xt7rjd4pnx2g https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7rjd4pnx2g/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19700506  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, May  6, 1970 text The Kentucky Kernel, May  6, 1970 1970 2015 true xt7rjd4pnx2g section xt7rjd4pnx2g Extra! Extra! Extra!

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UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON

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Vol.

lxi,

no. i:r

Day o( Protest Ends in Destruction

AFROTC Building Burns; Student Charged
students would present

By HON HAWKINS

Kernel Staff Writer
A lire destroying the Air force
H( )TC buildingon Luclid Avenue
ended a day of uneasy confrontation Itetween the students and the

administration.
Sue Ann Salmon, 21, of Hopkins County, was arrest eel in connection with the fire and charged
with arson.
The day Ijegan with typical
UK parts time protests. Around
1
p.m. students Leathered around
the fountain by the Office Tower
to protest the Kent State incident
in which four students died, I S
involvement in Camljodia and
firearms on campus.
After a period of light ac tivity
the rally picked up tempo as
outlined the
Spud Thomas
group's plans. He said the group
would attend that afternoon's
Hoard of Trustees meeting w hich
was open to the public.
As Thomas spoke it was
learned that only 70 seats were in
the room and 60 were already occupiedvery few by students. In
addition, only those students
with seats were to be allowed in
the room because of the building's fire regulations.
Bright Presents Proposal
It was finally decided that
Student Covernment President
Steve Blight would present the
student's proposals.
Dialogue continued until 1:4.3
p.m. when it appeared that the
entire group of demonstrators
tried to enter the Office Tower.
A large number traveled up IS
flights of stairs w hile still another
substantial number took elevators.
After alxmt 175 students were
on the eighteenth floor the police blocked the elevators and
closed off the stairwell preventing an more students from entering the eighteenth floor. I he
police contended that additional

a fire

hazard.

elevator came
up to the floor, but each time
a
campus policeman ordered it back down. Students already on the eighteenth
floor chanted "Let them out!"
'Move or go to Jail'
The Hoard of Trustees meeting began as a topical meeting,
although a eruianent committee was set up to hear complaints aljout the student code.
Steve bright delivered the students' recommendations, but no
action was taken.
I' niv ersity administrators
threatened the students with proposals of "move or go to jail"
several times as the students impatiently waited in the hallways
chanting slogans.
The Trustees concluded business and left with only one incident marring the meeting.
!. lev. ttor after

club-wieldin- g

A

H.

"Happy"

to President Nixon speaking out
against the Cambodian affair but
that he had not finished it. He
said he would not support today 's
proposed lxycott of classes, althe
bright endorsed
though
st rike.
March Covers Campus
The meeting broke up, and
students picked up handouts telling of a rally and march to be
held later at night.
The march covered the UK
campus. As it moved through
the Complex several students
could be heard shouting at the
marchers.
The marchers, carrying four
caskets for the four students killed

at Kent State University Monday,
marched on passing the Donovan-Haggiarea and stopping traffic.
At the comer of Luclid and Limestone the marchers became somewhat divided. Some wanted to
inarch downtown and others
wanted to proceed on to Barker
Hall, the HOTC building. Finally, they all sat down in the mide
dle of the
intersection. But local police halted
traffic back at the Short Street
intersection and the group moved
on to the HOTC building, Huell
Armory.
Confusion Reigns
Once there, rhetoric filled the
air. Most of talk was not talk,
n

Euclid-Limeston-

but yells attempts to get points
across or to solidify further plans.
Of the estimated 300 present
a large number spoke at one
time or another. Many called
Please Turn To Page 2
A rally was scheduled for 4:30
p.m. Wednesday at the ROTC
Building. This was apparently a
test of President Singletary's order prohibiting student meetings
after 5 p.m.
The rally was announced at
the end of a meeting attended
by about 2,500 students in the
Student Center.

Chandler,

former baseball
commissioner
and tw ice governor of Kentucky,
struck a student after the student
reportedly provoked ("handler.
Singletary Speaks
The students remained and demanded to be heard. After much
debate 10 students were allowed
to meet w ith L'K President Otis
A. Singletary and Albert ('lay,
temporary chairman of the Hoard
of Trustees.
After the closed meeting with
the 10, Singletary spoke to the
students and responded to questions. .Singletary said he was told
it was advisable to talk to the
students.
There was "no sizable interest by the Ijoard" to ban fire arms
on campus Singletary told the
students. He added that the only
thing he was persuaded of was
that students "dislike" arms on
campus.
Singletary also commented
that he was working on a letter

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Lexington firemen shoot a stream of water toward the flaming Euclid
Avenue Ptiiilding, formerly the Air Force ROTC building, after an
arsonist set the building on fire to culminate Tuesday's day of protest. The fire also damaged several rooms in nearby lllaer Hall,
foiling some women students to search for temporary housing in
other dormitories. A UK student, Sue Ann Salmon, 21, of Madison-vilie- ,
has been charged in the burning.
K,rill, photo Hy Duk Wan-

Iwtli Bums

deplorable Aels of

Violence"

Student Meetings After 5
Prohibited By Singletary
UK President Otis A. Singletary, has "prohibited" any student meetings after 5 p.m.
Wednesday.

f

In

a

statement released

Wednesday at noon, Singletary
said, "It is our intention to keep
the University open for those
students who were not involved
in the demonstration and who
want to complete their semes-

ter's work."

Singletary

condemned

the

burning of the Air Force HOTC'
building Tuesday night, saying,
"The deplorable acts of violence
committed last night on the University of Kentucky campus were

irrational and meaningless, and
am personally grieved at the
senseless destruction that hasoc-curre1

Kernel Fhoto by Ken Weaver

"In addition to the loss of
physical property, the lives of
more than a hundred students
weie threatened when fire spread

to their living quarters."
Singletary characterized the
situation here as a "state of limited emergency" and said local
and state police will remain on
campus "to deal w ith any further
incident which threatens violence
to persons or property.''
Cov.
Earlier Wednesday,
Louie Nunn issued a statement
be
saing the violence would nothas
"tolerated". Cov. Nunn
placed the State Police and the
National Cuard on "alert".
Singletary said assistance was
requested from the local and State
Police "after observing the commission of unlawful acts and determining that property and life
w ere threatened and that the campus security force could not contain the crowd."
Singletary said five students
were arrested on various charges.
The president said an investiga

tion of the incident was being
conducted but Stuart Forth, acting vice president for student affairs, said it was too early to determine whether disciplinary action would be taken against any

students.
Forth said

he was "extremely
depressed by the emotional and
irrational response to a complex
problem," and added, "If I were
to believe the rhetoric, I would
say they were looking for a con-

frontation."

Mobilization
Student
The
Committee, meanwhile, "urged
ev ery one to look beyond the mere
burning of a worthless building"
and see the cause of the incident as being an "illegal aggressive war that has cost 50.0(H)
American lives. We strongly feel
that all the buildings on this
campus are not worth one of those

lives."

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for action, out contusion rt iunrd.
An occasional rock crashed
a Hucll Annory window. The
marchers let out a resounding
lx)o each time it hapiiened. Several commented, "That's their
(the establishment) way of doing
things we don't want to he like
them. "
The crowd gradually leganto
disperse. A few police in the
area armed with walkie-talkie- s
stood around the rim of the crowd.

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Former Governor A.

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Possible Arrest
Dean of Students Jack Hall
then told the students they would
have to leave or face possible
arrest. The crowd ceased to dwindle as quickly as it was.
Then state, local and campus
police began to move toward the
students. Armed with billy clubs,
tear gas cannisters and guns, the
police lined the front of Huell
to prevent movement
Armory
toward the IU)TC budding.
The crowd held firm. A waiting game was in order.
UK grad student Mason Taylor reportedl lobbed a rock over

Chandler

Ky

Dick Ware

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police moved forward and struck
student Peter Mitchell. Tajlor
was arrested on charges of disorderly conduc t.
The police retreated and the
things relaxed once more.
Suddenly, the gae of the students turned toward the top of
the Student Center. A huge
l
shocked oidookers, leading
VHiieto believe the Student Center was on fire.
Kventually, the students realized it w as the Air Force HO TC
building which was aflame. People ran in three or four direc tions
try ing to get a U tter look at what
was hap)cning.
Singletary Meets Students Today
Police dominated the area
quickly. The fire department arrived and tried to salvage what
they could. Ik' fore the fire was
under control the H( )TC building
was termed a "total loss." Additionally, a number of rooms in
IMa.er Hall were destroyed.
The students then dispersed
and set forth plans for today's
activities, which include a
of 10 a.m. on Camlxxlia
and a meeting letween Single-taryanstudents at 1 p.m.
fire-kil-

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Radicals Give Their Views
On Burning Of Building

eon fronts a student in a quick encounter outside the Hoard of Trustees meeting room immediately following Tuesday's session.
Photos

the head of the police toward

theHOK' building. Several state

Ky JIM ITHK.r.
Kernel Stall Writer
Not all of the more radical students at I K were happy to see
a building burned down by arsonists, even though that building
was an Air Force HOTC building.
Fven though they weren't real appy about it, in. my lelt that
it was no great loss. Many students felt the burning was disgusting,
and would polarie more people besides being a danger to life.
"It doesn't break my heart," one student said, going on to say
that he felt that the burning was "forced" by the 1'niversity and
that HOTC didn't belong on this campus."
"They burned the wrong building.'' said jack Layne. "They
.shouldn't have endangered am body's lift1, no matter who did it.
Both (HOTC) buildings were relatively unguarded, so why didn't
they burn the big oner'"
Peggy Klein said she felt the incident was a "bad move. It
polaried a lot of people. I'm a pacifist, and don't agree with what
took place. It's disgusting."
Dennis McCarty, an SMC member, explained that "It was uu- fortunate that the building was burned down. Hut the tragedy of
Vietnam is worse. If a new HOTC building it put up to take its
place, it will be an even bigger tragedv. They should turn the area
into a people's park.
"Otis Singlet. iry and Jac k Hall should be ai rested f or aiding
and abetting arson," claimed Hevcrend im Cooines. who explained
that the actions they used against students did little to calm them.
"It's too bad that a building has to be burned down,'' explained
Karl May, "but if the burning of that one building could possibly
result in the saving of one human lite, American or Vietnamese,
then I say right on."
Kathy Harnett expressed anger at the "idiots for doing it near
a dorm. I'm afraid that it will also tend to cause more violence in
some way. It could have just whetted people's appetites lor more.
"It wasn't an end, it was a beginning," she explained.
One of the longest statements made was by Michael Dobbs,
which seemed to say a lot that others had tried to say:
"We have pleaded, begged, threatened; the people who rule
this campus and our lives have obstinately refused to pay any attention to our opinions or attitudes as students on any and all issues.
The time has come when we must demonstrate to the powerful
few that the students of this University will no longer tolerate disguised tyranny. If we must degrade ourselves by speaking to the
administration in their own jargon of violence in order to be heard,
then so be it."

Three Students Arrested
By

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Kernel Staff Writer
One undergraduate and two
graduate students were arrested
as a result of Tuesday night's
flare-uhere.
Those arrested were Sue Ann
Salmon, 21, on a charge of suspicion of arson; Mason Taylor,
26, charged with disorderly conduct (in front of Huell Armory),
and John Woodring, 2(), also arrested on a charge of disorderly
conduct. This information came
from the Lexington City Jail,
where Miss Salmon is held in the
'hold-overcxMii, and from the
County Jail, where Woodringaud
Tay lor are held.
According to City sources,
Miss Salmon- is being held on a
$2500 bond, Woodring, $300, and
Tay lor, $300.
The information on Miss Salmon came from the city jail

arrest

logbook and the county

jail supplied the information on

Woodring and Tay lor.
With the Kernel reporter at
both locations was the chaplain
for the county jail, Jim Cooines.
Mr. Cooines was at the demonstration from the !eginning.
said that "The State
Police are very ethical, some of
the best around."
When the harassment of the
police reached a high point, the
police responded in a manner
which prompted Cooines to sa
that "I'm glad that they used
as much restraint as they did.
Cooines also noted the KenState Police Colonel who
came up to him at the appearance of the squad and said "You
look pretty straight. Could you
HI iik what is going oi. I'd
like to know too. "
tucky

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Fire Drives Women
From Blazer Hall
By DANIEL E. COSSETT

Associate Editor
IS J
women
Approximately
were evacuated from Blazer Hall
earl Wednesday morning when
flames from the Euclid Avenue
Building fire threatened to spread
into the co-edormitory. Dean
of Students, Rosemary Pond, reported th.it all occupants of the
dormitory left the building in a
quick and orderly fashion once
the fire alarm had been sounded.
Although fire alarms had also
heen sounded in twoother dormitories, Jewell and Boyd I Ialls, the
residents were s(xn allowed to
return to their rooms since damage to these two buildings was
minimal. The fire inflicted heavv
damage to the south side of Blazer Hall, however, causing the
occupants to seek shelter mother
dormitories, sorority houses or in
private residences.
Some Leave Town
Most of these women are being temporarily housed in Keene-lan- d
Hall with Patterson and
Jewell Halls receiving a few of
w ere
the evacuees. Eleven co-eeither summoned by their parents to leave Lexington and go
to their homes, or left of their
own accord.
Twelve residence rooms in
Blazer Hall were damaged by the
spreading flames, according to
Ken
associate
Brandenburgh,
dean of students, with five of
the rooms being classified as
heavily damaged. All of thedain-agerooms were on the second
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Kernel Staff Writer

A sampling of UK faculty and
coaches was questioned today,
on their reactions to Tuesday's
student protest and the burning
of the Air Force BOTC buildfrom those
Statements
ing.
questioned follow:
Dr. Gene Mason, political
science professor: "Not only was
I
surprised that the building on
campus was burned, but I was
totally shocked and indignant
about the use by the Lexington
Police Department of AR 15
automatic weapons and automatic shotguns. Tear gas, billy
clubs, and loud sound systems
are devices used to control riots,
if there had been one. But
weaautomatic
ponry has no use other than to
chop down large numbers of
people."
Baskeball coach Adolph
Hupp: "I regret any violence on
campus of any kind. I don't
think burning buildings at UK
will stop the war in Cambodia
or the Vietnam war either. There
are other means. Students should
organize to bring this thing to
a stop, but violence at home is
not an answer."

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and third floors of the dormitory.
Brandenburgh commented that a
room is classified asheavilv damaged if most of the contents of
the room are destroyed. Damage done largely bv smoke and
water is classified as minor damage.
Blazer Hall is twenty feet
from the BOTC Building. Heat
in the third floor rooms melted
telephones fifteen feet from the
windows.
Blazer Damage Heavy
Miss Pond commented that
a great deal of the damage in
the twelve rmms was to university property. Several setsofdraj)-er- y
caught fire, and desks, mattresses, and chairs were singed
and water-soakeThere was also a great deal
of water damage in food storage
nxmis on the first floor of Blazer
in an area adjoining the Blazer
Cafeteria.
The only casualty of either
the Euclid Avenue Building fire
or the Blazer Hall fire was a fireman who was overcome with
smoke while working inside-BlazeHall. After being treated
at Good Samaritan Hospital, he
was reported to be in satisfactory
condition although he is being
held for observation.
No estimate has been made
of the cost of the damage to
either the Euclid Avenue Building or Blazer Hall.
The ROTC Building is insured
for $74,362 and the contents for
$6,200.

not show any individuality in
our actions . . . we just followed
what other universities did."
Dr. Guy Davenport, English professor: "It (the protest
and burning) seems deplorable.
I see the
burning of buildings as
the Biownshirts in Germany in

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Students Question Singletiry

Across The Nation

Vigils, Strikes Mark Student Response

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Faculty, Staff Reflect
Surprise And Regret
x
By I'.LLF.N

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By The Associated Press
Students at a growing number of campuses across America
today responded to calls for a
nationwide strike against President Nixon's Cambodian policy
and the Kent State killings.
Some universities shut down
altogether, others had rallies,
prayer meetings or vigils. There
were clashes with police on some
campuses. On some others, there
were indications of support for
the move into Cambodia.

rally was peaceful but there was
vandalism afterward.
The current wave of protests
was touched off Monday when
National Guardsmen called out
by Ohio Gov. James A. Rhodes
to control antiwar demonstrations at Kent State, fired into a
crowd. Four students were killed.
The Faculty Senate Tuesday
blamed Rhodes and his adjutant
general, S. T. Del Corso, for the
deaths.
Fifteen persons were injured
early today when helmeted police armed with clubs and
s
routed some 500 Seton Hall
University students in South
Orange, N. J. The students had
camped around a street bonfire
to protest the war.
Buffalo, N.Y., police fired tear
gas and battled students on the
campus of Buffalo State University and nearby streets Tuesday night. The incident involving about 500 students followed
similar encounters during the
day.

National Guardsmen patrolled
at the University of Wisconsin
in Madison after, police said,
more than 35 persons were arrested in two days of window
smashing and firebomb vandalism.
spokesmen

University

mated

10,000 persons

campus
protest
ment of
to hear
against

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attended

a

rally Tuesday night to
the President's deploytroops in Cambodia and
a

the

"people's petition"
Kent deaths. The

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The call for a nationwide student strike was made by Charles
Gonzales, president of the 110,000-membStudent National Education Association. There appeared to be a wide response.

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Police also used tear gas and
clubs in the state capitol building in Austin, Tex., to break up
a demonstration by several hundred protesters who had marched
from the University of Texas campus six blocks away.
Princeton University faculty
voted to suspend classes for the
remainder of the semester and
took a stand as a group condemning the war in Southeast
k
Asia. They also approved a
recess prior to the November election so students can work
in political campaigns.
Boston University canceled final examinations and its scheduled May 17 commencement exercises at which Sen. Edward
M. Kennedy,
was to
have been the principal speak-

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Dr. Lyman Ginger, Dean of
the College of Education: "I
didn't do it. I certainly think
it is unfortunate that a peaceful
protest developed into destruction."

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Dr. A. D. Kirwan, history
professor and past UK president: "I think any burning is a
criminal ac t and inexcusable."
"Football coach John Ray:
"I was disappointed to see students do it. Peaceful demonstrations are in order, but it was
hardly a peaceful demonstraWar is violence and
tion.
they're (the students) against it,
and then they do what they are
against. This was no semblance
of a peaceful protest. We did

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Bright Condemns Security,
Criticizes Police Action

J. PATRICK MATHES
Assistant Managing Editor
Student Covcmment presi-- t
t Steve bright has condemned
police action on campus last night
during demonstrations ending in
the burning of a KOTC building.
"I think President Singletar
made a big mistake by letting
Joe burih. director of Safety and
Security, make the decision to
use the police,"' said bright, himself an Air Force HOTC cadet.
According to bright, President
Singletary said the decision to
bring in police was up to burch.
Last night bright said "The
actions of the University of Kentucky campus were the result of
suppressive action and lack of
patience on the part of University and police officials."
"The rally in front of the
Army HOTC building was
alxnrt to break up when
two ranks of police were brought
in. After the resulting confusion
and limited unrest had ended,
the rally was again near ending
when a third rank of police was
marched in.
"If some type of violence was
likely as a result of such an
overwhelming show of force the
course taken tonight (Tuesday)
was certainly preferable to any
injury to individuals."

In a statement released Tues-

By

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day the Student Cos eminent
president stated, "I realize that
there was a class boycott less
than a month ago and that
large numbers of students desire to proceed with the
present academic schedule, and
I
respect their right to do so.
"but I feel that these considerations are secondary to the
overriding importance of the influence of the expansion of the
Southeast Asian conflict and the
Kent State incident on many
students here."
"It is my hope and request
that all members of the faculty
will respect the personal convictions of those students who participate in the student strike today, and that provisions will be
made to allow students participating to make necessary arrangements with no punitive ac-

tion."
During the board of Trustees'
meeting Tuesday afternoon,
bright presented a list of state-

ments concerning the extended
U.S. involvement in Cambodia
and the death of four students
at Kent State University."
bright pointed out the deep
concern among students over the
extension of the war in Southeast
Asia: "They have been concerned
since the statement of President

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Nixon last Thursda
" The
pensive and thoughtful
attitude of the students has
turned into one of frustration and
helplessness. Man of us have
been involved in opposition to the
war for months or ears. We see
our present involvement in Cambodia
a matter of
months and years."
bright continued, " The death
of four students at Kent State
comes as a shock to the entire
academic community. Students.

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and faculty members have expressed their deep concern and
regret for this deplorable event.
"It is also a consideration
that the same thing could occur
this is something
on our campus
we all must reflect on and consider carefully."
Two student requests were
presented to the Ixmrd by bright:
the first, that the Ixjard condemn
the slayings at Kent State University on Monday and, secondly,
that the board take action to prevent firearms on campus, including police weapons.
In closing his presentation to
the board, bright urged "all parts
of the University community, the
board, the faculty, the administration and the students to participate" in the discussions
scheduled for today.

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Student Government President Steve Bright addresses a group of
students on the eighteenth floor of the Office Tower outside of the
Kerm-- Photos n Du k w.ur
Board of Trustees meeting room.
i

NSA Head
Urges Strike
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WASHINCTON
Palmer, 23-- ear-olpresident
of the
National Student Association, is in the renter
of a growing nation-widcampus strike movement against the
expanded Southeast Asia war.
"We're not just an antiwar
group," Palmer said. "We're
moving into this because our
student constituency is sort of
demanding it. They said 'Move'
and we had to move.''
NSA was long on reeoid
against the war but had concentrated its actions on such
projects as setting up student
owned corporations, getting legal aid for students and pushing
tor curriculum reform.
but the U.S. attack into Cambodia last week followed by renewed American air raids in
North Vietnam galvanized NSA
into action and A volunteered to
cooidinate the student strikes
that began springing up to protest Piesident Nixon's turn in
w ai policy.
Tuesday, the day alter National (maid bullets killed four
students at Ohio's Kent State
University, Palmer said more
than 150 campuses were on
strike.
Is antiwar sentiment on the
rise again?
"The shock still hasn't worn
oft on Cambodia and I think
Kent State is going to exacerbate things. I think there's a
consensus, at least among students, that Cambodia was bad."
Why campus strikes?
"People felt they had to respond to Cambodia. Not to respond would have been to legitimize it. People looked to students to tell them it was wrong."
Violence?
"I don't think it is very smart.
It just plays into the hands of
people who want to mount the
repression even worse."
Palmer conceded NSA is in
some respects moving into the
vacuum left when the National
Vietnam Moratorium Committee disbanded April 20, 10 days
before Nixon's announcement of
the Cambodian operations. David Hawk, who left NSA to join
the Moratorium group, is back
helping coordinate the strikes.
APi-Cha-

K.

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once-stodg-

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WW

1

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Students Confront Police Outside Buell Armory
Attorney (ales

Vilesrenl )ioi
I

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r As Kaetor

'Fair Hearing At Present Difficult
By MIKE HERN DON

Editorial

Pae Editor

Sue Ann Salmon, the UK

stu-

dent charged in the burning of
the Euclid Avenue building
,
was
night's
in Lexington
formally arraigned
City Court this afternoon.
Miss Salmon, 21, a journalism
senior, appeared tired unda little
nervous as she entered the courtflare-up-

room today. She said she spent
the night in jail and was treated
well, although she got no sleep.
The four toot 11 inch ledhead
letused to make any statement

at the request of her attorney,
John V. brown Jr. brown, upon
his arrival in court, told the Kernel that he would enter a plea
of not guilt. The date tor tne
preliminary hearing is May 20.
"I could have chosen an date
for the trial," brown said, "but
wanted time for things to cool
down. It would be hard to get
a fair hearing at a time like this,
he said, and reterred to similar
incidents at Kent State and Harvard.
" Tuals will be in session for
students involved in trouble
1

there, and I don't want them to
influence the outcome of this
trial," he concluded.
A Kernel photographer said
she saw Miss Salmon being questioned by police at the corner
of Lexington anil Euclid immediately following the outbreak of
the fire.
Miss Salmon was informally
arraigned at 3 a.m. today anil
posted $2,500 IjoiuI and was released.
The Madisonville native lives
at 311 Lexington Ave. during the
school term.

a&mum

llri'fiht Sprtt lis

Her father, Dr. James Salmon,
in Madisonville by the
Associated Press, said, "I don't
know what happened but I'm
going to find out."

contacted

He said he had talked to his
daughter three times by telephone
since her arrest. Her parents are
reportedly on their way to Lexington but hail not arrived at
court time.

Miss Salmon and her attorney
said the would not make a pie-tri-

statement.

*