xt7rxw47r09x https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7rxw47r09x/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19370219  newspapers sn89058402 English  Copyright is retained by the publisher. http://www.kykernel.com The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, February 19, 1937 text The Kentucky Kernel, February 19, 1937 1937 2013 true xt7rxw47r09x section xt7rxw47r09x Best Copy Available

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

FRIDAY EDITION
SEMI-WEEKL-

Y

KERNEL

UNIVERSITY

VOL. XXVII.

UK HONORS

To Select Military Ball
Queen NomineesToday
To Start At
8:30 p. m.

QUEEN TO BE CHOSEN
BY NEWSPAPERMEN
AH

IN FLOODED AREA

Military Ball

Twenty-Nin- e

Nine Nominees Will Be
Sponsors of Various
Military Units

Coulson of Louisville
Staff Gives Principal
Address at Banquet
In Commons

DOCTOR McVEY ACTS
AS TOASTMASTER

Eye Witness Stories of
aster Is Related by
to
--

Dis-

The hours of the Military Ball,
Speakers
be held February 27 in the Alumni
gymnasium,
have been changed
Irom 9 uniil 12 o'clock to 8:30 until
Lee Coulson. assistant general
Vote will be tabulated this aft- 12, Paul Slaton, chairman of the manager of WHAS, Louisville, was
ernoon to determine the nine nom dance committee, announced yes- the principal speaker at the testi
terday. This change was
monial banquet given last
In
inees for sponsors of the R. O. T. C order to have more ttme made In the Commons In recognition night
of the
for the
regiment. Military Ball Queen and ceremonies of crowning the ball services rendered by the staff of
attendants, following completion of queen. Arangements are also being that station during the recent flood.
balloting by members of the ad- made for opening an extra check Mr. Coulson told the 300 guests
vanced military science classes which room at the dance In order to present of the activities of the staff
begun yesterday and continued to handle the expected crowd.
in rendering service to the stricken
day during class periods, according
area in the face of the numerous
to members of Scabbard and Blade,
difficulties.
honorary military organization, con
He also related several Incidents
ducting the election.
of human distress he encountered
Saturday a committee of local
which made one realize the serious
newspaper men will select the Milness of the flood.
itary Ball Queen and her two at
Other staff members of the radio
tendants from the nine nominees.
station gave short talks on the ac
The Military Ball Queen will also
tivities. Those who made talks were
become regimental sponsor, with her Near East Interpreter Will Joe Eaton, program director; Pete
two attendants serving as battalion
Em-m- it
Speak at 10 a. m. Tuesday Munro, head announcer, and
sponsors. The remaining six young
Oraft, chief engineer. President
women will serve as company spon
In Memorial Hall; Is from Frank L. McVey acted as toastmas- sors. It was said.
ter at the banquet.
Syria
The"lwenty-nln- e
women students
A musical program was furnished
names were nominated for
whose
The first convocation of the spring during the banquet under the direcselection as members of the group
tion of Will Cross, head of the Uniof nine by their sororities or lnde' semester will be held at 10 a. m. versity announcing staff, which inTuesday, Feb. 23, in Memorial hall, cluded selections by the Matinee
pent groups, are:
Alpha Delta Theta Sarah Rena- - with Ameen Rihani as the speaker. Melodies Ensemble and solos by
ker, Mary Austin Wallace, and Mr. Rihani. who will speak on "Pal- Nancy Todd, Oentry Shelton, Mary
Mary Edith Bach. Alpha Oamma estine, the Bridge Between Europe Louise McKenna, and Harlow Dean.
Delta Velma Hardesty, Evelyn Me and Asia," occupies a unique posiAt the speakers' table were seat
Alllster,
and Kathryn Flanery. tion as Interpreter of the Near East ed, In addition to the WHAS staff
Royce. to America.
Alpha XI Delta Gladys
and their wives, Mr. and Mrs. Elmer
Virginia Ferguson, and Jane Mur
A native of Syria, he came to this Sulzer. Dr. and Mrs. McVey, Mr.
phy. Chi Omega Pat O'Rear, Mary country as a boy and became an and Mrs. L. C. Brewer, and Mr. and
Lou Stark, and Mamie Maddox American citizen. Mr. Rihani has Mrs. Gerald Oriffln.
Delta Delta Delta Evelyn Flowers. spent long periods of time in both
Nell Pennlneton, and Katherine countries, observing, writing, and
Mahan. Delta Zeta Mary Neal interpreting languages.
Walden and Dixie Abrams. Kappa
In 1922, the speaker set out on a
Lleon,
Irene trip through the countries of the
Delta
Elizabeth
Kappa Near East with the hope of bringing
Sparks, and Lena Peak.
AAUVV
Kappa Oamma Jean Pat Belt. about an understanding between ri
Dorothy Me- - val Arab kings which should result
Emily Settle, and
Cammish. Independent Ollie Mae in the cessation of conflicts among
Boyers, Ruth Ecton, Wanda Lynch, them and the building up of a unit Physicist Elaborates on the
Louise Nichols. Muriel Rasmussen
ed Arab empire. Sources of infor
Unpredictability of Reand Jessie Roby.
mation which would not be accessisearch; 50 Members at
European travelers were open
ble to
to him, and therefore, he is capable
Dinner In Commons
of speaking of the Near East and Its
problems with authority and underDr. Rose Mooney, associate pro
standing.
fessor and head of the department
a number
has
the Sophie
Camera Club Sponsors Works of Mr. Rihani prosewritten poetry, of of physics of the principalNewcomb
College, was
speaker
books of
and
of Tounn? Photo
which the best known are "Chant and guest of honor at the annual
of Mystics," "Makers of Modern fellowship dinner of the Lexington
Exhibit
Arabia,' "Around the Coasts of branch of the American Association
A group of photographs, the work Arabia" and "Arabian Peak and of University Women, Wednesday
night, at the Commons.
of Freeman Taylor. St. Petersburg. Desert."
Fla., will be placed on display In
Doctor Mooney spoke on the unLibrary today.
predictable result of research. She
the
d,
was introduced by Miss Chloe
These pictures were used at a
meeting of the Lexington Camera
chairman of the fellowship
club at the Art center last night in
branch of the A. A. U. W. More
members
connection with a discussion of
Tau Beta, recently organized hon than 50 attended of the Lexington
the dinner.
"candid" cameras, when Lelca and orary history fraternity, has an branch
Contax cameras were discussed. Ap- nounced the offer of an award to
Besides Doctor Mooney and Miss
proximately thirty members attend- be made to the senior who has Glfford, others at the speaker's
ed the meeting.
shown outstanding ability in history table were Dr. Statle Erickson, Mrs.
This work of Mr. Taylor has drawn other than American.
P. K. Holmes, Mrs. W. A. Price. Mrs.
wide attention. This exhibition Is
At the meeting
the fraternity Frank Murray, Miss Gertrude Flocountry and is the Monday afternoon,of Joe Jordan of ra, Miss Catherine H. Washington,
on a tour of the
first of a number which will be the Lexington
spoke on the Mrs. Hobart Ryland. Mrs. W. 8.
brought here by the Camera club. history of the Leader
Kentucky Oazette, Taylor, Mrs. Ethel Doddlng. of
Mrs. Frank L. McVey,
this being the 150th year since Its Marguerite McLaughlin, and Miss
Mrs.
EDUCATION IN CCC
founding.
UNDER DISCUSSION
This fraternity was organized late Ira Pennlston, of Wllmore.
last fall. The officers are James
GEOLOGISTS MEET
Formulating plans for improving Oliver, president; Jane Auxler, vice- A dinner meeting of Sigma Oamthe education set-u- p In the Kentuc- president, and Donald King, secre
The main purpose ma Epsllon, honorary geology, minky CCC camps will be the principal
of the organization is to foster in- ing, and metallurgical fraternity,
topic of discussion at the all-dconference tomorrow Jhat will be terest in history at the University. was held Wednesday evening in the
with Patio. Prof. D. M. Voung, instrucheld In the offices of L. J. Horlach-e- r, Meetings are h'eld
assistant dean of the College of a speaker or a program relating to tor in the department of geology
and curator of the museum for the
history.
Agriculture.
the
department, gave an account
Those who will attend are Nat
department's recent field trip to
WARREN RECITAL TONIGHT
Frame, national director for the
Guests of the
Sudbury, Ontario.
Fifth Corps area; Paul Williams,
Miss Catherine E. Warren will fraternity were Dan Jones, Joe
state director at Ft. Thomas; and
Smith, Phil Miles, M. H.
present her third recital program of Arvln, Sam
Dean
Reverend Tomllnson.
heads the plans committee, 1937 at Memorial hall tonight at Baugh, Lebus Johnson, David R.
Walt-maSeveral plays, read Berry. Ernest Stepp. John Parsons,
7:30 o'clock.
composed of Professors C. S.
Carsle Hammonds, and Watson ings, and solos will be on the pro Harold Riley, and Hal Schrugham.
Armstrong, all of the University gram. There will De no admission The meeting was presided over by
"fob Grace, president.
charges.
staff.

RIHANI TO TALK
AT CONVOCATION

DOCTOR MOONEY

SPEAKS TO

Library Exhibit
Features Photos

History Honorary
Will Give Award

Glf-for-

Wll-mo- re,

er.

ay

Hor-lach- er

n,

EBLEN'S THESIS PUBLISHED

MONDAY-WASHINGTO-

N'S

The thesis that Professor Eblen
of the University wrote for his 8. J.
D. degree at Harvard which was entitled "Fraud on Special Powers of
Appointment," has been published
in the Kentucky Law Journal, and
was summarized in the January issue of "Current Legal Thought."

By ODIS LEE HARRIS
Monday the "Father of Our
Country" begs time off from the
solitude of his dusty domain, views
the many people and their methods
of tribute to him. and in probability sniggers up his sleeve to the
tune of "How 'm I Doin'?"
ROTARY HEARS FUNKHOUSER
Monday Is George Washington's
of birthday, the birthday of the first
W. D. Funkhouser,
dean
Dr.
of
the graduate school and head of president the the United States. as a
that
From
the department of zoology, spoke child, is able time hold aman. and
book
to
before the Danville Rotary club topush a pencil, he is told of the
day at noon on "Rotary Internaman who cut down the cherry tree
tional."
and could not tell a lie. These two

Weather Stops
Spring Grid
Practice

facts are vital to the elementary
education of man. Without them
we would have had no shinning example before us. which to us as a
child cramped our style, and as a
man proved to be nothing more
than pedagogical strategy.
Thare is no particular virtue in
being able to say "I cannot tell a
lie," especially If such a statement
Is true. If Washington could not
tell a He. he Is to be pitied rather
than glorified, for such a mental
makeup is Indeed a liability. The
man if there be any who can tell
a He and wont, deserves more glory,
respect, and admiration, than
Washington, the man who

Due to the recent bad weather,
spring football practice has been
As soon as 1' clears
discontinued.
up enough so that the fluid can
dry enough to be in a condition to
be played on, the grlddert will resume their spring conditioning. Any
student wishing to come out fur
football team may report now, and
"couldn't."
get his equipment.

All-Camp-

Hop

us

Set For Tonight

STAFF FOR WORK

Lee

Nine Candidates for Honor
To Be Chosen from Submitted List of

WHAS

Oarth House and his orchestra
furnish music for the second
dance of the semester to be held tonight from 8 un-t- il
10:30 o'clock in the Alumni
I1I

gymnasium.
Price of admission will remain
at 25 cents per couple or stag. All
funds derived from these dances
re added to the student loan
fund.

Catherine Toomay, Mezzo
prano, Ui Be Fea-

So-

tured
Miss Cathrrlna Tmmo,, l
-w .
hit:
soprano of New "York City, will ,aj- be
the assisting artist with the Uni,. versity Mpn'i riis m,, u
aay afternoon musicale at 4 o'clock
111 MemnHn! hoi!
.
n.
nn
Carl Lampert of the department of
W1" oireci tne Glee Club.
Harlowe rvon ti,
director and John Toohey the accompanist. John Shelby Richardson
of the music faculty will be at the
f""1" vi mi.-i- aoomay.
This will be the second appearance of the Men's Glee Club on
the
8undav afternoon
Club quartette, consisting of Jesse
........
i-

s

ubwb mompson, Harlowe Dean Jr., and Robert Dean,
w,ii pirseni, one group or songs.

The program to be presented is as
follows:

I.

Dedication
Franz
Steal Away
.'.'."'Huntley
The Lost Chord
Sullivan
The alee Club

II.

Zuelgnung
Strauss
Nlcht
Strauss
Die Forelle
Schubert
Ouvre ton coeur (Bolero from
carmen ")
Bizet
Miss Toomay

III.

Serenade
Schubert
Miss Toomay and Olee Club
IV.
In Plcardie
Osgood
Sylvia
Speaks
jesse Mountjoy, llrst tenor;
Dawes Thompson, second tenor;
Harlowe Dean Jr., baritone;
Robert Dean, Iwibs.
V.

Horsman
Shaw

Elliott

McFadyen

Clara Edwards
Miss Toomay
VI.
Schubert-Lis- zt
The Omnipotence
Toomay and Olee Club
Miss

Block and Bridle

To Hear Wetherill

Joe Wetherill and his band will
play for the Block and Bridle dance
which is to be held in the Judging
pavilion from 9 to 12 o'clock Saturday night, February 20. The admission price will be 25 cents a
couple or stag.

HORTICULTURAL CLUB
TO HOLD CONTEST
"The Formation of Fruit Buds in
the Strawberry and Practices That
Enhance It" is the subject of an
essay contest arranged by the
club of the University for
students in the College of Agriculture, according to W. O. Hubbard,
president of the club.
The winner will receive a silver
loving cup and will get to read the
essay at a meeting of the State
Horticultural Society in April.
For further Information and reference lists, see one of the following members of the Horticultural
club essay committee: W. O. Hubbard, Fred McOoldrick, Zack Smith,
Hortl-cultru-

al

and James Stephens.
PITTMAVS

THESIS

BIRTHDAY

Seniors Must
File Degree
Petitions

hand.

Seniors who entered the second
semester and who expect to complete their woik for graduation,
either in June or in August, are
requested to make application for a
degree on Monday, February 23.
This applies to all graduate student completing work in June or
in August.
lists are
As the commencement
made from these cards it t very
app'l-atlat
Important to file an
this time. No student will be conapplisidered who has not filed an
cation.
These should be filed in
room 9 of the Administration buildti ll a lie.
His old man would have beat the ing.
EZRA GILLIS, Registrar
"daylights" out of him if he had.
Do-In'- ?"

on

3fi

Invitation to Tournament
Depends On 'Cat Victory
Over Vanderbilt Tomorrow
Kernel"CollegeNightNo.2"
Scheduled For 8 O'CIock

Last

Con-

ference Game; Vandy Win
Will Give Them
I

ROSIl PLAY PRF.LIM
STARTING 7 O'CLOCK

Featuring the Twentieth Century tor, played by Powell, who Incurs
the wrath of "America's Richest Monday Giime Versus Xavier
Will He Season's Last
Girl," played by Madeline Carroll,

Fox musical, "On the Avenue," held
over especially for the occasion.
more collegiate "shorts" of all kinds,
a "bouncing ball" variety, and
"silent drammers" which
give the students an opportunity to
inject their own individual sound
effects, the second College Night,
sponsored by the Kernel, will be
held tonight at the Kentucky theatre.
Coupons will appear in today's
Kernel which entitle the student to
see the special show for the matinee
price. These coupons will be good
until 8 o'clock, at which time the
srjeclnl show will ntnrt
'On the Avenue," starring Dick
Powell. Alice Fave. and Madeline
Carroll, Is a brilliant musical con- cerning the adventures of an ac

when he presents a skit ridiculing
her and her family. Hate soon
turns to love, however, but brings
with it more complications in the
form of the actor's female associThe picture If
ate. Alice Faye.
studded with song hits by Irving

Brrlln.
Students are requested to
their coupon from the Kernel,
for a "College Night" ticket at
box office and present both to

'

clip
ask

the
the

doorman.
More than 500 University students
attended the first College Night held
In jit Friday, and those In charge expressed satisfaction at the enthusiastic manner In which the students responded to this project.

SPEECH CONTEST New Sour Mash
TO BE

TONIGHT

To Be Released
Early Next Week

Winner of O. D. K. Sponsored Scandal and Joke Magazine
Oritorical Match to AdSuggests New Subscripvance to
tion Plan
Tourney
Inter-Collegia-

te

A new subscription

Using the low point system of
scoring, whereby each contestant
grades every other contestant ex
cept himself on a series of stated
points. Instead of the usual pro
cedure of using impartial Judges,
the annual oratorical contest for
men students of the University.
sponsored by Omicron Delta Kap
pa, nonorary leadership fraternity,
will be held at 7:30 o'clock tonight
in Room 111, McVey hall.
The contest is open to all under
graduate men in the. University,
and winner of the event will repre
sent the University in the Kentucky
contest to be
held later, competing with repre
sentatives from Asbury, Berea,
Centre, Georgetown, Transylvania,
Eastern, Western, and Morehead
Colleges. The winner of this contest will in turn go to the interstate contest which will be held ths
third Friday in April with Northwestern as host. A prize will also
be given the winner of the local
contest by Omicron Delta Kappa.
A limitation of 2.000 words on any
one speech, not more than 200 of
which may be quoted material, has
been placed on the addresses. The
subject must be one which the con
testant considers timely and of in
terest.
Ben Ragland, student in the Col
lege of Engineering, was the winner
of last year'a contests.
Arrangements for the contest are In charge
of Prof. W. R. Sutherland of the
department of English, debating
director of the University.

plan, whereby

students may obtain the remaining

issues of "Sour Mash" for
cents, constituting a
e
saving of a quarter, has been
by the editors of the
magazine. The subscriptions may
be obtained from elthsr the pledges
of any sorority or Ross Chepelcff
and Jimmy Hagler.
The February Sour Mash, which
Is expected to be released Tuesday,
candid
will feature twenty-fiv- e
camera shots taken at the Guignol
players' opening night p?rformance
of "Invitation To A Murder," and
other places about the campus.
A "Best Gag of the Month" contest, sponsored by a national advertising firm, will begin In this
Issue.
Prizes will be awarded the
winners.
Dedicated to Valentine Day and
Washington's birthday, the "Mash"
will contain the Bioloeical Dirge,
Personal Files, the Ma.sh Barrel,
and other regular departments. The
usual abundance of Jokes, original
and otherwise, will be Included.
four

seventy-fiv-

Students to Hold

For Wildcats
The Wildcat will face the acid
8 o'clnrk Saturday night when
they meet, the Commodores of Vanderbilt on the floor of the Alumni
gym In what promises to be one of
the mo.'t cxcltinc basketball tilts of
the spa; on. This game will close
the Southeastern Conference card
for the 'Cats nnd nn 'its outcome
will depend the Invitation to the
"Big 13" tournament.
If the Wildcats drop their southern Invaders thev will merit an Invitation. However. If Vandv topples
the Ruppmen. thev are in direct
line for a bid themselves.
Earlier in the season. Kentucky
defeated the Commodores by the
comfortable margin of 41 to 26. but
the Cats expect a tougher assignment than the previous game in
Nashville. With a tournament bid
at stake both teams will have a
fight on their hands.
It is probable that Coach AdolpH
Rupp will start his regular quintet,
which has started a majority of the
games this season. These five men
are Carlisle and Hagan at forwards,
Thompson at center, and Captain
Donahue and Hodge at guards. This
will be the last regular conference
tilt for Ralph Carlisle and Warfleld
Donahue, the seniors of the regular
quint.
Prior to the Kentucky-Vand- y
game will be a contest between the
University frosh and the freshmen
of Cumberland College. This game
will start at 7 o'clock. Last week
the charges of Coach McBrayer
nosed out these Cumberland first-yemargin.
men by a one-po-int
The visitors will come to Lexington
to try to avenge this loss.
Kentucky will close its schedule
Monday night when they engage
the Xavier Musketeers at the Alumni gymnasium. At the first of the
basketball season the 'Cats nosed
out St. X at Cincinnati in an overtime period. Coach Clem Crowe
no doubt will try to even this year's
series by a decisive victory.
There has been some suggestion
game for the 'Cats
of a
with a Kentucky college, but this
has not been decided.

test at

ar

post-seas-

PLANS COMPLETED
FOR FIELD COURSE

Plans for the 1937 field course
held from June S to 20 for major
and elementary students have been
Three hundred students from all announced by the department of
sections of the state will participate geology. The course Is required of
In an instrumental solo and Instrumajor students in their Junior year.
mental ensemble program to be held
The trip covers between 2,000 and
March 26 and 27 in Memorial hall 2,500 miles and includes visits to
and the Art Center.
regions centering around the Ozark
The contest, originally scheduled Plateau of Missouri; Joplln, Miss.;
for Feb. 26 and 27. but postponed Fort Worth, Texas; the Ouachita
because of flood conditions, will be Mountains of Ark.; and Memphis
Judged by Ralph E. Rush, school and Nashville, Tenn.
band director of Cleveland, Ohio,
and William Bell of Cincinnati, both
of whom have Judged other contests
on this campus, and both of whom
have Judged national band and orchestra contests.

Musical Contests

EXTENSION CLASSES SET
Two extension classes, one in psy
chology by Dr. Henry Beaumont of
the department of pyschology, and
one in Kentucky history by Dr. T.
D. Clark, will be held each Tuesday
afternoon at 4 o'clock in the public
library at Covington during the PROFESSOR SUBMITS ARTICLE
spring semester. Prof. E. F. Far- The new Issue of the Law Journquhar will teach history of English al which has recently come off the
literature and contemporary poetry press, carries three articles of inon Tuesday afternoons at the Venterest locally: "Conditional Sales in
tura hotel in Ashland.
Kentucky," by Professor W. Lewis
Roberts of the College of Law; ' InPROFESSOR GETS POSITION
junctions in Federal Tax Cases," by
of the Ohio
Prof. Forrest R. Black, former Lawrence Broh-Kaprofessor in the College of Law, has bar. and "Divisibility of Covenants
Leases," by Hiram
been appointed attorney at the De- In Oil and Gas
partment of Justice, Washington. H. Lcsar of Mt. Sterling, who is
Ftudying law at Yale.
D. C.

Kampus
Kernels

Any sorority, fraternity, or
honorary organization wishing
their group's panel plrture from
the Kenturkian may obtain it by
calling at the Kenturkian office,
room St, McVey hall, between
the hours of 2 and 4 p. m. today.

hn

PUBLISHED

Acceptance by the George Washington Law Review of a thesis
written by Prof. W. H. Plttman of
Tracing our hero through the the College of Law, was announced
pages of history we are soon conyesterday.
Professor Plttman was
vinced that the proper exclamation a fellow at Harvard last year. The
should be "Why, George I" and not thesis deals with the question of
"By George I"
whether the doctrine of precend-en- ts
The reason for such is clear. Imis followed by the Interstate
agine our astonishment at learning Commission.
was at one time
that Washington
engaged In the whiskey business.
And was our ears red? (We hope
not, but if they were, they probably matched his nose.) Imagine
our further embarrassment when
learning that he gambled at poker,
and in all probability shot craps,
for the two usually go hand In
These factors, of course, were not
included in the Washington propaganda for grade school consumption, or even for high school. For
with these factors also taken into
account, the life of George Washington becomes slightly paradoxical,
and his question of "How 'm I
may be one of sincerity and
not haughtiness.
In fact he may be as puwled
about the matter as we are. If he
is, it serves him right for starting
ell this "I cannot tell a He" hokum.
Ha knew darn well why he couldn't

NEW SERIES NO.

inter-collegl- ate

The Bird of the Wilderness

M.

KENTUCKY THEATRE

19, 1937

.,ujr,

Rivulet
Night
Inter Nos
The Flsher'a Widow

8l

Will He Ruppmen'g

Men's Glee Club
Will Appear At
Sunday Musicale

T

TONIGHT AT

KENTUCKY

OF

LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY

Scabbard and Blade

COLLEGE NIGHT

PROF'S VIEWS ON SUPREME COURT

Randall
Doctor
with
interview
which Is an expression of his views
in opposition to the attitude of the

present administration Is printed
below In conjunction with an in-

terview with Dean Alvln E. Evans
of the College of Law In Which he
upholds the stand of the administration. Doctor Randall's state-

ment:
"I am against the scheme to pack
'Pack' has
the Supreme Court.
been used in two different

nnd thus President Roosevelt could appoint Judges to resay Justice Iirancleis and
place
Justice Sutherland should they resign.
"This would not be 'packing' the
Court in the sense now proposed.
It Is a poorly marked political
scheme to over-rithe Supreme
Court's dcclfins which are unfavorable to the New Deal.
"Is any one so naive as to think
that those in power have suddenly
become solicitous about infusing
new blood Into the Court and increasing the number in order to expedite the work? Facts recently
published show that it is not the
older fudges generally who are
behind "In their work, and as far us
fifteen JudRea expediting the decisions, the probability Is that the
opposite result would come to pass,
since it would mean that many
more views of Judges entering Into
the decisions.
"No, the real purpose plain to
anyone who is willing to see Is to
compel legislation regardless of the
Interpretation of laws and constitutions by the Supreme Court, the
proper body under our form of government to make such interrelatocourecl.

By E. II. MTEHSLER

"It is a poorly masked political
the Supreme
scheme to over-ri-de
Court's decisions which are unfavorable to the New Deal."
This is one of the statements
taken from an Interview with Dr.
Flank H. Randall of the College of
Law in which he was asked to express his opinions upon the attitude of the present administration
toward the 6upreme Court. The

senses;

de

first, merely to fill the vacancies,
arising in the ordinary course
through death or resignation, with
Judges wo will probably be favorable toThe party in power: ana
second, to increase the number of
the court sufficiently to allow the
party in power to control the court.
President Grant appointed two ions.
(Continued on Page Four)
Judges to fill vacancies that had

Pryor
society will
meet at 7:15 o clock Monday night
In the basement of the Archaeolo-Klc- al
museum. Pr. W. 8. Webb of
the department of physics will be
the speaker.
al

The Worship Group of the Y. W.
A. will mct at 3 p. m. at the
Woman's building Monday. Anna
Jane McChesney will be In charge
of the program.
C.

The Music Group of the V. W.

C. A. will meet

at

3 p.

m. In

the

music room of the library on Monday. They will listen to records of
"Tristan and Isolde" in connection
with their study of opera this semester.

The Men's Student Council will
meet at 4 p. m. Monday afternoon
In the office of Dean T. T. Jones.

There will be an open house for
all Independent men from 4 to 6
o'clock this afternoon at the Women's building.
Any women student desiring
work in a downtown More
plra.-apply at the Kernel
business offlce.
Kentucky

chapter of Sigma Xi

will hold a meeting at 7 o'clock tonight In room Joo of the C. 6e P.
building. Dr. W. D. Valleau will

discuss "The Role of the Gene in
the Theory of Evolution."

* Best Copy
THE KENTUCKY

Page Two

THE KENTUCKY

KERNEL

OP THE iTUPKtTTS
UNIVERSITY
OF KENTUOKT

OfTJOlAL NEWSPAPER
THE

OF

MEMBER- Board of Oommerre
Kentucky Iniereolleiiete Preee AMOclatlon

member ef tht Major OoIIt Publication. represented by
E.
Hill Co., 416 Lexington Ave, New York City;
Warker Drive, Chlraco: Call Building, Ban Francisco; 41 Will-oo- d
Blvd., Lot Angelea; 1004 Second Avt., Seattle.
A

i. Nome

COMPLETE CAMPUS COVERAGE
Executive BoD
Editor-in-Chie- f

Editorial
Associate
Assistant
Assistant

Business Manager

Adviser
Editor
Managing
Editor

Betty Earle
Theo Nadelsteln
William B. Arthur
Oeorge Turner

Editor

Eleanor Randolph

Society Editor
SPECIAL

Oeorge Ktrlar
J. B. Feulconer
Bobby Evan

WRITERS

SPORTS WRITERS
LouU Haynes
Robert Rankin

Tom

Walklna

Mack Hughea

ASSISTANT NEWS EDITORS
Sidney Buckley
Malcolm Pattanon
Raymond T. Lathrem
Tom Humble
CI 9 Bliaw

Advertising Manager

Letter

SrEAKIXG IX SLTERLATIl'ES:
The gal with the bluest eyes is Jane Freeman
...the boy who learns dance steps faster than
anyone else is John Spragcns. . .the coed who
does the most unexpected nice things for other
people is "Freddy" Lucas... the most
pashy tune is "Serenade in the Night"
pos. . .the stoogent with the most
is basketball player Tubby Thompson...
ture
the gal with the cutest peaked eyebrows is Nclle
Nevins...and the saddest feeling you can get
is the one that hits you when you realize you'll
be graduating soon!
pulse-throbbin-

DOX'T LOOK NOW,
trying to start isn't yours!

BUT-ib- at

g

car you're

Ralph Johnton

Franklin Dry den

The Oxford

Nadeutun

g

Managing Editor
Xews Editor

Ike M. Moore

The Camotjs

eer.

Lilniton

George M. Spencer
Ross J. Chepeleff
David H. Salvers

Up

with Theo

ntered t tha Poit Office it Leilneton, Kentucky,
end claei miuir undtr tht Act el March I,

A

Cuttly

Alfred H. Vogel

TELephones: News, 8 s. m. to 4 p. m., Univ.
138. Business, 9 a. m. to 4 p. m., Univ. 74. Bun-da- ys
and after hours, city 2724 or 7542.

HERE SHALL THE KERNEL ALL
STUDENT RIGHTS MAINTAIN
LESSONS IN ABUSE

If the amount of. correspondence this paper
has received concerning the condition of buildings and of the campus in general is indicative
of the seriousness of the problem, we are forced
to believe the problem is a serious one indeed.
The general complaint seems to be that an
of trash, refuge and other waste
particles litters the floors, and that pencil marks
and match scratches give evidence that students
are careless of the use they make of the various
buildings.
As reluctantly as we hate to admit it, it may
be dogmatically stated that, although the barbed
wire fences which surround the campus are an
eyesore, a nusiance, and even a physical menace,
they are necessary. Past experience has taught
the department of buildings and grounds that
students will take short cuts, and in so doing,
will kill the blue grass for which this region is so
famed.
It seems a shame that the' student body
not more regard for equipment than it has.
can think of nothing that would remedy
fault, except of course, the full cooperation

has
We
this
of a

more considerate studentry.

WRITING CRAZE
essayists, playwrights, and those streamMany
lined reocrders, the journalists, have lamented
in print the sickening overflow of people who
think they can write. Magazine editors and
newspaper editors are constantly beseiged by
carloads of articles and swaggering young men
whose literary talents the world waits for anxiously. A situation such as this exists here on
the campus.
The Kernel editors became disgusted with
their reportorial staff at the end of the first semester and issued a challenge to young scribes
who are infected with the prevalent writing
mania, to call at the news room, present a rough
outline of their genius, and take a position in
The number of gifted unthe paper's line-up- .
knowns who romped into the office is amazing.
As a result, we have a new array of embryonic
Brisbanes and George Selah Clarkes.
Another sample of the craze is the mobs of
students who have enlisted in reporting classes,
taking the course in typewritten expression rather than zoology or citizenship. The professors
of elementary journalism play to standing room
Why this sudden nation-widonly audiences.
shift to writing?
Chiefly blamable are the movies which constantly cast the heroic star reporter as a whiskey-loving- ,
nicomaniac who successfully accuses the
editor of disorderly conduct, who solves the
mystery of the Secretary of State's death, and who
society editor. The
always wins the lovely-leggecinematic strangulation of press reality is ap
palling. It is also indicative of the influence
motion pictures can exert.
Next to blame are the many inferior short
stories and essays that have apjeared in exclusive magazines.
What dreamer has never read
some story, some cloud of halitosis, that inspires
him to thoughts of achieving recognition in a
national monthly? It's even money that you
have cralwed through a flatulent article and
easily reasoned that you could have excelled
that bore with a minimum of effort. The uplifting quality of much printed matter exists in
e

that treatise's inferiority.
The final evidence for the cause of the writing
disease is traceable to the fact that people have
taken to reading, studying, and co