xt7qz60bzr1w https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7qz60bzr1w/data/mets.xml Savannah, Georgia Georgia Federal Writer's Project 1937 Compiled and Written by Savannah unit Federal Writers' Project in Georgia Works Progress Administration; Sponsored by Chamber of Commerce, Savannah; xiv, 208 pages: illustrated and maps, 24cm; UK holds archival copy for ASERL Collaborative Federal Depository Program libraries; Call number F294.S2 F4 books English Savannah, Ga., Review Printing Co., 1937 This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed in accordance with U. S. copyright laws. Georiga Works Progress Administration Publications Savannah text Savannah 1937 1937 2015 true xt7qz60bzr1w section xt7qz60bzr1w                       4.·v           T. 
      {5%  0;;/”- WJ        
1 is ik?   ? ,,7,7   ~4··»— **Y¤  "'— 1*}¤Z`t\?.*" :
,· ,  Q   4¢4~@?j -,  -     _i ~ ,_ ...;.    
  ¤   wi »      * Lis    —» — »  ~a  
      gf           I  
      €<7¢Ze ,   WM `* ‘‘;‘   g
riaéis ·/ /3 »
\   "6W%§§j%§# ??,’g"”"" @$2.2 ~%/J.»»?””d¥ i7#%’—6’M>&¢¢  
5;    ‘ w6»:—`7 iwwm      
    ‘A ·       J 
                                   
"   A .,.,. ....»m;».·¤¤ V. :—. »   ·— l ‘   ··»· · · "‘" ‘j’”"` `````’ ‘“`   V `‘»»  

 JW .;;;,7. ll
Z J
{Zi
Wi
ref;
 %ii>`
 QQ
 
@2
Ti
’$
I
 
. ;-
`. wi `
HHH
2  I ng
j  ., *   ;
.   wh 
` !=”1¢Q 
  V ·.     4
je *3    
,    5  5
P —    5 
5 [ ,;  
‘   353}
~    ..j
V  
I  i f
A · I.}? 
s-  -»   
4  w i?
y  V    
 A  Asijff
  `  
I     
»  A *·r ·» j
:  s. » .·;*[:`{
N -   ·‘~g,t"*§
‘*" g  ji 
Yi  , Ami?
" |·   ‘·l' ~—q,.f:rf
‘ · _;x  ‘r1¤—Ql
. {H   `gég

 $$2
F3; , 4V'—‘s
J? ` `
if ·
 
  Y
1   A I
  Y _ — LIBRARY ‘ =
    "|1N|VERS\TY‘ OF KENTUCKY  
      5 3}   ··  
  <1“`I ; V   ’“ 9   i
  V YQ SH @1%%%   Q ¥
 il        V; M gr, I " _·  · " i f     
`  S4 { w  .` A . A - ‘ `K     -
  rv a Y. ¤¤ss R .45 ~ ’¢ i Q    · 2 ’
  "it   »- ,. ,w`  `   ·   I
 YQ ·»;· 5 $3: W FJ J J ,2 5/ .    .' _·» V 
  ’?‘* Bw ·j%¥€¥¤§ — ff \\ i
 R·· 2 _€? D u; ·¤‘ ¥·¢ $4     ;_ 5
;->.»   I'   , • n • .. , A  *;g?<; ° ; U
* 2 ". `   ». y V U   - ’ `· ~Z  I
    »    Ri   · ·· — ·· ··       * R4-%‘¤¥’*    M §
Y `VEMQ V     v l W E   - Q · `    r·“»Lr;[,          N  d`    
R .Y`°Y   R v" H     ‘ ,  “ * RY       j   Q? i lg Q         E
  .    n · ;   ¤ sv   ; gf       R , . K   R   {     i
Y  ‘KfY ?rH§mK " ‘K“R »     9* 'k;§;;    **¥ Kif     R `“'“? ·~-   " Y
.;    Y     ‘K;’ ” P R ·f*?f ~       »   »’   “   g[  `”"*‘   M é
      ?§?`¥“}.”?   = ig   L g   q   _ ‘   [ K       ‘
Y  ;·;   *       Q`? K $+1   ~     “_¢ »   ‘     » =   ‘%»;?“   RY,_ ?  1
] R s —»—·»· »   WE
,       , ‘ W igi=  I/j      Q     is         "    "`-    ’`K K `KQ;-*\;¤ V. *5, ~ ' ~  ‘?  °,
¥*  ~      .i4.        ·`’     K 5  YVE   RK      Y`    K 4  "g“  Y    K 
,       A  ` " i f       R  1*  Y i   ..Y_ §     ,Y» ' $ $,1;  »¢,-@1, R
·     M '7 r,· ww   »— _ · u»· ~ ,,t ».n~  V gw ·-   - Qty  ~· ~  , ·  ,   .*   · `*   ·;·.. { ~ I ,,4 ,»>.•  z·. uu, V  ; Q · 0*  Y
    ».·        w».»       °·°V`              _’-  
   ‘     RY        Y        R `Y     »  Q   ~
  ;   *~#R      w ;% £.; ’~,YY       *   ~ R~    = 2    `  .` -    *>e‘;  ~‘‘~ M    £—     .»=, R** ~,...\ *
+1     Y       ·R·*   —     `$“@» ~¤¤    ~   }   ’ a J ‘- ·· Y .
*42    ·&V‘   __r_‘l V       A _ _ · ‘ - A V   —  ,   A ·‘ [ EM   ‘r"y¤··:g‘*I Ky? ‘·’* M · ;·I > __
)’   ’ `,   ~..’ ‘¤   ’“ “ , M » _` f ll   ff · l WJ ‘  '   I I N   ` V   ‘ W »  
  ` _ _`   __ ,— V V ¥`€>i·;j_ji > _; v~·__ rj     ' _ V " · _ V I A U   ‘ — V ` ·{· ‘ ·   A ·;_   I  i  
\ I .,¥;,¢· ~ ,___ ; _ ,,~“· .4 ~ A _* .. ,_ ··   _> _ »' ·»p··j: ’—,_-,__,_ A - ·, We  ,___, _____
  ~»·R * K~‘L ’ "‘”>**"\‘ ’‘`''     K { . W   4   _   * ·¤ R·»~’ I »‘~’ ‘ “  -     ‘'K‘ ‘·¥*   4   
    » `R  R_,`  Y" " ~ J`Y*’°   A gr `     `‘»~  i ¤;,.c»; v-L. 2:};;,W ~‘;v—;,R—· 2  `"    ,Y,—·,   ~»~—   L
* *  `_ K  , R K;’`   Y K K  ·”—,‘ ff;1 ~:K’§   ·~·`     J
   »   *’RK’ ‘     “   Y        Y. -..`     `’‘V     ‘‘.‘  
  J       -.   _R—Y           . VR~’   5  ''.‘     J
  I   =       ‘  ;  R=_  $352,1  Q 2
(  ;.g"5g·~¤;.   " "       f  T5;. ‘ ,2;, ``'. *?'; ¢¢'      · ~•·~— "'···’~—~·=‘······¤##·~·~·¥·¥···`.'   .
    J,§§2_;£g$*·· R· »       ~ . >»; »   ' `?`   · R 9 C} R °
_ '     ·A-·     A4   _   —  ·'   ‘ `   a) I
eb, - ° »¤ *” ‘*   M . ~ R.   A 4     __ __     ` ’

 .  `*\· 4,
:t,`r V * ;_, ll

 =`°\—.*,/
1 AMERICAN GUIDE SERIES {  
I Q
I ` I
  I S AVA N N A H {  
Compiled dnd Written by  
A SAVANNAH UNIT 2
l FEDERAL WRITERS’ PROJECT IN GEORGIA ·
i WORKS PROGRESS ADMINISTRATION
T - I I
  hn..¤·‘f»K ww   \"*_ ~ ¥‘— V I
I ·;
¢
lk   A . ,
  Sponsored by
I CHAMBER OF COMMERCE  
I SAVANNAH  
i   1937 y b
g REVIEW PRINTING C0., SAVANNAH, GA.  
LAS I I AM- . .....,74 _--,A A   ,.»-.A T- AAI

 ;’*f f .
O
0
{
` kg 917.58 F317
Federal Writers' Project (Ga. [E
Savannah; compiled and writte e
F 294.S2 F4 ¤*
\ V<>\E'
Copyright 1937 by thé
‘ Chamber of C0mm€I’€€
Savannah, Ga·
ea
2
5
vi
Q7

 l`°T1* n
O
o
:\
; {
rf)
K
Q F O R E W O R D ,
Vix L
Ln Savannah is one of America’s cities which has a very distinct indi-
viduality. Many writers have written glowingly of its charms. VVilliam  
g Dean Howells, one of its admirers and a frequent visitor in the last years Q
§ of his life, wrote of "that noble sequence of wooded and gardened squares
which form the glory of the city." Its romance appealed to him, as it has
appealed to countless others.
Here the past and the present meet in a happy combination. Streets
and squares and monuments and buildings recall two centuries of American `
history in which the city has played a not inglorious part. From this heroic .
E past has come inspiration for the progressive Savannah of today. The  
· walks and the drives that are outlined in this book will bring the tourist {
in contact with many spots made memorable by deeds of patriotic valor,  
or associations with men whose vision and services contributed notably to  
our country’s development. Scenes of rare beauty will also be revealed to g
those fortunate enough to use this book as a companion, and a new com- ‘
prehension will come to them of the significance of this city and section in `
the story of the South and of the Nation.
The authors of this book have caught the spirit of Savannah, and the ,
reader will glean from its pages an understanding of that intangible hold V
which she has on her people, which makes them think of her with longing Q
affection even after years of enforced absence, and brings within her doors
time after time visitors who have once come under the spell of her charm. f
The easy, informal style of the volume differentiates it from the usual .
guide book. While its primary purpose is to introduce the visitor to the
points of special attraction, it will prove of interest also to the armchair
_ traveler who has no immediate prospect of seeing Savannah for himself.
To those who conceived the idea of a national guide book and its
sub—division into local guides, and to those who compiled and edited and
made possible the publication of this especial volume, the citizens of this
section and the grateful tourists, into whose hands it will come, must ac-
knowledge their debt of obligation.
THOMAS GAMBLE.
oo
2
G
Q e
Q iii

 :i· '
P R E F A C E
` The Federal Writers' Project of the Works Progress Administration
District No. 3 of Georgia consists of 17 counties with offices in Brunswick
and Waycross in addition to the head office in Savannah. The project has
been functioning since November 1935. The first year of this period was
spent in compiling material for the Savannah section of the American Guide,
a compendium of informative detail to serve as a comprehensive guide to
the United States. A State Guide, a State Encyclopedia, a Civil Government
Survey, and radio playlets, initiated as subsidiary projects, are in process
of completion. In addition for the past four months the writers have been
occupied in building up source material for a guide on Savannah.
Savannah, the book that has evolved from this work, is both a history
and a guide. First-hand information from recognized historians, original -
documents, standard histories, diaries, and letters have been the sources
from which it has been written. Beyond these recognized aids thanks are
due to a number of organizations and citizens who have given time and
‘ cooperation to this undertaking. Special acknowledgment should be made
‘ to Dolores B. Floyd and to Thomas Gamble for their critical advice; to Ola
F M. Wyeth and the staff of the Savannah Public Library and the Library
Staff of the Morning News for their assistance; to Cletus Bergen for check-
i ing architectural material; to Thomas Gamble, Alfred Jones, George R.
Foltz and the United States National Park Service for the use of photo-
graphs from which some of the drawings were made; to the City Engineer’s `
office for its cooperation and help with old maps; and to the office of the
East Georgia Planning Council, NRC, for maps which it has drawn
especially for the Guide.
It is through the progressive attitude of the Savannah Chamber of
Commerce in sponsoring this book that its publication has been made
possible; and all workers connected with the local Writers’ Project are very
appreciative of this fact.
Many of our writers have had professional experience, while others,
through their work in historic research, compilation of data and arrange-
ment of material have learned much in the year’s experience. All of the
drawings used in this book, other than maps, have been done on the project.
Any discovery is an exciting experience, and the compilation of this material
has been pleasurable as well as profitable, since we believe that one or two
facts have been unearthed that have not been generally known. Careful
verification of all data in this guide has been made and we feel that as far
as is possible, the information it contains is accurate.
iv

  
me SAVANNAH we  
C O N T E N T S i
_""_ Page
Foreword .........................................................».............................................. iii y
Preface ............................,............................... . ............................................. iv `
Illustrations ...........................................`..............................................v........ vii
Maps __,.__.......................,.,.............................,.. I .............................................. viii ·  
Notations ......................................................... . ............................................. ix  
n General Infomation ..,,.................................. . ............................................. xi   `
PART I: The City  
Chronology .,............,...............................,................................. 3  
Signiiicant Facts ....................................................................... 4
Contemporary Scene ........................ , ....................................... 7 `
First Americans and Early Explorers ..... . .............................. 13 Z
_ English Colonization ....................................,............................ 18  
Civil and Military Development ......................,....................... 22 i
Industry ..................................................................................... 28/ I
Transportation .......,................................................................... 36J `
The Old South ................................,.....,................................... 43
Negro Life and History .................,.......... A .........,.................   47
Church Origins and Influences ................................................ 55
Georgia Historical Society ..........................,.........._......... ,_ ,,,__,_ 60
Telfair Academy ....................................,..4.......,...,................... 64
The Stage in Early Savannah ................. . .......................,,,_,,, 69
Newspapers .........................................................,...................... 76
Styles in Building ...................................... . .......,...............,....,. 82
Foot Tours
Points of Interest .........................................,.....»..................... 91 `
Markers and Monuments .........,................ . ...........................,.. 92
Foot Tour 1 ............................................... . .............................. 95
2 .............................................................................. 106
3 .............................................................................. 117
 
I

 C O N T E N T S — (Continued)
Page
PART II: The Vicinity
Points of Interest .................................................................... 129
Short Tour 1 ................................. - ................................,....... 130
2 .......................................................................... 134
3 .......................................................................... 137 _
Long Tour 1 ........_.................................................................. 141
2 ........................................................................... 151
` Fort Pulaski ............,....................... . ...............................,........ 154
{ Bonaventure ...............,............................................................. 160
i Wormsloe ........................................ . .................................... -..- 165
[ Bethesda ..........................................,........................................ 171
  Dead Towns .................................... . .................................. ..... 176
The Golden Isles ................................i..................................... 181
Trembling Earth ............................`........................................ 190
Glossary ............................................................... I ........................................ 195
Bibliography ........................................................ .. ................ I .............. ......--- 196
Index ..,.......................................................................................................... 200
vi
l

 ILLUSTRATIONS
.L—— Page .
Pink House Portico ..................................................................................... 2 ¤
The Post Office ............................................... . ............................................ 7 ,
Tomochichi Boulder ...,..................................................... . .................. .. ....... 13 I
Stone Underpass .................................................. . ........................................ 18  
The Old City Exchange ...................................... 1 ................................... -... 22
The Old Court House .............»........................... . ........................................ 27 I
Industrial Section ............................................... - ........................................ 28 '
Steamship Savannah .................................................................................... 36
Central of Georgia Railr0ad——1838 ................... . ........................................ 42 `
The Hermitage ,...................................................................................... . ..... 43
Slave Cabins ................................................................................................ 46 _ ·
The First Bryan Baptist Church ...........,........»........................................... 47 Q
· Christ Church ...................................................... . »....................................... 55 {
Independent Presbyterian Church .................,.....,...................................... 59  
Hodgson Hall ............................................,.......... . ..........l............................. 60  
The Telfair Academy ................................................................................... 64 Q
The Original Savannah Theatre ......................... . ........................................ 69 L
The News Press ....................................................,...................................... 76 ·
The Davenport House ..,............................................................................... 82
High Stoops ......,...................,.................................,..................................... 86
Iron Stair Rail ......................................................................................... -... 89 _
The Gordon House ....................................,.................................................. 95 A
The Meldrim House ............................................. . ....................................   101 ¤
Old Doorway .....................................................,.......................................... 105 `
Balcony on the Owens House ..................,.......,.. . ........,........,..............__,,,,,, 106 .
East Oglethorpe Avenue ............................................................................. 112 `
Girl Scouts Headquarters ................................... , ............,...,...................,... 114
Iron Balcony ....................................................... . .......V,....,...,.............._...,,,, 117 i
The Giles Becu House ...,..................................... . .................,........_.....,,,,... 122
The Market .................................................................,......,..............,_,,________ 126
Beach at Tybee .....................................................................,.................,.... 130
River and Marsh ................................................. . ............,..,,,.......___,,,_ _ _______ 134
The Savannah River ........................................... .. ..............,..,,.__,.,____,__,,___,,_ 137
Midway Church ..................................................._.,.__,.._,__,____,i<___________ _ ________ 141
Pine Forests .........................................................__,,___________,______,__________________ 151
Arcades at the Fort ....................................,....... N ....,_.._.._.___________________________ 154
Gaston Tomb .....................................................,._.___,______________________________ _ ____ 160
Wormsloe Gardens ,.......,...................................... _ ,,_,_________,__,_______________________ 165
The Original Plan of Bethesda ...................,....... _ __,_____________________________________ 171
Old Jerusalem Church ..............,...............,........i___,__________________________________   176
Fort Frederica ..................................................... _ _______________________________________ 181
The Cloister Hotel ..............................,,..............._,,_______________ _ ______________________ 184
The Swamp ................__,__.______________________,____,____,__, _ _______________________________________ 190
vii

 M A P S
Page
Skeleton Transportation .............................................................................. x
Skeleton Recreation ...................................................,................................. x
Guide Map to Foot Tours ........... . .............................................................. 90 -
Savannah and Vicinity ....................,,.....,........... . ................ Q ....................... 128
i WPA District No. 3 ........................................... . ....................................... 140
}
T viii
I
\
. l

 N O TAT I O N S i
In order that the tourist may have no difiiculty in finding any point  
of interest in Savannah and vicinity, or on the longer tours, five maps have j
been included in the material, and a comprehensive system of cross-refer- Y
ences has been devised. The maps include a Transportation Map, a :
Recreation Map, a Guide Map to Foot Tours, the Savannah and Vicinity .
Map and a WPA District No. 3 Map.
(1) The Recreation Map indicates all recreation centers in and 4
around Savannah, including tennis courts, golf courses, various resorts
where swimming and boating may be enjoyed and Savannah Beach where I j
surf bathing is popular.  
(2) The Transportation Map indicates two railroad stations, bus  
stations, U. S. and State Highways, the airport and the docks from which  
passenger steamers depart for New York, Boston, Philadelphia and Jack-  
sonville. `
(3) The Guide Map to Foot Tours indicates points of interest shown
by numbers which correspond with the numbers in Foot Tours Nos. 1, 2 and
3; parks and squares shown by Roman numbers; and historic sites shown _
by letters. T
(4) The Savannah and Vicinity Map indicates the points of interest ’ A
numbered according to the list accompanying the map; these numbers 1
appear in directions for short tours of Savannah and Vicinity. `
(5) A WPA District No. 3 Map indicates long tours leading out of
Savannah following U. S. and State Highways.
When a point of interest appears in an article, the correct number
of that point and the name of the map on which it appears are placed in
a parenthesis by that point of interest.
A glossary of local words not in common usage has been attached.
A suggestive bibliography provides further leads for those interested
in more intensive study.
ix I
I x

 -- "\` I
Ip 1 n
I- II x w `
v I,. 2 $4
1- V
cor     ,0} "-,,,, \ SAVANNAH AND VICINITY
° wES7·  I CI/,
’I/Is
    Musa OISSCG  _ °~ ,84 /?’I/g,? TRANSPORTATION MAP
~z _ ~¤_   **4/O
  {  .  MIC gEJICIFAL EAST GEOSSQWELENNING COUNCIL
I‘ CENTRAL  ‘ ·  
. /
_ DEPOT _
"·~  §`Ig/§TION F'!
I UNION  _l ‘
y. sncrrow  O\,<  
I  :7./1- S `I ·OY\\_\p"e` M
Z" ' 5 ·\- .
  `    I,/C To    
_ __ L Q S Ry DNN /
I »r-·   -   _,,_ .
I   ' · I *~\ I .
ws \/\ -\
lg V- ~/\ _ \/·    BZ: ,c 8
[_ \\ II TYBE5 nn.  
5 Sw e
I   \
I \ gf
III {/ \\\ f SCALE MILES
' \ MUNICIPAL I O I 2 3 4
\ AIRPORT    
I \ .11:.0. ·|2-30-35
I ~ .
  I A ,,  - W gw
Lofi ¤·» " Sr ‘;"’=<75**"" SAVANNAH AND VICINITY
’ WAL:  \I YwcA 
¤.\I  I ‘ _
L~\_  ,*YMC,·`  I_ /·’_/ RECREAT ION MAP
Io  I
7 J . /C
j   SSSEQSGQIS / /ZAVANNAH DRAWN BY
• ` ·‘ \ `L»` k\ /GOLF CLUB EAST GEORGIA PLANNING COUNCIL
K , 5/  *\" Q ?`g`\\7LF` COURSE
‘ L/\ I *1-c_¢"}I , \/
\ \ .1.c.c. 12-1:-J6
I X
I
. I

  U ,
NITY
AAP GENERAL INFORMATION
RAILROADS: Central of Georgia Ry. Co.: Central of Georgia Station, -
JCM. 301 W. Broad St. Daily service S. and W. Atlantic Coast Line Ry., Sea- .
board Air Line Ry., Southern Ry. System: Union Station, 419 W. Broad ,
St. Daily service N. and S. and W. Savannah & Atlanta Ry.: Savannah ‘ T
Georgia Terminal, Cohen St. Daily service to Waynesboro, Ga.
STEAMSHIPS: Ocean Steamship Co. Passenger and freight service
between Savannah and New York and Boston. Ticket oiiice, 301 W. Broad
St., main oilice and piers, berths 12 and 13, Central of Georgia Docks. .
Five ships weekly to New York. Adequate shipping facilities for auto-
mobiles. Coastwise line. Merchant & Miners Transportation Co. Passenge1· .  
and freight service between Boston, Providence, Philadelphia and Baltimore,  
n Norfolk and Newport News and Savannah, Jacksonville, West Palm Beach i
;%r and Miami. Main office, foot of Fahm St., berths 1, 2 and 3. Nine ships  
We weekly N. and S. Adequate shipping facilities for automobiles. Coastwise {
line. Augusta & Savannah Line. Passenger and freight service between E
Savannah and Augusta. Docks at foot of Whitaker St. Beaufort & l
4 Savannah Line. Passenger and freight service between Savannah and
' Beaufort. Docks at foot of Abercorn St. Freight lines: ships leave Savan-
"2‘°°"° nah for all foreign ports with accommodations for a few passengers. _
, AIRPORTS: Atlantic and Gulf Coast Air Line, Inc. Daily service, ,
Savannah to Mobile via Jacksonville, Tallahassee and Pensacola. Eastern ·i
Air Lines. Daily service, New York and Miami. Strachan Skyways, Inc. Q
Arrangements may be made for private planes. Hunter Field, Savannah ‘
Airport. Emmett Wilson Blvd. 5 m. on White Bluff Rd. Taxi to airport $1.
BUS LINES: Glennville & Savannah Bus Line, 417 Berrien St.
3 Savannah to Glennville. Greyhound Lines, 111 Bull St. New York to
1* Miami. Savannah Beach Bus Line, 111 Bull St. Savannah to Tybee.
Pan-American Bus Lines, 336 Drayton St. New York to Miami.
TAXICABS: Rates (present time, per person), and Zones: 10c, Bay
St. to Victory Drive; 20c, Bay St. to City Limits; 10c, Florence St. to
Ogeechee Rd.; 10c, additional to the river. Private car, double zone rate,
E, plus 10c for each additional person. Car by hour, $2.50. Long distance
. ® trips 12c per m. Daily sight seeing bus tour of the city and environs leaves
Hotel Savannah at 10 a. m., Hotel De Soto 10:15 a. m. Occasional after-
noon tours leave Hotel De Soto 2:45 p. m., Hotel Savannah, 3 p. m. Many
` points of interest covered in this book may be seen on these tours.
STREETCARS: Main junction, Broughton and Whitaker Sts. Fare
Sc (4 tokens for 25c). Outlying service such as to Port Wentworth,
xi
|2·3l-36
I

 — `°\;_' ,
Thunderbolt, Isle of Hope; additional fare according to zone. Busses have
largely replaced streetcars in the city; fare same for either.
TRAFFIC REGULATIONS: No parking in or on any driveway,
viaduct, underpass or overpass; no parking in any lane except to load or
unload merchandise or other commodities. Time limits noted by signs,
parking spaces marked by yellow line, so tourist should have no difficulty
in parking correctly. No U turn on Broughton St. between Habersham and
W. Broad Sts. All traiiic may make an R turn on red light. In general
Savannah trafiic regulations are like those of other cities.
ACCOMMODATIONS: Eight hotels in the downtown area with rates
from $1 to $2.50 per day for single room in smaller commercial hotels and
$1.50 to $3.50 per day in larger ones. Other rates accordingly. All hotels
are operated on European plan; tou1·ist homes are dotted throughout the
city, most numerous in vicinity of Whitaker and 37th Sts.
SERVICE CLUBS: Exchange Club meets every Monday, Hotel Sa-
, vannah, 2 :15 p. m. Kiwanis Club meets every Wednesday, Hotel Savannah,
. 2 p. m. Lions Club meets every Tuesday, Hotel Savannah, 2 p. m. Pilot
if Club meets second and fourth Tuesday of month, Hotel Savannah, 6:30
p. m. Propeller Club meets second Thursday of month, Hotel Savannah,
7 p. m. (Founded in Savannah, it is now a national organization.) Rotary
l Club meets every Tuesday, Hotel De Soto, 2:15 p. m. Savannah Business
and Professional Wome11’s Club meets third Monday of month, Hotel
De Soto, 6:15 p. m. Savannah Motor Club (AAA) meets first Monday of
month, Hotel De Soto.
FRATERNAL ORGANIZATIONS: Alee Temple, 429 Bull St.
Eagles’ Home, 110 E. Perry St. Elks’ Home, 12 W. Oglethorpe Ave. In-
dependent Order of Odd Fellows, 206 W. State St. Junior Order of
American Mechanics, 314 Whitaker St. Knights of Columbus, 3 W. Liberty
St. Knights of Pythias, 123 W. York St. Loyal Order of Moose, 19 W.
Congress St. Masonic Lodge Rooms, 108 W. Liberty St.
AMUSEMENT CENTERS: Savannah Beach, 18 m. E. of the city,
surf bathing, fishing, boating and variety of outdoor sports.
GOLF COURSES: Municipal Golf Links, Isle of Hope Rd. Two 18
hole courses and a clubhouse. Green fee 50c. Caddy fee 50c. Savannah
Golf Course, Moore Ave., 3 m. SE. of Savannah. Eighteen—hole course with
old Confederate breast-works now used for bunkers and traps. Cards for
non-members may be procured at the leading hotels for $1.50. Only caddy
fees charged for additional rounds. Wilmington Island Course, adjacent to
General Oglethorpe Hotel. 18-hole Donald Ross Golf Course. Green fee
50c. Caddy fee 50c.
xii
I
I
` l

 l`”\;"» ’  
GYMNASIUMS: Y. M. C. A., 308 Bull St. Y. W. C. A., 105 W.
Oglethorpe Ave. Jewish Educational Alliance, 328 Barnard St.  
POLO: Savannah Polo Field, Waters Ave. Ext.
RIDING ACADEMIES: (Privately Owned.)  
RIFLE RANGES: Savannah Rifie Association: Office, Factor’s Walk,
foot of Price St. Riiie Range at Wilmington Island.
STADIUM: Municipal Stadium, Daffin Park, Victory Drive and
Bee Rd. ~
SWIMMING: Daffin Park, large artificial lake. Savannah Beach,  
surf bathing. Y. M. C. A., indoor swimming pool. Y. W. C. A., indoor I g
swimming pool. i
TENNIS COURTS: Daffin Park, municipal courts. Forsyth Park,  
municipal courts.  
THEATRES: Six motion picture theatres in downtown area, two of i
which feature first-run pictures. The Municipal Auditorium is available
for performances of theatricals, musicals and concerts. Other halls for
public use are Armstrong Junior College Auditorium, Jewish Educational I
Alliance Hall, Lawton Memorial, St. Paul’s Episcopal Parish Hall, St. `
Paul’s Lutheran Parish Hall. _ ?
RADIO STATION: W. T. O. C. in Hotel De Soto, connected with the {
Columbia Broadcasting System.
LIBRARIES: Main Library, 2002 Bull St. Weekdays: 9 a. m. to 9:30 A
p. m. Sundays: 4 p. m. to 7 p. m. Downtown Branch, 110 E. Congress
St. Weekdays: 9 a. m. to 6 p. m. (Not open Sundays.) Hodgson Hall,
501 Whitaker St. Daily: 2 p. m. to 9 p. m. Carnegie Library (Negro), 537
E. Henry St. Weekdays: 9 a. m. to 9 p. m. Sundays: 4 p. m. to 5 p. m.
HUNTING AND FISHING: Hunting and fishing are year-round
sports. Fishing facilities at Isle of Hope, Thunderbolt, Coffee Bluff, Mont-
gomery, White Bluff, Vernon View, Savannah Beach, Ogeechee River
and Savannah River. April and May are usually closed season for fresh-
water fishing. Hunting season for marsh hen opens about Sept. 1. Squirrel
hunting is the popular October sport. Nov. 20 to March 1 is the open
season for quail, dove, turkey, deer, bear, raccoon, mink, rabbit, otter
and opossum. State hunting licenses may be obtained at any of the larger
hardware stores. County license $1, State license $3.25. Extra Government
tax on duck shooting $1. `
xiii I

   A ~~——··—~—ei·~ ,,.... _, V   A   -*1* »  
`Y 
E
[X 
   V
`· 1
i
SH OPPING: Broughton St. forms the nucleus of Savannah’s shopping  
district. Prices reasonable for all types of merchandise. Savannah known g
as a good place to shop for clothes, shoes, hats, notions and specialties of ~  
all sorts, including antiques, marine supplies, hunting equipment, old books  
and gifts. Out of town newspapers on sale at news stands on Bull St. or  
Whitaker St.  
 
ANNUAL EVENTS: January 1, Emancipation Day parade and it
celebration (Negro). February 12, Georgia Day. March 17, St. Patrick’s it
Day celebration. April (No fixed date), Huckster Contest, Forsyth Park; y
Annual Dog Show, auditorium. April 26, Southern Memorial Day parade.  
May 1, Chatham Artillery anniversary. May 15 or 30, Annual Beauty lg
Contest, Savannah Beach. May 22, Maritime Day. July (second Thursday), {
Annual Interstate Sailboat Regatta, Wilmington Island. November (Thanks-  
giving), High School-Benedictine Football Game, stadium.  
CLIMATE: Mean temperature 68°. Humidity readings 58-62. I
‘ Moderate climate. Few extremes in clothing needed. During the unusually {
S
Q) long, semi-tropical summers, light-weight apparel practical. January and K;
February, heavy coat useful. Winter usually mild. E
{ INFORMATION SERVICE: Savannah Chamber of Commerce, 3 E.  
‘ Bay St. Automobile Association, Hotel De Soto. Travelers Aid, Union  
Station, 419 W. Broad St. A
 `
I,
E.
I
xiv
I l`
. i  
. I

   _
{  
    f
Q PART ll  
THE CITY §
1 ‘
g `

 ;¢-V · Y~——~——————~ V_ r_r_r __ _ __n_  __i_ if _ ..............'*
__!_}L$_) _};_}·_} jjj _} _§ j.3J..§r.¥¤£ ..3 3 } .;»-`"Z’ .,"‘I`éZ} QJ.   Q ?’*_`j_ gV__`¤Q _   ;_ » g4
·‘ ’ . . """""""'—""T‘°"°“""""'» ' ‘ · ' `“‘*’*».~..·»·-·.;··—·p·-—·~·———-·-·~·~·-~·~-
[ .