xt7rbn9x214r https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7rbn9x214r/data/mets.xml The Frontier Nursing Service, Inc. 1949 bulletins  English The Frontier Nursing Service, Inc. Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. Frontier Nursing Service Quarterly Bulletins The Quarterly Bulletin of The Frontier Nursing Service, Inc., Vol. 24, No. 4, Spring 1949 text The Quarterly Bulletin of The Frontier Nursing Service, Inc., Vol. 24, No. 4, Spring 1949 1949 2014 true xt7rbn9x214r section xt7rbn9x214r The Quarterly Bulletm
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Fr011t1er Nursmg Servrce, Inc.
VOLUME 24 SPRING, 1949 NUMBER 4
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SPRING AT WENDOVER
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MOTHER AND SON
— Mrs. Sheldon Shepherd of Upper Bad Creek
and her baby, Curtis
Photograph taken by Miss Helen M. Feclcle, R.N., C.M.
Printed by kind permission of Mrs. Shepherd
Cover photograph courtesy of Mrs. Paul T). Muney
THE QUARTERLY BULLETIN af FRONTIER NURSING SERVICE. Inc. =
Published Quarterly by the Frontier Nursing Service, Lexington, Ky. `
Subscription Price $1.00 Per Year ‘
VOLUME 24 SPRING, 1949 NUMBER 4 `
"Entcrcd as second class matter June 30, 1926, at the Post Office :11. Lexington, Ky.,
under Act of March 3, 1879." ,
Copyright, 1949, Frontier Nursing Service, Inc.

 INDEX
ARTICLE AUTHOR PAGE
A Gift to Remember Hilda Sobral 29
A Rondeau Charles d’Orleans 2
African Notes Jessica L. Minns 31
Beyond the Mountains ° 55
Field Notes 62
"I Know a Bank . .   ` Helen E. Browne 34.
In Memoriam 11
l 4* Leo and I Mary Ann Qnarles 41
I My Experience as a Patient in
Hyden Hospital Marie Morgan Bunch 19
My First Delivery _ Lucy Ratli]j‘ 3
Old Courier News ` I 21
Old Staff News 44
One Sunday Afternoon (Cartoons) Barbara Bentley 38
Supervisor and Student (Photograph) Inside Back Cover
Uniinished Symphonies Ruth E. Alexander 36
Urgent Needs 7
BRIEF BITS
Courier’s Son (Photograph) 33
From a Trustee 35
Just .Iokes—Children 33
A Kentucky Country Coal Mine Madeline F. Cook 43
Letter from Mrs. Anthony Gillett 53
Little Girl’s Prayer Quoted by Mrs. Bolton 5
Masque of the Merrie Months ‘ 6
V Message From a Greek Friend Eleni Angelopoulon 20
x Miss Ulla \‘Vegelius (Photograph) 18
Oddments 37·
_ Sayings of Country People 30
r ; Small Service William Wordsworth 54
Thought for Today 5
I Trail to Thousandsticks Helen Warren 40
VVe May Think of History The Christian News—Letter 30
\Vhite Elephant G1
  V

 T · A Ronnanu Y .
By cnames D’Or1eans (1391-1465) ‘
Translated by Jann Payne (1842-1916) · .
The year has casl ils wede away Y
Of rain, ol lempesl and ol cold, y
T And pur on broidery ol gold
Of sunbeams brighl and clear and gay.  
There is no bird or beasl loday  
Bur sings and shouls in lield and Told,  
The year has casl i’rs wede away  
Oi rain, ol Jrempesl and ol cold. T
The silver 1°re+—worl< ol lhe lvlay i
ls over brool< and spring enscrolled.  
A blazon lovely lo behold. y li
Each lhing has |ou’r on new array: 1
The year has casl ils wede away. V V?
T  
 
 
l 

 A F1zoN·rn~2R NURSING snnvics s
ii MY FIRST DELIVERY
BE. by
, - LUCY RATLIFF
I  Medical Secretary, Hyden Hospital
Now don’t let the title of this article fool you—titles can
` I be so misleading sometimes. Let me make it clear; I never had
' a baby, never delivered one, never even helped deliver one. I
4+ merely mean by this title that, although I am a grown woman
_ and have been for quite sometime, this is the first, the very
I 1 first, time I have ever watched a baby being born. I did nothing
but take up space in that delivery room, but oh, what an
j experience! I learned a lot too. For one thing, I figure that if
leaving this old earth is as much trouble as getting here—I’m
aiming to stick around for a good while longer to make it well
I worth the trouble.
{ Like everything else here at Hyden Hospital, it all hap-
pened on a busy clinic day—Monday to be exact. On Mondays
  we hold prenatal clinic at the Hospital. I sat in the doctor’s
oflice placidly taking down data on each patient, thoroughly
I bored with the whole thing and wishing for a little excitement.
  Aimlessly I glanced out of the window and observed that one
  of the prenatals had ridden to clinic astride a mule. She tied
the mule to a fence post outside the Hospital and came into the
A clinic and sat in line on the bench patiently awaiting her turn
. to see the doctor. I noticed, as she came into the Hospital
· entrance, that she appeared near term and I marveled at the
sturdy breed of mountain woman who can ride a mule so near
  · delivery date. After the patient had been sitting for some time
,4 on a bench in the waiting room, she mentioned casually that
`, she was "punishin’." Immediately she was sent in to see the
doctor. After taking one look the doctor exclaimed, "We must
» get this woman to the delivery room at once." I glanced up to
és see why, just in time to see one tiny foot protruding. I heard
l a hurried scurry of feet as the nurses whisked her to the
Q delivery room. About that time the doctor turned to me and
  said, "You’ve been wanting to see a delivery—now is your
eil chance? Before I could answer I was sucked up in the draft _
  made by the student midwives on their way to the delivery
I
}

 F
4 THE QUARTERLY BULLETIN  
room. Upon arrival I found that, somewhere between the doc-  
tor’s office and the delivery room, I had acquired a white robe, ’
mask, and cap.  
I had the feeling of a poor stray fish washed up with the  
tide, and I was not quite sure about all my white paraphernalia.  
At first I suspected this disguise was supposed to prevent fright-  
ening the newborn baby. It was comforting, however, to see  
other figures all tied up in the same rigging. I recognized them `
by theirneyes and realized that they were the student midwives ·’¢
who had come to observe the delivery too. They stood there  
straight and silent; but how else could they stand in the long _  
white "straight jackets" and "muzzles" they were wearing? I  
carefully selected a place next to a nurse (student midwife) who   I
had spent a good number of years in India because I knew that 5,}
this was old stuff to her; she had seen numerous deliveries in   {
India. Just as I slipped into my place of observation the patient  
uttered a heartfelt, "Oh, Lordy, Lordy." I must have turned  
the shade of my disguise because my neighbor placed her arm Q
through mine and asked me if I needed air. I shook my head  
in the negative, but did not look up for my eyes were glued on ii
the delivery taking place, just as though I were hypnotized.  
There was silence in the room except for an occasional moan .
from the patient, and the calm, firm voice of the instructor of i
midwives, now sympathetic and encouraging—now urging the `, I
patient in firm, gentle tones to relax—then push, push harder  
. . . harder. I saw the second tiny foot appear. This was a ‘
breech delivery and I could see it was difficult for both the ,
patient and the midwife. The patient was giving full coopera-  
tion. It was exciting and wonderful to watch the engineering  
of this delivery. I stood there breathlessly waiting to see if 1
they would make it; would the baby be alive. It seemed to me {
the voice of the instructor became fainter and fainter. "Now  
push . . . p u s h . . . p u s h." Suddenly I felt a tug at my arm  
and heard a low whisper in my ear; it was my neighbor. She  a
had been keeping one eye on the delivery and the other on me.  fi
"You don’t need to push," she said; "the patient will do her own  g
pushing." It was only then that I realized, much to my embar-  
rassment, that I had become somewhat hypnotized by the whole  F
4

   . FRONTIER NURSING SERVICE 5
{ thing and was obeying the instructor just as though I were
  the patient.
E;] It last the baby arrived, crying and squirming. I was so
  relieved that I got out of the delivery room just as quickly
  as I could, feeling now that I had seen everything and all happy
  about my new experience, and also more or less like a wet sheet
  which has just gone through the wringer, and my abdomen was
4* a bit sore from bearing down so hard. To the first person I
JI saw I announced that I had at last seen a delivery.
  "Fine," said she, "was it a nice baby?"
g "Yes," I answered, and then remembering the mother's
{ ride into clinic and the feet-first position of the baby, added,
  "It wasn’t flat—footed_either."
$1 "My, you are observing/’ she exclaimed, much amused.
gyi "Was it a boy or a girl‘?"
  I had to admit that I had not even noticed.
tl
ll ——————;
i LITTLE GIRL’S PRAYER
Ll I am reminded at this point of a little story that was written
  me by one of my very good friends, a padre. He wrote about a
»' little girl who when she was saying her prayers thanked God
-_ O for mommy and daddy and for brothers and sisters, and then,
‘ to her mother’s amazement, branched out on her own, and this
{ is what she said: "And, dear God, take care of yourself, because
i without you we are sunk."
  —Speech of Hon. Frances P. Bolton of Ohio
> I in the House of Representatives, Saturday, April 9, 1949
`a
  THOUGHT FOR TODAY
  As a New York taxi driver was weaving in and out of
pg traiiic at breakneck speed, he remarked to a friend of ours,
  rocking inside the cab, "My wife always says, ‘You should live
  but not make a habit of it.’ "
{J

 6 THE QUARTERLY BULLETIN  
F
MASQUE OF THE MERRIE MONTHS  
From a calendar published by the National Children's Home, `
Highbury Park, London, N.5, England I
APRIL  
The name of this fickle month is variously derived. Some,  
seeking antiquity, borrow Venus’ Greek name Aphrodite. A g
more general acceptance associates it with the Latin aperire, g
"to open," when all the wide array of trees and flowers welcome i =
Spring. . J
The Saxon name for April was Oster-momxth in honour of V
their Eostre, the goddess of Spring, who gives her name to i
Easter. J ' *
The old-world festivals of Spring with all their April fool-  
ing have left some quaint practices. Surely the real April Fool ,
is April herself who can never make up her mind whether to  
laugh or cry. gi
MAY Q  
May, the merry month of flowers, borrows its name from  
the mythical Maia, mother of Mercury, whose celebrations for iq
renewed growth in Field and Forest merged into those in honour    
i of Flora, ancient goddess of ilowers.  
The Merrie England which Chaucer and Shakespeare knew  
made much of May Day. The bonds of Winter were at last  
loosed, and both gentle and simple broke bounds when Spring  
was well established. The branches of budding hawthorn were {
brought home at sunrise, a bower made for the Queen o’ the i
May, and the Maypole set up later in the day on the village E
green. Q
JUNE {
Mythology speaks of Juno, classic queen of heaven, for w
whom it is claimed June is named that she may wear its sum- `Q
mer glories as her regal dress. I
_ The name of Junius Brutus, betrayer of Caesar, is also ,
linked with the naming of June. A rival claim comes from jim- {
iorcs, which would make it just as aptly and far more pleasantly  
the month of youth. All such claims are about as true as one  
another. 3
In its days of sunshine June’s pleasant places are the haunts  
of summer bees, and when the sun sets the hidden brook singeth  
its quiet tune.  
?¥
 l

   FRONTIER NURSING SERVICE 7
Q
i
l URGENT NEEDS
li
if We print again our urgent needs in the Spring Bulletin as
» we have done every year over a long period of time. There seem
  like an awful lot of them, but only the most urgent are listed.
; We do not include such routine jobs as whitewashing the barns,
  reseeding pastures, etc. It strains our budget to carry regular
J minor repairs and the insurance on our vast properties. We
V depend on the generosity of our friends to meet the special
» . . .
· Urgent Needs we list each spring, and you have never failed us.
i Some of you can afford to take on big needs and some can
. only afford the small ones. All kinds of things are listed, from
=l a crowbar at $2.75 to a civilian jeep. We are profoundly grateful
, Q for every gift from the smallestto the biggest.
    HYDEN HOSPITAL
  \Viring Aunt Hattie’s Barn in rigid conduit with moisture-proof
  and dust—proof iixtures—Estimate ................... Y ......... . ...................... $ 500.00
  ; \\'iring Employees’ Cottage ........................................................................ 100.00
;? Fluorescent Lights, installed, for Superintendent’s office, district
  nurses‘ oilice, clinic and midwives’ examining room, kitchen
ii   and maids’ dining room—9 lights ...................................................... 335.30
{ S Replacing \Veatherpro0f Service Wire from Hospital to Wee Stone
; i House ...................................................................................................... 42.50
  ~ Aut0clave—Rebuilt at factory; includes haulage, express and
A installation ............................................................................................ 274.39
i (For news about the autoclave and what happened after-
{ wards. see FIELD NOTES.)
g Painting Aunt Hattie’s Barn Roof—Paint and Labor——Estimate .... 300.00
Q (Two coats of metal paint—not painted in 9 years.)
‘ Single Beds for Nurses to replace old, sagging cots beyond repair.
; Each ........................................................................................................ 28.50
One complete with mattress costs $28.50. (Note: 12 need
‘ · replacing: 6 are very bad.) . . . In response to this appeal last
l year nine of these new beds were given. All but two went to
\* the outpost district nurses who needed them most of all.
I Summer Uniforms for Nurse-Midwives at $19.75 each. 18 in all.
Total ........................................................................................................ 355.50
¤ All Wool Blanket Ends for Baby Blankets for Layettes. 100 lbs ..... 129.84
V (Includes freight.)
.- Outing Flannel for Baby Gowns .............................................................. 36.05
‘ Six Dozen Baby Shirts ................................................................................ 21.00
, Beads, String and Seals for Babies’ Identification Bracelets .............. 13.50
Q `Unbleached Muslin for Patients} Gowns and Draw Sheets ................ 52.48
Il Surgeons’ Gowns——1 Dozen ........................................................................ 31.50 -
‘l 2 Complete Tycos Sphygmomanometers .................................................. 32.85
—; Secondhand '1‘imer—perfect condition—for X-ray Machine ................ 20.00
  1 Typewriter for Clinic Nurse .................................................................... 119.48
  1 X-ray Film Filing Cabinet ...................................................................... 61.25
YE
.¢
1

 i {
8 THE QUARTERLY BULLETIN  
il
Replacement of Dishes, Cups, etc ........,.................................................A.. 88.80 ‘
3 Dozen 'I‘easpoons—Silverplate—at $3.50 .......................................,...... 10.50 f'
1 Dozen Dinner Knives—Silverplate ......................,................................, 6.50 S
1 Dozen Dinner Forks—Silverplate .....,....,............_............._.................... 3.25 if
1 Crowbar} ...........,,,,............,............._.........,........,.,......._....._..................,...._. 2.75 ;
` E
MIDWIVES’ QUARTERS AT HOSPITAL {
5.
Rewiring Electric Range—Estimated .............,.........,...,.......,,,....,.,....... ES 50.00 ifi
Vacuum Cleaner ......................................................................................i..,.. 47.75  
Resetting Furnace and Replacing Pipe and Galvanized Casing ......., 82.20 l
Slip Covers for 2 Chairs and a Studio Couch——Estimate .................... 36.00  
Olson Rugs for living room and two bedrooms (New rugs are made ·
out of the wool of the old ones) ...................................................... 23.70 _?
e
JOY HOUSE i  
The repairs and replacements at our Medical Director’s Residence  
are met by the donor. ¤_
, gi
WENDOVER.  
·!
Poultry Netting for Fencing Rabbits out of Garden .......................,.. S 6.25  
Electric Motor to Replace Gasoline Engine including proper pul- T
leys and changes necessary to connect it with the deep well  
pump already installed ........................................................................ 250.00 _¢‘
(This would save approximately $25.00 a month during il
summer, in labor, now spent in running the gasoline  
engine.) s  
A Turning Plow—needed when reseecling pastures ............................ 24.95  
Wheelbarrow-—-Metal Tray .............,............................................................ 14.55 §~
Sprayer for DDT and Orchard Spray .................................................... 9.75  
One Roll Galvanized Screen Wire (for mending screens) ................ 16.85 Z
Pipe Vise .......................................................................................................... 5.25
Electric Refrigerat0r—22 cu. ft. size with Deep Freeze Unit .......... 677.00 ,
(To replace kerosene icebox 14 years old) ‘
Reroofing Cabin with Oak Shingles rived out of our own timber—  
Estimate ................................................................................................ 200.00 . 1
Boudoir Lamps for guest room and staff room; Pin-up lamps for Y
bedrooms, Upper and Lower Shelves, Cabin and Garden House K-
(1 lamp in each room) ........................................................................ 45.20 W
2 Electric Irons for Wendover Laundry at $11.95 each ...................... 23.90 "
Asbestos Ironing Board Cover, 2 asbestos iron holders ...................... 5.95 .
Electric Hot Plate, two-burner—for clinic ............................................ 16.95  
Electric Clock for Kitchen .......................................................................... 8.20 Q
Painting Kitchen—Paint and Labor ........................................................ 25.93 l
Two-hole Paper Punch ................................................................................ 4.20
Typewriter Table .......................................................................................... 9.75
1 New Typewrite1·»—12" carriage .............................................................. 135.00
3 Dozen Sheets at $24.90 per dozen ........................................................ 74.70 ,
Having Piano Tuned and New Bridle Straps put in ............................ 25.00 {
(This is the piano that we use for the neighboorhood children’s ·
songs and for the Christmas Carols and for the square
dances.) _

 { .
  FRONTIER NURSING SERVICE 9
L, ~
  Wendover terribly needs a real cow barn to replace the
V, three old shed barns that are now tumbling down beyond repair
  and very unsafe. We keep at Wendover not only the four cows
l that belong there, but the Hospital cows that are going dry or
E- have young calves—because all four Hospital cows must be
{ fully productive at all times. The new cow barn at Wendover
§¤_ must have six cow stalls and one large calf stall, a feed room, a
  good foundation stone wall, and proper drainage. We will be
, glad indeed to send an estimate of what we think it will cost
  if anyone feels he can give a new piece of construction of this
  size.
  1 THE CLEARING
  Replacing Manure Bent at Bull Pen ........................................................ $ 139.93
  Replacing Hand Pump and Galvanized Drop Pipe—in the Well
¤_ (Materials and Labor) .................................................,...................... 164.06
. i Painting House at Clearing—inside and outside ....,............................... 54.87
z \Viring House at Clearing for Electricity ................................................ 125.84
  BEECH FORK NURSING CENTER
  \Viring Center—Non-metallic cable approved by Underwriters-
rj Estimate ................................................................................................ $ 800.00
gl \Viring Barn—Rigid conduit, moisture—proof and dust-proof
Ql fixtures .................................................................................................... 200.00
  \Viring Pump House ...................................................................................... 75.00
  \Viring Employee’s Cottage ........................................................................ 75.00
  Total ................................................................................................ $1,150.00
ii Replacing Gasoline Engine with Electric Motor, installing pressure
‘ tank imit and making pipe c0miections—Esti.mate .................... 400.00
Pole Fence in Pasture (Locust posts and labor—Poles given free).. 28.80
i 3 Revolving Chimney Caps Insta1led—Estimate .................................... 40.00
}‘ Linoleum (Inlaid) for Waiting Room (Material and Labor) .............. 150.00
*1 Metal \Vheelbarr0w ...................................................................................... 14.55
tl 1 Window put in Empl0yee’s C0ttage—Estimate ................................ 10.00
U
W BOWLLNGTOVVN NURSING CENTER
_ Painting the Center: Materials and Labor-local painter-
§ Estimate ................................................................................................ $ 400.00
’ Cleaning out Septic Tank and Putting New Top on——Labor only .... 22.66
{ Repair of Frostproof Hydrant at Barn .................................................. 15.69
Comfortable Chair for Living Room ...................................................... 18.95
Vacuum Cleaner ............................................................................................ 47.75
\Vashing Machine .......................................................................................... 125.00
' Electric Iron .................................................................................................. 11.95
I Can Opener—Wall Type ..................................................»............................ 2.19
~ Hatchet .......................................................................................................... 2.75
Folding Rule ..................... . ............................... ; ............................................ 1.10
_ Garden Fork ................ . ................................................................................. 2.25

 g.
‘ E.
10 THE QUARTERLY BULLETIN  
Bmyrus NURSING CENTER  g
Wiring Center for REA Current in Non-metallic Cable~approved ii
by Underwriters·—Estimate ..........`........i.,.,,»..,,..._._....__._.......__..,........ $ 800.00 j
Wiring Barn——in Rigid Conduit with Moisture-proof, Dust-proof ‘
Fixtures .................,,......,.i.....,..,......,,.....,..._`._,__`__,______,,,___,_,___,_____,_,_..._. 200.00  
Total .......,...........................,............A........,.,................,.._.....,......,... $1,000.00  
Painting Center—Labor only—local painter ............A.....,.............· . ......... 175.00 ;—
Garden Hose .....................................................................,...,....,.,....._..,........ 7.49 7.
Casein Paint (4 gallons at $2.45) ................... . .....................___,......,...,.... 9.80 ’
3 Paint Brushes ............ Q .......,.................,..................._.___.......,_.._._................. 7.15
Creosote for Barn and Manure Bent (10 gallons at $2.35) ............i... 23.50 y.
Servicing and Resetting Furnace and Replacing Smoke Pipe ..,....... 50.00 ·i\
Curtains for Living Room—material .......,...._._.._............._.._..__._......_......,. 7.50 y
FLAT CREEK NURSING CENTER  
Wiring Center for REA Current in Non-metallic cab1e·—approved  
by Underwriters (Estimate) ..,..............,.,.......,......._......,...........,....,.. $ 800.00 g;
Wiring Barn—in Rigid Conduit with Moisture-proof, Dust—proof  
Fixtures ...............,...........................................i.....,,.,,.......,.................... 200.00 {
—-— L.,
Total ................................................................................i............... $1,000.00  
Remaking Pull Gate ................................................,...................,...,........... 42.40  
Rerooiing Barn—Materials and Labor .................................................... 77.25 » .
Replacing Stone Retaining Wall at Spring after Heavy Rains .......... 42.00 l
Putting in Stone Culvert in front of Barn ..........,................................... 20.00 l
Chest of Drawers for Bedroom (unpainted) .............o.......................... 25.00 ,1
Clothes Hamper .............,............................................................,................. 6.29 yl
Paling Fence to Keep Horses out of Yard ................................,........... 23.70 I
·Servicing and Resetting Furnace .............................................................. 45.00  
POSSUM BEND NURSING CENTER AT CONFLUENCE  
Wheelbarrow ..................................................A............................................. $ 14.55 le I
New Kitchen Range (Cannot get parts for old one)——Estimate ...... 86.95 E
Enamel Floor Covering for Clinic ............................................................ 11.50
Stepladder . ..................................................................................................... 4.85 {
Sprayer for Apple Trees .............................................................................. 9.75 l
Garden Sprayer .............................................................................................. 8.75 I
New Furance—(Under-hood and over-ashpit) installed ...................... 450.00
Rebuilding Cow Shed, Sawdust Bin, Manure Bent (Used old lum- ~
ber) Moved to give right-of-way for Highway .............................. 86.05 U
Draining Wet Weather Spring in Horse Stall ........................................ 18.50 4
Portable Basket Grate for Living Room .................................................. 7.70  
Galvanized Screen Wire for Screens ........................................................ 11.34
Reroofing Pump House ................................................................................ 20.70
RED BIRD NURSING CENTER  
The repairs and replacements at this center are met by the donor.
GENERAL NEEDS  
1 Horse .......................................................................................................... $ 175.00 A
1 Civilian Jeep .............................................................................................. 1,450,00 F
(We need three more jeeps bad1y—and we are praying for
not less than one.) L

 Q
E
 1 FRONTIER NURSING sERv1cE 11
ll ’ ‘ T .
¢, ilu Memoriam 1
il It singeth low in every heart, U
; We hear it each and all,
Q A song of those who answer not,
g However we may call:
{ They throng the silence of the breast
  We.see them as of yore,
j· The kind, the brave, the true, the sweet
Who walk with us no more.
zip ’Tis hard to take the burden up,
` _ When these have laid it down;
[ They brightened all the joy of life,
¤ They softened every frown:
$’ But O ’tis good to think of them,
I When we are troubled sore;
il Thanks be to God that such have been
  Though they are here no more.
{ ,
{ More homelike seems the vast unknown
ly, Since they have entered there;
_i To follow them were not so hard.
ii Wherever they may fare;
,   They cannot be where God is not,
1 On any sea or shore;
Whate’er betides, thy love abides,
,1 Our God, forevermore.
i —-J. W. Chadwick
  During the past six months the Frontier Nursing Service
{S has sustained grievous losses in the deaths of many old friends.
{ Although all of them were elderly people, several over eighty,
two over ninety, they were each and all young-hearted still-
{ and not one of them had given up his interests and attachments.
F We shall try in the brief sketches which follow, to say some-
N thing about each of these friends who are now alive forevermore.
li
  MRS. FRANCES KENDALL ROSS, Lexington, Kentucky
Died October 22, 1948
F, This lifelong Kentuckian was an extremely modest and
retiring person. She had no children of her own, and yet she
V gave the better part of her life to mothers and children. The
HQ two little sons of a sister-in-law, who gave them to her when she
# was at the point of death, were cherished and reared to maturity.
, At Christmas and other holiday seasons, the neighborhood chil-

 ij
12 THE QUARTERLY BULLETIN  
;l
dren had toys given them. Many young mothers welcomed Mrs.  
Ross many times as a volunteer sitter for their children. In h}
her room she kept a large sewing basket and her fingers were if
never idle. The Frontier Nursing Service, one of several agencies I
to which she sent boxes of clothing for children and babies, will ,
receive a third of her residuary estate. In her love for children  
Mrs. Ross had passed the test for entrance into the Kingdom of  
Heaven. ll
MRS. JOHN W. PRICE, Louisville, Kentucky xl
Died November 13, 1948 ~ ii
Mrs. Price, known to her intimates as "dearest Miss Pricey/’  
was an adorable woman. It is rare to find anyone at the age  
of ninety—three who, like her, had kept the buoyancy and the yl
gaiety of youth. With her charm of manner she possessed the .§
deeper qualities of the heart. She was one of the best of friends,  
one of the kindest of women. Her letters radiated friendship 3
and kindness as well as a freshness that the disabilities of old  
age could never wholly dim. We in the Frontier Nursing Service  
are grateful for the affection she showed us over a long span  
of time. Now for "Miss Pricey" death has opened the door to i 
the land of eternal youth. One likes to think of her as the life  
of gatherings of old friends. One sees her with that gay young -.§
heart moving forward through a long vista of happiness, both  
given and received. til
MRS. FREDERIC M. SACKETT, Louisville, Kentucky  
Died December 19, 1948  
It was only a few months before her death that I last saw gl
this friend of mine and of the Frontier Nursing Service at the 1
hospital where she had been staying for some time. She had .'
the same friendly smile, the same interest in`people and things, '
the same daintiness, in a hospital room, that had distinguished i
her at home. It was plain that her nurses loved her———and easy j'
to see why they did. She spoke again to me of the pleasure ,
it had given her, more than twenty years ago, when she and in
Senator Sackett were in Washington, to open their house for I
the first meeting the F.N.S. held in the nation’s capital. is

 Q
  FRoN*1·1E12 NURSING smavxcn 13
  Mrs. Sackett’s marriage was one of complete happiness.
Yr Since her husband’s death she has been so bereft, and physically
[ so stricken, and so gallant through it all, that even those nearest
  to her in blood and friendship needs must mingle gladness for
her with their sorrow at giving her up,. Such a sister, aunt and
if friend, will always be missed—but for her there is all the wonder
? of her welcome on the other side. We in the Frontier Nursing
Service are grateful for all of her kindness to us in her lifetime,
‘ and for her remembrance of us in her will. From the depths
  of our hearts we wish her godspeed. '
  DR. H