xt7s7h1dk87v https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7s7h1dk87v/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19221013  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, October 13, 1922 text The Kentucky Kernel, October 13, 1922 1922 2012 true xt7s7h1dk87v section xt7s7h1dk87v The Kentucky Kernel
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
VOL. XIII

LEXINGTON, KY., OCTOBER

AND SHOOK

CAUFfELD

WILL TAKE KENTUCKIAN
PICTURES

MONDAY,

16

Prizes Will Be Awarded to Persons Selling The Most
Annuals

SEE ALLEN CAMMACK
The

Popularity

Election

Scheduled for Monday,

is

Oc-

tober 23.
Cauficltl
and Shook, the photographing company which has contracted to do the work for the 1923
Kentuckian will send their photographic representative on the camMonday, October 16. Every
pus
student who will be represented in the
annual must sec Allan Cammack,
photographic manager, and make an
appointment to have pictures made
during the two weeks which the photographer will be here.
No pictures will be accepted by the
management of the annual unless they
are made by Caufield and Shook. In
case a student has a print of a picture made last year or the year before by the Caufield and Shook company, it will be accepted but no other
work will be used.
The pictures will be made in the
Kentuckian office in the basement of
the Education building and appoint
ments will also be made in this office
The
for dates for the photographer.
office will be open every afternoon
for information. Members of organ
izations and presidents of all clubs
are requested to inform members of
the date for the photographer and in
sist upon making early appointments.
The popularity election is sched
uled to take place Monday, October
23. The vote will be taken upon the
six most popular girls in the Univer
sity. The contest will open the morning of the 23rd at 8 o'clock and will
close the afternoon of the same day
at 4 o'clock. There will be a ballot
box placed in the hall of the Main
building and voting blanks provided
Each blank will have space for the
names of six girls and a place for the
voter to sign his or her name. Any
vote not signed or else signed by a
fictitious name will not be counted
count. A committee
in the final
selected from the Kentuckian staff
will be appointed for the purpose of
counting ithe votes and after 4 o'clock
no votes will be accepted.
The contest for the sale of annuals
will open the 16 of this month. The
first prize will be an award of $10.00
and an annual, the second prize, $5.00
and an annual and all contestants who
sell as many as SO books will be given
an annual free of charge. All persons interested in ithe contest are
asked to meet Chas. D. Graham, business manager of the Kentuckian in the
office of the Kentuckian, any afternoon after 3:30 o'clock.

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF
BOARD OF TRUSTEES MEET
The executive committee of the
Board of Trustees of University of
Kentucky was in session in the office
of President F. L. McVey in called
monthly meeting as this edition o'
the Kernel was about to go to press.
The date of the meeting was changed
to a week earlier on account of President McVey's absence next week,
when he leaves for Oklahoma to conduct an educational survey of the
state.

MARY GARDEN TO GIVE
CONCERT HERE NOV.

1

Prima Donna Soprano to Appear in
Second Number of Series

ELIGIBILITY

RULES

13,

FOR

-

GARDEN

Kentucky Plants and Flowers
Beautify Space Back of

White Hall
The botannical garden, an innova
tion that promises to gain reknown
for ithe University for its beauty, was
created with the primary object in
view of bringing together on the cam
pus all the wild flowers, shrubs and
trees, native to the state, to be used
as a regular working laboratory for
all students of nature, according to a
statement made yesterday by Dr,
Frank T. McFarland, head of the
Rotany Department.
For ten years the Botany Depart
ment has felt the need of such a gar
den, but all efforts toward the granting of the request were fruitless because it was that there was no suit
able place on the campus.
On the return of Dr. McFarland
from Wisconsin in 1921, his request
for a garden was renewed, and two
acres back of White
and
Hall were granted to the Botany Department for a grass garden to be
used for experiments.
Thru the efforts of Doctor McFarland, W. A. Anderson, and the
botany classes, the field of grass and
weeds of last spring has been almost
miraculously converted into a garden
in which there are now more than
two hundred kinds of plants. Only
about fifty dollars has been spent on
Forty of that amount
the garden.
was used to buy fqneing to keep out
stock. Most of the flowers and plants
have been donated by those interested in the undertaking.
Last spring, when the garden was
started, Mrs. S. Thurston Ballard of
twenty-fiv- e
Louisville,
contributed
dahlias. At that time she promised
to send some very choice kinds next
year. The Rafinesque Botanical Club
donated the canna bed, and Doctor
one-ha-

lf

(Continued

on page 8.)

FIRST YEAR MEN TAKE
GAME FROM FRANKFORT BLUE AND WRITE ELEVEN
Battle Tomorrow

J.

BOTANICAL

No. 4

STROLLER TRYOUT MADE Freshmen Eleven in Fine Trim For DEFEAT

BURKS
Mary Garden will give the second BY DIRECTOR
concert of the Artists Scries which is
being promoted by the Lcxington
College of Music at Woodland Audi- Applications Must be Turned in
Stroller Officer Before Octorium, Wednesday,
November 1st,
tober 24
at 8:15 o'clock.
Mary Garden is international, being
equally as well known in foreign ALL STUDENTS ELIGIBLE
countries as at home. Her name has
been published by many of our lead- Annual "Amateur Night" to Be
Held on Hallowe'en
ing magazines as one of the twenty-fiv- e
Night
greatest living women of the
world.
"Our Mary" she is, for the AmeriJohn Burks, director of Stroller
can people. She dawned on America Dramatic Club, has made rules for
as a new sensation in 1910, and has the eligibility of students desiring to
been radiating new sensations ever tryout for tryouts for eligibility.
Tryouts for eligibility to the Strollsince. Her art is so original and many
sided that it is constantly presenting ers, dramatic organization of the Unia novel, surprising aspect. Such art versity of Kentucky, will begin October 26 and continue through the
is genius.
"One of the most brainy singers 28th.
It is hoped that a larger number of
who has graced any stage," says the
Musical Courier, hitting the key note new students will participate as the
of her marvelous ability to create ii Strollers is one of the foremost orevery role and song, something which ganizations on the campus, and to become a member is an honor which
has i. ot been found in it before.
is and should be highly appreciated.
Mail orders now to Lexington Col
Heretofore, great interest has been
lege of Music for tickets to this condisplayed and it is expected that there
cert. The prices are $3.30, $2.75, $2.20
will be keen competition for memberand 31.10 war tax included.
ship this year.
The season tickets are good for this
The Stroller play, the cast of which
concert. The down town ticket sak- .is selected from old Strollers and
will open in Ben AH Theatre lobby
is looked forward to always
Saturday morning, October 28, at 9 as quite the biggest event of the year
o'clock.
in University
dramatic and social
PLANS FOR IMPROVING

1922

circles. It is perhaps the happiest
memory of college life to those who
have been so fortunate as to have been
members of a Stroller cast.
The tryouts are under the supervision of a committee of Strollers who
will pass judgment on the candidates
This committee is composed of E.
M. Heavrin, chairman; William Blan- ton, James Shouse, Dan Morse, Henry Harper, Bill Tate, Tommy Lyons,
Troy Perkins, Louise Connell, Mary
Mclntyre,
Smith,
Anne
Frances
Hickman.
Short skits will be given from
among these, several of the best will
be chosen to be presented Amateur
night. A prize will be awarded to the
r.ost successful cast.
It has been the custom for the last 8
years for the Strollers to present an
known as "Amateur
entertainment
Night" on Hallowe'en night. All players showing any particular aptitude
are entered on the Stroller list of
and as such will be entitled to
try for parts in the Stroller play.
The following rules will govern the
contest leading up to Stroller eligibility:
1.
The contest is open to any student of the University of Kentucky.
2. Any type of stage performance
will be acceptable.
However, short
one-aplays are preferred.
3. Every aspirant expecting to become a Stroller eligible will be required to have a speaking part in his
or her performance.
4.
Plays should not exceed the time
of ten minutes, although longer plays
will be admitted if cast is of sufficient size.
5.
Manuscripts
must be secured
by those presenting plays. Strollers
will not be responsible for any material used by aspirants.
6.
will begin
Preliminary
on October 26th and last through until October 28th.
Alt entries will be
scheduled to appear some time during
these days by the Stroller committee.
7.
From the preliminary
the three best plays will be selected
to appear before the student body in
chapel on Hallowe'en night, October
try-ou- ts

try-out- s,

(Continued on page 8.)

on Stoll Field

Playing before one of the largest
crowds ever seen on the Frankfort
Field, the Blue and White Freshmen
eleven defeated the Frankfort High
team last Friday by a score of 33-The work of Treacy, Kirwan and
Evans in the backficld was the feature of the game.
The game was hard fought throughout and twice Frankfort came near
the goal line, only to be held for
downs both times by the wall-lik- e
defense of the Green team. Collins,
of Frankfort, was the outstanding
star of his team, being the only one
able to gain against the "Freshies."
The line-uFreshmen
Frankfort
Riffc
Polsgrove
LF
Warren
Kagin
LT
Griffin
LG
Volger
Wolf
C
Johnson
Montgomery
RG
Gayle
Stephenson
RT
Suppinger
Mclntyre
RE
Clarke
Evans
QB
Morrow
'
Sauer
RH
Fend ley
Treacy
LH
Collins
Kirwan
FB
Clarke
Touchdowns: Evans, 1; Treacy 2;
Kirwan, 2. Goals after touchdowns,
vans 3 out of 5 attempts.

UNIVERSITY

CINCINNATI

TEAM

OF

15-- 0

The Fighting Spirit Revealed in
the Fourteenth Annual Gridiron Contest

ENTIRE TEAM STARS
No Misplays by Wildcats ; Touchdowns Rice, Saunders; Field
Goal Gregg

They came, they saw, we conquered." That is the story of the
of Cincinnati tilt last
Saturday.
Fighting against heavy
odds, the Wildcats, playing With the
old fighting spirit, defeated the Bearcats to the tunc of
In the first real contest of the year
the Blue and White eleven demonstrated its worth and showed itself to be
one cf the best in the history of the
University.
The Ohio team started off as
though it would hand the Cats a severe beating, but the whole Kentucky
squad soon stopped the Red and
Black advance and then started a little offensive tactics of their own,
which netted them two touchdowns
and a field goal.
Cincinnati started off "with a rush
LIGHT TEAM DEFEATS PARIS
While one squad of Freshmen were in the opening quarter and after re- rushceiving the ball on the kick-of- f
(Continued on page 8.)
ed down the field, gaining twenty-fiv- e
yards in four downs, only to be penalized fifteen yards for holding. CinFORT! MEN REPORT FOR cinnati then kicked to Gregg. Kentucky failed to gain and Fuller kicked
CROSS COUNTRY WORK over the Cincinnati goal line. After the ball was put in play on the
twenty yard line, McAndrews fumbled
Interclass Meet Will be Held and Colpitts recovered. Kentucky was
Between Halves at Sewanee
held and Gregg barely missed a drop
Game October 28
kick. The quarter ended with the ball
possession in
in Kentucky's
Bob Porter, who captured the Kentucky Intercollegiate
Fest and Sanders Star
Run, held last fall, has returned to
Soon after the second period openschool and with 40 other scantily clad ed, McAndrews again fumbled and
it
athletes, is training for the Interclass Fest, grabbing up the ball, carried
to the five yard line. On the second
Meet. The Interclass Meet will be attempt Sanders bucked over for the
held between the halves of the first touchdown.
Fuller missed an
Sewanee football game Saturday, Oc- attempted place kick in the try for
tober 28. This race will give Coach point. Cincinnati was slowly driving
kick-ofBugheit a line on the material that them down the field after the
when Ferguson intercepted a pass and
will form the varsity team this year.
ran forty yards before he was downed.
The Freshmen have turned out in The half ended with the ball in the
larger numbers than the upper class- Bearcat's possession in the center of
men, but the ability of the older men the field.
is well known while the Freshmen are Chuck and Big Boy Make a Counter
In the second half Kentucky comunknown qualities. It is probable that pletely outplayed the Red and
Bhck
a string of stars will be developed out eleven. Fuller kicked off to Glascow,
of the Freshmen aspirants.
who ran the ball to
where
Pribble blocked
The Sophomores also have a large Cincy was held.
number of men trying for the class Bachman's punt and "Chuck" Rice
scooped up the oval and ran thirty
team, among them Brown, Varsity yards for a
touchdown. Pribble failand Butler and Ogden, ed in the try for goal; score, Kenboth track men.
tucky 12, Cincinnati 0.
At the beginning of the final period,
The return of Bob Porter greatly
lightened the task before Coch Buch-liei- t, the Wildcats started a determined
march toward the Bearcat goal, only
as a team will have to be selected to be stopped on
the tweny yard line.
in time to meet the University of Cin- After three unsuccessful attempts to
cinnati October 11.
gain, Gregg dropped back about fifThe act of the Athletic Board in teen yards and kicked the ball bemaking the cross country a minor tween the Blue and White posts for
three more points. The game end?d
sport and granting
letters to the with
the ball in
teams members is indeed a wise move.
Bear's Toes Was Supreme
Cross country has been recognized as
Fuller
the Cincy kickan important sport in the Western
ers by a large margin, averaging forty-fiv- e
conference, but Kentucky is the first
yards with his boots. Cincinnati
school in the south to give the fall tried ten passes, of
which two were
sport prominence in its athletics. It completed, two grounded,
and six inis safe to predict, however, that cross
tercepted by a blue clad warrior. Kenwill soon become one of the
country
tucky tried seven forwards, complet- minor sports in a majority of the
southern schools.
(Contiuued on page 8.)
Wildcat-Un-

iversity

15--

mid-fiel- d.

Cross-Countr- y

f,

mid-fiel-

two-mile- r,

mid-fiel-

* I

THE

Page Two

Alumni Notes
Alumni Secretary

Editor

KENTUCKY

KERNEL

Mr. Grady has cd in athletics and other activities of
Hoard of Trustees.
body." Wm. Owsley
just completed and is now living in a the student
1317 University Ave.,
new home at 2318 Bonnycastlc Ave. Snoddy
Madison, Wis.
of the
Howard West, chairman
"Just received your card entitled
Executive Committee, has accepted the 'Now,' so will do it now and enclosposition of personal assistant to the ing check for dues. Thank you for
of Joseph Baker Sons reminding mc.'? John E. McClure,
county,
Daviess
& Perkins Co., incorporated,
County Agent,
Bid., White Plains, N. Y. Owcnsboro, Ky.
His family has joined him at White
Plains. They archiving at 151 Waller
l'f
Avenue. Mr. West has been connect"Here comes a stray." Carsic HamLexington Utilities Comed with the
Bremen, Ky.
pany for the past four years and monds,
"The first Kernel for the year reachfriends here regret seeing such a live
worker leave, but extend congratula- ed me last week, and as always, weltions and best wishes for success in come. I am in Frcdonia, Penna.,
again, but not as a home economics
the new business.
teacher. Since August I have been
home making for two only. Yours
'OS
Eugene H. Jun-ki- n
"Am glad to know that enrollment for success." Mrs.
(Effie Lee Gentry.)
of the University promises a very suc"Enclosed find 1922-2- 3
dues. Have
cessful year. May possibly come down
to Home Coming game with Center, changed my name and home since last
November 4." R. H. Gucrrant, In- issue of Kernel, but don't want to
dustrial Appliance Co., 332 S. LaSalle miss a single number." Mrs. Glass
Carrier, (Margaret Sexton), Box 330,
St., Chicago.
Lancaster, Ky.
cx-1-

Baker-Perki-

November election and in the announcement of candidacy for state
office from two to six years hence.
Indications point to the presence
of more than a score alumni in the
There were four
next Legislature.
in 1920 and twelve in 1922. The Attorney General of Kentucky, Charles
I. Dawson, is a former student of the
University and the Secretary of State,
Both are from
Fred A. Vaughan.
eastern Kentucky.

CALENDAR
Lexington, October 14 (Second
Saturday Regular) luncheon, at
12:30, Lafayette Hotel.
Chicago, October 16 (Third j
Monday Regular) luncheon 1230,- -j
Men's Grill, Marshal Field Res- j
taurant.
Detroit, October 28 (Last Sat- - j
urday Regular) dinner, 6:30, Dix- - j
j
icland Inn.
j

O

O

QIVENS IS AIR LEADER

FOOTBALL IMPROVING
Alumni Turning Attention to Sport
Make Big Change in One Year
Football at the University of Kentucky has improved to the point where
the numerous "knockers" have been
supplanted by enthusiastic supporters and only an occasional "knocker"
who usually has constructive criticism
to offer.
Out of a list of 70 outstanding Kentucky athletes compiled by "Daddy"
Boles last spring, 63 entered the University, and not even all of the remaining seven went to the college at
Danville. Center has added some
very capable players to the wonderful organization of last year. The
majority of them, however, are from
beyond Kentucky's borders.
The Athletic Committee from the
Lexington Alumni Club, headed by
Dr. E. Cronly
Elliott,
worked
hard throughout the summer lining
up prospective
students.
Dr. Elliott's associates in this work were
Guy Huguelett, Rasty Wright, Joe
W. C. Wilson, Duncan Hamilton and Harry Miller. Each of them
and effectively
went
into the campaign.
George R. Smith headed the em
ployment committee which was an es
sential part of the campaign. The
slump in income from agricultural
products and the general depression
has held back many prospective stu
dents. Employment has been provided from being janitor for a church to
acting as night dispatcher for a taxi- cab company.
sixty per cent or tnese incoming
athletes are from counties in Ken
tucky where alumni clubs have been
organized. Alumni committees there
and former students in other counties
called on by "Daddy" Boles have
talked "Kentucky" with effect. Edu
cational advantages were not the least
of the attractions played up by these
committees. Less than five per cent
of the squad came from other states
and some of these are relatives and
old friends of undergraduates or for
mer students.
The addition of Jack Winn, all
American lineman and assistant coach
at Princeton for the last two years,
to the coaching staff has made a
change already. Coach Juneau prom
ises several surprises before the end
of the season. His attention is de
voted largely to the backfield now,
While Assistant Coaches Winn and
Buchheit handle the line.
g,

Former Student
Makes Reputation
as Army Flier and Instructor
A Kentucky man, First Lieutenant
will be one
J. Douglas Givcns,
of the entrants in the national air
races to be held in Sclfridge Field,
Mt. Clemens, Mich., beginning October 12.
Lieutenant Givens will fly a Lib
erty motor observation plane for one
of the trophies offered by promoters
of the Pulitzer races.
He was victorious in the acrobatic flying contest
at the American Legion Derby.
Lieutenant Givens left school in the
University in 1917 and survived the
examination for the air corps. He
was stationed in nearly every air field
in the United States, and finally was
made engineering and operations of
ficer at' the Ellington field in Texas
Later he went to Fort Sill, where he
was engineering officer. He is station
ed now at Chinook Feild, Rantoul,
111., where he is head of the air force's
technical school, instructing army pi
lots. He married a Texas girl while
Field. He
stationed at Ellington
comes from Uniontown, Ky.
ex-'1- 8,

'09

most absorbing thing to me is Tarl- ton Combs Carroll, Jr., who will be
ready to enter State about 1936."
C. Carroll, County Attorney of Bul
litt county, Shepherdsville, Ky.
I certainly enjoy the alumni news
in the Kernel. Our family now con
sists of Hughie Jr., 6; Donald, S;
Margaret, eight month." Hugh B.
Sanders, Hercules Powder Company,
Carthage, Mo.
"The Kernel came today and have
just finished reading it. So glad to
know the registration is so large this
year." Susan Grey Akers, 206 North
Wis. Miss
Carroll St., Madison,
Akers is teaching in the University of
Wisconsin Libary School.

Betwixt Us

"Most students of the last decade
will know 'Happy' Haffler, 'Biddie'
Forman were
Ireland and Howard
chums, but 'Biddie' was graduated
first and soon settled down and when
the other two pals played he was ab
sent and four years passed without
Last Saturday
the trio meeting.
morning 'Happy' came to town. He
when 'Biddie'
had hardly arrived
breezed in and then there was general rejoicing. Later the two went to
the Union Station where Haffler was
to get the train to LaGrange. They
were shaking hands in farewell when
a man from an incoming train bump
ed into them and looking up the two
saw Howard Foreman. Never did
Some fa
I hear such ejaculations.
miliar cuss words each threw at the
other for not writing; not coming
back to State regularly; not keeping
appointments and so on but all this
was cut short because Whayne had
to catch the L. & N.; Forman had
to taxi to the Southern station, and
Ireland had to go to the ball game.
Happy had ano.ther glad surprise
that day for he. met a member of his
company that he had not seen since
he left France, but Haffler received
the surprise of his life when he re
ceived a two weeks leave of absence,
Fraternities Plan
November 4 has been selected by the an extravagantly appreciative letter
social fraternities, both men and worn and a very substantial check from his
in recognition o
en, for their fall
in connec company this month
tion with plans for the Home Coming the emergency work he volunteered
football game when the Wildcats meet for during the recent rail strike." X
Center's Colonels on Stoll Field.
'92
Everything will be informal until after the game when a dance will be
Wm. S. Page has been Deputy Col
given at one of the hotels in honor of lector of Customs, Danville, since
1920; prior to that time he was depu
the visitors.
Tickets in the Alumni section are ty in charge of
As far as
being reserved already by former stu- our records show, he has never miss
dents. President Rodman Wiley, of ed paying his dues since leaving the
the Alumni Association, who has University.
He writes: "I am just
been traveling over the state in the reminded that I am delinquent in my
last week, reports an unusual enthus- dues herewith check for $2. Best
g
iasm and indications of a
wishes for all that appertains to the
attendance at the Novem- old campus."
ber 4 game.
sub-por- t.

record-breakin-

'OS

Class Spreads Virus
The class in legislative procedure
has aroused political ambitions in undergraduates reflected already in the
organization of political clubs for the

"In the corral and branded," writes

Mur-phre- e,

'21

Robert W. McMeekin is a special
student in Architecture, Mass. Inst
of Tech. His address is 33 Bay State
Road, Boston, Mass.
"It was my privilege to be in Lexington for the opening of the University this year and I believe the prospects for a 'Greater Kentucky' are
better than ever before. Please send
all back numbers and shoot the Kerne!
up to me regularly. I am expecting lots
of hard work and it will help a great
deal. I want to keep in touch with all
happenings from the beginning to the
'20
end of the year." J. D. Dinning (law
C. W. Gordon is with the Locomo
address,
tive Superheater Go., in their New student, Yale University)
York offices, as experimental engi- 1513 Yale Station, New Haven, Conn.
neer. Mr. and Mrs. Gordfcm (nee
Ruth Duckwall '19) are residing at
'22
Apt. 46, Lencrif Apts., 217 W. 259th "Members of the Class of '22:
St., New York City.
(Continued on Page 5)

"I have little news of interest. The

whole-hearted-

"I have left Sweetwater, Tens., and
am now a fellow at Columbia University. I noticed in the Lexington
Leader that an edition of the Kernel
Please
has already been published.
send me all numbers from the first."
Oscar V. Petty, Apt. No. 1, 854 W.
180th St., New York City.
"I am at Boston Tech., this year,
instructing and taking graduate work.
I want the Kernel sent to me as soon
as possible so that I may keep in
touch with football." E. V.
Suite 4, No. 2 Clinton St.,
Cambridge, Mass.

MATTHEW

A.

MANGiONE

&

COMPANY

The Progressive

SHOE HOSPITAL
My Work and Prices Always Keep Me Busy

'14
"Best wishes for success of old
'Kentucky.' I am now engaged in
rather unusual business, drying en
gineering and contracting and hav
ing a successful year." H. R. Mas
ters, Wolf & Bero Company, 264
Grove Ave., Elgin, 111.

140

SPECIAL

("HOME OF STUDENTS"
Good Things to Eat at All Hours
MR. and MRS. W. M. POULIS, Props.

John A. Keller Co.

ease pain, which no doubt, possesses
you at this time. Hope other alumni
rush to your aid with same quality of
Lecoq
financial prophylatic;"
H.
Nelson, Aassistant State Horticulturist, Raleigh N. C.
17

"Clarence Harney is confined to his
bed atKennelworth Hospital, Ashe-villN. C. It would be fine for the
secretary of his class to bring it to
the attention of his classmates that
they might relieve the monotony of his
existence there. What about an
alumni club here?" Karl P. Zerfoss
16, Georgia Tech. Y. M. C. A., Atlanta, Ga.

e,

'18

W. H. Grady, '05, who is general su
"Enclosed find two dollars, alumni
penntendeut,
Creosoting dues. I left the University for the
American
Company, 807 Columbia Bldg., Louis army in 1917. Please send back
ville, Ky., also alumni member of the numbers of the Kernel am interest- -

Florists

"SAY IT WITH FLOWER S"4
IS REPRESENTED ON
THE CAMPUS BY
--

Albright & Martin
230

Phone 4085

'16
S. J. Caudill, with Mrs. Caudill and
S. J., Jr., four months old, has been
visiting recently in Shelbyville, Ky.
Mr. Caudill is a consulting geologist
and petroleum engineer, with offices
at Tulsa, Okla., 818 Atlas Life Bldg.
"Enclosed find check intended to

ATTENTION TO STUDENTS

University Lunch Room

'15
"I've put rings around the dates
October 7 and 28, and November
and 18, and will try to get up for at
least two, if not more." Carlyne Jef
ferson. National Seed Co., 101 W
Main street, Louisville, Ky.
Capt. John W. McDonald, who has
been with the A. F. G., at Mayen
Germany, is now a member of the
Troop Officers Class, Cavalry School,
Fort Riley .Kansas, and expects to
be there until June, 1923.
'15
"You will observe my change in ad
dress. Have a better proposition with
the Duriron Company than at Cleveland. I regret leaving Cleveland in
many ways and especially that I did
not get to see through the formation
of an alumni club there before leaving. I live with Herman Worsham,
of the 1916 class and want every issue of the Kentucky Kernel sent to
Place,
my address 37 Manchester,
Buffalo, N. Y. N. E. Philpot.

South Limestone

S.

Limestone

Becker

"Cleaners That Satisfy"
CLEANING
PRESSING
REPAIRING
We Cater Especially to University Trade.
PHONE 621-Corner LIME and HIGH
BOB PORTER, Student Representative.
Y

r

BE

HUGHES SCH(X)LOFjDANCING
PHOENIX HOTEL

UNIVERSITY- - HIGH

SCHOOL

DANCE

SATURDAY EVENINGS, 9 TO 12 P. II.
(Smith's Sextette)
Special Rates for Individual and Club Instruction. Phone

547.

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

SOCIETY
Taw Delta Alpha Pledges
anTau Delta Alpha fraternity
nounces the following pledges: Ray
Baker, Owcnsboro; Wilson Daniels,
Thomasson,
Winston
Owensboro;
McFarland,
William
Livcrmorc;
Owcnsboro; Paul Miller, Tampa, Fla.;
Clyde and Carl Coppagc, Bradforda- villc. Tau Delta Alpha occupies the
same house as last year, 336 Harrison

Triangle Chapter Pledges
Kentucky Chapter of Triangle announces the pledging of the following
men: William Austin, Waverly, Ky.;
Ted Benson, Williamstown, Ky.; J.
H. Butler, Morganfield, Ky.; D. J.
Gatton, Owcnsboro, Ky.; Clyde Gray,
Petersburg, Ind.; Blewitt Little, Benton, Ky.; Arthur Nutting, Louisville,
Ky.; C. E. Taylor, Lexington, Ky.;
T. D. Williams, Lexington, Ky.; C.
Ky.; C. E.
R. Henry, Winchester,
Alberts, Winchester, Ky.; Ray Church,
Cincinnati, O.; R. N. Platts, New
Haven, Conn.

Ave.

One of the most enjoyable events
for the women students of the University, is the annual circus, given
under the auspices of the Philosophian
Society. Tonight in the recreation
room of Patterson hall at 8 o'clock
this long looked forward to entertainment will begin clowns "acrobats,"
and
animals"
"wild" and "trained
will hold sway for
two hours of fun and frolic.
All women students are cordially
invited to be present and take part.

Guests For Luncheon
Dr. Frank L. McVey had as his
guests at luncheon Tuesday at the Lafayette hotel, Dr. Frederick Hicks,
president of the University of Cincinnati; Mr. and Mrs. Richard Gilmore
Knott, of Louisville; Prof. Carl Lamp-e- rt
and Miss
and Mrs. Lampert
Frances Jewell.

"stunt-maker-

All young and beautiful (or those vho aspire to be beautiful) ladies
who desire to enter the popularity contest will apply to the firm of Personal Advisors, Inc. Perkins, Kirk, Moore and Whitaker, as managers of
their champagne.
Requirements of applicants: Ladies must be ladies. All ladies must
be between the ages of 16 and 18. (Reason for such is that those under
16 don't know much and over 18 know too much.) All ladies must furnish their own chewing gum while in the office of their managers. All
ladies who wish to enter race must be blond or brunette, no
(Managers to dewomen allowed. All ladies must be perfect thirty-sitermine such.)
All Freshmen girls who desire to make their debut will come early
as there is a special examination for them.
Office: Campus. Hours: most any time, especially in front of main
building.

Whit-wort-

CE

CREAM
"THAT SMOOTH VELVETY KIND"

BECAUSE THEY HAVE CULTIVATED
APPRECIATION

FOR

ITS

AN

WHOLESOME

GOODNESS AND APPEALING RICHNESS.

At Home of Thursday
The University Practice House was
at home Thursday, 4:30 to .5:30 o'clock
649 South Limestone, in honor of the
faculty and students of the department
of home economics.
The rooms were decorated with
pink and white cosmos and the colors
were used also in the refreshments
of ices, cakes and bonbons.
The affair was delightful in all de
tails and in the receiving line were
Mrs. Thomas Cooper, Miss Maybelle
Cornell, Miss Frances Jewell, Miss
Virginia Croft, Miss Nell Hank, Miss
Margaret Coffin.

Party For

'

Remington
Portable

A revelation to every student who is
tired of the pen. Will turn out your theses,
themes and all your writing, neatly, legibly
and quickly.

The most complete of all portable typewriters because it has the Standard Key
board and many other big machine" features. Yet it's so small that
it fits in a case only 4 inches high.
Price, complete with case, $60.

"Everything You Buy at This Store
Must be Right-o- r Your Money Back''

ORED AT RO

Limestone street in honor of their
pledges. The spacious house was
decorated with the fraternity colors,
of buff and red. During the even
ing ices and fruit punch were served
on the side porch.
The dance in

Saves Your Time- --

Hragm Rkmi far Rmf non forukU Typtwrktft
joe tack is a doxm

Everybody's Dessert

a,

Cam-mac- k,

S

REMINGTON TYPEWRITER
COMPANY, Inc.
227 W. Short Street.
Kentucky
Lexington,

every detail was a delightful affair.
were President
The chapcroncs
Frank L. McVey, Dean and Mrs. F.
Paul Anderson, Miss Margaret McLaughlin, Miss Frances Jewell, Prof,
and Mrs. W. E. Nichols, Prof, and
Mrs. Tuthill, Prof, and Mrs. E. S.
Perry and Capt. and Mrs. Marsh.
Among the invited guests
were
Misses Ann Louise Wise, Mary Han-nMary Elizabeth Crafton, Anncllc
Kelley, Ailenc Lemons, Lucy
Edna Lewis Wells, Elizabeth
Williams, Marie Beckncr, Alphonsinc
Stewart, 'isabellc Van Meter, Dorothy Blatz, Louise Marvin, Elizabeth
Lilliston, Elizabeth Glascock, Laura
Hubbard, Lurlcnc Bronaugh, Charl-se- y
Smith, Virginia Kelley, Katharine McAlonan, Frances Stahl, Lucille
Stillwell, Carolyn Nichols, Elizabeth
Messrs.
Ellis, Louise McCormick,
James Shouse, Dan Wile, Harry
Brailsford, Bowman Grant, Sneed
Yeager, Lowell Truett, Gardner Bay- less, Marshall Barnes, Otis Jones,
Thos. Foster, Turner Gregg, Tho