xt7r7s7ht87k https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7r7s7ht87k/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19670120  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, January 20, 1967 text The Kentucky Kernel, January 20, 1967 1967 2015 true xt7r7s7ht87k section xt7r7s7ht87k Inside Today's Kernel
Bookstore bus is laid up; will be in
service next week: Page Two.

rumble:
Greeks: Page Five.

Poet Edwards gives 30 selections for
student audience: Page Three.

The Sigma Chis ramble, thus holding
on to first place: Page Six.

Editorial discusses
inar program: Page Four.

WBKY will get UPl service to beef up
its newscast: Page Seven.

Rush-tim-

A

e

poet

for

the

Board Approves
Buildinir Plans
to
For This Year
In

a

Vol. 58, No. 80

--

Hi,

n

of

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sity
KvnIucky
KV., FRIDAY, JAN. UO. IW.7
LEXINGTON,

11
sem-

iv

(

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1

-- 7

By GLADWIN

LOS ANGELES

routinemeeting Friday morning. University trustees approved

Co. for a Centrex System.
Vice President for Business
Affairs Robert Kerlcy told the
Board that construction and re-

construction on the Lexington
campus would roughly amount
to $26 million, and on the community college campuses $19 million. An additional $1,275,000
should go for planning.
Kerlcy outlined five basic
methods of financing the construction:
1. Sale of
Tnistee-authorize- d

bonds.
2. Interim Financing
3. Securing guaranteed

bids

from bonding houses.

Application of funds available to the trustees.
5. Application of funds available from the statewide bond
issue passed in 1965.
Kerley said sales ofany bonds
would be postponed from five
to nine months when, he said,

-

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,

better than now.
"With the kind of program
we have at the University we
can no longer go to market with
little tiny bits and pieces," Kerley saidin emphasizing the value
of selling a large number of
bonds at once.
The capital construction resolution authorizes the executive

.

Credit Union
Assets Jump
To $300,000
By RALPH WESLEY

Everything from typing doctoral thesis to emergency medical expenses, everyone from part
time janitors to Orthopedic Surgeons are included in the University's Credit Union plan.
Like all such organizations
the University Credit Union is
a saving and lending organization operated on a nonprofit
basis. Any person employed even
part time by the University is
eligible for membership.
Since the election of Dr. John
Redman as treasurer and general
manager in 1961 the organization has increased its assets and
total membership by eight times.
Last year loans to members increased by over 20 percent.
Any employee who pays a
25 cent membership fee and purchases a minimum $5 share is
eligible to borrow from the organization. Many graduate students who are employed by the
University as laboratory assistants or graders often borrow
to finance typing their doctoral
thesis, tuition, or books.
Continued On Page

Assistant Managing Editor
Two proposals were introduced in Student Government
Thursday night seeking study
of SC association with state and
national student groups.
Rafael Vallelxjna submitted
a resolution asking formation of
a committee "to compare the
advantages andor disadvanprovided to the stutages .
dent body" by joining any or
all of the existing organizations.

2

.

Student Government is already an affiliate of the Kentucky Student Association. Other
groups named were: the National
Student Association, Associated
Student Governments and Southern University Student Government Association.
The other bill, submitted by
Phil Patton, called lor each newly
elected president of the student
body to be "annually sent to
the NSA presidents' conference."
The University has at different times been a member of both
NSA and SUSCA.
The Student Government s
forerunner. Student Congress,
voted to dtop out of the National Student Association last
spring alter having been a member for less than a year.
NSA membership was opposed by then President W inston
Miller on the grounds that the
organization took political
stands, ("arson Porter, then a
representative, was a key figure
in the floor light against NSA
membership.
NSA is by far the largest student government membership
liody in the United States. As
such it represents U.S. students

n

The meeting w ill be held May
in the Palais Des Nations,
the former headquarters of the
League of Nations, a forerunner
of the United Nations in governmental efforts toward world

28-3-

A Test

Of Skill

try-ou- ts

at international meetings, before
congressional committees and
education associations, and
maintains a large staff in Washington that prepares literature
and programs for student governments.
During the time the local
government was affiliated with
NSA, it did not use any of the
group s programs or attend any
of its meetings.
Prior to being a member of
NSA, Student Cougress was affiliated with the Southern University Student Government As

only white student governments
to be members.
The Association of Student
Governments is the newest- of
the student government organizations. It was formed by a
splinter group that dropped out
of NSA after opposing specific
policy stands. ASG, however, offers no staff or programming like
-

NSA.

resolution

Continued On Page

o tiered
8

Plans for the convocation were
announced here Thursday by The
Center For The Study of Democratic Institutions, the Santa Barbara Institution headed by Dr.
Robert M. Hutchins, the noted
educator. The Center was established in 1959 as an
of Ford Foundation
philanthropies, but now operates autonomously. It has a revolving roster of scholars w ho write and talk
U.S.
about world problems.
Supreme Court Justice William
O. Douglas is chairman of the
Center s board of directors.
The Geneva meeting, entitled
"Pacem In Terris II", will be
a sequel to the Center's similarly named convocation in New
York in February 1965, in which
2,300 persons participated. The
title comes from Pope John
XXII IS 1963 encyclical involking
"Peace On Earth."
"Largely because of the
success of Pacem In Terris I,"
off-sho-

sociation. A faction in the congress opposed SUSGA membership on the basis that it allowed

Another

1

peace.

Tau Sigma, modern dance honorary, is seeking new members. But
the
are unique in that all prospective members are put
through their paces to see if they've got what it takes.

New SG Resolution Would Order
Study Of Possible Affiliations
By HOWARD KERCH EVAL

prominent intellectual centers.
Prominent individuals from
the Soviet Union, and other
areas, North and South
Vietnam, and the Vatican are
among the 300 expected participants in the parley, along with
such figures as United Nations
Secretary General Thant, and
Sen. J. William Fulbright, chairman of the Senate foreign relations committee and a leading
critic of the administration's
foreign policy.

4.

"the tax exempt market will be

Servlrr
An unoffi-

Iron-Curtai-

e

Continued On Page

HILL

cial world "peace confernce"
to explore avenues toward Kast-Wecoexistence will be staged
in Geneva, Switzerland, in May
by one of the United States'

a resolution authorizing a capital construction program during
1967 which should cost about $16,675,000.
Trustees also authorized con
committeeof the trustees to take

action on individual projects
within the overall schedule. The
committee also is allowed to
adjust each of the three schedules outlined by as much as 15
percent.
Currently, $1,771,491 in federal grants have been pledged
to specific buildingprojects, Kerley reported. He added that the
University is eligible for substantial additions in some areas.
The first item on Schedule
1
(construction and reconstruction on the Lexington campus)
Buildis the Classroom-Officing to be built on the sites of
White Hall, Patterson Houseand
the Carnegie Museum.
Constniction on the new

'World Peace'
Conference
Sel In May
(c) New York Times New

By FRANK BROWNING
Kernel Associate Editor

struction of temporary parking
lots with meters and granted
permission to negotiate a contract with General Telephone

Fight Pages

Continued On Page

7

'Role Of Contemporary Women'
Series Of Discussions Planned
Universities across the nation have shown a
good deal of interest lately in encouraging the
"adult" women to return to school.
The Office of the Dean of Women here is
becoming part of this national trend with a series

of discussions and lectures emphasisingthe" Emerging Hole of Contemporary Women."
Planned for women in the wider community,
those not already involved in educational pursuits, the series will focus on providing information as well as encouragement, so women may
have the opportunity to explore their potential.
The series, under the direction of Mrs. Celia
Zyzniewski assistant to the Dean of Women, is
scheduled for each Thursday morning in February
from 9 to noon in room 303 of the Home Fconomics
Building.

"Women and ('hanging Society,"' the first session set for Feb. 2, will feature Dr. James Gladden, a professor of department of sociology. Miss
('attic Dm Miller, Kentucky Commissioner of
Public Information, will be a special guest.
Dr. Ilairiett A. Hose, director of the Counseling and Testing Services, will be featuied at the
second session, Feb. 9, concerning "Motivation:
Strengths and Advances in the Adult Women.''
Special visitors loi the session will be Miss

Katherine Peden, state Commissioner of ('commerce, and Dr. Lawrence A. Allen, chairman of
the Department of Library Science. Following the
morning session Mrs. Frances Shine will conduct
a tour of the rare Uiok room in King Library.
The third session, scheduled for Feb. 16, will
involve a discussion of "WIhi are the Traditionalists: Women or Society?" Dr. Albert J. Ditt,
associate professor of ps etiology, will be the
featured speaker and discussion groups will be
ttinducted by women enrolled in the University.
Following this session a tour of Kenneth Campbell's "Stone on Stone" showing in the Art Gallery will be ttinducted by Fdward Bryant, director of the gallery.
The final session "Which Choices Are For
You" on Feb. 23, will feature an overview and
panel iliseussion. Involved in this session will
be Mrs. Irene Wagner, chid magnate design engineer at Ciucihle Steel Conipan); Di. Helen 1..
Holloek. stall physician at the Lexington Vetei-au'Administration Hospital; and Dr. Doris
Seward, dean of women. The panel will be eoin
posed ot members o WAl'K. Women At I'nixei-sitv- ,
of Kcntiu ky.
Following this session a lundieon will be held
in the Student Center.
.

.

.

s

* u

2 --

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL,. Friday, Jan.

!

2(1,

Doctoral Thesis To Travel Money.
It's In The Credit Union Plan
deposited, yields dividends to
shareholders. The dividend rate
has risen steadily from 4 to
4 34 quarters percent dividend.
This represents a dividend one
quarter percent higher than most
building and loan associations
pay in the commercial market.
Losses on loans from the
credit union arc less than
of one percent, a figure
payoff penalties."
considerably below any other maMost Lexington banks charge
jor installment lending agency.
penalties for early payoff of loans,
Although some credit unions
charge for service, and add one pay higher dividends than the
percent to insure the life of the local 4.75 percent, the local
borrower against the debt. The
provides a maximum of $2,000
credit union charges none of these life insurance to its members. Life
to its members.
insurance is matched dollar for
For example a member can dollar on
depositors under 55
for
borrow $100 from his
years of age and slightly less
one month with a total cost of
per dollar on those over
$1. To borrow from a Lexington
University Credit Union membank would cost $10 for service
for discounts
not including the one bers also are eligible
charge
in local stores. Savings run as
percent for life insurance and
the six percent interest on the high as 20 percent on automobiles
and 45 percent on furniture.
loan.
Family financial planning assisUniUnder these provisions
tance is another service provided
versity employees borrowed over
to the 2,000 members.
million dollars last year.
Members elect nine unpaid
The average loan was near $2,500,
directors to manage business afsome running as high as $16,000.
There is no maximum amount fairs. Audits are conducted by
state officials as well as an electthat can be loaned.
Each share of stock, money ed supervisory committee, which
Continued From rage 1
Terms of the loans are one
percent on the unpaid balance.
While this is a rate of 12 percent
a year, it is approximately equal
to the commercial bank "six perloan.
cent add-on- "
"At present we have probably
the lowest interest rate in tow n,"
notes Dr. Redman. "We Rive free
life insurance and we have no

one-fift- h

co-o- p

co-o- p

fifty-fiv-

one-ha-

e.

lf

PARK
East

CHURCH
High at Clay Avenue
DR. J. T. HARMON,
Pastor
Dr. W. P. Fryman, minister, visitation
9:45 a.m. Church School
11
a.m.
"Strategy for Victory"
7 p.m. School of Missions
Mrs. Roger Jones, Director

University
Methodist Chapel
151

E.

MAXWELL

Sunday, Jan. 22
Sermon

METHODIST

by

CANTERBURY HOUSE

Rev. Fornash
At 11 a.m. WORSHIP

472 ROSE ST.

Episcopal Church
SUNDAY

SERVICE

SERVICES

8:00 a.m. and 10:30 a.m.
7:00 p.m. 2nd Sundays

WOODLAND CHRISTIAN CHURCH
Elmore Ryle, Minister
Minister of Education
Morning Worship 10:45 A.M.

at

Kentucky Ave.
Miss Mary Hulda Allen,
Church School 9:30 A.M.

East High

"THE MAN WHO

Sermon

TO

REFUSED

Youth Groups

Nursery provided during Morning Worship

CRESTWOOD
Sunday

Worship

5.00 P.M.

CHRISTIAN CHURCH

DRIVE

1882 BELLEFONTE

DEFEATED"

BE

JAMES A. LOLLIS, Minister

REV.

10:30 a.m.

Sunday

For Transportation

Call

9:30 a.m.

College Seminar
277-378-

9

JR., Minister

ORIN M. SIMMERMAN,

PARKWAY

9:50 a.m. Church School; College Class: Sam Davis, Teacher
11:00 a.m. "AN ADVENTURE IN FAITH"
7:15 p.m. Orin Simmerman, Sr., Guest Minister

Donald W. Durham,
(Next to Hospital,
J. K. Wood, Pastoral
Sanders, Associate Minister
Samuel Morris, Youth
(I'arklnf in Kear or Church)
9:50 a.m. Sunday School
9:00 a.m. and 11:00 a.m. "When God Says No"
7:30 p.m. "Who Is The Lord God?"
Nursery for all Services
(Parking In Rear of
1716 S. Lime

Minister
Minister
Minister

Church)

Church Of God, 812 Loudon Ave.

General Headquarters, Cleveland, Tenn.
E. W. Carden, Pastor
Phone
Sunday School
i0:oo A.M.
MOKNING
835-51-

uoo

WORSHIP

AM
7: 30 P.M."

EV.GELST,C

I' t",TU.?',d,r Thursday
Prayer Meetlnf,

70

PUBLIC INVITED

t$3

P M'

SOUTHERN HILLS METHODIST CHURCH
2356 HARRODSBURG

RD.

DONALD

9:30 o.m. College Class
"GOD WILLS
TRANSPORTATION

PROVIDED

R. HERREN,

10:50 a.m. Morning

Minister

Worship

US FREE"

FOR STUDENTS

Call

or

277-617- 6

277-402- 9

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN

RICHARD T. HARBISON, MlnWtrr
Mil I, ST.
9:45 a.m. College Class. Mr. Jack Matthews, Leoder
11:00 a m. Sermon: "The Loving Father"

171 NORTH

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
WEST HIGH

at

UPPER ST.

RUSSELL R. PATTON, Minister

9:35 a.m. College Class
Morning Worship, "Jesus and th
Transportation provided for students Call
10:50

252-034- 4

i

L

or

277-669- 4

WW

Bus Laid Up;
Hack On Wheels
By Next Week
The Wallace Bookstore bus,
age unknown, was reported disabled this week with a starter
ailment.
Bookstore officials said that
the convalescence of the British
vintage bus is expected to be
short and that it should return
to campus service next week.

Cardigans Crews
Lambs Wools Alpacas Mohairs
V-Ne-

ck

100's to choose from
all colors.
Offer good through February 4th.
OPEN MONDAY

The Kentucky Kernel

The Kentucky Kernel, University
Station. University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506. Second class
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Published five times weekly during
the school year except holidays and
exam periods.
Published bv the Board of Student
Publications, UK Post Office Box 4986.
Nick Pope, chairman, and Patricia
Ann Nickell, secretary.
Begun as the Cadet in 1894 and
published continuously as the Kernel
since 1915.
Advertising published herein is intended to help the reader buy. Any
false or misleading advertising should
be reported to The Editors.

I

THE

STORE

STUDENTS
PREFER

NIGHT TIL 9 O'clock

EfFMTC

120 South
Upper
DOWNTOWN
254-650-

0

IN DOWNTOWN LEXINGTON

READ THE CLASSIFIED COLUMN IN
THE KERNEL EVERY DAY

Sale!

Sale!

SPORT COATS, TROUSERS
WINTER JACKETS
SUITS were $75
now $49.99
SPORT COATS were $45
now $29.99
DRESS TROUSERS

12 price

WINTER WARM OUTERWEAR
were $.'9.95 now $29.99
were $59.95 now $.59.99
WINTER CLEARANCE
In All Departments
OHIO U.
MIAMI U.
PURDUE U.

Children"

fJ

MEN'S SUITS

CENTENARY METHODIST CHURCH

Dewey

It was so popular . . . that wc make the same
offer of free monogramming on any sweater
purchased from our regular stock.

includes two Certified Public Accountants. A credit committee
approves all loans.
The treasurer and general
manager of the organization, Dr.
Redman, is well known as a
member of the board of directors
of Credit Union International.
He was elected last October to
serve as vice president of the
board of trustees of the Kentucky Credit Union League.
Despite rapid growth the
credit union is significantly hampered because the University
comptroller has refused to allow
contributions by payroll deduction, an almost universal feat
of credit unions.
"With payroll deduction,"
predicts Dr. Redman, "we could
expand (from $300,000) to over
$1 million in assets before the
end of the year."
Lexington's IBM credit union,
similar to the University in the
number involved, income, and
other relevant economic aspects,
tends to substantiate Dr. Redman's prediction on payroll deductions and credit union growth.
After payroll deduction was
added there, the IBM union assets shot from less than $500,000
to $5 million.

ALDERSGATE METHODIST CHURCH
1881 EASTLAND

Free Monogramming

W. VIRGINIA U.
BOWLING GREEN S.U.

Limestone
U. FLORIDA
U. KENTUCKY

OHIO STATE U.
U. CINCINNATI
EASTERN KY. U.

wi
fl:

* Till: KENTUCKY KERNEL.

I

ri.lay. Jan. 20. I'l(,7

-

I

Cheerleader Applications Open
Final selection of new cheerleaders for l7-f)is set for
o:30 p.m. March 20 and 21 in
the Memorial Odiseiim, according to Col. James I Alcorn,
who is in charge of receiving
all cheerleading applications.
The initial tryout session is
scheduled for March 6 and 7,
in the Women's Cym, under the
supervision of Mrs. Bert Gx. At
this time all men and women
w ishing to compete will perform.

and the number of participants
will be eliminated to 20 to 2
students.

8

ft

V:

I

I-

The seven judges lor the

PO ET JONATHAN WILLIAMS READS TO

A

STUDENT CENTER

AUDIENCE

cheer-leadin- g

finals will be Betty Jo

Palmer, assistant dean of women, Jane Batchelder, program

director of the Student ('enter;

Joe Birch, assistant dean of men;
Bernard Johnson, assistant professor ofphysical education. Mrs.
Charlie Bradshaw; Carson Porter,

Student

e

the signature and approval of the
Dean of Men and the Dean of
Woman's Office respectively, lu
fore submitting their applica-

Gov

(tnd Stev

Huddle Culled Ih Virv

H; L

ing, no later than March 1, 1967.
Col. Alcorn pointed out th.it
trvouts are open To both mciiand
women. "It is noted that other
SEC schools have both men and
women on their squads and it
seems to give them a better balance," he said.
Men and women must have

eminent president;
Johnson,
pres-

ident.

tions.

"The I'niversity requites anyone wishing to participate in a
school spoil v) red organization to
have a2.0overall academic standAlcorn said.
ing.'

All applications must be delivered to Col. Alcorn's office,
room 103, Administration build

The Huddle, a restaurant in
building located on the northeast corner of Euclid and Rose,
Friday was gutted inaone-alarfire. A cleaning establishment in
the rear of the building suffered
smoke and water damage. Restaurant manager Tom Simpson
said he hopes to reopen the establishment soon. No one was
injured in the blaze, believed
caused by an overheated potatoe
a

(l.

frier.

Williams Offers 30 Selections
ley, Browning, Wordsworth, Van
Poet, publisher, hiker, and
Williams Gogh, Beethoven, and Poe.
photographer Jonathan
An exhibit of Williams' Ixwks
read some 30 of his poems and
are on display in the King Li300 slides Thursprojected nearly
brary through Sunday."
day night in the Student Center
Williams introduced the stuTheater.
dents to the idea of "one-worWilliams is theauthorof eight
poems" and "poems in gardens."
books of poetry. Publisher of
The poet says he writes "jar
Jargon Books at North Carolina,
he has designed over 50 lxoks
of poems by promising poets
of England and America.
English Prof. Guy Davenport called Williams' work "not
an entity, but a cosmos" in his ANNOUNCEMENTS of any University
Board
organization for
introductory remarks adding "his must be turned the atBulletinwomen's
in
the
Kernel office no later
a unique activity inourtime."
is
desk in the
2 p.m. the day prior to
Williams read some of his than Multiple announcements publiwill
cation.
be made if a carbon is furnished for
earlier (1936) poems, written each day of publication.
while he was at Black MounThe committee for the Student
tain College. He read parts of
and Guide to Courses will meet at
his poems about England
Alabama, and an unpublished 6:30 p.m. Monday in Room 117
work "Reflections on Appala-chia.- " of the Student Center.
d

gon poetry" and is now writing
a collection of "new" Appalachian poetry.
His idea of poetry, he said,
is a poem that pleases both the
eye and the ear. He said having a sensitive ear to the quality
of a word is like "thumping a
watermelon" to judge its worth.

Here's 25$
to help get you
through
mid-yea- r
exams

UK Bulletin Board

Williams' worldwide travels
were reviewed through some remarkable photographs of modern
poets and of the graves, houses,
and special places of English
and American poets, composers,
and artists including Keats, Shel

"ill
J

4

All women liv ing in Residence

Halls must make appointments
for Kentuckian portrait sittings
by calling extension 2S25 or going
to the Photography Service,
Room 216, Journalism Building.
Deadline is Feb. 1.

I

W-y-

in Room
ical Center.

p.m. Tuesday
of the Med-

Students can obtain tickets
to the third subscription concert of the Lexington Philharmonic Orchestra by presenting
their I.D. cards at Room IS
of the Fine Arts Building after
10 a.m. Monday. Guest soloist
for the concert to be held in
Memorial Hall at S:15 p.m. Friday, January 28, will be Byron

(When you can't afford to be dull)

Janis, pianist.
o

'Y"

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colates

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CANDIES

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Enclosed is (check one):
Wrapper from NoDoz Mints, or Front
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panel from package of 15 or 36 NoDoz Tablets, or
from bottle of 60 NoDoz Tablets.
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But hurry, offer ends Feb. 28. No refunds after March 7,

The final oral examination of
James Howse Jr., candidate for
the Doctor of Philosophy degree,
will be held at 8 a.m. Saturday
Buildin the Chemistry-Physic- s

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The Heritage String Quartet
will present a concert at 8 p.m.
in the Agricultural
Friday,
Science Auditorium.

Oh what a quieting, soothing
effect a delicious box of cho-

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Feminine Tranquilizer

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Deadline for application for
admission to Auburn School of
Veterinary Medicine for the fall'
semester of 1967 is Feb. 1. Students may contact the Acting
Dean of Education of the College of Agriculture, Dr. W. G.
Survant, for additional informa-

r1

1

Socie-

al

7
Mn 563

Applications for the Cvvens
Scholarship may be picked up
at the Student Financial Aid
Office by interested freshmen
women. They must be returned
no later than Feb. S.

m

(

The Pryor
ty will meet at

7Jt

,

MAIN ST.

(ilU

* The Kentucky Kernel

Wllilllil

The Smith's Outstanding College Daily
Umvi umiy of Kknucky

KSTAHLISHED

FRIDAY, JAN.

1894

If

20. 1907

Ei!itorids represent the opinions of tlw Editors, not of the University.

Wai.thi

SnK

M.

(I;nt,

Editor-ln-Clii-

1(K(), Editorial Voce Editor

Wii.i.iam Knait, Business Manager

Significant Discussion
committee of 10 faculty men
frankly disturbed disturbed
about the emphasis placed on violence in contemporary America.
They have organized an unofficial Committee on Peace Education and Research. Monday night
they presented the first of seven
seminars intended to investigate
as a philosophy oflife
and to examine it in terms of its
place in the twentieth century
world. One by one these seminars
will examine various facets of both
violence and
the personality traits common to each,
rationale for both, testimony from
a
worker, and peace
research as an academic discipline.
A

is

non-violen-

ce

non-violenc- e,

non-violen-

ce

The program is extensive and
shows promise as being one of the
most stimulating series of seminars
at the University this year. Monday's seminar, slated as "Basic
Precepts," deserves commendation.
While it bore some criticism as
intellectually light weight, or perhaps slightly "Sunday-schoolish- "
at times, nonetheless the approach
of
was opened to more
than 100 persons.
non-violen-

ce

Lawrence Tarpey approached his subject from two
views: the
Christian
ethic and the Gandhian viewpoint
of nonviolence. Certainly, other approaches might have been taken and
other philosophies might have been
considered. However, these approaches are valid philosophically,
and they are both of considerable
importance in the modern world,
considering the Asiatic oriental
awakening in international affairs
over the last 20 years.
Prof.

non-viole-

nt

--

Lawyer's Approach
The Law School these days is
dispensing good common sense
along with its judicial instruction.
Prof. James R. Richardson reg
cently offered these
to students who
techniques
want to succeed without really
trying:
Laugh at the professor's
jokes. If the instructor looks up
with a smile on his face you know
he told a joke.
Rring newspaper clippings of
today's topic into class.
Ask for outside reading
assignments.
Read only those books in
class which appear to be the course
textbooks.
Ask questions. Only those
questions which the professor can
easily answer.
Appear alert.
Sit in the front row only if
you can remain awake.
If you must sleep during
class, arrange for a friend to wake
you up when class is over.
apple-polishin-

Further justification for the
Christian approach is that at least
of the world's population give at least lip service to the
teachings of Christ. Yet it is undeniable that these very people do
two-thir-

ds

not accept
national credo.
non-violen-

as a basic

ce

Aside from the specific approaches yet taken to
in the seminar, the series is significant in that it is one of the most
non-violen-

important

intellectual-ethica-

ce

l

i

dis-

cussions to spring up on the
pus in recent years. Extensive planning has evidently been in the
works, and a real opportunity for
mind opening and expansion seems
likely and should not be slighted.
cam-

"Now,

Ilon-Y- ou

Jus' Be You rselfi"

Letters To The Editor

Fans' Support Asked For Basketball Team
To the Editor of the Kernel:
This letter is for those who share
my enthusiasm for the game of basketball. Others may stop reading
at this point.
For years we have been treated
to unbelievably successful basketball teams at Kentucky. Many have
been the seasons when a defeat
was reacted to as something close
to a tragedy. Conference championships have been taken as a
matter of course and even national championships have been
something to be hoped for, if not
won, in almost any year. (I was
manager for three years and the
one year of those when we lost
five games and failed to finish
number one in the ratings was
considered at the time a pretty
bad season).
This success has had its effect
on those watching the games. Instead of being supporters and
of your schoolmates and
friends you have come to be spectators at a theatrical performance,
applauding the
plays
and clamoring for 100 points when
the score reached 90, and, I am
sorry to say, in recent years becoming less superior in sportsmanship to some of those hostile crowds
we used to criticize on our road
well-execut-

trips.
have a
for something

proposition for you
different this year.
Do you remember what exciting
I

moments this team gave you last
year? Don't those of you who
know some of these players as classmates and friends find them a
likeable bunch of fellows. Do you
want things to continue for them
as they are now?
If this can't be the year of the
best record, then let it be the year
of the best fans. Don't just show
your enthusiasm after a great play
after a scoring
or at the time-oDo what good fans need to
spree.
ut

do; encourage the team when it
needs it most.
You in the band, keep up the
good work. Cheerleaders, lead and
help the fans. You have some very
good cheers, but give up the fancy
ones which few can or will follow.
If this leaves you with "Give 'em
the Blue!", "Two bits, four bits"
and clappingyour hands in rhythm,
so be it. The main purpose of the
game is not anybody's performance, but a pleasant emotional
and athletic experience shared by
friends. This is everybody's opportunity to repay the team for
some really exciting and superior
games.
Do you believe your encouragement can have some effect? I've
been watching Kentucky for 18
years now, and I know it can, and
has. I've seen Kentucky crowds
make the difference on many occasions, and I've seen crowds on
the road do it at least as often
(and I've heard Kentucky teams
give credit to their crowds for a
win).
So what do you say? Help
the team when it's down and help
them through every game to come
this year. You and the team will
both have a successful season and
an awful lot of fun.
Hello to my friends and former

students.
Robert P. Moore

Teaching Assistant
in Russian
Cornell University

The Kernel's Status
It was encouraging to read in
Kernel that the campus
newspaper has suddenly become
interested in something called

to the Kernel staff to be reminded
of their newspaper's status on campus; the Kernel is called "the
campus joke." Secondly, it should
be beneficial to be reminded why:
the Kernel's value as an information media (sic) is undermined
by its insulting presentation of
opinion, especially on the editorial
page.

These being general truths of
no great controversy,
less feel it important
an illustration, if only
fication of the Kernel

to suggest
for

the

edi-

staff. That

illustration is the editorial entitled
"Right-Win- g
Censorship" which
appeared Jan. 13.
Without going into the specific
content, let it suffice to say that
most rational people realize there
are irrational people who do irrational things.
This "truism" is employed by
the Kernel editorial staff, but with
two serious distortions: first, it
seems incorrect to suggest certain
behavior to be attributable only to
the "right-wing- "
when it is in fact
behavior found in almost any seg--'
ment of society; secondly, it is
entirely absurd to suggest that a
minority element in such a diverse
political philosophy establishes the
character of the whole. This is
all very elementary and yet such
errors seem typical in the Kernel.
The Kernel can be considered
If