xt7r4x54g889 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7r4x54g889/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19590212  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, February 12, 1959 text The Kentucky Kernel, February 12, 1959 1959 2013 true xt7r4x54g889 section xt7r4x54g889 Lexington Had Twofold Effect On Lincoln
By PAUL SCOTT

Just as in 1959, wives of 1841 often persuaded sometimes reluctant husbands to pay visits to the
s.
Such was the purpose of Abraham Lincoln's second
Journey to Lexington.
Mary Todd Lincoln was a Lexingtonian. so presumably
she wanted a final stamp of parental approval.
Lincoln stayed in Lexington nearly a month, perhaps
the first teal vacation he had taken during his 32 years.
Hut his leisure moments in the Blue Grass left scars on
the Great Emancipator.
During the period of his visit, the slave markets
were operating full .blast. Mary Todd Lincoln's home,
located on West Main Street, was in hearing distance of
in-law-

the slave market on Cheapside, one of the largest In
Central Kentucky.
The market was the center of dally slave auctions,
which Lincoln could perhaps hear and sometimes see
from the Todd home. Although the young politician
had heard much about these markets, they were much
worse than he had imagined.
Lexington impressed Lincoln although it was, compared to today's city, very small. There were no super
streets, no speeding automobiles;
highways, no one-wa- y
just the horse and. buggy for transportation and the
gigantic Phoenix Hotel all three stories of it.
However, the Main Street which Lincoln saw was
only a slightly less modern version of today's thorough

problem.
Levi Todd. Lincoln's

also took him on
several tours around Lexington and Fayette County, over
the Georgetown Pike and most of the horse farm area.
No one really knows whether Lincoln ever trod the
ground where UK now stands, but if he did, he would
certainly be proud of this institution.
After all, Lexington was Mary Todd Lincoln's hometown and no husband can afford to disapprove of anything concerning his wife's birthplace.
It just isn't ethical!
brother-in-la-

w,

IS.

5
m

4

fare. Much of his time was spent In the area of the
courthouse and public square, observing the slave auctions and trying to devise a solution to the Negro

I

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
1

Vol. L

-

4v
I TO

iiiLV..":.

Construction Begins

Fxcavation on the new Alpha Tau Omega house site has been
completed and workmen have begun construction on the new
building.

Excavation Completed
For New ATO House

LEXINGTON. KY., THURSDAY, FEP..

Ike Wants Welch
To Stay At TVA
President Eisenhower said Tuesday he hopes University Dean
Frank J. Welch, whose resignation
is at the White House, will remain
as a Tennessee Valley Authority
director.

If he knew what considerations Welch's only comment was that
would influence Dr. Welch, the his resignation is still at the White
president said, he would-usthem House.
on him.
Dean Welch is supposed to reContacted four hours later about turn soon to the University's Colthe president's statement,
Dr. lege of Agriculture to resume his
duties as dean. He has been on
leave of absence since November
1957, when he was appointed to
an unexpired TVA directorship.

SUB Membership Meet

Excavation has been completed
The house is scheduled to be
and actual construction will begin completed during the summer and
ATO fraternity ready for occupancy by Sept. 1 of
on. the $140,000
house on Clilton Avenue. Ed Ro- this year, Roberts said.
berts, president of the fraternity's
Hugh Meriwether, arcnitect for
alumni association, said today.
Meriwether-Marydesigned the
A Student Union Board mass
Georgian-Colonistructure which membership meeting will be held
will accomodate approximately 48 in the Music Room of the SUB at
boys.
4 p. m. today.
The building will be two stories
Students interested in becoming
and is to be constructed of red members of the board are urged
brick. The interior of the building by
John Anderson, president, to
will be conventional with the din- apply for membership. He also said
ning room and meeting room on students interested in serving on
the main floor.
committees which help with acKitty Smith. Arts .and Sciences
Lewis and Fox Construction Co. tivities planned for the semester
representative in SC. was elected is the contracting firm for the pro- should attend.
tin new chairman of the Students' ject.
activities for
The SU Board
Party yesterday.
fraternity is currently lo- February include a jam session
The
vice
Jack McGhee was
cated on South Limestone Street. featuring the "Red Coats" Friday
chairman by the party's central
committee. He is also serving as
head of the planning committee
for the April 7 SP convention.
Other tllicers for the spring semester include Carolyn Colpitts.
No one in the nation watches War days. Southern young people,
Colin Lewis, treasurer so great a "stage show or has op- products of the
Bible
and Dick Warren, sergeant-at-arm- s.
portunities as challenging as to- Belt, have trouble rationalizing the
day's young Southerner," Ralph Sermon on the Mount and the
Chairman Smith moved the reg- McGill said Tuesday night.
latest press conference in the state
ular meeting day of the SP cenSpeaking at the, Blazer Lecture capitol, he said.
tral committee to each Monday at Series, the Atlanta Constitution's
The young Southerner must pro4 p. m.
editor compared today's turmoil vide future leadership, McGill
In action yesterday, the Stu- in the South to that of
il
stated, but whether he stays and
dents' Party voted to take no ofsees the region through depends
ficial action on the matter of
on its adults.
SuKy's request for a seat in Stu- Civil Liberties Union
The speaker forecast the rising
dent Congress. The SuKy request
of a new political leadership which
for a seat was rejected by SC Mon- To Hear Dr. Albright would be more sensitive to the deday night.
A public meeting, sponsored by mands of the growing industrial
the Lexington chapter of the centers of the South. Furthermore,
American Civil Liberties Union, he said, these future leaders will
DANCE ANNOUNCED
will be held at the Kentucky Utili- not consider "where a colored man
A Superstitious Swing, sponwill sit on a street car or where
sored by the men's and women's ties Auditorium at 8:30 p. m. Dr.
residence halls and
the SU A. D. Albright, dean of Extended
Board, will be held at 8 p. m. Programs, will speak on "The
tomorrow in the SUB, Admission Status, of Integration in the Fayette County Schools." Open discusis free.
sion will follow the talk.

Is Scheduled For Today

e,

al

Kitty Smith
Is Elected
SP Chairman
ed

from 8 p. m. to 1 a. m., in the SU
Ballroom, the Fats Domino concert at the Coliseum Feb. 20 and
the Gold Diggers' Ball Feb. 28.
SU Board
officers are John
Anderson, president, Anne Armstrong, vice president, Cynthia
Beadell, secretary, Charles Cassis,
treasurer, and Karolyn Sulier,
program
Committee chairmen are: Judy
Schrim, social committee, Jim Hill,
games
committee, Sara Jean
Riley, SUB topics committee, and
Barbara Wall, publicity committee.
-

McGill Gives Blazer Lecture
so-call- ed

pre-Civ-

"'

Campus Enrollment
Is 6, 786 For Term
The UK campus enrollment for
the spring semester is 6.786 students, Dr. Charles F. Elton, dean
of admissions and registrar, reported yesterday.
A total of 204 freshman and
transfer students enrolled at UK
for the first time this semester,
Dean of Men Leslie L. Martin reported. This was a drop of 111 new
ktudents enrolled from last year's
total, he fcuid.

Enrollment figures for
centers at Ashland and Covington, and the' number of students
evening program
in the
in extension classes throughand
out the state are not complete
yet, Dr. Elton said.
figures shows
Total
an increase of 89 students from
the same period last year. The
moid spring enrollment at UK
was 7,193 students, in 1949.
off-camp-

us

(

V

V
J?

on-camp- us

on-camp-

No. 63

12, 1959

us

RALPH McGILL
Delivers Blazer Lecture

his child will go to school, the
most important issues of the day,"
bur will "open, new and better
schools, not close them."
"The mind must be shut before
the doors of the schools can be
closed." The "politicians' determination to end public education
is incredible," he stated. In the
face of the South's phenomenal
commercial and economic progress,
the "proposed destruction of public
education is deplorable."
To close the public schools is
"trampling out the vintage where
political wrath is sowed," McGill
said, for, if education is "crucified," it will rise again "because
of the determination of the people
for public education."
McGill atributed Kentucky's and
other border states' painless integration programs to good leadership, although the smaller percentage of Negroes in. the states,
the plantation economy of. the
Deep South and the "more open
minds" in the integrating states
were contributing factors.
In the question and answer
period following his lecture, McGill
said he felt the NAACP was
"pushing" too hard in the South,
However, he continued, "it is working from the basis of a legal, moral
position. That can't be said for
the other side."
"If this nation is to continue
to exist, I don't see how anybody
can argue against equal rights in
public functions for all people,"
.McGill said.
"All the. Negro is trying to be
is a' citizen. I think he has a right
to be one."

The dean announced last weec

that he had definitely given his

resignation to President Eisenhower. This came after unconfirmed
reports said he would be granted
an indefinite leave by the University or would try for a nine-ye- ar
appointment to the TVA governing board.
Dr. Welch's current TVA appointment would expire in May,
1960, if he kept it. He would then
be eligible for reappointment for
another full term of nine years.
In Washington, both of Kentucky's senators expressed hope
that Dr. Welch would retract his
resignation after the president's
statement. While not definitely a
guarantee that he would receive
Sen. John
the reappointment,
Cooper said the presiSherman
dent's statement "certainly indicates that he would want Dr.
Welch to stay on (at TVA) beyond
May, 1960."

If Dr. Welch were to remain at
TVA until 1960, he would have to
give up his University retirement
benefits. Both Sen. Cooper and Sen.
Thruston Morton said the decision
was now up to Dr. Welch.
The president, noting the decision Dr.
Welch wold have to
make, said:
"I don't know whether we could
persuade Dr. Welch to stay longer,
but I would say this I would very
much hope that he would, and if I
knew what considerations would,
influence him, I would use them.
"But, actually." Eisenhower continued, "I believe he has to go
back to the University or he has
lost a very favorable position in
his retirement opportunities. And
I think that would be a serious
question for him."
Dr. Welch discussed his situation
Monday
with Gerald Morgan,
White House aide who handles the
problem of filling jobs. Morgan apparently went as far as he could in
assuring Dr. Welch he could continue with TVA after May, 1960.

Cbieaoan To Give
Haeh Organ Hccital
Heinrich Fleiscr.er, professor oC
music at the University of Chicago,
will give an organ recital at 3:33
p. m. Sunday, Feb. 22 at Memorial
organ recital
Hall. The
open to the public.
is
all-Ba-

ch

* II

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thuisd.iy,

Teh. 12, IO'iO

LITTLE MAN

Play Contest
Announced

Rush Is Reported
Slower By Frats

vTiM

XO

ON-CAMP-

CUAN UP 6iCL0

US

- r?M0M0eg

NOW, A

PtAff

By Guignol

Fraternity rush is progressing Dampier said there was less stiffKentucky
The" third annual
more slowly than usual this semes- ness In informal rush. He also said
second semester rushees had Playwriting Contest, sponsored by
ter, according to reports from rush that
chairmen.
The chief complaint about rush
is its disorganization and the lack
of a complete list of boys interested
in rush.
Sigma Nu, Sigma Alpha Epsilon,
ami Kappa Alpha voiced opinion
that rush should be more formal.
Hob Maitloek, Sigma Nu rush
chairman, said his fraternity experienced difficulty in contacting
interested boys. He said with formal rush the rushers have a list of
the parties and a
schedule. This helps both the fraternity and the rushers, he said.
CJeorge Ruperts. SAE rush chairman, and Jim Baughman, KA rush
chairman, both urged the need for
more organization in the second
cmcster rush programs. Rupert
waK with a schedule as provided
for in formal rush, more boys are
able to visit more houses.
Taking the opposite view were
Don Dampier, Phi Sigma Kappa,
and Bob Kent, Alpha Gamma Rho,
both rush chairmen.
pre-arrang-

ed

School Tombstone

the advantage of a whole semester
to become familiar with fraternity
life. This, he believed, would cause
less depledging within the fraternity.

N

Bob Kent, Alpha Gamma Rho

rush chairman, said he favored informal rush because it was not
necessary to worry about scheduled
parties. Kent added that during informal rush, rushees see actual
fraternity life in a manner which is
not stiff and formal.

RemadeGcncs.
Are Possible,
Expert Says

Guignol Players, has been announced; First prize in the contest
is $25. with a second prize of

and a third prize of $10.
The contest is open to all stuKendents enrolled in a four-yet.
tucky college. Plays must be
one-sand 20 to' 40 minutes
in length.
All entries must be typed and
double-spaceThe name of the
writer should be placed in a separate envelop and not on the
manuscript. Entries must be sent
to the Guignol Players. Fine Arts
Building, before March 1.
ar

rm?-ac-

et

pre-stora-

8

HbK NATUKAL

Wonl To Tin1 Wise

pos-

AP)
WESTERVILLE, Ohio
There's a tombstone in Room
205 at Westerville High School
a horse's tombstone.
Acquired by seniors
in
the
Ohio history class, who form the
Junior Historical Society, the
stone marked the grave of Rowdy
Boy, a pacer which fell dead Aug.
15. 1892 before a race here.
transmitters of hereditary charac-freezin- g
of sperm for prolonged
is being extended to determine any
might have and
defect they
whether or not the defects can be
corrected, he said.
NOW SHOWING!
Glass is a national lecturer for
"TEACHER'S PET"
the society of the Sigma XI, a naDoric Day
Clark Gable
tional honorary scientific fraterni"THE BRAVADOS"
ty. He spoke at an open meeting of
Gregory Peck - Joan Collins
UK's chapter of the society.

pill a? of peefECTiai
IN

d.

A
AP
EVANSVILLE, Ind.
It may eventually be possible to merchant warned Mrs. Stanley
human genes Fisher to move out from under
remake defective
his store awning, fearing a heavy
into sound ones.
That opinion was expressed in covering of snow might make it
a lecture here recently by Dr. Ben-tle- y fall. Mrs. Fisher moved under
which
Glass, professor of biology at the awning next door
promptly collapsed and engulfed
Johns Hopkins University.
Glass said recent advances in her in snow.

genetics have opened up the
sibility of exposing defective genes
to a form of acid found in normal humans and thus converting
them into healthy genes.
The biologist also mentioned
other experiments in genetics, such
as separation of sperm to
and artificial insemination.
Biochemical analysis of genes,

Sorrv, Charlie
The
NAPPANEE. Ind. (APy
came
Nappanee Advance-New- s
after
out with this correction
printing a story about the popu-

larity of paw paw fruit:
"It is not Charles Lehman who

e
paw paw fan. The
is the
paw paw veteran is Frank Lehold-tim-

5-7-

Down In The Dumps

-

4

-

Dutch Lunch
The Dutch Lunch Club will
meet at noon today In the Football Room of the SI' II. Officers
will be elected at the meeting.

It was
HAMMOND. Ind. (AP)
not the lack of
good business
it.
that drove dress shop owner
Donald Faulkner to rooting around
in the city dump. He was looking
In sports, the nest way to wm
without any luck for $2,900 in
store receipts dumped from the is to defeat the other team.
A double play cannot be made if
wastebasket where he had hidden there are two men out and tin
it.
bases loaded.

Charles
man, Charles'
father.
doesn't even like paw paws."

Last Times Today! "AUNTIE MAME"

STARTING
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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday, Feb.

12, 1939- -3

New Program Owen, Moore To

Lead
Slalcs Combo Orientation Program
And Records
A new music show, "Live and
Lively," is scheduled by radio station WBKY for Thursday evenings this semester from 6:30 to
7:30 in Studio A.
proThe show, an
duction, features a live combo as
well as recorded music.
Members of the combo are Dave
Hake, senior in engineering, piano
and vibes; Leland Smith, electric
guitar; Bobby Doyle, drums, and
Dick Muse, bass horn.
About 20 people were present for
the first show last week, Laura
Prior, program director said. The
studio seats 100 people.
Bob Reamy, who acts as no-,- t
and announcer, produces the show
with Laura Prior and Wayne
all-stude- nt

:t-

AW

:

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W

fWi

if ;W.

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,

"

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,

Anna Owen and Billy Joe Moore
have been named head guides for
next September's Welcome Week
program
according to Assistant
Dean of Men John Proffltt.
Miss Owen is a councilor
at
Tatterson Hall and has been both
a guide and assistant guide. She
is a junior in the College of Commerce from Lebanon.
Moore has served as a head guide
during Welcome Week for the past
two years. He is a graduate student from Lexington.
These are the first appointments
that have been made for the fall
program which will take place

13 to 19. Any student intoi-est- ed
in applying for a position as
an assistant guide may do so
the Dean of Men's Of
fice no later than Feb. 16.

The assistant guide program eliminates an extended training period for guides. By serving a one
year apprenticeship as an assistant guide, students are prepared
to act as guides for the following;
year's program. Proffitt said.
Housemother Hubbard went to
the cupboard, but the pledges had
already escaped with the muss

ML

Gregory, technical director.
program
Tonight's
includes
"Foggy Day," "Palladium Party,"
and "Dancing on the Ceiling" olus
recordings by some of the newer
singing groups such as the Crew
Cuts and the Kingston Trio.

..

Sept.

IPV

Author of "Rail; Round the Flag, Boyv.'c:
"Harcfoot Boy with Chc;: ,

THE GIRL I LEFT BEHIND ME
YOUNG DEMOCRATS
"

PPn.

((ided

It hnppens every day.

A young man poos ofT to college icavin,;
sweetheart with vows of eternal love, and the
he finds that he has outgrown her. What, in such cases, is the
honorable thing to do?
Well sir, you can do what Kock Pigafoos did.
When Hock left Cut and Shoot, Pa., he said to his sweetheart,
a simple country lass named Tess d'Urbervillcs, "My dear,
though I am far away in college, I will love you always. I will
never look at another girl. If I do, may my eyeballs parch nnr.
wither, may my viscera writhe like adders, may the moths get
my new tweed jacket!"
Then he clutched Tess to his bosom and planted a final kiss
upon her fragrant young skull and went away, meaning with
all Ins heart to be faithful.

The Young Democrats Club
will meet at 7 p. m. today in
the Social Room of the SUB,
Killie Rose Paxton, publicity
chairman of the club announced

oin was thr method Gordon Bear, Kernel photographer
to use in trying to derided which of the Hudson twins to
use, Sally left or Sue right.

his

ACTOR NOW A PRODUCER
NEW YORK (AP) Victor Jorv.
veteran portrayer of suave gen-- !
tlemen on stage and screen, is
tackling a new chore now as a

ORCHIDS, ROSES
CARNATIONS

He is

teaming with Douglas
Crawford to present "The Prisoner" on Broadway. The Bridget
Boland drama was seen in London
in 1954. Besides sharing in the
management, Jory is to star in the

For the Kentuckion Dance
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Hut on the very first day of college he mot a coed named l atn
Morgana, a girl of such sophistication, such poise, such saroir
fain as Kock had never beheld. She spoke knowingly of Franz
Kafka, she hummed Mozart, she smoked Marlboros, the cigarette with better "makiii's". Now, Kock didn't know Franz
Kafka from 1'inocchio, or Mozart from James K. Polk, but
Marlboros he knew full well. He knew that anyone who smoked
Marlboros' was modern and advanced and as studded with
brains as a ham with cloves: (lood sense tells you that you can't
beat Marlboro's new improved filter, and you never could beat
Marlboro's fine flavor. This Hock knew.
So all day he followed Fata around campus and listened to
her talk about Franz Kafka, and then in the evening he went
back to the dormitory and found this letter from his home-tow- n

sweetheart Tess:
Dear Hoek,
Us kids lnul a .'(! Unn tjestirdnj. We mnt down to the
pond and eaujht some froijs. I cmuld the most of aitilnd;.'
Tfun ut hitdud ridis on trucks ami aid lots of uuhij ahiff
liki that. Will, I must clost now U cause I got to whitewash
the

ftnee.

lourfrund,

-

Tiss

P.S.

... 7 can do my Hula Hoop 3,000 times.

Well sir, Hock thought about Tess and then he thought about
Fata and then a great sadness fell uon him.' Suddenly he knew
he had outgrown young, innocent Tess; his heart now belonged

to get a better shave !
PRE-ELECTR-

IC

Quicker . . . closer . . . smoother . . .
no matter what machine you use. 1.00

to smart, sophisticated Fata.
Hock, being above all things honorable, returned forthwith
to his home town and walked up to Tess and looked her in the
vyc and said manfully, "I do not love you any more. I love
n girl named Fata Morgana. You can hit me in the stomach with
all your might if you like."
"That's okay, hey," said Tess amiably. "I don't love you
neither. I found a new boy."
"What is his name?" asked Kock.
"Franz Kafka," said Tess.
"A splendid fellow," said Hock and shook Tess's hand and
they have remained good friends to this day. In fact, Holland
with Franz and Tess and have heaps
Fata often double-dat- e
of fun. Franz tan do the ilula Hoop 0,001) times.

p'cj to

SHAVE LOTION
SHULTON

New York

Torpnto

All's well thai ends mil including Philip Morris. Phil'
Morris ends veil and beams well and is inn.J' 7
natural tobaccos by the name people unj muUc '.". i.
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* J

Scheduled Humor
The University of Kentucky.

Lllicicnt.
Trustworthy. Brac. Ami puhhMtcr
of the funniest schedule hook in the
United .States.
This semester's issue was undoubt-edla masterpiece of college humor
;i truly immoital collection of very

Then he goes to class at
the proper time, sits alone for half
an hour until, finally, he becomes
curious. He wonders whether he's the
.only person in the class and if he's
really in the right room at the right
time. Alter a epiick check with the
department secretary, he learns the

Mibtle mot hid jokes. Extremely Ivy!
Consider the case of the

class has been cancelled.
Although not as shaking as the

professors. 'The poor naive student registers in Fundamentals of
Poster Painting lh, taught, he thinks,
by Dr. A. Q. Swcctpants, a myopic
who hands out A's
old fuddy-duddlike hotcakes. Instead, he finds the
conscientious
)oung Dr. Glockne
Gnue, who, on the first day of class,
announces that he actually expects to
be painted!
Add to this a change in the class
meeting time from
a. m. on
Wednesday and Friday to 8 a. m.
Thursday and Saturday, and you have
a perfectly hilarious situation.

i.

gressive.

a course.

Pro-

Forward-looking- .

y

non-existe-

y

11

Also, the disappearing-clas- s
witticism. Again the innocent student-i- t's
even more hysterical if the same

victim falls for this one registers in

ule is ruined and has to be redone.
Perhaps the best recommendation
for the University's
humor
book is that J.hc jokes have to be
lived. Simply glancing through it reveals no funny pictures, stories, etc.
Only experience proves its wit.
However, to guard against the
book's becoming too funny, secret
bulletins, entitled "schedule changes,"
are circulated periodically among the
faculty. But even so, hilarity is preserved.
No, we don't have a campus humor
magazine but then, .who needs one?
There's always the schedule book.
tri-annu-

mf

s,

well-thumbe-

.

lass:

"Her hair glistened like the rays of
the setting sun, and her long, sinewy
legs accentuated her high bosom and
rounded hips."
So here she is, just as described.

1

m

te

d

There is little doubt that such
azines and stories will continue to

magflour-

ish. For in an age of harsh realism, the

fanciful, dreamlike
have no place.

yarns of yesteryear

The Kentucky Kernel
m

University of Kentucky

the Post Office at Lexington. Kentucky as wcond class matter under the Act of March 3, 1879.
rublisbed rour tunes a wet-- during the regular school year except holidavt aud exams.
SIX DOLLARS A SQIOOL YEAR

Jim Hampton,

Editor-in-Chi-

ef

BttL NtnuKC, Chief Neus Editor

Labhy Van Hoose, Chief Sports Editor
Rose Paxton, Society Editor
Billie
Perky Ashley, Business Manager
Nohman McMitliv, Advertising Manager
Cordon Baeb, Staff Photographer
Hank Chapman, Cartoonist
-

THURSDAY'S NEWS STAFF
Alice Rjlddinc, Editor

Jamm Nolan, Associate Editor

f

Ct

f

J.

to see beymd the boundaries of the
campus into civic al fairs.
To The Editor:
2. Mr. Jones evidently feels that
When I came to school this year, I
noticed a disgusting tendency of the your editorial expresses the opinions
a
Kernel staff to try to introduce a of chosen lew, all membcis ol the
little culture into the community and Kernel staff. If a jk11 were to be
taken, I believe he wjould find that
the local radio stations.
is representatiVe of the
But now I see that one of the your editorial
Kernel's alert readers has stepped opinions of many people in Lexingforth and set these snobs in their ton as well as on the campus.
3. It is Lrue, Mr. Jones, that WLAP
place (Headers' Forum, Feb. II). This
giant of good sjelling points out that and WVLK do play the "top" 50
the radio "I). J.'s" are playing the records, according to Lexington sales,
"top 50" records and in doing so are but the continuous repetition of these
only catering to the wishes of the all day every clay is comparable only
to the Chinese water tortuie for those
"people of Lexington."
However, I disagree with his who preler vaiiety rather than conmethod of remedying the situation. sistent cacophony in their music listen1
don't think the Kernel editors ing.
1.
would like to encourage W'BKY
should be allowed to go out and buy
enough classical music to put these in its efforts to counteract the rash
ol mediocrity spreading throughout
records in the "top 50."
Down with the Kernel editors! T radio. However, my heartiest conthink they all should be burned at gratulations go to WBLG. which, as
the stake during the Van Cliburn a commercial station, has employed
excellent taste in its choice of muic,
concert, while the "people of Lexington" dance around to the tune of which is often pleasant and enjoyable without being either classical or
"Sixteen Candles."
Then Lexington could return to its Mr. Jones's variety of popular music. '
old state of a happy town with a big I would like to add, too, that WBLG
sound and lots of happy people: has practiced the same restraint in its
thin happy people, tall happy people, advertising, which is certainly more
fat happy people, and people who jersuasive to me than the "hard
sell" advertising of certain other Lexcan't spell.
Phil ('.ox ington stations.
As a UK alum and present emMore On The Top 50
ployee of same, I say good work,
To The Editor:
Kernel, and keep it up!
Blessings on you for your apt ediKay Riley
of last Thursday. You have
torial
beautifully expressed what I have
long felt concerning Lexington radio
"Readers' Forum"
in general. By way of rebuttal to
AVFcomes Letter
Tuesday's
letter from
Mr. Jones (which, by the way, indiThe Kernel welcomes letters from
cates he would better forsake the top
its readers on any subject, on or off
50 in favor of a little attention to the
campus. We will print nil letters
books!), I would like to express a
which are not libelous or in bad
Jew of my own opinions:
taste. Names will be withheld at
1. Mr. Jones apparently feels that
the writer's request, but all letteis
Kernel editors should confine their
must be signed.
criticism to campus affairs. I am dePreferred maximum length is
lighted to see you, as editors, evaluat250 words, but greater lengths are
ing anything so worthy of censure as
acceptable subject to editing to
some Lexington radio stations, theremeet space demands if the subject
by also demonstrating your ability
matter merits.

Thin Happy People

badly-spelle-

Catered

.:,i'""v

The Readers' Forum

this type of story has been mentioned:
that of a man being marooned somewhere, anywhere, with no less than a
dozen fair maidens who: 1. either exalt
him as a white god and submit to his
every whim; 2. or who take him prisoner
and torture him in a fate worse than
death, by forcing him to father a child
for each of the whole passel of his female
captors.
For an example of the lucid writing
style of these perspiring epics, note the
following description of a typical wild

.

v'-- .

Joyce And Her Date Are Awfully Quiet Tonight.

By GURNEY NORMAN

e

'

ing class is still good for a few laughs,
especially if the student's whole sched-

Virile Men's Magazines

If you are a college male and have
ever been in a drugstore, no doubt you
bave paused by the magazine rack, cast
a watchful glance across your shoulder,
ihen picked up a pulp thing with a
name like "Male Blood" and a picture
on the cover of a semi-nudblonde
leing torn to pieces by an abominable
wuskrat, and started reading.
And as you stand there by the magazine rack, you find shortly that you
are being elbowed about as a crowd
of men like yourself gathers for a bit
drug-Moreof intellect-sharpeninSome
I understand, have even instituted a card catalog system to aid the
nightly readers who never buy anything,
not even the magazines.
It is well that this innovation is coming about, too, for there reportedly was
one case where a little old lady, while
trying to find a copy of "Little Old
Ladies' Home Journal." was trampled
beneath the mob of boys standing
around or reclining on the magazine
rack, devouring the latest from "Gusto,"
Man's Pornography," or "Him."
It is no wonder that men some quiet
young and tr)ing mainly to shake off the
last signs of puberty and avidly seeking
accurate information on Life's Greatest
Adventure clamor for such stellar reading matter.
Consider the titles of some of the
true stories to be found in the
mags: "My Wife Was a Male
Vampire." "Adrift on a Raft With 13
Virgins." or better yet, "I Was Burned
Alhe in a Ubangi Religious Orgy."
Though of course you shouldn't let" it
interfere with your belief in the story's
credulity, still one is slightly