xt7rv11vfs8m https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7rv11vfs8m/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19590421  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, April 21, 1959 text The Kentucky Kernel, April 21, 1959 1959 2013 true xt7rv11vfs8m section xt7rv11vfs8m McVey

Campus

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UK Tennis Team

Is America Really
A

Plays Transy Today

'Free' Country?:

Today?sEditorial

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On Coliseum Courts

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
LEXINGTON, KY., TUESDAY, APRIL 21,

VolrL

No. 97

1939

Panel

SDX To Hold SC Candidate

Jones And Wainscott Agree
To Appearance On April 29
lioth candidates for the Student Congress presidency have
agreed to appear before a four-manews panel on April 29
to defend their respective platforms.
n

Taylor Jones, Campus Party
nominee, and Bob Wainscott. Stu- dents' Party candidate, will an- swer questions from panelists re- presenting University publications
and radio.
Sigma Delta Chi, men's profes- sional journalism fraternity, is
sponsoring the discussion. It is
tentatively scheduled for 3:30 p.m.
1
in Memorial Hall, a week before
the SC general election.
BOB WAINSCOTT
Moderated by Dr. Malcolm Jew- SP Candidate
ell of the Political Science Depart- ment, the panel will consist of
Jirn Hampton, Kernel editor-in-chie- f;
Bill Neikirk, chief news editor; Gurney Norman, Kentuckian
editor and Kernel columnist; and
a representative of WBKY, University radio station.
The proposed discussion would
be the first trme In recent student
government election campaigns
that presidential candidates have
appeared on the same program.
. The idea for the panel was
JeJi&osa Mqr&an, Jim Fulks, Jane conceived
bv - Sterna Delta Chi
Connell and Jim Channon.
on Apri, 9 Consent of both can.
Both parties will be watching didates was obtained last week,
the primary vote tomorrow to look following the nomination of Jones
for some indications of Voter pref- as the Campus Party candidate.
erence. A heavy vote in one col Wainscott was nominated April 7
lege or another for one of the par
ties might reflect some of the party
strength in a particular college.
The College of Commerce, where
the Campus Party has been quite
strong, will bear watching. Both
parties have a field of four candidates in the primary and the
total party vote will tell if the
division of strength has changed
or not.
v
,
In engineering, Dick Watkins of
the Campus Party is favored to
4-Y
capture nomination tomorrow.
!
Watkins lost last December's SC
race to Colin Lewis in which the
final result was in doubt for a
month. His opponent is Don
--

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TAYLOR JONES

DR. MALCOLM JEWELL

( T Candidate

Panel Moderator

41 Candidates Seekim

Primary Nomination
MILLOTT
Tuesday Editor
Congress
Tomoi row's Student
will find 41 canprimary elections
didates in two parties seeking 14
nominations and the right to run
in the May 6 SC general elections.
Each party will pick seven of
their nine assembly nominees tomorrow. Two Students' Party candidates. Bill Whitaker in graduate school and James Herron in
pharmacy, are unopposed in the
primaries and will be SP candidates on May 6.
The Campus Party will nominate
candidates for graduate and pharmacy in a party caucus before the
general elections.
The race for both party nominations in arts and sciences appears as one of the bigger races
of the election this spring. BeBy DAN

sides

being

the bijge.st

arts and sciences will elect three
of the nine SC representatives.
The Students' Party primary race

finds eight candidates seeking the
three spots on the May 6 SP arts
and sciences slate.

Included in the eight are in- cumbents Kitty Smith and Garrj 1
Sipple. Miss Smith is the present
chairman of the Students' Tarty
Sipple was appointed to SC to
fill the unexpired term of Rose
Billings, who did not return (o
school last PcDruary after her
election in December.
The 'six other SP arts and sciare Priscilla
ences candidates
Jones, Robert Anderson, Ken Hix-so- n.
June Moore, Priscilla Katz
and Trudy Webb.
The Campus Party race features
six candidates seeking the three
party nominations. The six are
college, Ethelee Davidson, Lessley Decker,

by the Students Tarty,
An SDX spokesman said the
panel would operate somewhat like

the "Meet the Press" television
Questions from the four
panelists, recognized by the mod- erator, would be directed to either
or both of the candidates.
The spokesman said probable
areas of questioning would be outlined in advance of the program
and given to Jones and Wainscott.
Questions would deal with the
candidates' platforms, their future
plans if elected SC president, and
their past records in the congress.
Neither candidate will know in
advance, however, specifically what
questions he will be asked. The
SDX spokesman said giving the
candidates information as to general areas they might be asked
about was to enable them to do
any research they might require
to supply a complete answer.
A Kernel representative
said
yesterday the paper has not yet
decided which candidate, if either,
it will endorse. He added, however,
that impressions received at this
discussion would probably influence the paper's endorsement of
a candidate.

series.

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Lynom.

For Some Seniors:

Grad Test To Serve
As Comprehensives
spokesman said.
Dean M. M. White of the College of Arts and Sciences said the
Graduate Record Exam would have
advanced area tests in the larger
departments, but the questions will
be general.
The scores will be broken down
by the areas and given an over-a- ll
score to be rated with other colleges, he said.
Several departments don't .give
comprehensives. These include
bacteriology, chemistry, English,
mathematics and astronomy, physics, political science and sociology.
The Radio Art Department has
may suboral comprehensiTes,
stitute part of the comprehensives
for the Graduate Record Exam.
The decision for substitution is not
definite, Department Head O. Leonard Press said.
The Anatomy and Physlology
Department will not substitute the
Graduate Record Exam this year,
Department but it may use a similar test InPsychology
The
plans to use tne area test for its dependently later, R. S. Allen, de- a department partment head stated.
comprehenslves,
The May 6 Graduate Record Examination will replace parts of
senior comprehensives in two arts
and sciences departments and the
entire comprehensive exam in a
third.
The anthropology and botany
departments will substitute the
graduate exam- In certain areas,
but will give comprehensives In
areas it does not include.
The School of Journalism will
substitute tbe graduate exam for
its entire senior comprehensives,
according to Dr. L.' Niel Plummer,
director.
The modern foreign languages
and philosophy departments will
not use the Graduate Record
Exam Instead of comprehensives
because of the uncertainty of having the results in time for the
senior grade deadline, department
heads said. They may substitute
comprehensives next year, but the
decision is not certain, they said.

The SP engineering race finds
Jim Steedley, Alan Isaacs and
Grady Lee seeking the one nomination there.

Rarhenbus Plaque
Donations for the purchase of
a bronze plaque in memory of
Dr. Charles Barkenbus, professor of organic chemistry, are
being taken in the main office
of the Chemistry Department.
Contributors may also be sent
to Dr. Smith. Chemistry Depart -

mnt.

nd

Anatomy

partment.

Pro, R- - s- and Physiology

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SDX Officers Plan Panel Discussion

Laying the groundwork for Sigma Delta Chi's proposed April 29
panel discussion between the two Student Congress presidential
candidates are the professional journalism fraternity's new officers,
installed Friday. They are, from left. Paul Zimmerman, treasurer;
James Nolan, president; Palmer Wells, vice president; and Bill
Biakeman, secretary. The panel will be moderated by Dr. Malcolm
Jewell of tho Political Science Department and will be made up
of campus newsmen.

-

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SEIFC Concludes Meet Here
Exchanging ideas, election of of- - versity of Georgia,
A new plan was set up
ficers and problem discussions
Southeas- - ing the' present rotation of con- the annual
tern IFC convention held at UK vent Ion sites with the home school
Under
of the secretary-treasure- r.
last weekend.
Twenty-eig- ht
delegates from 10 the new plan the convention will
Alabama, be held at the school of the presischools representing
Georgia, Tennessee, Florida, Louis- dent of the organization.
iana, Mississippi and Kentucky at- - The I960 convention will be held
at the University of Alabama.
tended the convention.
In the Southeastern
The delegates discussed individNew officers
Lanford, ual problems concerning rush,
group are president, Bill
University of Alabama; vice presi- Greek Week, outstanding pledge
dent, Stuart Kay, LSU; and secret- programs and other Greek organary-treasurer,
Will Little, Uni- - ization sponsored activities.
Chang-highlight-

ed

. Jim
Heil, UK IFC president,
said the convention "went very
well, and that every school attend- ing must have returned home with
valuable new ideas. Our IFC acquired several good ideas which
will be utilized as soon as pos-

sible."

The UK IFC attributed much of
the success of the convention soto the AFROTC
cial functions
accompanied the
sponsors who
delegates to all activities except
business meetings.
.

* 2 -- THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tuesday, April

21, 1959

My Fair Lady"

UK Graduate Stuclcnts
To Receive 11 Fellowships
The U. S. Office of Education
hns nnnounccd the award of 11
more National Defense Fellowships
grants to
to UK for three-yea- r
beginning graduate students.
The University previously had
been allotted two of these fellowships for history majors. The new
ones are for one graduate student
in solid physics,

L&it?
'

,
.

....

.

',

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universities to the Washington
Screening Committee.
A total of 1.000 National Ie

Wednesday.

Senate approval of tbe supplemental appropriations measure
now under consideration.

cludes transportation.

fense Fellowships have been approved for next year, subject to

The trip to Cincinnati will be
11 a.m. from tbe Sl'B and will
return about 10 p. m.
Tickets are JS.C0 each and in-

two in mathe-

matics, five in world politics and
three in econometrics.
i:.ioh fellowship carries a basic
stipend of $2,000 the first year,
$Z,?D0 the second year and S2.10H
the third year, plus 5100 prr year
for each dependent.
The .scholarships will be awarded
by the depaztments in which the
students will study. Outstanding
graduating soniors from any college or university are eligible."
The University allocations .".re
made on a national competitive
basis, as a result of a study of
proposals presented by a number of

wW

Tickets for "V.y Fair Lady"
be purchased today and
Saturday. Th bus will leave at

may

EACH WINNER

Regular Size

.

;

Hamburger
With
15c
Fried Onions

161, HK!
RECEIVES A $7 MEAL

TICKET

To Go, 7 for $1
ARCHIE'S
106 W. EUCLID

Gttlll

SC

PHONE

AIR CONDITIONED
"Build

A

Bettor

Butt-Ca- n

installation ' crew

HALES

..."

with screwdrivers,
wrenches and electric drill) came through the Journalism Building
on the walls, it
Saturday, installing these streamlined "butt-cans- "
was followed by two unknown punsters (equipped with grease
pencil, paper and paper and eigaretts). After scribbling and posting their sign, the two chortling smokers lit up and tried the disposal units for size. M&O's Chief Engineer E. B. Farris yestercosting 510 to 11 each, were being
day said 50 of the "butt-cans- ,"
installed in campus buildings.
M&O's

When

(equipped

PHARMACY

We're Installing For Your Future
The Prescription Center
915 S. Lime

The Knik Glacier, which serves
as a natural dam for Lake George,
is only 45 miles from Alaska's largest city, Anchorage.

Senior Recital
joint senior recital will be
presented by Jane Lynn Ma- honey, pianist, and Joan Blyth
Stadelman, trombonist, at eight
tonight in the Laboratory Thea- tej- - of the Fine Arts Building.
The concert is open to the

Russ Tamblyn - Alan Young

j

"MONEY, WOMEN
AND GUNS"

Canal i
The 101 mile .Morris
jvas built in 1831 from Phillips- City, N. J. It
burg to Jersey
operated until 1924.
--

Jock Mahoney

Projection-Scree-

Friday, May 8th
With the Road Show Engagement
of
Roger and Hammcrstcins
Colorful Musical
Will

Re-Op-

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"SOUTH PACIFIC
starring
Mitzi Gaynor and Rossanno Brazzi

Open 7 a.m. to 10 p.m.

Kim Hunter

Equipment

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REAR OF STORE

Tim Hovey (color)

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LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY
TEMPORARILY CLOSED

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CLASSIFIED ADS; Home of the College Folks
FULL TIME SUMMER WORK Weekly
earnings up to $150. Apnly in person at
YMCA Employment Office between
ZlAlt
1:30 p.m. Tues. through Kri.

and her bosom companions

3-

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after 5 p.m.
for baritone sax. Call
21A4t

Portable 1958 Admiral HI- with 45 "rpm adapter. Price $75. For
after 5
more information call
FOR SALE

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ASHLAND "Money, Women and
Guns." 2:17. 5:26. 8:35.
"Torn Thumb." 3:37. 6:46. 9:55.
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TONIGHT

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FEATURE TIMES:

TONITE
WED. & THUR.

SUSAN KOHNER

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STARTS TOMORROW!

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3:37.6:27.9:10.

'STRAND

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"Never Steal Anything
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EXINGTON

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from WARNER BROS

CIRCLE 25 "Night of the Quarter
Moon." 7:30. 11:00.
Plunders of Painted Flats." 9:35.

KENTUCKY

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TECHNICOLORS

Spook Chasers." 1:28. 3:58. 6:28.
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FAMILY

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Private Rooms for Parties
'High Fidelity Music for Your Dining Pleasure"

MOVIE GUIDE

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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tuesday, April

C

Hager Is Elected
KEA Vice President

-

1

V

f

m

?.

C. R. Hager, extension class
director In University Extended
Programs, Friday was elected vice
president of the Kentucky Education Association at the group's
annual meeting in Louisville.
Miss Grace Weller, assistant
superintendent of Hardin County
schools, was chosen president-elec- t.
Hager, a resident of Nicholasville,
is secretary of the Central Kentucky Education Association, of
which he formerly served as president and vice president. He also
is a member of the 1960 White
House Conference for Children and

'

He is assistant district commisfor the Boy Scouts of
America and is on the advisory
committee of the Kentucky Cooperative Counseling and Testing
Services.
The new Kt.A vice president has

sioner

cJaAJ:.

Before coming to UK, Hager was
superintendent
of
Jessamine
County schools for 10 years. He
is a member of Phi Delta Kappa,
education honorary, Kentucky Association of School Administrators.
PTA. and a life member of NEA.

""MwwPMawteMaiBBfc'.--

hvrnvl Sncct heart

Today's Kornrl Sweetheart is Trisulla Jones, a sophomore math
najor from .Miami I$eah. Fla. With the campus in full bloom,
riiscilla seems to be taking in the scenery with pleasure. The
camera's eye is also enjoying the scenery.

Summers To Leave UK
ForPps ition At Ohio U.

THE
REDCOATS

Teeliuology Filing
Will He Shown
In ItlcVcy Hall
Three films dealing witii technology and applied science will b(
shown at eight tonight in Roorr
111 of McVey Hall.
The films are part of a scries on

YOUR PERSONAL APPEARANCE
Is

IfJiPOBTANT
Try our excellent Laundry and Dry Cleaning Service.

The "Best Dressed" on the campus do!

LAUNDRY

ARE

-.

technology and applied scirnct
sponsored by the Department nf
an M.A. degree and done gradu- Mathematics and
Astrononv .
ate work at the University of
Tonight's
films are entitho
Chicago and at Columbia
'Tattern for Chemicals," "Atom
ization" and "Rival World.

Youth.

.

.21, 193J-

CLEANING CO.

Claude McGaughey

COMING

Grad. UK '48, manager

Dr. Hollis Summers. College of
Arts : nd Sciences distinguished

piofes'

the year, has announced
position at Ohio
this semester.
English professor
novelist, gave the
arts and sciences lecture

f

he wi.l take a
U;:ivti ity after
Dr. Summers.
nd a )oet and

GET SATISFYING FLAVOR...

j

April 7.
His r?cent book of poetry, "The
Valks Near Athens," refers to
Athen...
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A n:;iive of Eminence. Dr. Summers his written four novels. He
(urrti.t'y is working on a text-tr.c-

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graduated from Georgetown
College in 1937 and earned his
Master of Arts degree at Breadloaf
School of English in 1943. He received his Ph.D. degree at the
Ffate University of Iowa in 1948.
He

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* AS GLIMPSED FROM
THE EDITOR'S CHAIR:
Every Friday afternoon six students
and an instructor, known collectively
as "Journalism 90d: Editorial Materials," meet in the Kernel editor's
office to discuss the week's happenings
and to plan the following week's
editorials.
During our informal discussions,
we usually play., a game of mental
leapfrog, jumping from one subject
to another in an effort to get ideas
.

AnnerieUc, The Pitiful

for editorial topics, and last week the
meeting ended with a few comments
on American freedoms and the modi- fications they've undergone in the last
decade or so.
Some of the more obvious changes

were brought in large measure by
the tidal wave of muck that Sen.
Joseph McCarthy raked tin and
.
-r
v
smeared across the horrified face of
this country-mu- ck
that tinted euiltv
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to lay aside
and innocent alike with an indelible form, to
red hue. McCarthy's bombastic bel- - individual responsibility and colleclowings caused an immediate and tive integrity and seek refuge in tho
often irreparable damage to the per- - warm bosom of "togetherness," the
sons he wrongly accused of being new American Nirvana.
Communists, but they also caused a
This is not, by any means, a denial
cnam reaction that led to events which of the threat or the reprehensibility of
would dismay anyone, American" or the Godless inhumanity that prcsent-da- v
not who believes in the fundamental
Communism represents. It is.
of .freedom that are the rat)Kr an assertion that banning,
principles
vcry backbone of our democracy.
books or avoiding "unrealistic picLargely because ot Mcuartnys. tures" is merely to treat the sympclialribcs, for example, many American
as the
toms, not the .disease-mu- ch
libraries were purged of books having Georgia legislature did a few years
,ahy relation to Communism. Even ago when boll weevils were devouring
worse, the mass panic he engendered the state's cotton crops. Unable to kill
spread in governmental circles, reor control the pests with chemicals,
sulting in the removal of thousands the legislators simply passed a resoof books from the libraries of our lution outlawing boll weevils in
foreign information centers.
Georgia!
These centers, as Philip Wylie
The boll weevils, unimpressed by
noted in his recent book, "The Inthe legislation, continued to devour
nocent Ambassadors," are gathering Georgia's
cotton. The Communists'
places of young intellectuals and stujob is simpler: by merely waiting, they
dents who are attracted to American
can allow us to devour ourselves.
idealism and want to learn more of
While most of Atrprica's ostrich
the country through its literature
heads have been plunged beneath the
(and literature, it must be remembered, is an excellent mirror of a sands of Communism (or cotton
people). It is always difficult and patches), many of them have buried
themselves beneath strictly internal
often impossible, as Wylie acidly observes, to explain to these people that
America is a free country when they
see its own government's libraries
being purged of books merely be
cause those books happen to be an
athema to an egocentric,
ass like McCarthy.
Not all the
acts, born
of ignorance and nurtured by an un- reasoning fear, have been confined to
faraway places; one of, the most
pathetically typical library stories
we've yet heard emanated from the
neighboring state of Indiana, where
.
copies ot "Robin Hood were banned
from public library shelves.
Why? Quite simple. Robin Hood
stole from the rich and gave to the
poor. And that, according to the
addlepated logic of some bucolic
backwoodsmen, meant Robin Hood
was a Communist. So "Robin Hood"
was exorcised reading it might taint
Hoosier minds with Communistic
ideas.

problems. Such as, for instance,

micro-minde-

I
,

'

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Drawing By

Bb

Htrnden

Let Freedom Ring

The Readers' Fonr
Some Advice To Homer
To The Editor:
So you and Paul
friends, Homer?

Scott have no

Yes, Homer, Greek social organiza-

tions do have their disadvantages and
advantages. Scott said what? All kidding aside, Homer, there is such- a
theory stating an organized group can
effect more than an individual. You
shouldn't believe everything you hear,
boy you oughta check the prices
first. And quit saying you disbelieve
in God because your friends say
for getting in?. No, I
don't know if he has a grudge from
being blackballed, but you have to be
sociable, able to live with people.
I'm not saying Independents aren't
able to get along, seeing as a majority
can be condemned by a single one,
because I like a great number of Independents and have a great respect
for them. So don't let someone be
jealous because a large group of
organizations can put out a few dollars each and have a ball.
Who dirty rushes?
Oh, he said you'd have to sacrifice
your life during "hell week." Nah, I
don't think it'd be right to say Independents wear panties, but have you
ever heard of anyone at UK being
killed in such a fashion? A few went
blind when the faculty outlawed day- -

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others among Stephen Foster's im- mortal compositions have suffered
similar butcheries. The purpose, again,
is to prevent any allusion to Negroes
in possibly derogatory terms. We
wonder how many Negroes have writ- ten the radio networks to thank them
for debauching the very music that
literally exudes understanding, love
and sympathy for their race?
About as many, probably, as this
country's future leaders and states- men-n- ow
in college, learning "to- .

getherness"-cou- ld

stuff into a tele- -

phone booth or a foreign car.

The Kentucky Kernel

So?

Well, Homer, blast it, stop shoving
this money at me. Just wait until
next rush.
Of all the nerve!

Finn

incident rc- sembles a mole hill beside Mt. Ever- est. Book publishers, joining the racial
side show, have gone so far as to
change the name of "Little Black
Sambo" to "Little Boy Samlo."
And the radio networks, not to be
outdone, have stricken the word
"darkie" from "My Old Kentucky

ITMT

griping?

In New York, libraries have removed copies of "Huckleberry Finn"
one of America's greatest literary
from their shelves,
masterpieces
Mark Twain was very meticulous in
presenting the dialects of his charac- ers accurately, and this meant that
the Negroes said "dis" and "dat" and
forth-acce- nts
which the crackpots
s9
say are flies in the irtteriacial oint- ,nent. offensive to the Negro of today.
ignore the fact, apparently, that
n .M l
nuckieoerry rinn, aside from its
importance as a social document in
other ways, is a biting indictment of
slavery and thus a defense of the
Negro's right to freedom.
Compared to some of the otlier in- credibilities perpetrated to "protect
the Negro's sensitivity, however, the

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light, but that's all.
Sure you sell light bulbs at ChristIn Florida, library officials banned
mas, Homer. It's a civic project for such books as the Horatio Alger and
the polio drive. Lie in an iron lung Tom Swift series because they "gave
for awhile then bitch.
an unrealistic picture of American
Now that you mention it, Homer, life"
we don't have a sister sorority at
It is ironically humorous that these
whose windows to throw rocks. It's thiners are hannenint? in our own conn- O
O
this way-w- hen
you become a Greek, try t0 people who profess to epi- you don't act like baseball pitchers tomize the very principles of freedom
who've gone sterile. With everybody and whose forbears fought wars to
chipping in, you can have a party at obtain and, several times since, to
the house. Meanwhile, individuals preserve this freedom: to read, to
can go dovyntown and pay twice as write, to speak, to assemble, to ques- much; you just don't see it go.
tion, to petition and to live accord- He said what? Couldn't pay bills ing to the dictates of one's own con- so he got his walking papers? Who? science.
Are fraternity pins expensive? DeFreedom in America is coming to
pends on which kind you want you
mean the right to one's own opinion
can order as you .like. Some people -as long as it coincides with the
have a materialistic concept, but to
"right" one; the right to speak one's
others there is some symbolism and mind-as
long as one does not say
meaning attached to it. You'don't buy
the "wrong" things; the right to con- American flags to use as rugs.
You're dam right we have partiesl
scholastically we're always
ranked among the highest in the nation. And we get to see football
games. How many Greeks do you hear

in-

tegration.

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group-thinkin-

Entered

University of Kentucky

it the Port Office at Lefngton, Kentucky ai second cUst matt undr the Art of March 3 1879
'
week during the regular uhtxl year rutvt holiday! ud euumi
Publubed four time
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SIX DOLLARS A SCHOOL YEAR

Jim Hampton,
Box Neixirk, Chief Setts Editor
Perry Ashley, Business Manager
Billie Rose Paxton, Society Editor

Editor-in-Ch-

Larby Van

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I loose,

Chief Sports Editor

Norman McMullin, Advertising Manager
Howard Barheh, rhotourapher

Hank Chapman, Lew Kinc, Skip Taylor And Bob Hkhndon, Cartoonists
TUESDAY'S NEWS STAFF

Mfauau Davis, Associate Editor

Dan Millott, Editor

Stkwabt

Hjox:,

Sport

Editor

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THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tuesday, .April

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dream walking . . . the Loom Sc Needle dresses
LIbby Hanna, Chi Omega, in a cool, feather-weifh- t,
drip-dr- y
black and white checked suit. Terfect for
tours, city walking at home, or "abroad. Styled
foreign
by Arnell, $17.95. A white beret gives a dash of style,
a wise choice
$1.50; and a naccented freshness
windy and rainy days. A white travel bag tows
for
all identification papers, sun glasses, address book, all
(Adv.)
necessary Items for travel. $22.50.
A

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Always pretty and chie Sue McCauley, Kappa Kappa

Gamma, selects a charcoal cotton sheath with a triple
layer organdy collar. A wise choke for foreign and
American social gatherings. The collar is detachable,
giving the wearer a basic dress with which to wear other
accessories. . . . 539. Gloves are French imports fash(Adv.)
ioned exclusively for the Loom. $3.95.

Last Summer Travelers Give
UK Coeds Foreign Visit Tips

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Soft shoulders . . . soft moonlight, Edwinna Humphreys,

Kappa Kappa Gamma captures the romance of
Hawaiian shores in a dress sewn and designed by
Hawaiian hands for the Loom & Needle. Perfect for
shipboard dancing, cabaret parties, American patio
entertaining'. . . a small investment, $10.95 in tones,
ginger, blue and brown. Visit the Loom; select your
now . . . other styles offered. All are specifically cut
(Adv.)
to flatter the figure.

for and about

Women:

Dr. Server
Comfort Is
Keynote For To Sponsor
Travel Wear Mexico Visit

"A Jazz combo from Brown Uni- culty in understanding Americans.
almost time for summer
While spending a few days in a
vacations, and many UK coeds are versity, which had played at the
Shirley discovered
making preparations to travel World's Fair, began playing "When French hotel, of elevators that
antiquities
the Saints Go Marching In," and the
nbroadv
who trav- all the students representing 15 are prevalent. When her brother
Last sea.son'8 visitors
would open the elevator door on
eled by plane and boat are offering countries marched together around
fifth floor, Shirley, on the
rdvice and giving quick orienta- the boat. For the first time, I really the
By JOYCE RUSSELL
elevator, would be suspended beBy CAROLE MARTIN
tion pragrams in the dorms and felt as if I were home."
If you want to receive
tween floors, bewildered at her
For lots of French atmosphere
"
If you are so fortunate as to be
rorority houses.
you get your
planning a trip abroad this sum- resort benefits while
senior, reported and very little money, Sue Mc- predicament.
Libby Hanna, UK
English boys were very inter- mer, you probably have some education, Dr. Alberta Server has
restaurant,
Paris
the styles in London and Paris Cauley suggests a highlight of her esting to Shirley. They "dig" prothe type of clothing the ideal plan.
elsewhere which was the
to be very extreme, but
ll
and qualms about you.
For six summers, Dr. Server, asgressive jazz,
summer.
to take with
in Europe they were much the trip to Europe last
are
of romance lanAt the door of this charming love to dance. Their dances
The experienced traveler will tell sociate professor
tame as our own.
different from ours. Tables you, above all be practical. If you guages, has conducted a summer
Quarter, rather
She enjoyed most a visit to the restaurant in the Latin a woman, are set up in one room for drinkcourse ofare going by plane, you would be session in Mexico. Each
She said customers are met by
"World's Fair in Brussells.
a dog. Binocu- ing and eating, and the dancing wise to check with your travel fers three credit hours for eight
cf her ride in the Otomium, "I several children and
menu takes place in another room.
agent and find out just how much weeks' study. The summer load is
lelt Just as though I were in a lars are used to read the
Dancing on shipboard is a mat- poundage your airline allows for six to nine semester hours.
of
on the back wall. A collection
flying saucer at night!"
according to Shir- baggage.
These hours are recorded as
met the tele- foreign money and theater posters ter of balance,
While in Italy, she
University residence credits and
of French- ley. First you dance up and then
adds to the exciting
Mo