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ON PAGE TO

O-

The Kentucky Kernel

-

Looking Back On
What He Used To Know

UNIVERSITY

VOLLME XXXIII

Z246

FRIDAY. MARC H

...

SPRING CLASSES
Curtis Slrine Ouavlol Ph,v
TO APPROXIMATE
At Sunday Afternoon Musicale SCHEDULE SET

President Says

By Loik Ogden
The internationally known Curtis
String Quartet will appear in concert at 4 p.m. Sunday in Memorial
hall as the next in the series of
regular Sunday afternoon musicales.
This string quartet, composed of
two violins, a viola, and a 'cello, represented the United States at the
Court of St. James during the Silver Jubilee of the late King George
V. Following their appearance, they
gave a series of concerts in England
nd made an extensive tour of the

Played From Originals
While in Vienna, they were paid
the special tribute of being allowed
to examine and play the original
manuscripts of Haydn. Mozart.
Schubert, and Brahms.
Jascha
Brodsky, first violinist in the quartet, has stated that muny modern
editions do not follow the originals
and that by having played the actual manuscripts, the Curtis Quartet is able to present a much more
authoritative interpretation than is
usually heard in chamber music
concerts.
In America, the Curtis group has
frequently played and been entertained at the White House. The
European concerts were sponsored
by Lady Astor, the American embassy, the English Houses of Parliament .and the League of Nations
in Geneva.
Program Presented
The three part program will include the "Quartet in E flat Major-b- y
Dittersdorf,
allegro, andante,
menuetto, and presto movements;
the allegro ma non troppo. lento
scherzo, and vivace movements of
Dvorak's "Quartet in F Major. Opus
96:" and "Nocturne" by Borodin.
"Canzonetta" by Mendelssohn and
a "Polka" by Shostokowich-Jaff- e.
Ushers for Sunday's program are
Juanita Creedle, Kathleen Hagan.
Frances Sellers, Bet tie Harris Russell, Kenneth Fincher, Kenneth
Gray, William W. Hall, and George
Langs taff.

Freshman Club
To Dance Tonight
The University YWCA - YMCA
Freshman club will entertain from
7:3 to 10:30 tonight in the social
room of the Union building. Mis6
Rosalie Oakes, YW secretary, has
announced that every University
freshman is invited to the affair,
which is a
dance.
Dancing and refreshments will be
Included in the program which is
designed to give new students an
informal good time as well as an
introduction to other freshmen.
Brewster Phelps, social chairman,
and her committee, including Gene
Oetjin, Peggy Johnson, and Ken
Bruckart, are in charge of the ar"no-dat-

e"

rangements.

Music Fraternity
Initiates Seven
Alpha Gamma chapter of Phi Mu
Alpha, men's honorary' music fraternity, held formal initiation ceremonies recently, followed by a banquet at the Union building.
Those initiated were: Leyis H.
Horton, Lexington; Garland Young,
Overland, Miss.; Ledford Gregory,
Lexington; Murrell Saluthky, Somerset; Man-iTalbott, Winner, S.
D.; Kenneth Fincher, Kingsport,
Tenn.; and Newel Hadden.

US's UKs
Lawrence B. Emory, Henderson,
was recently promoted from second
to first lieutenant in the Quarter-mahtCorps on the Alaskan Highway, and was assigned to Company
F". 477th Regiment.
Lieutenant Embry was graduated
from the University with a B. S.
degree In Agriculture in 1942. He
was a member of Block and Bridle,
Animal Husbandry honorary, and
Alpha Zeta. national honorary ag-

er

ricultural fraternity.
Lieutenant Embry nas commissioned at Fort Bi nning, Ga. in September and was stationed at Camp
Lee, Va., and Camp Phillips, Kan.
prior to his transfer to Alaska.

II
Curtis String Quartet . .
have entertained
appear in tomert on the Sunday Afternoon

... famous group who

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To Tell Students

Carolyn Spicer Elected
As President 01 YWCA

Do

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Drth.- -

Ancle
White, pres-- j
ldent of the American Association
of University Women, will speak on
"The University Student and the
National Effort'" at the general con
vocation at 11 o'clock this morning
in Memorial hall.
Carolyn Spicer. arts and sciences
In her address. Dr. White will tell
junior from Lexington, was chosen
students what they can do both now
president of the YWCA for the
and later in the post-wworld.
coming year in the election held
Dr. White is particularly fitted to
Tuesday. She succeeds Jeannette
- give the college viewpoint because
Graves, a senior in arts and sci-- !
sne nas won acclaim in ner active
ences. also from Lexington.
life on the campus of the University
Vice president cf Alpha Delta Pi.
of Wisconsin, where she is the only
Miss Spicer is alo a member of
woman holding a full professorship
Alpha Lambda Delta, freshman
in its College of Letters and Scischolastic honorary, Cwens. sophoences.
more leadership group, and the PitHas Wnconiua Fh.D.
kin club. Her YW experience in- A native of New Haven. Conn.,
eludes, in addition to one year's
she received her A.B. and M.A. de- service as treasurer, two years' work
,
, ...4
V
om nautuiic course. Cain- 'k 'on the Y's Owl. and a summer's
bridge. Mass. She received her Pli D
training in the YW graduate fchcol
1 from the University
of WLscoii.mii
at Blue Ridge. N. C.
"
while she was teaching there.
Other OiTk-erElected
Travel became her avocation and
Carolyn Splrrr
Other officers elected were Helen
the inspiration for her books fol- -.
150
Approximately
books have Harrison. Lexington,
. . was eh itril Tuesday
to the lowing her first trip to Europe as
been donated to the Victory Book
Wanda Scrivner. Lexington, secre- (.campaign which ends on the camof pieident of ;, ) C. I leader of one of the Student Friend- -,
ship Tours of the International S u- pus today, according to Miss Helen tary; and Virginia Baskett. Casper.
Wyo.. treasurer. They will replace
dent Hospitality Association, unde-- Fry, assistant librarian in the cirJane Birk. Sarah Anne Hall, and
the management of the Open Road.
culation department.
Speaks Oa Emergency
Although this number is less Miss Spicer.
d
The
Speaking on the present situa- -.
than that of last year, the drive
tion. Dr. White has said. "Some
this season is considered much more is a member of Alpha Lambda Del- -j
things can and should be postponed
successful by the librarians because ta. Cwens, and the Cosmopolitan.
for the emergency that is todav. But
of the higher quality and better and Pitkin clubs. She is chairman
of the Book committee of the YW
The annual Patterson oratorical ' there are some things that cannot
condition of the books collected.
and soent last, summer training in i contest will be held March 26 under be put off until the end of the cri- Soldiers Get Magazines
In addition to the books, maga- religious leadership at the Western the auspices of the patlerson Liter. sis. First among these are the tram-- ;
Lisle Fellowship group in Denver.
ing and exercise of the critical and
zines nave been received. Approxirv Society, it has been announced L
inquiring mind, of the creative un- mately 300 magazines have already Colo.
Miss Scrivner. in addition to her Dy Robert Amnions, president. A agination. Today we need them
been sent to the soldiers stationed
at the Phoenix hotel and 50 more activity as representative of the cash prize of an amount between $50 desperately to save what is good in
group on the Y cab-- 1 and $100 is offered for the best th world we have. Even while we
will be given to them. Miss Fry ex- Junior-Senimet. is presidt-nplained.
of her pledge j twentv-minueffort to turn out
oration given. Any are bendin8
'
tne instruments of our survival on
Among the books that have been class in Alpha Delta Pi.
University student is eligible to
I
the best patterns we know, we must
donated are "I Took to the Woods."
In Charge Of Sarvev
,
,K
searcn lor new patterns.
" ""J
T
a recent
club
!susxam
m v,.,.
Vv "c- - jeci may oe cnosen.
...
,v.
od
Tool-u- p
for the future that is the
selection; "Our Hearts Were Young
ugious survev. miss Bosket t is a i This contest was provided for in task of everyone
r;
who can look beand Gay," the current
member of Delta Delta Delta. She the will of
James K. Patterson. yond the day's need. Fellowships
"The Moon Is Down," the popular ic )ha .oninianl svf
..1.
t
"first president of the University. It are our way of ensuring that what
novel by John Steinbeck, and "RanDelta's cup for the outstanding u SDecified tnat .h contest
the trained and enlightened woman
dom Harvest," which is popular at friehmon
r rr n r
ti
t
he neld on March 26. whiih was his an dofor the mkm of new m.riH
present because of the motion pic- cup
for the freshman woman with birthday.
will not be lost in the destruction ot
ture adapted from it.
the lushest scholastic standine
oldDonated
Students interested in competing
,
.,
.
DVl
.1111
Data
Besides these new books, there
should notify Dr. J. Huntley Dupre.
Granted Fellowship
the freshman woman with out- - nf the hisfnrv ricTiartmpnt nr t? nK..rt
I)r Whit
c -- nr
have been several
t'
standing scholarship
She is alo a,- -.
Jt;dges wiu
books on photography and the war
anO)in0ed heim Fellowship in 1928-2- 9 and was
a member of Alpha Lambda Delta later.
donated that should be of particuthus enabled to spend a year abroad
lar interest to the soldiers, accord- and Cwens.
collecting material for a critical
The new YW cabinet members
ing to Miss Fry. Also among the
book. In 1930 she went abroad again
books given in large numbers are will be selected before the end of
to check the finished manuscript.
quarter,
according to Mi s s
mysteries and pocket-siz- e
During this time in Europe she
editions the
Rosalie Oakes. YW secretary, and
s.
of once
wrote one book, laid the foundation
installation of the new group will '
Continued on Page Three.
The annual contest among mem- take place early next quarter.
bers of the Patterson Literary So- ciety will be held at 1:3 p. m. tor
morrow in the Union building.
members of the society are
eligible to compete. A cash prize
The University Outing club will
Virginia Zuniga. graduate student of between $50 and $100 will be
sponsor a party from 7 to 11 p. m.
Siven to the winner. The subject
tomorrow at Castlewood park. This from Costa Rica, will be the speaker selected for
the orations is "Plans
at the Dutch Lunch Club'h meting
will be the club's last outing for the
World."
at noon today in the Football room for a Post-Wwinter quarter.
of the Union building.
Members who plan to compete VIRGINIA ZIMGA . . .
bowling, and a tour of
Miss Zuniga's talk will deal with are Bob Humphries. Jay Wilson, . . . graduate student from Costa
the Castlewood tunnel will afford
country, Ethel Smith, Bob Warth. and Robert Ammons. Rica, will speak before the Dutch
the amusement for the evening. Al- her native
Lunch Club at noon today in the
program chairman, has announced. The public is invited to attend.
bert Craig and Charles Ftitts will
Football room of the Union buildfurnish the music.
ing.
Students desiring to go on this
WAR MARRIAGES . . .
outing must sign at the Information
. . . will be discussed
by Dr. Irwin
desk in the Union building before
Sanders, sociology department, in
6 p. m. today. The group will meet
an open meeting of the Home Ecoat the Union building at 7 p. m.
nomics club at 8 p. m. Monday in
tomorrow.
The- annual Junior Senior Prom
Room 9 of the Home Economics
The committee in charge of ar- will
be held from 8 to 12 pm Fribuilduig. A business session will prerangements includes Betty Jo Chiles.
day. March 12, in the Bluegrass
cede the talk at 7:30 p. m
Mildred Sparks. Lilly Baker. Helen
room of the Union building, with
1W-VFRESHMAN (LIB . .
Harrison. Bill Martin, and John
Jimmy James and his WLW or- ..
will entertain all freshmen witn
Trimble.
chestra providing music for the
an Old Clothes party and da:ice
formal dance.
from 7:30 to 10:30 tonight in the
Social room of the Union building
Pat Conley, chairman ol the So- cial committee cf the SGA. is in
WESTMINSTER tELLOWS.Ur . . .
charge of arrangements for the
. will hear W. B.
French speak
wuiiam E. Ware, Trenton, was
Distribution of bids is being
at their Sunday evening meeting
elected president of Sigma Gamma handled by
on "If I Were Your Age." Supper
Jeannette Graves, and
Epsilon. national honorary geology
June Wyatt is supervising decora- nil be served at 6:30. followed bv
fraternity, at a meeting Monday tions. Bob Hillenmeyer
v.
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Evensong.
"
and Wm-fre- d
night in the Miller hall building.
Ellis will act as receptionists.
V
TATTtRSON LITERARY
jPete Manos, Port Chester, N. Y..
Each senior will be given two
SOCIETY . . .
was elected
S. ,
Luther bills to the prom, each junior, one.
will meet at I o'clock Saturday
Powell, Owensboro, secretary; A. C. "hey may be obtained at the
arternoon in the Union building
McFarlan, Jr., Lexington, treasurer; Union information
desk Tuesdav
,'The annual senior oratorical
and Robert Burden. Lexington, social through Thursday, from 9 to 12
will begin at 1 30 The public
chairman.
1
a.m.. and from
to 4 p.m. The
is un ited.
schedule will be Tuesday morning.
I KENC
XMSH
A through E. afternoon. F through
reading knowledge exaniuia- K: Wednesday morning. L through
,'"S W,n
S'V"n froni 9 tO tMZ
P. afternoon. Q through Z. A
a. m. Saturday In Room UW. Miller
on le v . . .
Pal I
distribution will be conhall.
ducted on Thursday for those jun
is in i Inn 'c ot 'i ran
Robert Kibler, editor of the
Inwa .N'ute
iors or seniors who were unable to 1)11
Kentuckian, has announced that
Today
III! lor the annual
'fit
call for bids at the scheduled time.
all fraternity and sorority picFreshman club dance. Social room.
James, youthful WI.W maestro. Semot I'l om.
tures taken for this year's an1:30 to 10:30 p m. Dutch Lunch
drew record crowds during his re- nual have been returned from
club. Football room. noon.
cent engagement
at Cincinnati's ijhr ol the winter season
the engraver and that the picSalurdav
Ncthcrland Plaza, where he appeartures may be had by a reprePatterson Literary Society.
p ui.
teiritic bund "
ed in the Restaurant Continentale
Sunday
sentative of each group calling
He started pluyuiv with name
and the Pavilion Caprice.
at the Kentuckian office.
Ouen hou.se for ol.hft- rv.,-.- r......
He has had favorable notices in bands w hen he was 15 years of age. 3 to 5 p. ni.
In addition, the majority o!
Downbeat.'' national music mag After trying tile drum, tlule. and M RsES AID
the other individual pictures
azine, as well as the Cincinnati saxophone, he eventually drouoed
.
have been returned and they
..
.m k
dailies. "Downbeat" stated. "Jim- - all three and turned to the clari- - Wnnien i.
may also be obtained, he
,,
James opening at the Nether- - net exclusively, and it is on this Mrs. Good at the
hmd Phi.u
high- - instrument t:,- - he
.'s one of .(
hospi -jl inuuet!lHt-t- y
Dr. Helen Constance

Spent Summer
Training At YW

Graduate School

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VICTORY BOOK

Hall.

Bacteriologists Eligible
For Civil Service Jobs

persons are urged to apply immediately.
Most cf the pjtitions available
are in the United States, and no
The United States Civil Service age limits have been set up for
announced recently that it is ac- ,them. Further Information may be
obtained at all first and second-clacepting applications from bacteripost offices as well as from
ologists for filling future needs In
Civil Service office in the nathat field. Basic pay for such po- :the
tional capitol.
sitions is S2.600 and $3,600 a year,
which under the present overtime
system, is increased to $3,828 or
$3,163 for a
week.
Six options are mentioned: general medical bacteriology, anaerobes, viruses, brucellosis. riekeVt-siaand biologicals. Persons apThe rumor that is circulating on
pointed will do research in one of
,the campus to the effect that the
these branches of bacteriology, and
will prepare reports on their find- .current quarter wilj close earier
;than originally planned is false, acings.
cording to a statement issued from
Degree Required
Applicants must have completed President H. L. Donovan's office.
It was further stated: "The quara
college course leading to
a bachelor's
degree, which must ter will close Saturday noon, March
have included 24 semester hours of 20. Final examinations will be given
study in bacteriology. Two years of during periods assigned for regular
professional experience in advanced class meetings. The instructors may
bacteriological work for the assist- at their discretion use the final one,
ant grade, earning $2,600 yearly, two, or three periods for this purand 3 years of such experience for pose. Each class is expected to
the $3,200 yearly assistant grade, meet through the last period for
are required. Post graduate study which it was scheduled in the week
in bacteriology may be substituted of March 14 to 20."
for experience,
but such study
Also included in the statement is
must be in addition to the 24 se- the comment that at present there
mester hours called for in the edu- is no foundation for the rumor that
cational requirement.
he spring quarter will be shortened,
although unexpected events of the
Apply Ta Washington
Applications will be accepted at future could cause this change to
the Civil Service Commission, in be effected.
Washington, D. C. until further
notice.
Interested and qualified

SHORT QUARTER

e,

Sanders To Speak

RUMOR FALSE

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Patterson Society

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Schedules Contest

best-seller-

Winter Quarter

Final Outing
Set Saturday

Dutch Lunchers
To Hear Zuniga

Kampus
Kernels

Only-senio-

ar

Ping-pon-

Tau Beta Pi. Engineering honorary, will hold traditional tapping
ceremonies for new pledges at 10
o'clock this morning in Memorial
hall.
After the ta oping. Prof. Thomas
D. Clark, acting head of the history department, will speak on
"Engineer and History." The public is invited to attend the ceremonies.

g,

Jimmy James 7o Play Music
lor Prom In iliiion Marcli 12

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W. E. Ware To Head
Geology Fraternity

terms is dependent upon the field
in which the soldier is working. The
fields will include engineering, phys-- j
ics, chemistry, psychology, and other
specific areas.
. What
curriculum
is
being
planned for the
pro- gram?
A. K
schedule calls
for sixty-fou- r
weeks. The following
work has been translated into se- mester
hours:
8;
Mathematics
Physics 8: Chemistry 18: Zoolo- -'
jgy 12; History, English, and Geo-- j
graphy 15: and other selected sub- Jects such as languages, sociology,
and psychology 25.
Q. What is planned for the medi- 'cal program?
A. This calls for the same number
of semesters of work as the Anier-- j
lean Medical Association standards
now require. Medical curricula are
unchanged and each school will
continue to establish its own curri- -,
cu!a. Medical men assigned to this
program will be selected from the
group; school autlior-- j
ities will be requested to do this
selection under the general suix-r- vision ot the Armv

f

Non-Ficti-

To Tap Pledges

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WlLII

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con-'tes-

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Pictures Available

At Kyian Office

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best-selle-

Engineer Honorary

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Ledford Gregory, violinist, will play
for Evensong which will follow the
supper meeting at 6:30.
Members of the Westminster Fellowship will go on a hike Saturday
afternoon, weather permitting, leaving from the church at 4 p. m. Reservations should be phoned to the
church Friday night.

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two-thir-

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an elder of the First
Presbyterian Church and former
moderator of the Lexington-Ebe-nezPresbytery, will be the principal speaker at the regular meeting of the Westminster Fellowship,
Sunday evening at the Maxwell
Street Presbyterian Church.
"If I Were Your Age." will be the
subject of Mr. French's address.

c

SPEECH CONTEST

nt

SET MARCH 26

ASTP Questions Answered
one-thir-

s

newly-electe-

W. B. French,

To Home Ec Club

urriculum is planned for
the basic program?
A. In a typical curriculum about
of the academic hours
will be in mathematics,
physics,
chemistry and other sciences. The
d
remaining
will be devoted
to history, English, and geography.
(. What will be a typical week
in the A S. T. P.?
A. A typical
week will include
twenty-fou- r
hours of classroom
work, including laboratory periods,
and twenty-fou- r
hours of supervised study time. There will also
be six hours a week of supervised
physical conditioning
and about
five hours a week of military instruction. The latter will consist of lectures, orientation work, morning
formations and some drill. There
will be sufficient free time provided
each day for personal affairs and
the men will be off duty from late
afternoon on Saturday until the
Sunday evening meal.
.. Will the advanced program run
for nine months also?
A. Not necessarily. Qualified men
will be routed into specialized fields
where the work is in twelve-wee- k
terms, but the number of such

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Sunday Evening

Dr. Funkhouser
Speaks On Travels

Q. What

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Westminster Group
Will Hear French

Dr. W. D. Funkhouser, head of
the graduate school, will speak on
Dr. Irwin Sanders of the sociol- "Travels in Central America" at 3
ogy department will speak to the p.m. Tuesday
in the Browsing room
Home Economics club at its next of the library, in the third of a semeeting to be held at 8 p.m., Mon- ries of lectures entitled "Invita-- :
day, in Room 9 of the Home Econo- tion to Reading."
mics building.
The talk will center around Dr.
Dr. Sanders' talk, which will deal Funkhouser's various trips to the
with "War Marriages." will be pre- Latin American countries. To sup- -'
ceded by a business session at 7:30, plement the discussion there will be
according to Mary Searcy, president books on Central America on dis- -'
of the club.
play.

The following questions and answers concern the Army Specialized
Training Program. They are issued
by the American Council on Education, Washington, D. C. in an effort
to inform students of war service
opportunties.
Q. When will the Army Specialized Training Program begin?
A. Some colleges will be asked
to initiate programs on Marcli 1st,
others on April 1st, still others on
May 1st, and so on. In this way
men can be assigned to colleges for
basic and for advanced programs
as they become available through
replacement training centers and
induction centers.
Q.. Does a soldier make application for the college program?
A. Yes. He makes application to
his Commanding Officer for the
Army Specialized Program, and If
accepted he is assigned either to
attend a college or university or an
Officer Candidate School, depending upon his qualifications.
y. What will be the length of the
basic course in the A. S. T. P.?
A. The basic program
will consist of three twelve-wee- k
terms, or
a total if approximately nine calen-

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Mildred Buchanan, junior music
major from Mayslick. will replace
Josephine Harrison as the librarian
of the Camegie Music room in the
Union building. Miss Harrison recently moved from Lexington.
A new schedule for request music
has been announced for the remainder of the quarter as follows: Monday, 12 to 1 p. m.. 2 to 4 p. m.;
Tuesday, 12 to 4 p. m.; Wednesday,
12 to 4 p. m.; Thursday, 12 to 4 p.
m.; and Friday, 12 to 1 p. m.. 2 to
4 p. m., 7 to 8:30 p. m.
At these periods any record, classical or popular, which has been
requested, will be played.
On Mondays from 7 to 9 p. m. a
prearranged formal listening program will be presented.

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CAMPAIGN ENDS
Volumes Collected
Of High Quality

Mildred Buchanan
Named Librarian
Of Carnegie Room

Applicants Need
College Degree
For Positions

Cadet James C'ruUhfield Dowden,
Bagdad, and Cadet N'eal Phillip
Scott, Lexington, have reported to
the Army Air Forces
school for pilots at Maxwell Field.
Ala., to begin the second pliuse of
tiieir training as pilots in the U. S.
Army Air Force.
Cadet Dowden attended the Uni2
versity in
and served eight
months in the U. S. Army prior to
being accepted as an aviation cadet
ill the Army Air Forces.
Cadet Scott received his B. A. degree at the University in 1941 and
was appointed an aviation cadet
October 21, 1942. f Columbus. Ohio dar months-

Jr

NUMBER J

According to a statement Issued
from President H. L. Donovan's office, an effort will be made to have
the course offerings for the spring
quarter approximate those appearing in' the printed schedule of
classes.
The announcement further states,
"It is not advisable, however, for
students to plan their programs of
study too far in advance of the
opening of the quarter. The reduction in the number of regular students and the necessity of providing
classroom facilities and instructors
Doris Smith . . .
i for such soldiers as may be sent
. . . was
formally presented
here will necessitate some changes
in the regular schedule of courses. to the "Heat Band in Dixie"
It is hoped, however, that most of
these changes will be confined to a Tuesday night as sponsor for
.
reduction in the number of dupli- the coming year.
Europe's royalty, will cating sections and changes in
Musiiale in Memorial hours and rooms, rather than in a
withdrawal of any large number of
courses. Students may be assured
that provision will be made for all
courses necessary to complete ;e- quirements for graduation in June."

M

continent.

I'M 3

Dr. Helen Constance While,
University Women's President,
y ji To Address Convo At 11A.M.

y

Some Changes Will
Have To Be Made

...

Against Great Lake

OF KENTUCKY

LEXINGTON. KENTUCKY.

Group Performed
At Silver Jubilee
Of King George V

ON PAGE FOUR
Tats Hindi ISM?

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The Kernel Editorial Page

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
OP THE UNTVERSTTT OP KENTUCKT

OPTTCIAL NEWSPAPER
PrTl.tSr1Er

DtTRWO THt SCHOOL TFAR
OR EXAMTNATION PgBTpOg

T

HOMmTS

t.XCKPT

Pirtirii

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ll

J Vlrirtg-m-

RM AN

Tear

eof.art

g

F.dt tor

Whin ihr

si in It it I s

id

so well to the War

so

uiili

at nrM6 fetos. ivserf
AMra covers 0t rrM
fO. HOW 00 HCAtMf0S Of

Associate Editor
Cartoons
Circulation Manager
Assistant News Editor
Assistant Society Editor

of

i

Ih

(niiisii irsn.l

I

lit-

Clit-s- t

til lit

.ut-no-

ll Was Such

Good World

A

"l hai's
hae heard

BY ALICE WATKINS

Gitest Editor

huusf

iv

O)

farh.

Ihr dorm.

gus. don't ihink

"Well.

ain

ii

i

''.

I

new

ft'lliiu".

thing rolling."

ei

"No long and

Ik-

-

gotid.

Jak."

Ilrt rfitian Crulrr. Cnitrd

Slnlr.s Aniix,

s

Id iI.

"He

lc Mow. gii a lo.id ol the Narge."
"I h huh."
"W'hal's the nunei. loncsomcr"
"oH'. jusi thinking."
"W'hal's oui name. man. I tan't go on jusi
he ing on."
Smith."
ihnsoii. r.I.ul lo know ou.
"Mine's Bill
What otiiln on atiathed tor"
).k.
"UiiiJi ii's the Slsi. Yeah, that's what ii
rr. ;hi .ud."
"He, ih. it's mine. Your hariatks .kmi'i

".k

ss

iien

"tah.
"See

lt.

Ik

i

l's is

ii.-- "

Sa. this gie.n."
ou tonighi. then."

Itiiiimhi 4. midnight.
"What are ou ihinking alioui. akr"
"Oil. jusi thinking alxml the hos. wonlfiing
.

if v're d ling."
vnu a liaifiuii

haf
"

r-

man.

.uk:"

"I'i LainUla."
Tail.

g"d

fto.

ond."

"W'e

tlllk.

lial

a

g"Kl Sigma

kinda' like talking."
"Jusi me. Iiill. I
"(.I. id ou tame. ak. I his waich isn't anv
sinin' here ItMiking oiii
loo ileas.im. usi
oei eniiiv. hl.uk spate. M.H. ohii hills ol
sand, (it ii a cigarette. atk!-- "
"Are von kiililing"-- "
"iisi tlreaining."
"Mel a toiijile of gus louiglll lll.il I ilniiglii
were si ill tiies. Ii sure was gieai lo see lliein."
"How long iliev Ikcii in?"
' 'C
ol mouths. I he saitl the old school
had reall t hanged. Inn dcfinilfl. Saitl
a man there aiumore. Siritil
leniale.
(ionise ih. ii would suit us line, if ue could jusi
gel hat k.
Ihe saitl the women wire filler
laining the soldiers stationed there in town. Inn
that ii didn't mean a thing."
" I he 're icmciiilcring vou. then."
l

li.n

.

Tan thajiiei ai ken- -

.?"

.

nun i lit- ei In si da of s, In Mil ve'e heard
ii. I iisi i lu- rumor spread out ihe tampus thai
the men wtmld Ik in st hool tor onl a lew
Well, we're all iliankltil thai they're
weeks.
siill and ihank goidness. ihe know now
when iht will have logo.
NfVl wt In aid about gasoliut- I al inning. Ihr
In si won! around was that il woiikl begin tail
in Oi i ol ki t ausing I lit- abstiiif ol nil t ars on the
taiiipiis .mil lausing ui.ui "t oiiiuiuioi s" in ihop
.mi ol sih.Kil. I hnt aie siill a great man t.us
M en and
the t niollmenl tlitl not tlro tu t .instill ili- wiihtliawal ol those who lie in neaib
minis. I he hat sobed the pinblem ami it's
mii king, isn't h?
Ai tin nil ( hi isi ui.is limt whtn slutleiils wcic
In ginning lo plan iheit ncM tU.tilil's sthethile.
ilitH it iKgan thai
seteial ol ihe depart incuts
voiil.l be uiilnli.mil ..'.vl 'let man ol ihe
ionises Wnllltl llol Ik olleletl for I he willlcl
I h.ii
was slopM tl ill tine lime b
u.i iii
n i. iv .111 and Dean (.Ii.iiiiIki lain, but nm
III.
t ti
siuilt ni in iht- l'iiii i
Ik Ime iratiitall
h.id s. iImiI iht piobleui man ilillen ill wits
il
I

ht-i-

.

I

1

I. ii

I

In in

Willi ihe I. tunning ol stig.it tollee. and gav
pi o ing lo Ih lo lilt gltalt I i Alrlil simess
Ik g. in thinking .iImiiii
fill, i vi iv
iloilu s.
.
I In
nniisii.il
hail Im i ii a huge ( In isim.is
it
nail betaiise we mr al wai. hut iht mis hob
i!:i iiish was "mil ol this wolltl."
( )l t tun
we all see I lit' lietessily ol I. ill. m
ihinking st i
ing le.illlt l and when we
allowed onlv ihice paiis ol
iousl .iIkiiii
'hot s in accordance with the new laiioning pio-

'me

iii-.Ii-

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P14NE

IllUJrRATEO:

ANSWER:

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"HilK' VI."
"(it it a girl h.itk l here?"
"Yeah, she'll graduate in Maith."
"What's she going to do then?"
"Slit's going lo wail for me. Iiill.
sfie would anil

I

t

big-wi-

She said

litliee il."

"You keep tight on helieving it. fellow."
Dun I letkoii llieie's milt h tun lor her l ight
now. I hose guvs said lli.'il all ihere is lo do is
jusi hang around ihe Ulnar
now. I Ik I thai
place is jusi o ci flowing w ith ferns. I he saitl
ihe Outage and Rose Street were piatiit.illv
empi. now. That teiiainl is hanl lo heliee.
I tan
lenieiiilier how il was alter games and
it s. all the tiowtls. Coll, those were good
mo

anuhing.

.itk?"
"eah, sound the alarm, those aie ap planes."
"An oilier onleis. Jatk er. I mean. Captain,
sir?"
"usi hop to ii. wc'e got a little lianle to
"Hi-a-

i

JIMMY JAMES CONTRACTED
FOR MARCH 12th PROM
"To be able to satisfy all the public and if not. then at least 51
percent of it." That sums up the
ambition of Jimmy James, whose
band journeys down from Cincinnati next March 12 to play for our
listening and dancing pleasure at
Prom.
the Junior-SeniSeveral attempts were made by
Ed Barnes. Pat Conley. and other
students in charge of all the arrangements for this dance, to proband but
cure a really
due to the "No Sirs" received from
on the campus
one of the
their attempts were futile. However, they were able to book a
band for the Prom. The
main reason for our not having an
orchestra of a higher price bracket
was the dropping of so many students in the last two weeks because
of the Air Corps but then again,
there were enough students backing the committee to "throw a big
one."
JAMES has been a member of the
WLW staff since 1935. quitting a
lucrative career in other people's
orchestras to start one of his own.
There was Hal Kemp's band, for instance, with which he toured all
the famous continental music halls
and dining rooms of Europe in 1930.
In the ranks also were John Scott
Trotter and Skinney Ennis, who
likewise were able to organize their
own bands later on.
In addition to having been a
member of the fine Kemp orchestra. JAMES has played clarinet and
sax with Henry Busse. Horace
His arrangeHeidt. and others.
ments of nursery rhymes in modern
fashion are an outstanding innovation at WLW.

gram wt- lealietl lh.il w . iliiln'l n ail in etl
an more than ih.il. I he onl problem was
that tlieic was a little rumor Ix ing tossed around
even before ihr laiioning went into elleii. Slim
stores never hail as ninth business.
As for ihe t lollies laiioning iiinmi. ih.u was
tlul "sioniK-iliion when Suntla's lleralil-I- .
eailer presented a lull page explaining why
Illinois must stop. I here was little basis to the
Nevertheless, stores were pat kctl
t lollies ruiiioi.
w iih lusiriu.il
t ustt miers who feared thai
the
would not h.nr enough t lollies ncl w iiiier to
keep lliein waim oi thev loultln'l