xt7rjd4pm517 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7rjd4pm517/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19581016  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, October 16, 1958 text The Kentucky Kernel, October 16, 1958 1958 2013 true xt7rjd4pm517 section xt7rjd4pm517 ...

I

--

1

.finij

j;

u
1'

cy

'

l,

s

:

7

....

5

'

'

J

i

'

I

1

i
L

...

Widening of Euclid Avenue would chop off the Sigma Nil's lawn anil the Coliseum grounds approximately as jdiowu
hy dotted lines rHie project is expected to start next spring.

EUCLID PROJECT
WOULD SLASH
UK FRONTAGES
A $275,000 project to

Ea. IE EEIaj

According to plans released by
city traffic
engineer, the widening would
necessitate removal of parts, of the
front lawn cf the Sigma Nu house
and of the Wildcat Gr-il- l
and

AFROTC
Set Up As
Model Unit
New

AFROTC heads in four

states have been advised to visit
the UK Air Science Department,
set up as a model program, early
in their tours of duty.
The assistant commandant of
AFROTC units in the Kentucky,
Ohio. West Virginia and Tennessee area made the recommendation.
The newly assigned professors will
examine the UK department's attainments in three separate areas.
These are a cadet leadership
laboratory program,' a high degree of motivation toward entering advanced AFROTC and the
department's general teaching
methods.
Col. R. W. Boughton, professor
of air science and tactics here,
said the department seeks to
avoid "spoon-feedinits cadets.
It aims at developing their leadership through actual practice, he
added.
This practice includes having
cadet officers plan and conduct
laboratory programs within a military framework. They instruct,
evaluate the leadership of their
peers and subordinates, and serve
on a number of cadet governing
boards.
Representatives of 19 colleges
and universities in the four-staarea are expected to visit here
as tours cf duty of new air science
professors begin.

frontages.
The preliminary plans call for
widening Euclid Avenue by 8 to
10 feet from Harrison Avenue to
Rose Street. The amount of widening for the Rose-Hig- h
Street
stretch will be about the same.
Survey work from Rose to High
Street has been completed by C.
J. Fuller, consulting engineer,
under an $8,000 appropriation
made Aug. 21 by the Lexington
Board of City Commissioners.
Fuller is now designing widths
from Harrison Avenue to Rose
Street and from Ashland Avenue
to East High Street.
Heidenreich said the part of
Euclid Avenue between the Coliseum and Stoll Field would be
widened to 52 feet. The new street
would consist of two
strips
separated by a
median
line. He added that the project
requires a right-of-wa- y
66 feet
Coliseum

24-fo-

ot

4-f-

Continued on Page

h

u

)

II

I

K

it'

3

I

-

(

Lexington, Ky., Thursday, OttoIxT

The famed Oxford University
debate team will make its first appearance at UK in more than 23
years on Nov. 11.
Known for their brilliance and
wit in debate, the Oxonians currently are on their annual tour
of the United States. Their appearance here is being sponsored
jointly by the College of Arts and
Sciences and Student Congress.
The Oxford debaters are Thomas
Stuart Griffiths and Brian Alastair
Walden, both outstanding students
at the English university. Oppos
ing them from UK will be Dick
Roberts of Paducah and Terence
Fitzgerald of Lexington. The topic
will be the question of whether
development of nuclear weapons
should be halted by international
agreement.
Griffiths is president of Oxford
Union Society, news editor of the
magazine Isis and is active in
dramatics. His colleague, Walden,
holds a government scholarship '
for post graduate research. An
pilot officer, he is a former president of the Oxford Union

ex-R-

i

Society.
Dr. Gifford Blyton, coach of the
UK degate team, expressed his

Pt&S Z

"X

.HIT

vA

;t i ...

J

te

HILDA LU HAY
A

Cute Weightlifter

enthusiasm at the forthcoming
'
visit by the Oxonians.
"The visit of the Oxford debate
team will, we hope, stimulate a
revival of interest in the art of
forensics in Kentucky, a state
which has a long and brilliant
tradition in this art," Dr. Blyton
said.
The debate will be at 7:30 p.m.
Nov. 11 in Guignol Theatre.

No Pressing Problems

UK Girl Has Weighty Hobby
I'd lose a few pounds, I began

By PALMER WELLS

"It tones up the muscles and
gives you a relaxed feeling," says
pretty Hilda Lu Hay of her hobby
weight-liftin-

.

g.

When most people have to listen
to music or read in order to go
to sleep Hilda has found that lifting weights is the best form of
loosening the muscles and attaining relaxation.
The trim, blond freshman said
that her Interest turned to heaving weights over a year ago while
still in high school at New Castle,
Indiana. Starting with
weights and working up to higher
weights she Is now capable of
lifting up to 100 pounds.
"It all began," she says, "when
my brother broke his arm playing
football and began lifting weights
to strengthen his arms. Thinking
35-pou- nd

lift-

ing the weights myself. The extra
pounds turned to muscle. I gained
15 pounds."
major,
A physical education
Hilda has learned to take gaping
reactions to her avocation mildly.
"It's just a hobby, "I've had a lot
of fun with it."
Observers might be surprised to
beauty
note that the
has no bulging biceps but possesses
attributes befitting the most feminine of her sex. She has blond
hair, sparkling blue eyes and stands
five-foo- t,
four Inches and is an
Alpha Gamma Delta pledge.
has
The charming weight-lifte- r
a long list of athletic accomplishments to her credit. Utilizing her
boundless energy she led yells at
New Castle High School for seven
years, has participated in swim

Hi, 1?)"8

NumlxM- - IT

Oxford Debaters To Engage
Campus Team Here Nov. 11

.

g"

.

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY

Euclid Avenue from Harrison Avenue to High Street is almost certain to begin next Volume L
spring, a city official said yesterday.
four-lan- e

J. M. Heidenreich,

TT

H

rm

j

v-

1

-

nrSSSTo

Ve

to)

a;

Call Him TicAv'
"Tucky" was the name chosen by the
for the Wildcat's new
mascot. IVIrs. Roy Hogg,' Frankfort, was announced winner of the
contest at the Kentucky-Aubur- n
game. Pictured with "Tucky" are
cheerleaders Joanie Weissinger, Tat Nallinger, Bev Price. Susan
Bradley and Nancy Barnett.
K-Cl-

,

i

V.

--

-,-

-

Hamilton LXA Chapter
Loses National Charter
CLINTON. N. Y.. (AP)
The
College
Hamilton
chapter of
Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity has
reported that its national charter
has been revoked because it insisted on a policy of
in membership.
Timothy W. Scholl. of Water-towchapter president, said the
dispute with the national organization started last March after
the Hamilton unit adopted a resolution stating it would not restrict membership "for any reason-o- f
race, religion or color."
In a story appearing In the
Hampton ttudent newspaper,
Scholl quotes the national fraternity policy as stating. that "qualifications for membership are to be
socially acceptable to the general
on

n,

ming and diving meets, plays toll
,
and likes to dance.
Hilda's athletic interest and
ability may be traced to her
father, Langan Hay, who was a
star halfback for the University
of Kentucky Wildcats from 1932
to '36. As a college athlete, Mr.
Hay was a member of the first
UK swimming team and was on
the track team. He is currently
football, wrestling and golf coach
at New Castle High School. Dad The annual Kentucky Thoralso participated in the family oughbred Debate Tournament will
be held in the Fine Arts Building
weight-liftin- g
exercises.
Thursday, Friday, and Saturday,
Having assumed her studies Oct.
here at the University. Hilda says
Visiting teams from 14 colleges
she may drop her unusual hobby will take part In the debates. Dr.
because of the tendency to gain Gifford Blyton will coach the UK
weight. She says that she has no teams.
desire to become the female
A complete schedule of all deweight-liftin- g
champion but would bates wlli be available in the foyer
like to teach physical, education. of Ihs Fine Arts Building.

Debate Contest
Begins Today
16-1- 8.

i

fraternity, to believe In the pr in
ciples of Christianity, and to be
of the white or American Indian
races."
Scholl's statement did not say
whether the resolution had been
prompted by any specific cae. A
member of the chapter said members had been instructed "not to
comment."
Scholl's statement said "the national fraternity refused to change
..
its policy of discrimination
and the Hamilton chapter refused
to change its policy of
.-

-

"As a result." he said, "tha
charter of the Hamilton chapter
was revoked on Oct. 1 for refusal
to rescind its resolution and comply
with the policies of the general
fraternity."
Scholl said the Hamtlton chapter would continue as a local fraternity but that no new name
had been selected yet.

ATTENTION:

organizations who have not
purchatrd a page In the 1959
Kentuckian, please do so immediately. If an organization la
Interested In a contract come to
the Journalism Building lioooz
210. TbU must be done right
All

away.

* 2

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, TluirMl.iv, Oct.

Infirmary

I

Ifi, 10"8

Art Club Elects; Newsmen "Attend
Freeman Speaker Press Meeting

Activities

Wednesday, Oft. 8
Admitted: Orndy Lee, John
Jl.impton. and Vioki Kasden.
Fellowship
Dismissed: Mine Keffer, Bob
Llndon, Joyce Anderson. Uarbnra
The Rev. David Vines Miller,
Wilson and Polly Hardin.
missionary in the Belgian Congo,
will be honored at an open house
Thursday
at 8 p.m. Oct. 18 at Westminster
Admitted: David Maviltsby.
Fellowship. All Protestant church
Dismissed: David Coyle. Drenda
are Invited.
Clarkson, Norma Perkins. Betty students
A native of Johnson City, Tenn.,
Jo Kinp and'Vickl Kasden.
Rev. Miller was graduated from
Union Theoolgical Seminary, RichFriday
mond, Va. For four years he and
Dismissed: Iloger Hagnic.
his wife have been working in the
Saturday
Belgian Congo under the auspices
Dismissed: Grady Lee, John of the Presbyterian Church.
Hampton and David Maultsby.
Rev. Miller will speak on the
"African situation and the Church"
Monday
regular meeting of the
Admitted: David Rhodes, Bill at the
Westminster Fellowship at 5:30
Desmond. Phillip Grief. Shelton p. m.,
Oct. 19.
from cenLong,
f parks, KayJuenger.Darleen Youncj;, tral Kentucky Students have been
colleges
and Kraig
invited to the meeting.
Tuesday
YWCA
Admitted: Michael Vaughn,
Gene Oliver, Richard Duncan,
The YWCA will hold a mass
William Gilpin.. Charles "Rambo, membership meeting tonight at
Louise Read and Marilyn Lyvers. 6:15 in the SUB Music Room.
Dismissed: Bill Desmond and
Mrs. Paul Little will show slides
Loubc Read.
and speak on her travels In
Russia. All interested girls are
Wednesday
invited to attend.
Dismissed: Shelton Sparks.

Wotminstrr

Victor Portmann, assistant
The Art Club election was held
fessor of Journalism." is In Chicago
last Friday in the Fine Arts buildtoday attending the fall counicl
ing.
Officers for the club are Jo meeting of the National Editorial
Salyer, president: Phyllis Dell Association.
Portmann, president of the KenCourt, vice president; Julia Barn-har- t,
tucky Press Association, was acsecretary and Billy Ogger,
companied by Thomas L. Adams,
treasurer.
staff, who
Richard B. Freeman, Art De- of the Herald-Leade- r
Is vice president of the KPA.
partment head, will give n lecPortmann will attend a discusture at the meeting at 1 p. m.
sion on editorial policy at the
Friday.
president's meeting, for presidents
of the state associations. He will
return to Lexington Saturday.

POSITIVELY

Take Advantage Of It To See

VISION
SCREEN

fra

(ntiikHi

2 PM

Oct.

Wed.-Thur- s.

15-1-

6

DEADLIER THAN THE MALE

Jean Gabin

Irene Browne

&&Ynr7?i
HXIHCTOH-MIHTUC-

KV

ENDS TODAY
"Cat On A Hot Tin Roof"
STARTS TOMORROW

Color

.

Scope

0r

I

v.x

letutZttiy

1

i

Valerie French

6.50, 10:10.

"
Heaters
Necessary

"In-Cor-

If

m

tuft

"itPti'n,

STARTS TONITEI
West's most
. . . The
shot it out!
Wyart Eorp, Bill Cody,
All in

.

.

1ST RUN
fame
Pot Garrett,
Pat Master-sogun-fighte-

n

"BADMAN'S COUNTRY"
Starring
GEORGE MONTGOMERY
BUSTER CRABBE
NEVILLE BRAND

2nd Feature
DEBORAH KERR
DAVID NIVEN

Colorscope

"BONJOUR TRISTESSE"

1:12, 3:19, 5:26, 7:33.

"THE HARD MAN"

CIRCLE

HELD OVLR!
1ST RUNI
"Moonshiners" vs. "Revenooers"
Fightin' and Feuding in Ky. . . .
ROBERT MITCH UM KEELY SMITH

and JIM MIT CHUM in

"THUNDER ROAD"

"Bonjour

25

Trstesse.

in

GEORGE MONTGOMERY

"TOUGEST GUN IN
TOMBSTONE"

7:05. 10:30.

"Bad Man's Country," 9:15.
"Thunder

FAMILY

ENDS TONIGHT
Jack Lemon June Allyson

i

"Toughest Gun In Tombstone,"
j

"YOU CAN'T RUN AWAY
FROM IT"
Color

j

Scope

j

j

8:52.

KENTUCKY "Kings Go Forth."
12:27, 2:45, 5:03, 7:21, .9:39.

Heaven

"Night

LEXINGTON

Also
Sal Mineo

Road," 6:55,

10:20.

Fell,'.' 7:07, 10:21.

Jas. Whitmore

"THE YOUNG DON'T
CRY"

"The Hard Man," 9:09.
STRAND "Cat On A Hot Tin

rMr''(

--

A

Roof," 1:15, 3:24, 5:30. 7:35, 9:45.

j

4

SPEED "VICTeOLA n
BY RCA VICTOR

vHv$

II

4'H $i

-- V-V

Plays all speeds and all sizes.
Excellent tone quality. Portable metal case covered with
washable "vinyl" in your
choice of three pastel shades.
Easy terms.

STARTS TODAY

$2995
m WmL

Try Our Complete
Line of

RCA VICTOR AUTOMATIC
"45" RECORD CHANGER

5

play fourteen
"45"
records smoothly and
automatically. Has unusual
fine tone quality. Handsome
leatherette covered portable
carrying case. Easy terms.
WiSl

'

Trench Coats
Iridescent
Raincoats

RPM

I

Musical In

x

Baraczida
For Only $15.95 up

OPEN 'TIL 9 P.M. MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY

Gorgeous Color')

ALSO

The Single Breasted
Va Length

S3995

STARTS TOMORROW!
The New Screen

Rain Hats $1.95 up

By The

PHILLIP

Composers Of
"My Fair Lady"
9y f

FAMOUS

MGM

and MAURICE
CHEVALIER

GALL

& SON

Starring
LESLIE CARON
LOUIS JORDAN

it

y

c1

h

;

FOR FAMOUS BRANDS

v

JUST TWO BLOCKS WEST OF CAMPUS

Also News and Cartoon

117 S. Upper

IJaaH
H3iM

li

rl

Nobody Can Launder A Shirt Like

i

JLSViULSUViP).

--

cr J

rt

4--1

.

(
r- -

SAVE 15

2-06-

53

David Freyman
Campus Representative

BECKER
iff
Li

rs

.

2nd Feature

"Man Of The West,"

BEN ALI

In

I
!

CIN IMASCOPE'

Sea." 2:00,

At

"Deadlier Than The Male," 3:25,

Also

Guy Madison

5REX HARRISON
KAY

Electric

j

:

I

v

The first mass meeting of Alma
Magna Mater will be 5 p. m. Tues- day at the SUB. Anyone having
relatives who attended the Uni-- :
versity of Kentucky Is eligible to
attend.
The UK Amateur Radio Club
will meet at 5 p. m. Monday in
the Engineering Study Hall, on
the second floor of Anderson Hall,
All interested amateurs are invited
to attend.

Also

Alec Guiness

r KFNflAI
I

ASHLAND "All
5:20, 8:43.

"NIGHT HEAVEN FELL"

Alma Magna jtfuler

Radio Club

Daniel Delorme

ALL AT SEA

Xf

MOVIE GUIDE

BRIGITTE BORDAT
In

Ciiinmis Party

WIDf

N

LAST TIME TONIGHT

I

1

Adolf Hitler did not read the
Kernel in public after he established the Nazi Party.

DRIVE-I-

THEATRES

pro- -

not always a woman! All
members or students who
but a good cigar is a horse of a wisn to affiliate with the Campus
different feather. Pogo.
party should meet at 7 o'clock
tonight in room 204 of the SUB.
A woman is

DELTLINE

ON CARRY OUT

CORNER LIME AND EUCLID

* Till: MNTl

Legalists Are 'Pitchmen
fly TAI L ZIMMERMAN
Collepc Is an odd
d
walls, thick;
tc mbir.ition:
toor.s. me srrrniry of study, coin- pitching and cheers for the girls. '
Most, students who have seen
on the walk or
the
heard the law students cheering

The UK

Lrvw

ivy-cla-

j

coin-pitchi-

ng

more in common th.m Mudnt ImU and c.irnin?
in the larger, more dispersed col- .:it 'Aw w.r.
lrKrs-

'pitthitv

Miiclid
-

if

(.-...;- .-

iiiul u!::.stlii..t
the pretty i:vls have .vnin up.
Pirlmps the. eteran.s bro'.inht the
customs back . . . no one knows
for sure. After all. who care.-It's
Just a fathering of good friends

-

:;is

-

Traditions of thfo kind h.ir lrcn
upheld at the law school for many
years. Before World War It, it
was a custom for the law stuclrntv
to sit together at the football
games wearing ascot ties and derby passing the time.

frobably. wondered what kind of
an odd ball place the law school is.

It would seem that this would

,

t

,

,

v

....

1

1

,

ontmiml front I'atr I
d.d i.o know wlwiher

tl.e

V

1

1

1

et

s

tile a:n"ii.t.

,n'i,',iinl tl.e

,

en-

l.r.AUN

widening
ui,.'ul
tlir vfadmrn i(!e sidewalks
inovmu

u-ad'.n.-.;
uini' llieatli
The ronrrete wall and rvclon
fence bordering th" h.lseball field
nil the north would be lvmoed
Undent eii h said preliminary
'plan-- for tin project would be
to University olfirlals
"within a month. Upon completion
of the widening. Euclid Avenue
would become part of the Mate
primary road system because it
yerves a state university. IMig-rnnti- e
plans cull for an extension
of Euclid Avenue west to connect
with Bolivar at Upper Street.

I.

t:r

iivnY

t'Ki

I'hnnr

--

-

-

i

--

I

FOR LADIES
?

'

CITY CLUB

PHONE

Main St.
2-74-

66

e

-

.

,i

'ipc t'

i

itelirl

i't'rf
p:vr
or

M

WESTBORO SHOES

FOR MEN and BOYS

Three Coins On The Sidewalk
Law students allegedly have worn out three sidewalks in front of
Lafferty Hall by pitching coins on them.

OPEN FRIDAY NIGHTS 'TIL 9 P.M.

are cordially invited

(Southland Shopping Center)

featuring

Ladies' Sportswear

Shetland Sweaters, Shorts & Skirls

Call, write, or stop In today to discuss
details or to makt an appointment
at your convenience.

E.

tuu n.
n.
10 1.lt

t

nc-ti-

-

Your Portarit Deserves
The Very Best!

510

,vf

ivi"i

'-

India Madras Crush Belts, Shorls & Skirls

Adcm Pepiot Studio

i

and GIRLS

So lovely . . .
So happy . . .
Keep that special look of
loveliness, keep y.our
greatest of days alive
forevennore ... in a formal
wedding portrait by our
studio. To keep, to give,
your portrait lets you
share your happiest day
with those )ou love.

ix

h'ic
'm i
rim' u t

ii.

Alo
lh-

VELVET STEP SHOES

day of days

Always

l( m.u

rriit

Jmlllh Withrr.

OPEN FRIDAY EVENINGS

2 ortraits

.

M

i

-

i-

It

LOST

425 Southland Drive

in

nur

bro i
Krrrti Alnotr.i ln.ik.
bv liii lirion
If tinmrl
I()HT--n-

t

iy

imhwi
f.t

oiv

l

lorlt.

1

;8

i

SOUTHLAND SHOPPING CENTER
HAPPY HIKER

4ii

I

in;

V

-

I'm-rrtt-

liO.tlt

DON MEYERS SHOE STORE

'"

?i

Y7

ill)

to visit

'

5

mi i

I

SHOP AT

You.

T

vi

MTV 5TtTirNTs

Radio Equipped
rs

i:r.v
sirr!;
f iix

i

ROOM IOIl KENT

ed

Inc.
30

i

U,

t,

i,ri
Stn-r- t

rt

ill. 117

C

--

iie-hn-

Jnt.

i

I

YELLOW CAB

2-22-

jnx)

iu lude nrrrNn vot'Ksi'j.r. MH
..il k
I.' li. r

'I lie

-:

IT., 1D"S-

.

CLASSIFIED ADS

LEXINGTON

Dial

IIhmm!.i.0

1

Jefferson Art
To Open St unlay
The opening of the Jefferson
Place Gallery art exhibit at the
Fine Arts building will be Sun-t'i- y,
Oct. 19 from 3 to 5 p.m. ,
The exhibit is composed of 42
p intings
and five sculptures.
Fiofessional artists have submitted works to the showing. The
r.iintinffs rancp frnm rpnrpxpnta- ticn to complete abstractions.
The oldest artist having works
in tho exhibition is Mr. Gates,
former head of the Art Department :it the American University.
Other artists whose works are
represented are Bayliss. Brabanski.
Calfee. Contreras, Davis, Greenly,
Maurer, McKinsey, Noland, Orwen,
and Summerford.

Project

;

--

le a place populated by quiet,
rtttdious men of treat ambition.
W. L. Matthews Jr., dean of
the Law College, says that he
thinks it is an expression of the
jpirit and closeness of the law
students. Since the law school is
relatively small, and all the classes
are held in Lafferty Hall, the students know each other and have

KIR M.I

k

nil!:,

.iiicn.
th-

(

v

* V

Data From Pioneer

The Kentucky Kernel
Eitfl

hr

ToM Office At

Published

Lfincffn.
Att rf Marth 3, 1S79.
mttrr
ronl
rik during the rrgular mIhkiI yrar HKpt holiclji and rxumi.
Kentucky M

lour limcl

SIX DOLLARS

Amrr ErrEBsoM, Chief

Pbmt Ajkut,

Scut

r1

A SCHOOL

Jim Hampton,

Editor-in-Chi-

MrwVr

YEAR

ef

Larry Van Hoose,

Editor
Ann Roberts, Society Editor

Chief Sports Editor

Norman McMullin, Advertising Manager

Business Manager

John Mitchell,

Staff Thotographer
Marilyn Lyvers and , Judy Pennebaker, Proofreaders
THURSDAY'S NEWS STAFF
Jim Hudson, Editor

Nancy Meadows, Associate Editor

To Horse, To Horse

!

Bill

Neikirk, Sports Editor

1

is National Save the Horse

cutting classes.
This year, National Save the Horse
Week comes in conjunction with the
opening of the fall races at Keene-lanSurely no better way of commemorating the week could be found
than going to the track early carrying a supply of sugar cubes and
sneaking into the stables to pay
homage to the noble animals per-

d.

Texas newspaper instituted
the Horse Week "to honor
horses (and mules) lor what they have
meant to this country and the world"
a noble sentiment. Let's look at
what horses, in particular, have meant
to Kentucky.
First of all, they were instrumental
in the discovery, by Daniel Boone,
of that popular springtime playground, Boonesboro Beach. The Kentucky Militia and ROTC before the
invention of the automobile, tank
and jeep, went forth to do battle
?n horseback. The establishment of
A
Save

66

6,000 miles.

the Kentucky Derby, in which horses
play a very prominent part, made the
Bluegrass State the horseracing capi-to- l
of the world and furnished students with an excellent excuse for

Week. Old Dobbin and the Old Grey
Mare, whd, for some time ain't been
what she used to, have come into
their own. They are now in a class
with Other animals who have weeks
of their own National lie Kind to
Dumb Animals Week, National Cat
Week, National Listen to the Whooping Crane Week and National Remember the Buffalo Week.

PASADENA, Cdif. (AP)-'I- he
belt of
deadly radiation suiiounding the e.itth
may virtually disappear within a few
years, a California Institute of Technology spokesman has said.
Data fiom the moon probe Pioneer
disclosed Sunday that radiation begins
to diminish about 10,000 miles above
of
earth and at 00,000 miles it is one-sixtwhat it is at 10,000 miles.
Information radioed back by the Explorer satellites showed that within their
limited range radiation increased with
altitude. Pioneer's instruments indicated
that this was true only up to 5,000 or
h

Dobbin Has His Day
This

Disappearing Radiation

University of Kfnh cky

t

The diminution of deadly rays found
by Pioneer was predicted several weeks
ago, the Caltcch spokesman said, by Dr.
Henry Victor Naher, professor of physics
and specialist in cosmic radiation.
Dr. Naher, now in New Zealand
tests with
balloons, said the radiation zone was
created by cosmic rays splashing 'against
high-altitud-

earth's ionosphere. The ionosphere, a region of electiically charged atmospheie
about 25 miles high, reflects radio waxes
back to eailh.

a contribution

at the
window, stand
quietly and reverently, hat removed,
during the race. Remember the roles
played by horses of the past. Look
forward to future meets. Forget the
hardships caused by money lost on
longshots observe National Save the
Horse Week to the fullest.
pari-mutu-

Poetic Perils
To The Editor:
My old man came to town today
To check my bills he had to pay.
He finally found me in the Grill,
Drinking Cokes with some big wheel.

He stood and watched, unknown to me;
While I spent his money quite freely.
He finally broke my social twirl
By cursing wildly in the whirl.
"My clear son," he said to me,
"You're living quite expensively!"
"But, my dear pop, oh can't you see,
It's my four-yea- r
course in Grillology!"
"That's not the principle involved;
There's still a problem to be solved.
Grillology may be okay,
But all those Cokes won't make your
grades!"
The moral here is plain to see:
A" semester's average requires a C.
Grillology may be a breeze,
But still you have to make those C's.
So let the boy spend all his "mon,"
And let him have lots of lun.
When all the mon goes, so will he
But he could make that C a B.

Much Ado... 9r
By

'

GURNEY NORMAN

(In no way docs the following column
lefer directly or indirectly to Sue Bueh-anathe very attractive Keys queen).
Most campus beauty queen contests
aie absurd in their inconsistencies. They
are situations only for .ridicule ami certainly not for serious acceptance. The
Keys Queen contest, which supposedly
crowns the "most beautiful sophomore
woman" at UK, is an example.' To select
a "beautiful woman" by a popular vote
rather than consider such merits "as
beauty, poise, grace and talent is ridicu-Jou-

h,

s.

In such contests, it is obvious even
before the dance that only three or four
.

girls can be considered as serious contenders for the queen title those who
we sponsored by the largest fraternities
or sororities, or jointly by a large fraternity and sorority. The Creeks, quite
naturally, will appear at the dance in
full titrength to insure their candidate
a victory.
Certainly the Greeks can't be blamed
for taking advantage of their size to get
another trophy, as long as the rules of
he contest ermiMt, It seems, however,
that sKnsoring organizations of dances
would take care in setting up a queen
"ontest that would add some "dignity to
.the otherwise empty title of queen.
Let's hope the Homecoming Queen
contest will be genuine and worth paying
attention to. Get some judges in on it!
OUR MAILBOX this week yielded a
letter to this column. Since it was um
signed, we cannot print it here, but it
was interesting and some paraphrasing
of the letter is in order.
The letter referred to a column by this
wiiter that was critical of an, order
boys to diess a cenain way in

the Donovan Hall cafeteria. The letter-write- r
asked me if I had ever heard
of restaurants requiring customers to wear
ties and coats, fraternities requiring members to dress lor dinner, or a family
which required sons to also dress for

dinner.
Answer: What the anonymous letter-write- r
mentions is common knowledge.
But people who eat in such restaurants
as mentioned or live at a . fraternity
house do so voluntarily, and by doing so
they accept the dress requirements. This
is fine. But the situation at Donovan
Hall is different. Those boys have to eat
there.
The previous column complained that
there was no justification for forcing men
to adhere to dress standards when they
have no choice about where they eat.
This is the same as requiring people to
dress in a prescribed manner for classes,
where attendance is required. While seeing everyone formally attired might be
pleasing to some eyes, it is still an infringement iqon a person's individuality
to make him drcss a certain way.
Other cases of attempts to regiment,
people in their habits are evident at
UK. The House Presidents' Council says
girls should not be on campus in Bermuda shorts unless they are in a'P. E.
class. Now it is immaterial to this writer
whether girls wear Bermudas at home
or on campus. But the idea of that invasion of someone's will is repulsive.
"But it is a question of taste," the
council might say. Sure it is a question
of taste, but it is the individual's taste
that is important, not the opinion of a
council determining everyone's dress.
Thank you for your letter, Mr. Anony,
mous.

br-licv-

The Readers' Forum

sonally.

Then, after making

e

the spokesman said,
that .the ionosphere simil.uly reflects cosmic rays back into space. These
rays arc captured in the earth's magnetic
field and thus a wide belt of trapped,
concentrated radiation is created.
The cxiremely dense field of radiation found by Pioneer and the Explorer
satellites, Dr. Naher believes, will dissipate when the (urrcnt period of solar
flares ends.
Solar flares, also known as sunspots,
arc caused when tremendous explosions
many times more powerful than any
hydrogen bomb occur on the surface of
the sun.
These flares arc accompanied by emissions of radiation. It is this radiation,
splashing against the earth's protective
ionosphere, which Dr. Naher believes
forms the lethal zone of cosmic rays
around the ea nh.
"In a lew yeais, when the period of
solar excitement has dwindled," the
spokesman said, "we may find that the
radiation zone has vittually disappeared.
We can expect it to build up again
with the next cycle of sun spots."
Dr. Naher,

Contributed

ing and capable students are able to
accomplish.
Certainly students who attain the qualifications necessary for membership in
honorary societies are much more in demand by potential employers than those
with low grades ancf few or no extracurricular ac tivities.
Sincerely.
Frank Bennett
William Dorsey
(Re the questions asked in your first
paragraph, gentlemen, we rather doubt
that Norman's "irrational views' were
prompted by failure to get into campus
organizations. In addition to being editor
of the Kentuckian, Columnist Norman is
secretary of Omicron Delta Kappa; president of Sigma Delta Chi, professional
journalism fraternity; a member of the
editorial board of Stylus; a member of the
K Club and track team, and has a 3.0
overall standing. We suspect he merely
wrote an honest opinion no more, no
levs.

THE EDITOR).

Scientific Dating
To The Editor:

by

impressed by the profundity of
Dr. Leslie's most penetrating study of
dating. The joys oi scientific living are
here at last! Not before the adxenl of
the sociologist that master scientist who
draws conclusions purporting to direct
our lives from "qucstionnaiics of high
school and college students" have we
really known how to live.
The pattern is fixed; and if we refuse
to follow, this scientist or social worker
(one hesitates to specify) looks us deeply
in the eyes, reiterating without a blush:
"You have a problem."
He classifies us as orderly as the elements; his norms aie fixed, as dull and
dehumanized as masvproduccd gadgets.
His prescriptions for dating and marriage
are set forth as universal panacea. Since
I d not lokvlor a wife who "krww htvw
to cook and keep house," a fresh little
home economics major with bright eyes
and.dishpan hands, bobby socks and a
mind that wanders nimbly fiom cookery
to the stratosphere of science fiction until it alights gingerly on a Pat Boone
and. since 1 have missed that great "advantage," so cogently emphasized by Dr.
Leslie, "over (my) patents (of) casual
talks around the drugstore." I mournfully hang my head, remembering the
exclamation of G. B. Shaw: "What will
people think!"
Sinceiely,
Milledge Gulphin
I was

Nancy Howard
Billy B. Hart

Sour Grapes?
To The Editor:
Was the purpose, if there was one, of
Gurney Norman's ("Much Ado" column)
of Oct. 9 to excuse his own shortcomings? Is it jK)ssible that his own grades
aren't as high as he feels they should
be? Has he been refused membership in
an organization he wanted to join? The
reader suspects there must be some personal reason for his irrational views.
In his
raving, he has ruthlessly condemned good grades, honorary
fraternities, the Leadership Conference
and all other campus activities that
wiingness to work.
m
Membership in ahnost any of our
campus organizations is a good opor-tunitfor development of leadership
abilities and should not be any great
handicap to college students.
It is tiue that it may be possible to
belong to so many organizations and to
participate in their activities to such an
extent that grades may be poor. However, if students can belong to fraternities and still make good grades and
attain membership in the honorary
and sororities, they ceitainly
have nothing to be ashamed ol. On the
contiary, they are examples ol what will
re-qui- re

.

--

y

Ira-Utiliti- es

* TUT KLNTt(KY KCKNLL. T!hiim!.u. Od.

rn THE

'--

Dorm Lads Domesticate Buns

J

h--

Krrnrl l.ntmtlocy l.tprrt
It

The Periscope
With
DAN MILLOTT

Affairs

XX. J i
Something happened last Monday afternoon which I feel deserves immediate clarification.
The Students Party named this
writer as its chairman for the
fall semester. This immediately
brought to light the future of this
column, which up until now has
dealt with campus affairs.
When I learned of the SP's decision I considered the fate of this
column thoughtfully and I had
frankly considered dropping it.
But with farther consideration
with the Kernel editor, I have
decided to continue the column.
This I am doing because there
are many other areas besides SC
nnd campus politics which will
warrant comment.
Delta Upsilon Makes Move
Tuesday night IFC heard a
presentation' on behalf of a proposed colony for Delta Upsilon
fraternity. The sales pitch was de-- ;
livered by the general secretary of
DU. Otis J. Hill.
After his presentation, Hill presented another petition to IFC.
A motion to accept the petition
was followed immediately by a motion to delay action until Oct. 28