xt7r7s7hr366 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7r7s7hr366/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19181111  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, November 11, 1918 text The Kentucky Kernel, November 11, 1918 1918 2012 true xt7r7s7hr366 section xt7r7s7hr366 THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
UNITED WAR WORK CAMPAIGN ISSUE
vol xi

y

LEXINGTON. KY., NOVEMBER 11, 1918

No. 4

UNIVERSITY QUOTA $2,500
LET'S MAKE IT $4,000
WAR

M

CAMPAIGN

On

STARTS

Faculty and Students Pull
Together To Double
$2,500 Quota For
Allied Fund.
GIRLS DIRECT ALL BUT
FACULTY AND S. A. T. C.

Dr. Boyd and Miss Graham
Head
Add "Pep"
Dime-Contes- ts

to raise
from the University of Kentucky for the United War Work organizations.
United as never before,
faculty and students are bending
every effort to raise the quota and
double it by the end of the allied drive
November 16.
Dr. P. P. Boyd, Dean of the College of Arts and Science, heads the
Miss
campaign for the University.
Mildred Graham, president of the Y.
W. C. A., is in charge of the student
Professor Enoch Grehan,
workers.
head of the department of Journalism,
is handling the publicity end of the
drive.

It is on! The campaign

$2,500

Under these leaders is a full force of
committees, organized to reach by personal solicitation every person connected in any way with the University.
The military authorities, represented
by Lieutenant S. T. Coffee, are handling the drive in connection with the
S. A. T. C. A contest among the companies is increasing Interest there.
Another heated contest is in progress between the girls of the University who live in the dormitories and
those who live in town. Miss Ruth
Duckwall heads the commtitee of
'IHall girls," and Miss Lillie Cromwell
has charge of the town dwellers. Boys
who are not in the S. A. T. C. are being canvassed by a committee of girls
led by Miss Katherine Weakley.

TAKE TWO YEARS
UNIVERSITY MAY HAVE NATIONAL
TO DEMOBILIZE HOSTESS HOUSE SOON
As a result of a conference of the
Young Women's Christian Association, represented by Miss Ina Scherre-beck- ,
national war secretary, with
President McVey, the prospects for a
hostess house on the campus appear
very satisfying.
The need for a hostess hoUBe has
been emphasized by the number of
men enrolled in the Student's Army
Training Corps. Since in this body
a suitable place is needed where the
men may meet their relatives and
friends, as the soldiers in cantonments
welcome their loved ones in the Y.
W. C. A. hostess house. Especially
urgent has been the necessity for
such a house since many mothers and
relatives came to administer to their
boys who were stricken with influenza, and no place had been provided
for their comfort. It is hoped that
the National Y. W. C. A. will realize the need of a hostess house at the
University when Miss Scherrebeck
makes her report of the situation and
that one may appear on the campus
KERNEL STAFF MEETING.
in the near future.
It is the plan to build a connecting
barracks between Barracks No. 3 and
The Kernel Staff will meet in the No. 4, the ground floor is to be conJournalism rooms in the Main Build- verted into Y. M. C. A. recreation
ing Saturday morning at 11:45.
rooms.
Demobilization of the American
forces in France will require a period
of two years after peace is declared,
according to a statement made in
New York by General T. Coleman du
Pont, who has Just returned from a
two months' visit to the western front.
"One of our generals askt me," he
said, "to tell the people at home that
our boys have a year's work ahead of
them.in removing the barbed wire the
Huns have strung across France."
Asserting that the Vivil War had
turned thousands of men back into
civil life, weakened and purposeless.
General du Pont said the seven war
agencies should be supported.
"Every hut in France," he said, "will
become a university classroom on the
day peace is signed. The boys will be
given every educational advantage under leading educators and business
men from the United States.

AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION

HELPS WIN

A Million Books Needed For
Men in Camps of
Uncle Sam
3,500,000

BUDGETED

More than seven hundred thousand
books have been sent to the American
soldiers over seas. A million more
are noeded to supply every man with
a good book to read in his leisure moAltho most of the work is to be done ments.
by personal solicitation members of
Many of these books are donated by
the University will have the opportun- patriotic citizens of this country. They
ity of hearing speakers of note during are left at tho local libraries from
the campaign. Lieutenant Credo Har- which they aro sent to tho American
ris, author of note, lately returned Library Association, freo of freight.
from the front where he was engaged Some of them aro too heavy and bulky
in Red Cross work, spoke at Patter- for circulation, so these are exchanged
son Hall Monday night.
iu tho various book stores for others,
Four minute speakers will be pro- for examplo, Jack London or Rex
vided by Professor Maybe for all stu- Beech.
dent gatherings.
Somo of tho donated books aro "RuRoger Nooo, Y. M. C. A. worker, pert of HentzaH," by Antony Hope;
Just back from France, will speak to "Tho Last of tho Mohicans," by Coopmembers of the faculty at 3:30 p. in., er; "Tom Brown at Oxford," by
.

(Continued on Page Five.)

(Continued on Pago Five.)

y.

f

.

C. A. PLAYS

ITS

PART IN WORLD WAR

QUOTA

FOR THE UNITED WAR

WORK

CAMPAIGN RAISED FIFTY PER CENT

JOHN R. MOTT GIVES REASONS
WHY WE NEED $250,000,000

""

It was originally planned to raise $170,500,000, for the seven organizations
in the United War Work Campaign. At a recent meeting in Chicago, John
R. Mott gave ten reasons why much more is needed for successful work
The reasons follow:
WHY WE NEED MUCH MORE THAN $170,500,000
1. Because of the remarkable Increase of the American Army and of
its inevitable continued increase. The budgets of at least three of the seven
organizations uniting in the forthcoming Campaign were based on data assembled last spring, when it was thought there would be not more than 1,000,00ft
American soldiers in France by November first. As a matter of fact, the
number there by that date will be 2,000,000. When those budgets were made,
moreover, it was thought that the total number of American soldiers on both
sides of the Atlantic by next summer would not exceed 3,000,000, whereas
our military leaders are now preparing for an American Army, before the
end of next summer, of between 4,000,000 and 5,000,000.
overseas.

2. Because of the marvelous expansion of the American Navy. When
America entered the War, we had less than 70,000 men in the Navy. There are
now over 600,000 sailors and marines and the number will be further greatly
increast. Relatively, the organizations whichare uniting in their Campaign
have neglected the Navy, but it is their desire to help this arm of the service
as much as any other, and therefore a much larger sum of money will be needed for this purpose than is now included in their respective budgets.
3. Because this war, unlike others, is not alone a war of armies and
navies, but a war of entire peoples. In particular, it involves vast numbers
of the industrial classes. Since our financial plans were announct, the claims
of these classes at home and overseas have been prest upon us, and it has
been made clear that we must augment greatly our efforts on behalf of the
millions of men and women at work in arsenals, in navy yards, and in countless militarized and other indispensable war industries.
4. Because the burden of this war falls so heavily upon the women of
America and of the Allies. They have taken the places of multitudes of men
engaged in ordinary occupations and have thus released millions for the
fighting forces. They are also largely engaged in making munitions and in
other essential war industries. The facts concerning the needs of women
affected by war conditions convince us that a much larger financial provision
should be made on their behalf than the budget of ou rorganlzation contemplate.

5. Because of the comprehensiveness
of the ministry being rendered
the American Army and Navy and the forces of our Allies. It is the aim
Blue Triangle is Well Known of these agencies to place at the disposal of our soldiers and sailors all that
Over There and Over
is best in American life. We represent to them the American home, the
Here
American school and college, the American library, the American forum, the
best phases of American club life, the finest aspects of the American stage,
and above all the American Churches and Synagogues. This is a colossal proThruout the states, across the sea, gram
and calls for a large expenditure of money an expenditure necessarily
of increasing with the growth of the Army and Navy.
in every place where numbers
young women have gathered together
G.
Because of the continuity of the service we are seeking to render. We
for the purpose of service, the Blue aim to follow the soldiers and sailors from tho time they leave their homes,
Triangle has found Its way, using its while they are in transit, while they aro at the training camps, large and small,
resources to bring a bit of cheer Into while they are on their way to the ports of embarkation, as well as at those
ports, while they aro on tho sea, during their stay at the ports of debarkation,
the midst of toil and weariness.
during their experiences in further training overseas, in the zone of combat
John R. Mott says, "This is a war of Including tho front line trenches, while they aro at leave resorts or In the
the entire people. It is also a war of hospitals or in tho prison camps, and then all tho way back to their homes.
machines. In every war the burden Tho volume of expenditure necessarily grows with tho steady enlargement of
fighting forces.
has been heavier on the women and tho
7. Because of tho Imperative need of placing all these helpful facilione is particularly bo on account
this
ties at tho sorvlce of tho French Army of 4,000,000, of the Italian Army of
of tho women In munitions work."
3,000,000, and of tho smaller but very Important armies of Russia, of BelAt the entrance of the United States gium, of Portugal, of Macedonia, of Palestine, of Mesopotamia, and of Egypt.
into tho war, production became one Tho claims of theso Allied Armies wero not sufficiently recognized in the
of her greatest probloms, a problem framing of our budgets.
S. Becauso of tho Indescrlbablo need of the millions of prisoners of war,
which became over more serious with
tho frequent removal of men from In- who must look to us solely for a comprehensive program In tho Interest of"
their physical, moutul, social and moral
dustry. Thus It happenod that within
9. EVEN THO THE WAR WERE TO END WITHIN A FEW MONTHS,
a short time after the mobilization of
OR A FEW WEEKS, WE SHOULD STAND IN GREAT NEED OF A FUND
tho great American army, tho IndusOF MORE THAN $17,500,00, BECAUSE THIS WORK, UNLIKE THAT OF
trial Army of the United States nroso, MANY OTHER AGENCIES, WILL HAVE TO BE CONTINUED THUOUT
well-bein-

(Continued from Pago Two.)

(Continued ou Pago Six.)

aft
if

..-

-

* f

T
THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

PAGE 2
Y. W. C. A. PLAYS
(Continued From I'ngo One.)
composed of women In bucIi numbers
that It seemed that there would bo
"for overy fighter a woman worker."
This sudden Inrush of women Into
the Industrial world, a world which
was altogether new to many of them,
brought about conditions which for a
time threatened
to bo disastrous.
Housing accommodations were inadequate, and the government could not
in a short time erect sufficient build
ings to meet tho demand for them.
There was the question of feeding, of
recreation, of developing that group
Bpirlt which would guarantee tho contentment so necessary for the accomplishment of good work.
Was it not fitting that tho government should commandeer for solving
these difficulties tho Young Women's
Christian Association, that organization which has workt since its founding against all those forces which
threaten the happiness and
of the young womanhood of Amerr
ica? Among Its
activities,
the Y. W. C. A. had in every Industrial city a regular program of work
under the direction of the Industrial
Committee, and it was upon this foundation of experience that the special
war work was built.
Thruout the war, the work of the
Y. W. C. A. has been to meet emergencies. It has planned and obtained
temporary quarters for girls who came
as strangers into
towns,
and then supervised the erection of
model permanent lodging houses, furnished by the government. It has followed the girl into the factory and
made suggestion for the improvement of conditions there. Among other
things its work has been to organize
clubs with rest rooms and recreation
halls, frequently to conduct cafeterias,
and to open classes where young women who have left school to work
may study English, French, Spanish,
current events, etc.
"Thousands of women are engaged
in the making of munitions, in the production of food, and in the manufacture of clothing. Whether thousands
more will be forthcoming and whether
their morale will be equal to the tre
mendous strain put upon them de
pends largely upon the housing, feed
ing and recreation facilities available.
The young Women's Christian Asso'
elation has gladly accepted its share
in the work, to be done and has put
its organization at the service of the
Government in the crusade for 'Freedom, Justice and Democracy.' "
The work has not been confined to
America.
Estelline Bennett says,
"Wherever the woman and the young
girl have gone out from the beaten
ways to meet the new demands upon
them, the Young Women's Christian
Association has raised the Blue Tri
angle of protection In their midst.
It has gone with the nurse to the
fields of Flanders, mothered them,
watcht over their physical
and stimulated their courage. Where-ove- r
there is a base hospital in
France, there Is a Blue Triangle
nurses' hut close by. The hut may
barracks-likbo a tiny, temporary,
structure with chintz curtains at tho
light over
windows and a
the table, or it may be an old French
chateau with a wonderful garden.
However It is housed, tho nurses' hut
with the Blue Triangle secretaries
keeping a spark of a home fire burning, is an oasis of peace in the midst
of tho horrors of war."
In April of 1917, the Y. V. C. A.
sent secretaries into Russia to help
ihn TiiQCilfin wnmon wnrlr niif Hinlr
well-bein-

pre-wa-

d

tangled war problems. Thru all the
red riot of revolution theso women
hav csluck to tho task, fleeing from
Petrograd
when
authorities
tho
thought it necessary, holding classes
i English,
stenography
by tho flickering light of n few scattered candles when tho
twilight of a short Russian winter day
settled down upon them and a great
need and scarcity limited tho supply
of electricity, kerosene and candles,

e

1

SLOGAN

EIRE"

OFJHE K.OFC.

book-keepin-

n

So tho work has been carried

"Work Related to Winning
of the War" Says

ADA MEADE
THREATRE
THE HOME OF SUPERLATIVE ENTERTAINMENT
OFFERING THE WORLD'S BEST

Fosdick
MORE FUNDS NEEDED

3 shows

According to a statement made by
Captain H. N. Royden, men accepted
at Camp Fremont, California, for the
Infantry Officers' Training School, to
be opened December 1, may be transferred there from other camps, if
called by their draft boards before receiving orders to go to Camp Fremont.

Tho K. of C. first entered war work
during the Spanish American War,
then on tho Mexican border it assembled its forces and erected a chain of
service buildings in New Mexico,
Arizona and Texas. Now in tho world
war its secretaries are everywhere,
In camps and training stations in this
country, in the base hospitals, in Italy,
France, Flanders, on the transports
and at points of debarkation over
there. In September of this year there
were 300 workers of this order in
France, 450 on the way to the field
and 200 more being fitted for service.

Clubhouses have been erected at
points of embarkation in this country
and debarkation in France and seventy-fDr. C. B. Cornell has just given ive
secretaries have been assigned
psychological examinations to mem- duty on the transports. One
hundred
bers of Company A. All S. A. T. C. secretaries have been ordered to Italy
men are required to take the test and where ten buildings are being put up.
the result will largely decide whether
The order has three buildings in
the men go to officers' training camps.
London, a headquarters building in
permanent huts
Paris and forty-fiv- e
in France.

WITH

RED TRIANGLE

War Camp Community
vice Does Its Bit
Over There

Ser-

When General Foch ordered the of
fensive this summer the Knights of
Supplies sent
Columbus followed.
from America were carried in a fleet
of huge motor trucks up behind the
lines, where they could be distributed
to the fighting forces.
The poem which follows shows the
spirit in which the order accomplisht
its work.

15,000,000 NOW NEEDED "They

home-sick.-

"

War
Tax
Included

20C.-30-

BARBER SHOP
is now equipped to do your

Cleaning and Pressing
DONE RIGHT - RIGHT NOW
164

EAST MAIN

PHONE 3743

ORPHANOS BROS.
We clean all kinds of Hats; Military Work a Specialty;
Hat Cords

Metropolitan Restaurant
All the Delicacies in Season.

McGURKS

W. B. MARTIN'S

THE POPULAR

BARBER SHOP

AND

CONFECTIONARY

LUNCHES

CUT

HAIR

25c

SHAVE

Everything Good
to Eat

Call On Us

15c

SHAMPOO

25c

TONIC

15c

153 S. Limestone St.

Lex., Ky.

Warren Bros

BUY LIBERTY BONDS

GROCERS

PRESCRIPTIONS
SODA WATER
CANDIES

Corner Limestone and High

BUY LIBERTY BONDS

Joha's Drug Store

when

the Playground and Recreation Asso- And are you weary and opprest?
ciations of America was called upon Then, brother, lay aside your care,
by the commission of which Raymond And come, this sheltering roofi to
Fosdlck is leader, to carry on their
share."
endeavors in the communities adjoinMr. Fosdick says "From my personal
ing the camps, organizing social and
C.
work
recreational resources in such a way observation of the K. of
abroad and at home I can most coras to be of the greatest value to the
dially endorse it. The work of the
soldiers.
K. of C is directly related to the win
In some six hundred communities
ning of the war. It should be sup
the War Camp Community Service
ported by all Americans, Protestants,
overseas all the activities undertaken
Catholics, Jews, all. I have seen it in
for the care and comfort of the men.
operation and I know that it is con
The "take a soldier home to dinner"
ducive to the best morale among our
habit was one of its greatest contribu
men."
tionc. It establishes centers in each
community which furnish the best en
Captain H. N. Roydon has Just revironment to a man in a strange city.
The man therefore finds conditions as turned from Paris, whore he Inspectnearly normal as those at home and in ed the influenza hospital. The hosmany cases more so. He meets and pital sent out an urgent call for help
knows business and professional men ten days ago and government trucks
and visits in their homes, a factor from the S. A. T. C. hospitals have
which helps to steady one new in the been carrying supplies. Two S. A. T.
C. orderlies are on duty and conditions
service.
are improving.
One boy who was especially home
sick, was invited to spend tho night
Fifteen S. A. T. C. men have jUBt
with one of tho well known citizens
of tho community. The next morning left for Cincinnati, where they were
in trying to express his gratitude to examined for aviation service. Those
his host, he said, "Geo, wouldn't it be accepted will enter the ground school
great to get tho Kaiser
at the University of Illinois.

20c.

Chas. Reeder's

Of him

in

-

Z " 7"
Pictures shown In this Theatre are positively first run in Lexington
"COME TRY TO GET IN"

do not ask the faith or creed

that comes into their hut;
The War Camp Community Service, True knighthood's door is never shut
one of the seven organizations for
Against a pilgrim warrior's need.
which the coming campaign is to be
They question only: Would you rest,
waged, was organized
1917,

I

Afternoon,
Night, -

A
V

The Knights of Columbus are "on
all during tho war, from tho banks of
tho Job." They are very popular as
tho Volga to tho walled and barred fac
by the figures of the amount
torles of Japan, and from the interior is shown
raised in their first campaign,
of China to the shores of the Ganges."
Now that this organization is
asking for funds it is well to know
MILITARY NOTES
something of it.
Sixty men of Company B. are testing their ability as truck drivers. Each
night they drive government trucks
without lights thruout Fayette county,
to accustom themselves to darkness
and rough roads.

VAUDEVILLE
OF SUPERB
MOTION PRICES
PICTURES
daily

AND A SUMPTUOUS PROGRAM

on

dress-makin-

well-bein-

' SERVICE UNDER

Victor Bogaert Co.
Leading Jewelers

Established 1883
"The Hallmark Store."
133-13- 5

W. Main St.

..

Lexington, Ky.

The Post Office Pharmacy
MAIN & WALNUT
BUY LIBERTY BONDS

PHOENIX
TAXI CAB CO

Becker

INCORPORATED.

PHONE8

1854-368- 0

DAY AND NIGHT
CITY RATES

B0

SERVICE

Dry Cleaning

CENTS

Co.

Phoenix Hotel Lobby

R B-

-

Robards

C. R. McGoughey,

COLLEGE BOYS' TAILOR

Proprietor

AND

8UIT8
PRE8SED
Suit
Suit

$1.25
Cleaning,
$1.50
Cleaning,
$0.50
Suits Pressed
ALTERATIONS A SPECIALTY
ALL WORK GUARANTEED

PHONE
152 S. Lime.

1550--

WE CLEAN, PRE88 and REPAIR
ABSOLUTELY.

Y

Lex., Ky.

BUY LIBERTY BONDS

Phone

621--

Cor. Lime and Hlih

BUY LIBERTY BONDS

* PAGE 3

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

L. H. BELL
THE

FRUITS, CANDIES,

REASONS GIVEN

FOR

WILDCATS EAT TIGERS
ALIVE 21-- 3

Tho Wildcats defeated the Tigers,
of Georgetown College on Hinton
SEASON
to college patrons
Field, Georgetown, last Saturday with
Lexington, Ky.
115 S. Limestone.
Wilson in Letter to Fosdick tho scoro of 21 to 3. Both teams
CIGARS AND TOBACCOS
showed lack of practice, yet, tho vicPraises Work Done
tory was an easy one for Kentucky.
A.
President Wilson, In a letter to Ray Hobor, Riddle and Shanklin were the
mond Fosdick, tho chairman of the stars of tho Kentucky team, while
Progressive Shoe Hospital Commission on Training Camp Activi- Nonnelly and Lehnhard, of Georgeties, states tho reason for combining town did some good playing.
Kentucky kickt off to Georgetown
My work and prices always the seven organizations for tho com
ing campaign.
beginning tho bame about 3 o'clock
keep me busy
President Wilson says:
Tho Tigers took the ball down on short
140 South Limestone
"The War Department has recog- forward passes and line bucks. At the
line Jennings, George- Shoes repaired while you nized the Young Men's Christian As- fifteen-yarYoung Women's Chris- town's quarter, made a drop kick over
sociation, tho
wait
tian Association, the National Catho- Kentucky's goal, making the first
Georgetown
lic War Council, tho Knights of Colum points of the game.
bus, tho Jewish Welfare Board, the kicked off next. The Wildcats were
War Camp Community Service, tho held for downs on tho three yard line.
American Library Association and tho Georgetown made a punt to KenFOR
yard line, but it
Salvation Army as accepted lnstrumen tucky's twenty-fiv- e
talltles thru which the men In the was returned by Riddle. By a forward
FALL AND
ranks are to be assisted In many es pass from Bland to Heber, Kentucky
in favor
sentlal matters of recreation and scored, ending the quarter
morale.
of Kentucky. During the second quar"It was evident from the flrst, and ter, both teams past ithe ball back and
J39 West Main Street
has become increasingly evident, that forth, keoping the ball on Georgetown
Look foe the Iron Dog
the services rendered by these agen territory most of the time, but play
cies to our army and to our allies are ing with little gain or glory for either
essentially one and all of a kind and side. The score at the end of this
must of necessity, If well rendered be quarter was tho same as at the end
WEST SHORT
rendered In the closest cooperation of the flrst.
PHARMACISTS
It Is my judgment, therefore, that
Tho Wildcats kickt off at the beginLexington, Ky.
we shall secure the best results In the ning of the second half. Jennings reBoth Phones 123 matter of the support of these agen turned the ball sixteen yards. KenMain and Lime
cies, if these seven societies will unite tucky gained the ball on Georgetown's
their forthcoming appeals for funds, forty-yarline. They took the ball
in order that the spirit of the country straight down the field and the second
In this matter may be expressed with touchdown
was made by Riddle.
out distinction of race or religious Georgetown next took the ball down
opinion in support of what Is in real the field to Kentucky
line.
ity a common service.
Here tho Wildcats held for downs and
"This point of view Is sustained by the Tigers lost their best chance of a
the necessity, which the war has score.
forced upon us, of limiting our ap
In the last quarter, Georgetown did
peals for funds in such a way that two little effective playing.
They ator three comprehensive campaigns tempted several long forward passes
shall take the place of a series of which were unsuccessful.
Shanklin
Independent calls upon the generosity took the ball in an end run of about
of the country.
forty yards for the Wildcats, making
"Will you not, therefore, as Chair a touchdown a few minutes after Kenman of the Commission on Training tucky got the ball.
Line-up- :
Camp Activities, be good enough to
request the societies In question to Georgetown:
Kentucky:
L. E
Dlshman
combine their approaching appeals for Dean
Baugh
LT
We have long been known as headquarters or funds in a single campaign, prefer- XJhl
Murphree
L. G
ably during the week of November 11, Parker
Military Equipment in Central Kentucky so
Kelley
C
that In their solicitation of funds Batsel
Downing
R. T
as well as in their work in the field, Stapp
ARMY UNIFORMS
Heber
R. E
they may act in as complete coopera- Bomar
Q. B
Blnnd
Jennings
tion and fellowship as possible?
ARMY OVERCOATS
Muth
R. H
"In inviting these organizations to Powers
L. H
Shanklin
give this new evidence of their pa- Lehnhard
ARMY RAIN COATS
Riddle
F. B
triotic cooperation, I wish it distinct- Bauer
Officials Payne, referee; Lieutenly understood that their compliance
FLANNEL SHIRTS
with this request will not In any sense ant Hauser, umpire; Anderson, head
Imply the surrender on the part of linesman.
ARMY SWEATERS
any of them of Its distinctive characMARRIAGES
ter and autonomy, because I fully recARMY HATS
ognize the fact that each of them
ESTES MORGAN
and
has its own traditions, principles,
ARMY GLOVES
The marriage of Miss Lila Caye
relationships which It properly prizes
strength- Estes to Mr. Ralph Morgan, Second
and which, if preserved and
ARMY HOSE
largest serv-ic- Lieutenant, U. S. A., took place Oct.
ened, make possible tho
23d at the home of the bride's parents,
at Lebanon, Kentucky.
CANVAS BELTS
"At tho samo time, I would be
Lieutenant Morgan before entering
obliged if you would convey to them
manager of Elmen-dor- f
expression of the service was
ARMY TIES
from mo a very warm
Dairy.
tho Government's appreciation of the
Both are former students of the
they have rendered
Out stock is now complete with everything splendid sorvlco
University.
& Mais
In ministering to the troops at home
Mrs. Morgan was a member of the
you may need in the military line.
and overseas in their leisure time. Alpha XI Delta fraternity.
Through their agencies tho moral and
spiritual resourcos of the nation have mentioned. This spirit, and tho paS.
been mobilized behind our forces and triotism of all the members and friends
"Get Acquainted With Us While In
used in the finest way, and they are of those agencies, give me confidence
Town."
Pay Kentucky's Noted Candy Shop contributing directly and effectively to to believo that tho united war work
a Visit
war.
campaign will bo crowned with abundHOME MADE CANDY EXCLUSIVELY tho winning of tho
Made anil Sold Only By
"It has been gratifying to find such ant success.
Schange's Candy Kitchen
"Cordially ami sincerely yours,
a flno spirit of cooperation among all
115 S. Upper St.,
"WOODROW WILSON."
tho leaders of tho organization I have
from Main Street.
Jut around corner

COLLEGE
We cater

FRUIT STORE

MARTIN &
STOCKWELL'S
RESTAURANT
ALL THE DELICACIES OF THE

Matthew

UNITING III CAMPAIGN

Mangione

UNIVERSITY VIEWS

d

COLLEGE NOVELTIES

FOUNTAIN PENS

Athletic Goods
WINTER

Hay Hardware Co,

3

University Book Store
233
Sir

Caden Drug Co.

d

Kaufman
Clothing Co- -

Military Headquarters
f

Copyright 1918 Ilart Schatfucr

0. s.

Everybody EATS at

UNCLE CHARLIE'S
t

five-yar- d

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

PAGE 4

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
Published ovory Thursday thruout tho Collcgo year by tho student body
of tho University of Kentucky, for tho benefit of tho students,
alumni and faculty of tho institution.
THE KENTUCKY KERNEL is tho official newspaper of tho University.
Is issued with n viow of furnishing to Its subscribers all the collcgo news
of Kentucky, together with a digest of items of interest concerning tho

It

Universities of other States and Canada.
SUBSCRIPTION, ONE DOLLAR A YEAR. FIVE CENTS A COPY
mail matter.
Entered at Lexington Postofflco as second-class

EDITORIAL STAFF
THORNTON CONNELL
Miss Eliza Spurrier
Miss Eliza Piggott
I. N. Parrlsh
Miss Kathorino Weakley
Gavin Norment
Miss Mildred Graham
Miss Austin Lilly
Miss Virginia Helm Milnor
Miss Louise Will
Cecil Heavrin
N. D. Witt
R.J. Ralble
Adelo Slade

EDITOR-IN-CHIE-

Managing
Associate
Military
"Squirrel
Sporting

Editor
Editor
Editor
Food"
Editor
Editor
Homo Economics
Patterson Hall
Philosophian
Law
Engineering
Literary Societies
Club Notes
"Co-ed-

for the recreation and protection of our men when they HUTS WILL BE NAMED
will have "virtually all their time on their hands." As
Ml. MOtt puis It, rne period ui uemuuinzauuii snuuiu
FOR FIRST TEN STATES
not be allowed to become a period of demoralization, but
be made one of growth in knowledge and
rather should
working efficiency and of strengthening of character
Kentucky Should Be The
and life Durnoses.
Name of the First
we would brace, back up,f hearten our
If, therefore,
men and the hosts or women worKing m munifighting
tion plants and other war industries in order to release For tho first ten states which shall
the men. let us put into this United War Work Campaign subscrlbo their quota in tho United
Y.
the very best that is in us. Let us invite contributions States War Work Campaign, five SalM. C. A., three K. of C. and two
from all sources. Let us, ourselves, do without everything in the nature of a luxury and give, give, give to the vation Army huts will bo named in
limit of our power. Then, indeed, shall we, the students France. Tho plan was suggested by
of the University of Kentucky, altho 3,000 miles from the the Georgia Campaign Committee and
actual battle front, help to win the war and get our own was officially announct at national
back again to the home that is really safe for decent, headquarters last Thursday.

wholesome living.

PUT GINGER IN IT.

"

REPORTERS.
H. G. Bryan, Katherino McGibben, Frances Marsh, Margaret
Smith, Roberta Blackburn and Margaret McClure.
BUSINESS STAFF
Business Manager
Edwin T. Tapscott
Assistant Business Managers
J. P. Barnes and Carl Dlnker

UNITED WE SERVE

The University of Kentucky has pledged $2,500 of the
$250,000,000 needed by the seven organizations united in

the war work campaign.
Let us raise that $2,500, and then some! Let us go
"over the top" with such an OVERSUBSCRIPTION that
when our students "over there on the hnng line, in rescue
work, in canteens and hospitals, hear of it, they will say,
tho they have to squeeze the word's past the lump in the
throat, "The dear, old University of Kentucky!' Bless its
loyal heart! It's behind us to the last ditch!"
If they can feel like that, they will hold their heads a
little higher and go at their tasks with a new enthusiasm,
a bit more pep. Surely such a result is worth every ef

fort we make.
five

The Kernel honors itself when it devotes an entire
issue to the business of arousing in the student body, the
heartiest interest in the United War Work Campaign
which began Monday, N