin easy range
for enemy riflemen, or even for
"By the way, I think It would a grenade thrower.
be a good idea for a patrol to
On the destroyers riding at
take out that machine gun beanchor in the harbor, gun crews
fore someone gets hurt."
waited tensely. They were orThere are many such incidents
dered to "cover" the barge, but
in General MacArthur's story.
there was nothing to shoot at
If he knew the meaning of
unless the Korean Reds fired
fear, or ever considered the posfirst. And by that time it might
sibility of death, he never showbe too late.
ed it. He exposed himself to
"We sure heaved a sigh of rein battle like a reckless
danger
lief when that barge moved away
platoon leader, although as Commafrom here," a young Navy lieunder-in-Chief,
he was by no
told me, later.
means "expendable." He had a tenant
must be nuts to take
saying:
chances like that."
"You can's fight 'em if you
General MacArthur, meancan't see 'em."
while, looked like a vacationer
After the Inchon landings In
taking a pleasan