xt7r4x54fw3s https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7r4x54fw3s/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19170426  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, April 26, 1917 text The Kentucky Kernel, April 26, 1917 1917 2012 true xt7r4x54fw3s section xt7r4x54fw3s 1

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
University of Kentucky
GIRLS9
ISSUE

VOL IX

LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY. APRIL 26, 1917.
FACULTY DISSOLVES
MYSTIC 13 AND KEYS

ARBOR DAY AND TAP
EXERCISES

ON MAY

4

Tree To Be Planted and
Senior Societies
To Pledge

WILL FLOW

ORATORY

May 4 is the date announced for the
annual Arbor Day exercises of the
University, and for Tap Day for Lamp
and Cross and Staff and Crown, Senior
honor societies for men and women,
respectively. Class work will be suspended on this day after 10 o'clock,
and It is probable that the battalion
will fall in for dress parade, as has
been the custom in past years.
Arbor Day Is a State and National
holiday, and altho the University does
not observe it on the regular day all
the forms are gone thru faithfully.
The Senior class selects a spot on the
campus and plants a sapling, dedicating it to some person 'whom it desires to honor. Each member of the
class throws in a shovelful of soil and
the spade is Anally turned over formally to the official representative of
the Junior class. Short speeches will
be made this year by William Shin-nicpresident of the Senior class;
Orie Li. Fowler, Senior orator, and Virgil Chapman, Junior orator.
In other years some of the best
speeches of the year have been made
on the occasion of the planting of the
tree and this year is expected to be
no exception to the rule of general
excellence.
Tap Day is always of great interest
to the members of the Junior class,
for the Senior class societies formally
pledge their members for next year
men and women.
from the third-yea- r
Lamp and Cross always pledges the
ten men who in the opinion of the
members are the most representative
of the next year's graduates, and Staff
and Crown usually pledges the same
number.
The members of fhe Senior honor
societies now in the University are:
(Lamp and Cross MoClarty Harbison, Curtis Park, Than Rice, Bart
Peak, William Shinnick and George
Hill.
Staff and Crown iLinda Purnell,
Helen Burkholder, Frances Geieel,
Mary 'Hamilton and Jane Dickey.
Of the four Lamp and Cross men
who are not "here now, George Gum-b'eand Oren Lamaster have been
teaching since February, and W. T.
Radford and 'Ben iMahoney are in the
Kentucky National Guards.
MARTIN

HEADS

DEMOCRATS.

Bill Martin, a Junior in the College
of Law, was unanimously elected president of the Democratic Club last
Thursday night. Other officers were
chosen as follows: Doc Rodes, vice
president; A. 8. Treadway, recording
secretary; A. L. Cole, corresponding
secretary; B. J. Riley, treasurer; H.
L. Mliward,
an4 John Leama,

RANKS

GREATLY

ARE

DISHED

Enrollment Is Reduced To
Almost Half Within
Week

ADOPT

RESOLUTIONS

Approximately half of the students
of the University have taken advantage of the recent faculty ruling, giv
ing credit for the rest of the year's
work to those who will return to the
farm and put in a food or feed crop,
leaving the students ranks greatly
thinned. The number has been fur
ther diminished by several students
entering military service.
Among the most recent enlistments
are: Herndon J. Evans, of Frank
fort, and fflmer B. Allen, of George
town, who joined the Kentucky Na
tional Guards Tuesday morning. W.
S. Rust, of Canada, and J. McGowan,
of Bagdad, will leave in a few days to
enlist in the coast artillery.
Only 100 men are now left of the
Be400 in the University battalion.
of
cause of the loss of twenty-eigh- t
forty members, 'the band disbanded
Tuesday. Band members have been
transferred to the signal corps, which
had been reduced to a very few men.
Hardest hit by the
farm" movement are the College of
Law and the College of Agriculture,
of which departments almost the en
tire enrollment have left. In other
collegea the Junior and Senior classes
are only slightly diminished, while a
number of Freshmen and Sophomores
from all departments have returned to
the farm.
Discontinuance of athletics for the
remainder of the year has been
by the Athletic Committee, but
no action has been taken. Track worlf
has been practically suspended as several leading members of the squad
have already left. Meets with
and the University of Cincinnati have been cancelled by those
"back-tothe-

d

Van-derbl-

)4i,

gergetti4tjf.

.

VIRGIL CHAPMAN TO
EDIT LAW JOURNAL DR. TIGERT RESIGNS

The Keys and Mystic Thirteen,
Sophomore and Junior honorary societies of the University, wore ordered dissolved by the faculty in special
meeting Friday. This action was
taken on the recommendation of the
Discipline Committee after they tried
the members of the two societies on
the charge of giving a dance at the
Phoenix Hotel last Friday evening in
violation of the faculty rules and regulations for University dances.
A rule was passed two years ago requiring the annual dance of these organizations and several others to be
held on the campus. Committees from
the two societies said that a lack of
facilities for a proper entertainment
on the campus was the reason the
dance was held at the Phoenix.

STUDENT

(Continued on Page 8)

No. 29

TO MEREST

FRACTION

Virgil Chapman, of Lexington, was
f
last week appointed
for
the ensuing year of the Kentucky Law
Journal, monthly publication of tho
students of the College of Law, by
Dean W. T. Lafferty and the faculty
of the college. Ben H. Scott, of Louisville, was named business manager.
Both are Juniors in the Law Department.
The Kentucky Law Journal is is
sued monthly by the students and has
a circulation among the lawyers of
every county in Kentucky. Some of
the ablest lawyers in the State and
nation are contributors to its columns.
Messrs. Chapman and Scott expect to
have their periodical adopted as the
official organ of the Kentucky Bar Association, and place it on a sound
financial basis before September.

AS ATHLETIC COACH

editor-in-chie-

Only One Company Now
Left of Three Hundred Cadets

FUTURE IS UNCERTAIN
"The transfer of Kentucky from the
Eastern Department to the Central
Department of the Army of the United
States renders military affairs of the
University so uncertain that it is impossible to say just what will happen
in the future," said Captain Fairfax
Tuesday.
The pesent organization of the remaining students will be continued
and drill will proceed as has been (he
custom in previous years. One large
company has 'been formed from the
remains of the four companies and the
men who formerly drilled in the
morning company will be transferred
to the afternoon period. Since so
many of the members of the band
have left, there will 'be no more practicing of music and the band will confine Itself to drill. The signal corps
will form another unarmed detachment.
At the first of April there were
about 300 men in the battalion. Now
there are about 110. Others are signifying their intentions
of leaving
daily and the commandant expects
that no .more than fifty will remain
for inspection.
of guard
Only the ceremonies
mounting and company inspection can
be carried on with a single company
and the commandant has abandoned
the schedule of drill recently adopted
Capin preparation for inspection.
tain Fairfax does not know whether
he will be called away before inspection, but the sergeant recently named
as his helper here will arrive about
the 27th or 28th of this month. The
inspecting officer will be sent from the
department headquarters this year.
There has been no notice or order
concerning the staging of a problem,
as yet, in connection
or "sham-battle- "
That will be
with the inspection.
held or not at the pleasure of the inspection officer.
Captain Fairfax wishes it known
that no applications for positions as
officers in next year's battalion will
be considered. All officers will be appointed toy him and no application will
have weight.

STEWART IS WINNER
OF ESSAY CONTESTS
was winner of the
short-storand essay contests which
were held by the Patterson Literary
Society Saturday night. F. O. Mayes
took second honors in both contests.
The prizes were books donated by
President Emeritus James K. Patterson.
Judges of the contest were: Herbert Sehaber, Roy Scott and J. D. V.
Chamberlain, members of the Union
Society.
H. L. Stewart

CATS BUT TIGERS
HOME DIAMOND

3

ON
TO

0

Triple and Three Doubles

Disastrous For Scott
Countians
MAC VERY EFFECTIVE
The walloping Wildcats continued
march to baseball
championship honors Tuesday after
noon, when they put the kibosh on
the Georgetown Tigers in their own
cage by the count of 3 to 0.

their triumphant

McClellan showed that he had lost
nothing of the effectiveness that marked his first appearances, and had the
Scott countians swinging wildly at the
places where they only thot the ball
was. Two hits, both by Moss, told
the whole story for the home team.
The Cats bagged nine hits, Scott,
Captain Curtis Park and Rodes getting two each. Waters, Cambron and
and the
the captain got
redoubtable 'Doc" lashed one to the
fence for three.
Centre College and Kentucky will
play on Stoll Field this afternoon.
(Continued on Page Five)

PROHI. CONTEST TO BE
HELD AT GEORGETOWN
The State oratorical contest of the
Kentucky Intercollegiate Prohibition
Association will be held at Georgetown College, Saturday evening, at
7:30 o'clock. The University of Kentucky will be represented by Thos. L.
Creokmore, whoso subject "Is "Prohibition aud Patriotism."
Tho girls of Rucker Hall will glvo a
reception to tho delegates Saturday
afternoon. All students of the University are invited to attend. Delegates will leave on the 2:05 car. The
sessions will coutinue thru Sunday.
Dr. D. Leigh Colvin, of New York, and
Hon. H. V. JHoChesney, of Frankfort,
are tho principal speakers.

Will Occupy Chair of Philosophy Again Next
September
NO SUCCESSOR NAMED
Dr. John J. Tigert, athletic coach
this year, has resigned his position as
head of athletics at the University,
and will again occupy the chair of
philosophy, resuming his teaching in
September.
Under the terms of a leave of absence from the philosophy professorship, Dr. Tigert was to notify the Executive Committee not later than
March 1 whether he preferred to continue his athletic work or return to
his academic work. He advised the
trustees that he would resume his
classroom work next September.
As yet, the Athletic Committee has
not discussed a probable coach for
next year other than to authorize
President Barker- - to treat with Dr.
Tigert, but negotiations ended with
Assistant
the latter's resignation.
athlete
Coach Tattle, star
and coach at the University for two
years, has not decided what he will
do next year, but it is probable that
he will accept a fellowship in another
university
to continue his studies
along with his coaching. He, however, will return to the University It
j
a fair offer is proffered him.
gymnasium director,
S. A. Boles,
has assisted in coaching football and
track in addition to directing all athletics. He will remain at the University. iTo Dr. Tigert belongs the credit
for getting athletics at the University
on a strong basis. He developed a
team that "did Purdue" in 1915, and
held the undefeated Tennessee Volunteers, candidates for the Southern
Championship, to a tie in the Thanksgiving game at Knoxville. He has developed the team composed of Doc
Rodes. Haydon, Grabfelfler and Captain Brittain.
Dr. Tigert came to the University
in September, 1912, from Kentucky
Wesleyan College, where he had been
president for two years. He first assisted Coach Sweetland. In 1913 he
became head coach, assisted by Brum-age- .
He became athletic director In
1915, assisted by Coaches Tuttlo and
Park, and in this Beason, he developed tho machine that wrought havoc
with the Southerners.
NEW STROLLERS AWARDED

PINS.

Tho Strollers last Thursday awarded pins to the members in tho cast of
the "Lion and the Mouse," who have
not boon in previous performances of
They are: Misses
tho Strollers.
Marie Collins, Angela Morancy, Mamie Miller Woods, Margaret Wilkinson, Freda Lomou, Venule Duley and
Martha Buckman; Gus Gay, Herndon
Evans, Grover Creech, W. C. Draddy
'
and Gordon Marsh.

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL.

faft2
Triangle, Metro, World and V. L. S.
Feature Pictures.
First Class in Every Appointment

THE ORPHEUM THEATRE

K.

"WE GIVE

A

BE PREPARED!
Invasion

BE

Againjst the

:

of High

10

SEN ALI

Fcatureand Comedy
Pictures

Prices

MONTH

THEATRE

Fifteen

Can Give Best Values

FOR MEN READY
We are Out of jthe High Rent District
No Exceptions

Let Us ?Show You
How To "CUT THE CORNERS"
Of Your Expjises This Spring and Sumner

BAAQAAf

STOtL

d

Special mention should be made of
the chorus, which is said to be the
prettiest and the best trained that
has ever appeared here. Included in
the cast are several of the leading
stars of vaudeville.
Beginning today the Ada Meade will
present nothing but musical comedies
the rest of the season. The best companies on the road have been booked
and vaudeville goers are assured that
a real treat is in store for them. Phone
612 for seats. Advertisement.

KENTUCKIAN WILL GO
ON SALE NEXT WEEK
will 'be put on

The 1917 Kentucklan
sale tlTo early part of next week, almost a month earlier than the book
has ever been ready before. From
the standpoint of art the book is said
by those students who have seen the
to be a gem. Delivery
has been promised May 1 by the
printers and students who desire to
get their copies from the first
t
are warned to carry their receipts and the final payment around
with them.
page-proof- s

ship-Men-

Ten
Cents

ALL NEW BUT THE NAME
"If a

Same Management Same Classy Shows
$1, You'd Leave Here Rich"

Laughas worth

Prices
"'

20,

10, 15,

25, 30,
DAY AND

rintMl..l..l...i.i.i.Mlll.l..Mi-HH"f-

Boxes

&

35501

NIQHT SESSIONS
BOOKKEEPING

Bn8lnesa,PhoMgrMliy

GRAVES, COX

TYPEWRITING

ud

TELEGRAPHY

USlNEli C0LLEIE

ud

It.

BammrkCoMMnUI
CiTnnTtr.
Collam
In President, hut yean of experience in Mercantile and
Banking" btnineai, alao 40 years educating 20,000 young
men and women for luccea. G7" Enter now. flWM. Wrlll.
College I59E. Main St., near Post Office,
Depot
Addre
WILBUR R. SMITH. LaxlBfjtoaTaty

COMPANY

SPECIAL RATES TO
University Students
HUGHES

School of Dancing

Mrs. Hughes, Member of American
National Association Masters"
of Dancing

UNIVERSITY
EVENINGS
TUESDAY. THURSDAY,
and SATURDAY
HOURS: 8

to 11

o'clock

MR. JOHN CLARK & MR. HENRY KELLER

FURNISHING MUSIC.

YOUNG MEN

AT THE ADA MEADE. CHAPMAN PRESIDENT
OF THE HENRY CLAY
"A Prince for a Day" is the title of
a clever musical comedy which will
be seen at the Ada Meade Theatre
the latter part of this week, 'beginning today. Pretty girls, clever stage
effects and comedy that is rich and
sharp are some of the many features.
Thirty people, the largest number
ever seen on the stage of a popular-pricevaudeville house in Lexington,
ake op the cast.

Admission

"Superior Vaudeville"

high schools of the State

have already been
Preliminaries
held thruout the State to select men ii
for the debating teams, resulting in
the elimination of about half of the
ii
teams entered in the contest.
The
schools which will be represented in
the contest, which promises to be the
biggest ever held in Kentucky, are:
Louisville, Lawrenceburg, Anderson
County High School, Somerset, Midway, Butler, McCracken County Hign
School, Ludlpw, Covington, Newport,
Franklin, Brandenburg, Highland College and Stuart Robinson College.
The debating, declamatory and mus
ical contests will be under the direc
tion of Professor Charles P. Weaver,
while Dr. J. J. Tigert will have charge
of the track meet. The preliminaries
will require about three days and the
finals will be held Friday night. Medals will be awarded the winners in
each event. During their stay here
the high school students will be guests
of the University.

New Spring Clothes

1

cADA MEADE

Tournament,
Annual Interacholastlc
which will bo held at tho University
beginning Tuesday, May 8, and probably as many more will send representatives to competo in the musical
and declamatory contests and to take
part in tho field meet.

The Store That Has Mastered Overhead Expenses

P. M.

11 KM)

to 10:30 P. M.

Cliif e if Pktire Each Day

will send debating teams to the Sixth

IS THE ONLY RELIEF

CAS

NEXT

WINNERS GET MEDALS

Gutting off Jthe Corners tt

We Sell For Cash

HELD

Fifteen Schools To Compete
In Contests at the
University

OUR NEW SELLING SYSTEM
44

OPEN 10:00 A. M. TO

FREE TICKET WITH EACH ONE PURCHASED."

H. S. TOURNAMENT

Fortify

Go Where the Go'iGo
Admission 5c and 10c

MEET ME AT.

Personally Picked

J

McGURK'S

Arrangements for the track meet
want the new "style ideas' Where All it WeU and Good
have not as yet been definitely com
as soon as they're
Hot"Chocolate,,vHome-mad- e
Candy
pleted, due to the military stir thru
and Ices.
At a called meeting of the Henry out ine state wmcn has resulted in a
Clay Law Society Monday night Vir tendency on the
part of various
gil Chapman was chosen president for schools to abolish athletics.
We're
your service
the coming year. Other officers were
Prof restive Shoe Repairing Shoe
with new
elected as follows: W. J. Kallbreler,
Lexington, Ky.
140 S. Limestone
FREE TUITION ACT
vice president; Miss Rebekah Paritz,
Rubber Heels and Soles a Specialty
IS UPHELD BY KERR
secretary; Jack Herndon, attorney-generaEd. Dabney, treasurer; E. E.
The act granting free privileges to
Ulce, chaplain, and A. D. Crenshaw,
:: Stetson and Knox Hats, :: Metropolitan
students of the University was held
sergeant-at-armAfter the election, President Chap- to be valid by Judge Charles Kerr, in
The Place for Good Things to Eat
man outlined his plans for next year, a decision handed down Monday morn- :: New Regal, Hanan and
ing, in the case of the test suit filed by
closing with a plea for all to attend
together in a united effort to Improve about thirty students against the Uni
versity. The suit, which was brought
Nettleton Shoes.
DENTIST
the Henry Clay Society.
For any kind of dental service call on
at the suggestion of President Barker,
asked the court to give its opinion as
to the validity of the act giving free INew Shirts and Neckwear!
1ST CHBAPSIDK
KENTUCKIAN NOTICE tuition, matriculation, room rent, fuel,
Office hours 8 a. m. 6 p. m.
Phons M4-light and transportation
to county T
it
ii
rnem a "once over"
appointees, selected by competitive ex
Any student leaving the Unlver
sity and wishing to have his book aminations,
today.

ready?

SAM GULLO

at

l;

Restaurant

IR. J. T. Slaton

ttrive

sent to any address may do

so by

by filing his receipt and the final
payment plus fifteen cents postage
with any member of the business
staff. Address all communications
to Charles R. Smith, University of
Kentucky, Lexington, Ky.

LITERARY CONTEST
WILL BE HELD FRIDAY, MAY 4.

UNION

Society will
The Union Literary
hold its annual declamatory contest
in the chapel Friday evening, May 4.
The winner has his choice of the two
prizes, a gold medal and a et of
Histories of England. The contest is
open to members of the society, and
Uie public is invited to attend.

The case will go before the Court
of Appeals to ibe heard on May 15 and
if the decision of Judge Kerr is upheld the effect may be that between
$20,000 and $30,000 will be ordered returned to students from whom they
have 'been collected. This case has
been discussed at the University for
several years and has come up at different times before.

TO get ahead of
Boll Weevil

GRAVES, COX!! broadcast one hundred pounds of
i;
&

COMPANY
INCORPORATED.

frM.."M...ii

Because of the number affected,
Judge Kerr characterized tho issue as
both important and serious. Tho opinion handed down is in twelve typewritten pages and goes into the matter in
detail. Many decisions and precedents
are cited.

W.

Patronize Our Advertisers.

153

w...M"i

nun

n-- J

Nitrate of Soda

per acre, just before plantB. Marlins Barber ing your Cotton, or use

the same amount per

SHOP
The Closest Shop to Univmity
HAIR CUT
Shave
Shampoo
Glover's Shampoo..

56c

15c
15c
35c

acre along the rows after
chopping to a stand
For information vnit

tm

WILLIAM 5. MYERS, Director
S. Limestone St.

Lexington, Ky.

A

Haw

YaaaV

* Mil

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
FACULTY

RULING

"Lexingtons Bigger and Better Men s Store '
OFFERS TO THE COLLEGE YOUNG MEN

The World's Best Clothing

Hart, Schaffner & Marx
You pay no more for these good

clothes than you would just
ordinary clothes.

Ptftt

The College Boys' Store

IS

EXPLAINED BY BARKER

SUGGESTIONS

MAD

INCORPOHATED.

Clothing,

E

"Tho young men of Kentucky, in
my opinion, can render their country
no more patriotic service at the pres-

Tailoring, Shoes & Furnishings

"Wear for Young

Men & Men Who

Kaufman Clothing Co.

Stay Young"

ent time than by going upon the farm
Representative
Corn,
and dovoting their entire tinio and en
ergy to increasing the food supply of
the United States,"
said President
Darker in chapel Friday morning.
Friday's chapel was devoted entirely to a detailed explanation to the
students of the .meaning of the resolution passed by the faculty last Wednesday afternoon granting any stu
dent the right to leave college to work
on the farm with the samo grade for
With the majority of our old customers coming
the somester he now lias.
hack. Pretty strong proof that
George Roberts, acting dean of the
Clothes stand the test
College of Agriculture, addressed the
student body on the real significance
of the prseent food crisis, saying, "UnNcu Spring
less the .Kentucky farmer and those of
the South are able to meet the present emergency in the national food
by increasing their crops
shortage
enough to supply the 'population of
their section, some of them will be
without adequate food this year." He
145 West Main Street
also called particular attention to the
necessity of quick action as the ma
jority of crop planting must be done
days.
within forty-fivGO TO
Your Sandwiches
Professor E. S. Good, head of the
HUMPHREY'S STUDIO
Animal Husbandry Department, in his
the
and Hot Chocolate
FOR YOUR
address, asked the students who would
PHOTOGRAPHS
EXCHANGE
WOMAN'S
soon return to the farm, to try to re341 West Main.
Phone 1635-X- .
207 W. Short St.
frain from selling underfed and young
stock ibecause the price was alluring.
IN
"Rushing
pigs and calves PULLIAM ENLISTS
NAVY MOSQUITO FLEET.
on the market at the present time in
107 WEST.MAIN STREET
order to get the benefit of the high
Harold A. Pulliaim, a Sophomore in BEST SODA FOUNTAIN IN THE
prices means a wastage of almost half
CITY. FINE HOME-MADUniversity last year, who has been
in their food values," said Professor the
CANDIES
attending Cornell University, is one
Good.
to
of 700 men from that institution
Dean Roberts branded any student
enlist in the reserve mosquito fleet
who would take advantage of the facv
4. I
of the navy. The work of these ships
ulty ruling and get a credit for the
Typewriting to do.
is chasing submarines.
school year in order to go to work in
THESES a specialty
munition factories a slacker and unJ.O. S. Box 585, U. of K.
worthy to be called a citizen of the STUDENT RANKS ARE
(Continued from Page 1)
United States.
Resolutions granting credit to stuJudge Barker concluded the program by saying that college would be dents returning to the farm, whlcn
continued until the end of the year in were adopted by the faculty at a speJosef
all the departments. He advised every cial session last Wednesday afternoon,
The Photographer in your Town
student to follow the dictates of his follow:
"Resolved, By tho faculty of the
course
own conscience in whatever
Has pleaied the exacting
University of Kentucky, that any stuhe chose to follow.
student and the best peodent who in good faith leaves the Uniple generally for fifteen
versity and returns to the farm in oryears . Can he show you?
NEW FRATERNITY IS
der to make a food or feed crop for
ESTABLISHED HERE tho coming year shall be given his 311 W, Main St. Phone 1092-- y
present grade in each class, this grade
The Alpha Gamma chapter of the to stand for tho entire semester's
Alpha Chi Sigma fraternity, a nation- work.
al society for professional chemists
"In order to obtain the benefits of
was established at the University this resolution, the student shall notiSaturday night when the installation fy his dean of his intention before his
exercises took place at tho Phoenix departure and on his return shall satJ
South Limestone
Hotel. Tho exercises were in charge isfy his dean of his good faith aird
of Dr. L. F. Nickel, of Washington actual work done."
Most Slate Men Know Us
University, St. Louis, national vice
Many students and younger mempresident,
and Dr. L. I. Shaw, or bers of tho faculty will make applicaMeal Tickets
Let us meet you
Northwestern 'University, of Chicago, tions for commissions in the Officers'
national secretary.
Tho examinations
Reserve Corps.
The chapter members here are: G. have been conducted by Captain FairD. PURCELL GO.
C. Bauer, M. iH. Bedford, P. L.
fax and a number of students have
826-3-30
West Main Street
H. W. Borntraeger, II. H. been accepted. A tologram from the
LEXINGTON, KY.
howovor, has
L. C. Dan- Eastern Department,
Chancellor, W. F. Cramer,

J. Franklin

Won't You Come in and Look?

CO.

GRADDY-RYA- N

Says Student Renders Patriotic Duty By Returning to Farm

State

We're Beginning Our

i

Spring Style

it

Ai) the new ni.'ty Spring

f styhare here ready to
show you.

Both High and Low Shoes.

HAVE A LOOK.

The Special Shoe Co.
Lexington, Ky.

206 W. Main St.

Cy. Hanks Prop.

Eleventh Season

Justright

Patterns at

$18 to $25

Justright Tailoring Company

e

Eat

The

Boot Shop

Walk-Ov- er

(PHOENIX BLOCK)

Shoes that

at

CALAGIS & CO.

half-grow- n

FEEL RIGHT
LOOK RIGHT

WEAR RIGHT

Tans for the Cadets a specialty
COME IN AND SEE US.

CHAS. COHEN, Manager

Thrifty Students
Wanted
We will give employment to a good num-

ber of thrifty students during the summer
vacation as demonstrators of the great usefulness of the HOME AND SCHOOL REFERENCE WORK in the various counties of
Kentucky. Good salaries or a very high
rate of commission will be paid to such as
are suitable. All who enlist with us before
April 15 will have the benefit of our free
training class which will meet one hour
each day, outside of school hours, and will
be conducted by men and women who are
experts in the lines you are expected to
follow.

For information call at 407 West Sixth
Street or call up 2228-Y.

Midland Publishing Co.

E

nil

Franz

Spengler

Martin & Stockwell's
Restaurant

Blum-entha-

J.

l,

iels, 'Lawrence J. Heyman, C. W.
Owen. A. M. Peter, E. A. Taylor, Rob-er- t
L. I.
B. Taylor and F. E. Tuttle.
Longaworth is pledged. H. M. Noel
is eligible to membership, but joined
the navy last week and was unable
to be present at tho meeting Saturday
ulght.

suspended any further action.
President Barker In addressing the
studenta In chapel last Friday morning said that class work would continue as usual and that thoro Is little
s
reason for tho "hysteria" which
among students and some fac-

RUBBER APRONS 50c
JUST THE THIN6 FOR USE
IN

THE

LABARATORIES

pro-vail-

ulty members.

Patronize Our Advertisers

* THti KENTUCKY KERNEL.

Pagt4

The Kentucky Kernel
Published every Thursday throughout the College year by the student body of
the University of Kentucky, for the benefit of the students,
alumni and faculty of the institution.
THE KENTUCKY KERNEL is the official newspaper of the University.
It ii Issued with the view of furnishing to Its subscribers all the collego news
of Kentucky, together with a digest of items of interest concerning the universities of other States and Canada.
FIVE CENT3 PER COPY.
UMCmPTION, ONE DOLLAR PER YEAR.
mail matter.
Entered at Lexington Postoffice as second-class

EDITORIAL STAFF.
William Shlnnlck
Dillard Turner
Wayne Cottinghaxn
J. Franklin Corn
Miss Eliza Piggott
Thomas Underwood
J. R. Marsh
Miss Mildred Graham
Eugeno Elder
Herbert Schaber
Harry Cottrell

EDITOR-IN-CHIE-

F

Assistant Editor
Managing Editor
"Squirrel Food"

"Coed"itor
Sporting Editor
Exchange Editor
Y. W. C. A.

Mining
Literary
Agriculture
..

REPORTERS.
Thornton Connell.
W. C. Draddy.
BUSINESS STAFF.

John S. Sherwood.

Frederick M. Jackson

Business Manager

Eugene Wilson

The Girls, God Bless 'Em.
The edition of The Kentucky Kernel last week,
which was entirely in charge of the
of the University, was one of the best issues that has appeared:
this year. If it were not for the fact that comparisons
are distasteful the writer would be inclined to say that
in general make-uliterary finish and subject matter
outdid the regular members of the staff.
the
But beyond the particular fact of this edition of the
college paper lies a great generality. Women of today,
and especially college women, are snowing that they are
capable of making all the sacrifices that could be demanded of men in times of great crises. The plan to
mobilize the women of the country during the war has
.met with success; everywhere we find them willing and
.anxious to put their patriotism into concrete form. On
the campus of the University we see them drilling and
preparing themselves for the work of Red Cross
nurses; a number of them have gone home already to
aid in food production. Quite a number here in Lexington are raising gardens "on the side."
To enumerate all the things the women of the University of Kentucky have done or intend to do for their
native land would be impossible and superfluous. There
is too much, in the first place, and it is too well known.
We can only say that they have been faithful to every
trust and are deserving of the confidence and thanks of
every University man.
To its congratulations on the excellence of the Coed Edition, the Kernel wishes to add its appreciation of
everything else the girls on the campus have done and
its admiration of all they are.
co-e-

ds

p,

co-e-

ds

J. Franklin Corn.

Our Last Attempt.
"Squirrel Food" trusts that tho readers of the column will bo kind In their
criticisms this week. It is hard to
Jest when tho heart Is heavy. Tho
clown often has a tear behind tho
smile.
Tills is tho last time wo perpetrate
our stuff on tho student body. In a
few days we are leaving and now are
taking advantage of our position on
tho staff to say a word of farowoll.
Tho most linppy associations of our
college life havo been with the Kernel. Wo did not realize it fully until
now. At times tho work has seemed
a grind. Often it has seemed Impossible to conjure forth a slnglo paragraph. Hut in the end the Joy of tho
work and the pleasuro brought by an
occasional kind expression of appreci
ation havo boon well worth the iprlce
Many mistakes we have made dur
ing our connection with this little
paper. Wo have realized and have
suffered deep regret over some of
them. But we hope that they have
been mistakes of action rather than
mistakes of heart. And If you who
know us will carry away with you
some little pleasant recollection we
feel that our college days have been
a success and that life is very much
worth the living, after all.
Likely it is that we all will foe scat
tered far in the near future. So what
ever your fortunes "Squirrel Food"
wishes you good luck and Godspeed
and dares to dream that sometime we
may meet again.
"'Sometime,' you said, and so I dare
to dream
That youth and Spring may somehow linger by
'Till once again we catch the silver
gleam
e
Of lost stars set against a
sky:
That once again the apple blossom
days,
The gray, sweet woods, soft blurred
with Springtime haze,
May find us fared down dear remembered ways.
'Sometime,' you said, and so I dare
to dream."
May-tim-

Lykelle Prose.
Mr. John iMarsh

Is now takirig the

examination for First Lieutenant of
U. S. Army. John is certainly made
of such stuff as heroes are made of.
Maysville Advocate.
At the Girls' Drill.
"Mary wouldn't
First Soldieress:
make a good soldier to fight in the
front ranks, at all."
"Why?"
Second Soldieress:
First Soldieress: "She Is so modest and retiring."

The Kernel this week bids goodbye to one of the
most faithful members of its staff, one who has served
jt in various capacities with success and whose place it
will be hard to fill. J. Franklin Corn, editor-in-chiHere It Is Again.
last year, and "Squirrel Food" at present, has heard the
HIckJ"Well, I see they are most'
call of his country for soldiers and is leaving, either for all leaving."
the officers' training camp in Indiana or for the regular
Quick: "