xt7rbn9x174j https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7rbn9x174j/data/mets.xml Lehndorff, Georg Hermann Albrecht, graf von, 1833-1914. 1887  books b98-33-40282553 English Porter & Cortes, : Philadelphia : This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. Horses Breeding. Horse breeding recollections text Horse breeding recollections 1887 2002 true xt7rbn9x174j section xt7rbn9x174j 































PERE

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  HORSE - BREEDING





RECOLLECTIONS.




          BY
      (T. LEJHNDORFF.



  PHILADELPHIA:
PORTER & COATES.
    1887.

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              CONTENTS.






                 CHAPTER 1.
                                          PAX E
GENERAL OBSERVATIONS...................



                 CHAPTER I.

IN-BREEDING-OUT-CROSSING ............... . 44

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                       NOTES

                            ON

    BREEDING RACEHORSES.



                     CHAPTER I.
               GENERAL OBSERVATIONS.
  THE principal requisite in a good racehorse is soundness,
again soundness, and nothing but soundness; and the object
of the thoroughbred is to imbue the limbs, the constitution,
and the nerves of the half-bred horse with that essential
quality, and thereby enhance its capabilities.
  The thoroughbred can, however, fulfil its mission only pro-
vided the yearly produce be continually subjected to severe
trials in public. The only appropriate test, proved by the
experience of two centuries, is the racecourse, although its
adversaries oppose it as too one-sided, and propose in its
stead others of more or less impracticability. The last strug-
gle for victory, in which culminates the exertion of the race,
results from the co-operation of the intellectual, the physical,
and the mechanical qualities of the horse, the development of
which combined power is higher and more reliable than any
that can be obtained in the same animal by other means. The
combination of those three qualities forms the value of the
horse destined for fast work: the mechanical, in respect to
the outward shape and construction; the physical, as regards
the soundness and normal development of the digestive organs
and motive power; the intellectual, or the will and the energy
to put the other two into motion and persevere to the utmost.
The attained speed is not the aim, but only the gauge, of the
performance.
                                                  7

 

NflJs ON BREEDING RACEHORSES.



  The grand ideal principle which places this test so incom-
parably higher than any other based upon the individual
opinion of one or more judges is the absolute and blind
justice, personified in the inflexible winning-post, which alone
decides on the racecourse, and the irrefutable certainty that
neither fashion nor fancy, neither favor nor hatred, neither
personal prejudice nor time-serving-frequently observable in
the awards at horse-shows has biassed the decision of hotly-
contested struggles as recorded in the Racing Calendar for the
space of one hundred and seventy years. This it is that gives
to the English thoroughbred horse a value for breeding pur-
poses unequalled and looked for in vain in any other species
of animal creation.
  I apprehend great danger from the endeavor to improve
horse-racing-like any other human institution, not without
its shortcomings-by corrective measures, which might inter-
fere with that principle of blind justice; its fun(lamental laws
would thereby become undermined, and the building, which it
took centuries to erect, fall to ruins.
  Nothing but the framing of the racing propositions ought to
serve as indicator of what is required of the thoroughbred;
every state in need of an efficient cavalry should be careful
how to place authority for that purpose in experienced hands,
and see it used leniently, but on clearly-established principles.
As for the rest, it should be left to the immutable laws of
Nature to gradually mould, in outward form and inward com-
position, that horse which best answers those requirements.
  The centre of gravity in all trials of strength and endurance
is to be found on the racecourse: the straighter the running-
track the more infallible the result; the longer and steeper the
gradient the severer the test.
  As to the distances to be run over, I would recommend for
three-year-olds and upwards from one mile to two miles at the
scale of weights adopted in the rules of racing at present in
force in Prussia, which is about ten pounds above English
weights.
  Two-year-olds should-due regard being had to the time of



8

 
GENERAL OBSERVATIONS.



year and the state of the ground-never run less than four and
a half nor more than seven furlongs; shorter races ruin their
temper more than those over longer distances, in which the
pace from the beginning is not so severe nor the start of so
much consequence.
  Whoever has had frequent opportunities for observing in a
racing-stable the development of two-year-old horses will, as
a rule, have noticed an evident change about the middle of
summer. They quite suddenly lose their foal-like appearance
and become young horses. In general this alteration takes
place at the same time as the shedding of the two middle teeth;
all at once the youngsters are better able to resist the wear and
tear of training and improve as the work agrees with them.
Of course this change does not occur simultaneously in all two-
vear-olds, although they may be equally well reared; neverthe-
less I have noticed at this period a greater degree of evenness
in the development of late and earlier foals than seemned war-
ranted, considering the difference in their respective ages.
  As, however, at midsummer the ground frequently is too
hard to admit of good work being done with two-year-olds
without danger to their legs,\I would advocate that the princi-
p)al races for horses of that age should not take place before the
autumn, when owners who have judiciously saved their young
animals during the summer may indemnify themselves through
richer prizes than were offered for competition in the earlier
part of the season.
  In principle I do not disapprove of running two-year-olds;
on the contrary, I take it, if done in moderation, to be an un-
erring means to ascertain the soundness of the constitution.
From midsummer-say first of August-I look upon such
races, according to the degree of development in the individual
horses, as useful; care must, however, be taken not to overdo
it, especially with fillies, whose temper is more excitable than
that of colts. I have generally noticed that mares which cred-
itably stood the test of two-year-old training also proved them-
selves superior at the stud. Taking, for instance, the most suc-
cessful brood-mares during the twenty years from 1860 to 1879,



9

 
NOTrS ON BREEDING RAC'EHORSES.



-that is to say, the dams of the winners of the four classic
races, Two Thousand Guineas, Derby, Oaks, and Leger, of
that period-we find, upon examination of their earlier career,
that of those eighty, or rather eighty-two, mares-two races
resulted in dead heats, which were not run off' only thirty did
not run as two-year-olds. That early ripeness in a racehorse
may be regarded as a proof of health, even with regard to later
usefulness at the stud, is further corroborated by Little Lady,
the dam of the Two Thousand Guineas winner, Camballo, hav-
ing carried off the Anglesey stakes for yearlings at Shrewsbury
in 1859-the only race of the sort ever run. I mention this
circumstance, however, by no means in support of yearlings'
races; on the contrary, I look upon them as senseless institu-
tions, which, fortunately, twenty years ago were abolished in
England, the only country where they ever existed.
  The severe training and repeated trials of yearlings, more-
over, I take to be dangerous in Germany, where the wtinter
generally sets in and puts a stop to all training operations
about the middle of November. In England, and especially in
France, where, as a rule, yearlings can be tried about Christ-
mas-time, it may be done without detriment to their health;
the more so, as in those favored climates their development is
less retarded by the cold, and young horses acquire earlier than
in Germany the power which is necessary to bear the strain of
training.
  I consider the test by hurdle-racing, and especially by steeple-
chasing, rather one of acquired cleverness than of consequence
fbr breeding. The principal race across country in England,
the Liverpool Grand National, has repeatedly been won (for
instance, in 1863 by Emblem, and in the following year by her
own sister, Emblematic, by Teddington out of Miss Batty) by
animals not possessed of sufficient staying power to run a mile
creditably in even moderate company. This applies more par-
ticularly to the younger sister, Emblematic. It is not so much
length of distance that constitutes a criterion of endurance as
the pace at which it is run. In a steeplechase this is generally
eo slow that a horse able to race half a mile is never for a mo-



10

 

GENERAL OBSERVATIONS.



ment extended; if with such speed he combines a quiet temper,
so as not to take more out of himself than is required by his
rider, he may, in an ordinary race of that description, gallop
a long time without being distressed, and, having thus hus-
banded his strength, have sufficient left in him to enable him
to win the race.
  Jumping is more a question of agility than of power, except
in young and unpractised horses, that tire more through their
awkwardness in leaping than through galloping; schooled
chasers, however, are required to put forth additional energy
only when the race is run at an inconveniently fast pace diffi-
cult for them to continue.
  To the practised jumper, on the contrary, the leap over a
fence of not extraordinary proportions, if taken at a moderate
pace, rather affords him time to recover his breath than causes
the waste of additional strength. Since the speedier horse
jumps at a slower pace than the slower stayer in proportion
to their respective degrees of speed, the former, equal cleverness
in jumping taken for granted, must necessarily consume less
strength than the latter.
  The steeplechase course, therefore, fkvors, cwteris paribus, the
speedy horse as compared to the slower stayer, and practice
daily shows us instances of horses that as non-stayers were use-
less on the flat become successful chasers, and, vice Hers&, stayers
on the flat which over a country fail to gain distinction.
  Intending regenerators of racing on what they consider more
rational principles, therefore, show a lamentable ignorance of
the nature of the horse when advocating the adoptioii of the
steeplechase as the test by which to gauge the capabilities of
the thoroughbred, and would, if they succeeded in their en-
deavors, attain only the exact reverse of what they aim at.
I would recommend those who still insist that steepleehasing
is more reliable than racing on the flat for the purpose of
ascertaining power and soundness in a horse to look round the
large steeplechase establishments in England, France, or even
Germany, and examine the legs of the horses kept for that
kind of work. The numerous patched-up screws that run and



11

 
NOTES ON BREEDING RACEHORSIES.



win races year after year would not stand for a month the
lreparation for a flat race, much less the race itself; and,
finally, as to the excellence at the stud of stallions celebrated
as steeplechasers, experience teaches that none such exist who
subsequently made a name as sires of racehorses, whereas stal-
lions that on the turf belonged-to the first class frequently sired
superior chasers.  As a touchstone for mares intended for
breeding purposes, steeplechasing, independent of other con-
siderations, is unsuitable, inasmuch as horses are qualified for
such work at a more advanced age only. Whereas, therefore,
the brood-mare is kept from her vocation longer than is desira-
ble in the interest of breeding, her fitness as a matron suffers
proportionately by long-protracted training.
  As far as I know, there is in the whole stud book not a single
steeplechase mare that has made for herself a great name as the
dant of winners on the flat.
  A cardinal point, which continually maintains and regener-
ates the thoroughbred as a source of power and soundness, and
places it, with regard to certainty of propagation, far above all
other breeds of the equine race, is the circumstance that the
thorourhbred is tried before it is sent to the stud, whereas of
the half-bred such individuals only as are unfit for breeding
purposes are put to the test. Half-breds at the stud, more
esp)ecially stallions, from the day they are foaled to that of
their death, lead an existence of sluggish idleness, generation
after generation, without interruption. However useful cart-
mares may be in the plough or other kind of slow work, a half-
bred brood-mare is never subjected to a real trial of her capa-
bilities, and, as an extremely rare occurrence, such a mare
returns to the stud on account of an excellence accidentally
brought to light; but if. however, done so, it will probably be
too late for any use for breeding.
  What would become of the usefulness of our half-breds, what
of our cavalry, without a continuance of crosseswith stallions
of pure blood, bred for stoutness and chosen on account of their
proper excellent qualities, so as to constantly renew the neces-
sary steel in the breed 



12

 

GENERAL OBSERVATIONS.



  The thoroughbred is in a much lesser degree the produce of
any particular locality than the cart-horse or even the half-
bred; it is rather one of an artificial nature, better able to
withstand external influences, and capable of being trans-
planted to all parts of the globe and continued without es-
sential deterioration as long as the elementary principle is not
lost sight of-that is to say, as long as its capabilities are tried
in public, and as long as the best-tried animals are in prefer-
ence used for reproduction. The thoroughbred stands to the
half-bred in the same position as the plantation tree to the wild
tree of the forest: the former thrives in any locality where trees
grow; the latter feels at home only where it first struck root,
for, having never been transplanted, it wants those fibres by
means of which to take hold of and draw sustenance from the
new soil.
  I do not, however, mean to sav that thoroughbred mares are
in no way influenced by translocation to other countries and
climates; on the contrary, I am of opinion that greater safety
will be insured by breeding from mares bred at home than
from imported ones. I merely assert that in the thoroughbred
the power of resistance to local and climatic influences is in-
finitely higher than in the half-bred, etc.
  For this reason the establishment of a stud for thoroughbreds
in Germany is less difficult than one intended for the baser
breed, provided the locality be adapted to the purpose and the
requisite means available. I do not mean to say that faultless
brood-mares of the first class are easily obtainable in England;
but since the price of such mares is eventually almost unlimited
in comparison to what half-bred brood-mares will command in
the market, and as, in numerous instances, owners of eminent
mares which did them good service on the turf prefer breeding
from them in public establishments to selling them to the more
extensive breeder, in England the fluctuation in the thorough-
bred material is influenced in a higher degree by the change of
circumstances than that in our half-breds. The chances of a
foreigner making a favorable investment, therefore, rise in pro-
portion, provided he is at home in the Racing Calendar, the



13

 
NOTES ON BREEDING RACEHORSES.



Stud Book, and last, but not least, the personal concerns of
English breeders.
  This brings us to the practical question, What must be the
aim of the breeder in the selection of brood-mares; or, as ap-
plied to us, what principles must guide us in the importation of
brood-mares from England or France, or when choosing from
those bred at home
  I believe, if strictly adhered to, the following hints may be
depended on as offering the greatest amount of safety in the
choice of brood-mares:-
  1. To buy, without exception, mares from the best strains of
blood only, more regard being had to the dam even than to the
sire.
  2. To bear in mind that a good pedigree alone is not suf-
ficient, because the best-bred mare may be unsound (I thought
that by the acquisition of the own sisters to Gladiateur and
Vermout, although neither had done anything remarkable on
the turf, I had made sure of an enormous success; but both
turned out unsound and worthless at the stud); to be, there-
fore, particular to buy from the best strains of blood such
mares only as have
   (a) Themselves exhibited some form on the turf, and only
     on account of insufficient age not yet been tried at the
     stud, or have
   (b) Already bred winners, and thereby proved themselves
     sound dams and fit to propagate the excellent qualities
     of their respective families.
   As a matter of course, of the mares coming within the limits
of the foregoing conditions the most powerful and truthfully
made will be preferred; but no consideration of the exterior,
however prepossessing it may be, if not accompanied by those
requisite attributes, should be allowed to prevail-for there is
no more baneful, no more certain, hereditary evil than un-
soundness-especially rheumatic or scrofulous disorders.
   I am well aware that with regard to No. 2, and especially
 subdivision (a), I shall meet with vehement opposition, and
 that a number of instances to the contrary will be cited. They



14

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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS.



are not unknown to me, but I adhere to my opinion for the
following reasons:
  When I require in a young mare intended for stud purposes
individual performances, I do not mean to say that I would not
buy one that had not, on a given number of occasions, been
first past the post.
  Although I value racing form, as such, very highly, yet do
I consider it of still greater importance that a mare should
have proved, by repeated running, even if not attended by
eminent success, that no unsoundness of limbs, no organic dis-
ease or defect of temper, prevented her bearing the strain of
training and racing.
  I know perfectly well that in numerous instances thoroughly
sound animals with a good temper and all the necessary qual-
ities for racing, through no fault of theirs, but in consequence
of a mere accident, have been kept from appearing in public
(absolute certainty in that respect can, however, only be ac-
quired by personal superintendence of their training); but
I know equally well that in nine cases in every ten unsound-
ness, weakness, or temper has been the cause. It is advisable
to rely on the Racing Calendar alone, and not believe a word
of the fictitious marvels told of the innumerable mares without
public form, and which tales are spread about by the owners of
those animals. If only one-tenth of them were true there
would have been every year at the least a dozen winners of
the One Thousand Guineas, the Oaks, or the Prix de Diane
if one accident or another had not happened.
  The affirmation on the part of owners that the mare for
sale had never been trained, was not even broken, likewise fre-
quently differs from the truth, and is solely intended to make
the purchaser believe that she would in all probability have
done wonders if she had been put into training. But, in
reality, this ought to be considered as a drawback, as, those
of a few eccentric breeders excepted, nearly every thorougihbred
in England, if sound, well developed, and sufficiently well bred,
is sent to be trained; only when too sniall, unsound, or cripples
are they thought not worth the trouble and expense, and con-



15

 
NOTES ON BREEIDING RACEHORSES.



sequently kept at home at grass. I am deterred by the expres-
sion " never been in training" or " never been broken," when
applied to a young mare, even more than by an injured leg,
which tells its own unvarnished tale of the reason of her non-
appearance in public. The wisest plan is to keep aloof from
both until they have by their progeny proved their soundness
as dams.
  A look round the select studs of owners who breed their own
racehorses in England and France (Lord Falmouth, Duke of
Westminster, Mr. Lefevre, etc.) will show that nearly all their
brood-mares have themselves been winners or are the dams of
winners, with the exception of only now and then a mare of
their own breeding, or from their racing-stables, sent to the
stud on trial, of whose internal soundness the owner is perfectly
satisfied, and who has only in consequence of an accident been
prevented from running on the turf. Mares with high-sounding
pedigrees, but without any pretensions to individual goodness,
form the staple of a good many studs breeding for sale over
which a few matrons of sterling worth-bought, if possible, for
large sums at public sales-serve to throw a kind of halo.
Mares without fashionable pedigrees or previous excellence,
which in England are to be had by the dozen for less money
than that for which half-bred ones can be purchased on the
Continent, are owned by needy people, who wait for a lucky
chance, or by second- and third-rate breeders, who speculate on
selling them to the flats from abroad.
  Sir Tatton Sykes, quantitatively one of the most extensive
breeders of modern times, sold only his colts, while he allowed
the fillies to grow up wild and untried, and kept those he liked
best to breed from. The upshot was a stupendous failure, which
must have ruined any man less wealthy than the Yorkshire
baronet. He had peculiar ideas, and, I think, believed in the
soundness of his principle. Had it been any one else, I should
have put him down as a very knowing manager; for in a stud
breeding for sale a considerable saving may no doubt be
effected by substituting for brood-mares of well-established
reputation, that cannot be had without the outlay of large



16

 
GENERAL OBSERVATIONS.



sums of money, young and perfectly untried animals which
have cost very little to keep and nothing at all to train. The
only difficulty is to make the public, or even a small section of
it, share the apparent belief of the owner and induce them to
pay for the yearling colts in proportion to their credulity.
  If Sir Tatton had been obliged to put all his colts into train-
ing, instead of disposing of them to the highest bidder, even for
a mere song, as was toward the end the case, he would, I am
convinced, in spite of his eccentric obstinacy, soon have changed
his mind and principle of breeding. I could continue the sub-
ject, and make similar remarks with regard to some studs of
the present day largely breeding for sale from untried mares.
It is thus not surprising to see such breeders on speculation
amongst the foremost champions of that theory. Any attempt
to get from the same men-who invariably have a large stock
of rubbish on hand for sale to the unwary stranger-one of
those mares with racing performances (of which, as I explained
before, they keep a small number), will be met with the de-
mand of an absurd price or the stereotyped "not for sale."
Should, however, an exception be made and a reasonable sum
asked, it is ten to one that there is something wrong about the
niare.
  On the other hand, it is evident that in England latterly
a wholesome reaction has commenced to prevail; not so ill
France, where the thoroughbred is at present in danger of
suffering from the pernicious wholesale production from un-
tried mares in studs breeding for sale.
  In support of the assertions of those fanatics who ridicule
individual racing form as not hereditary, and look for the
probability of propagation of such qualities in the breed only,
without taking into account the propagating individual, Poca-
hontas (the dam of Stockwell, Rataplan, King Tom, etc.) is
frequently quoted as the irrefutable proof of the correctness of
their theory. They copy from one another, and rely on the
public taking as little trouble as themselves to refer to the
Racing Calendar for the old mare's performances. For the
benefit of those who not only look for examples to prove their
       2



17

 


NOTES ON BREEDING RACEHORSES.



ready-made theories, but are anxious for real facts from which
to draw instruction, I will detail the racing career of Pocahon-
tas, in order to show that she comes up to my standard of a
good brood-mare. Pocahontas, though she was a roarer, by
her racing during four seasons proved herself possessed of a
good constitution; her form, moreover, was not so inferior as
many pretend it to have been. If she had run in races of
minor importance, she would probably have had more than
one winning-bracket to her name.
  Pocahontas, bred 1837, by Glencoe out of Marpessa (dam
of Jeremy I)iddler and Boarding School Miss), when two years
old ran only in the Criterion, unplaced to Crucifix.
  As a three-year-old she ran twice, also unplaced: in the
Oaks, won by Crucifix, and in the Goodwood Cup, won by
Beggarman, in which race Lanercost was second and Hetman
Platoff third.
  At four years of age she ran three times unplaced: in the
Goodwood Cup, the Cesarewitch, and the Cambridgeshire.
  In the following year, at Goodwood, she won the first heat
of a race finally won by Currier. At Brighton she also won
the first heat of a race ultimately won by Miss Heathcote. She
made her last appearance on the turf in a mile race heats at
Rochester and Chatham, where in a field of nine horses she
won the first heat and in the other two ran second to
Patchwork.
  To see mares celebrated on the turf-like Marie Stuart,
Fraulein, etc.-turn out indifferent at the stud may at least
partially be accounted for by their too arduous and too pro-
tracted racing careers.
  Lord Falmouth's mares, whose racing careers invariably
close with the end of their fourth year, rarely super in a
like manner. In support of the correctness of this and other
assertions advanced by me, I give the list of that nobleman's
entire stud at Mereworth as it existed in 1880. It was com-
posed of the following twenty-four mares:



18

 


GENERAL OBSERVATIONS.



19



          BROOD MARES AT MEREWORTH IN 1880.

Names printed in black letters are those of winners of one or more of the four clasoie
           races8-Two Thousand Guineas, Derby, Oaks, and St. Leger.



1858



Name.



SILVERRHAIR..



18701 SILVER RING



1&591 HURRICANE..



18671 ATLANTIS....



18671 GERTRtUDE...



Pedigree.



Own Performances.



Year.



By Kingstonout 186o
of England's 18;11
Beauty (dam   1862
of the win-
ners:
Attraction,
The Rake).

By Blair Athol 1872
out of Silver- 1873
hair (dam  of
the winners:
Silvester,
Peri wig.
Garterly Bell,
Fetterlock,
Slilso,
Apollo).

By Wild Day- 1861
rell  out  of 1862
  Midia  (dam [ 1863
  of the win- !
  ners:
Cynrictus,
Avalanche,
Tornado,
Sydmonton).

By Thormanby1 1869
out of Hurri- 1870
  cane (dam of
  the winners:
Stromboli,
Atlantic,
Cataclysm,
Whirlwind).



By   Saunterer
out of queen
Berths (dam
of the win-
ners:
Queen's   Mes-
senger,
S pIn way,
Wheel of For-
tune,
Great Carle).



1869   8
1870  11



1871



10

29



Bred the



        I ;              f,,ll,.illg
  I -[  Of which         Winners.
        Important Races.

3  2  Eglinton Stakes. 'Silvester.
5   1                  Silver Ring.
3 l                   l'eriwig.
_ l           _          ... (iarterly Bell.
11 I 3                  Fetterlock.
                        Sillvio.
                        Apollo.

7   5  Bretby Stakes.  Ringleader.
7    I

14   6



4
8
4

16



2
3



1000 Guineas.



9   5 + Clearwell Stakes.
2  ... Prendergast
l_  -_   Stakes.
11   5



3
4


1

8



Stromboli.
Atlantis.
Atlantic.
Cataclysm.
Whirlwind.





Henry II.



                lKin Clovis.
Yorkshire Oaks, I Childeric.
Great    York- . Charibert.
shire Stakes.



I
I
I

 

      NOTES ON BREEDING RACEHORSES.

BROOD MARES AT MEREWORTH IN 1880-continued.



N !Name.



1860I Queeu
     Berths



1872. Spinaway..



   I





1876' Wheel of
   I Fortune



   Pedigree.



By Kingston out  
of Flax (dam
of the win-
Ders:
Reginella,
Court Mantle,
Linsey  Wool-
say).

By   Macaroni
  out of Queen
  Berths (dam
  of the win-
  ners:
Gertrude,
Queen's  Mes
  senger,
Wheel of For-
  tune.
Great Carle).

By Adventurer,
  out of Queen
  Bertha (dam
  of the win-



             n ers:       I
             ,e rtrude,
             Queen's Mes-
             senger
             Spinaway,
             Great Carle).

LADY COVEN-' By Thormanby[
TBY         out of Lady
              Rtoden  (dan
              of the win-
              nersh
            Ma Belle,
            Liddington,
            Mirella ',  byI
            WestAustralian
              Out of Saun-
              terer and loi-
              terer's dam.

LAD Y   O F By Blair Athol
  MERCIA      out of Lady,
              Coventry
              (dam of the
              winners:
            Peeping Tom,
            Yorkshire Bride,
            Farnese,
            Lady (iolightly,
            Placentia,
            Earl Giodwin).



Own Performances.



ear.



1863
1864






1874
18,5









1878



1879





1867 ,
1868










1877



4

5
1
10



3
13
16 1



6



5'

11



;4



2

3



1



  Of which
Important Races.



Oaks.



   I Oaks, Nassau
11   Stakes, Y ork-
     shire   Oaks,
     York Cup,
     D o n c a s t e r
     Stkes, Royal
     Stakes,  New-
     Market Oaks.


6 RRichmond
     Stskes, Buck-
     enham Stakes,
     D ew hu rst
     l'late.
4 '1000  Guineas,
     Oaks,  Prince
10   of  Wales's
     Stakes  Ascot,
     Yorkshire
     Oaks.



1  ...
6      1
7      1








2  ...




  I



  I



20



  Bred the
  following
  W' inners.


Gertrude.
Quee,.'s 'Mes-
senger.
SpInaway.
Wheel of For-
tune.
Great Carle.


Merry-go-
  Round.
Darnaway.


















Peeping Tom.
Yorkshire
  Bride.
Farnese.
Lady Golight-
  ly.
Placentia.
Earl ("odwin.



1865










1751



I



I



i
i
i


I



iI
i
i
I
I
i
i
I



I


I
I
I









I
I





I

i



i

I
i
i



.....



i

 



            GENERAI, OBSERVATIONS.


BROOD MARES AT MEREWORTH IN 1880-coatirnued.



z     Name.



174



LADY  GO-
LIGHTLY



18761 PtACEr  .IA..



18671 WHEAT-EAR..



1874 K I TTY
     SPRIGHTLY



Pedigree.



By King Tomr
out of lady
Coventry (dan
of the wiu-
ners:
Peeping Toni,
Yorkshire Bride,
Farnese,
Placentia,
Earl Uiodwin).







ByParmesanout
of Lady Cov-
entry (dam of
the winners:
Peeping Toni
Yorkshire lride,
F-rnrese,
L;idy t;olightly,
Earl Godwin).



By Young Mel-
bourne out of
Swallow (own
sister to Stil-
toii atid dam
of the win-
  ners:
Whitebait,
Lady Bugle Eye,!
Nigh jar,
Ortolan,
(ierniania
Merlin).



By Rosicrucian
or  You 1n g
  Dutch nan
  out of Nike
  (dana of the
  winuers:
Juvenis,
Dreadnought,
Hydromel,
Adjutant,
Spring Captain,
Best and Brav-
  est,
Britomartis).



Own Performances.



Year.



1876
1877









1878





1878
1879









1869
1870
1871












1876
1877



I -;  v I   Of which
;     Importaut Races.

I I



8
15



8



2
2

4







6
9
4

19










10
6

16



5 Champagne
10 r Stakes.
   Nassau  Stakes,
     York s h i r e
     Oaks,   (Great
     Yorksh i re
     Stakes,  Don.-
     caster Stakes,
     Newnn a rket
     Oaks,   New-
     market Derby,
     11. in St. Leger.
2  York Cup.



17



1










3
4


8










3
1

4



Bred the
following
winners.



              I Skylark.
Ascot Biennial.  Fieldfare.
Newmarket Bi- Redwing.
ennial.      I Leap-Year.



21



I

 

      NOTES ON BREEDING RACEHORSES.

BROOD MARES AT MEREWORTH IN 1880-continued.



Pedigree.



By Blair Attol
out of Wheat-
ear (dam of
the winners:
Skylark,
Fieldfare,
Leap-Year).


By   Kingaft
out of Wheat-
ear (dam of
  the winners:
Skylark,
Fieldfare,
Redwing).


By Orlando out
of