xt7s7h1dnf14 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7s7h1dnf14/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19670209  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, February  9, 1967 text The Kentucky Kernel, February  9, 1967 1967 2015 true xt7s7h1dnf14 section xt7s7h1dnf14 Inside Today'9 s Kernel
A type of cancer, once
thouqht in
curable, can now be treated with
XRays: Page Three.

Cassius

Peace

with housemothers, editorial
suggests: Page Four.

recruiters will be
next week. Page Eight
campus

South Vietnam's education system
fers from the war: Page Five.

The local ACS chapter has been hon
orcd by its national: Pogc Eight

Do away

Vol. 58, No. 91

Arthur Daley comments on
the man Page Si.

Clay

University of Kentucky

LEXINGTON, KY., THURSDAY, FEU. !, 1)7

Eight Pages

suf-

Corps

on

ADDITIONAL VOTING GIVES CODE
NEEDED LAW STUDENT MAJORITY
Kentucky
Ups Funds;
Ranks 3rd
ByRONCHOLSON
appropriations for
higher education from $19,672,000
Boosting

in

to $63,166,000 in 1966-6Kentucky now ranks third
nationally in percentage increase
in aid to state colleges and universities. According to a report
issued by Prof. M. M. Chambers
1960-6- 1

7,

of Indiana University, this increase represents a 221 percent
period.
gain for the
Of the $63,166,000 in appropriations for state colleges and
universities fiscal 1966-6$38,533,000 is allotted to the Unisix-ye-

7,

versity.
According to Dr. A.D. Albright, executive vice president,
the increase in state appropriations is due in part to a "greater recognition by the people of

the Commonwealth and their
representativ es of the role education plays at all levels in the
development of the state' s resources, particularly in the development of the state's human
resources."
Although state aid funds constitute only a little over half
of UK's total budget, the steady
increases have enabled the University to improve overall
On Page

2

Forestry Switch
Angers Faculty;
Exodus Is Hinted
By FRANK BROWNING
Kernel Associate Editor
Faculty members in the Department of Forestry indicated

strong dissatisfaction with proposed changes in the University
forestry program this morning,
and one said his colleagues might
begin to leave if the plans are
not altered.
The controversy stems from
changes made in the department
following the Feb. 1 resignation
of Chairman Boyd Richards due
for the
to "massive
of Forestry."
Department
According to Agriculture Dean
William A Seay, administration
of UK's 15,000-acr- e
Robinson Forest in Breathitt County has been
switched from the department to
the Division of Agricultural Services, the unit which runs other
University farms.
In addition Dr. Blaine Parker,
Agricultural Engineering, was
named temporary Forestry
temporary Forestry chairnon-suppo- rt

chair-name- d

man by Dr. Seay.
Dean Seay stated the departments have in no way been merged, adding "there is no change
in it the department at all. 1

want to further strengthen the
program in ev ery way we can."

However, Dr. Malcolm Dav enport, a professor of forestry, sees
the action in another light. "For
Continued On Page 8

f

TSp

Code Now
To Be Scnl To Facility
Mucli-Delnilc- d

Enough students voted in favor of the proposed law honor
code in a supplemental election Wednesday to
approve the document and sent it to the Law School faculty for review.
Mitch
McConnell, in an
of the code prior to sending it
nouncing the results of the specto the college's faculty.
ial election, said that 88 per-

i

Fasting student met Wednesday at the beginning of a three-da- y
During the noon hour they heard Dr. Richard
Butwcll on the Vietnam war.

fast fo peace.

Peace Fasters Hear
Butwell On Vietnam

cent of the law students had
now voted on the code question and that 135 favored it w hile
112 had voted against.
The results of Wednesday's
vote, in which only student s who
had not voted previously could
participate, were added to the
results of last Thursday's election.

A more recent
interpretation
of what constituted approval of
the code, however, means that
the document would have won
approval even if the special vote
had not swung the majority fur-

HELEN McCLOY
Kernel Staff Writer
Don't expect any kind of solution to the problem in Vietnam,
even when the war ends. And if you want your voice heard in
ther ahead.
national policy making, write your Congressman.
Previously, 51 percent apRichard Butwell, director of
Ky sees likelihood of talks with
proval required only 50 percent
the Patterson School of Diplo- - North Vietnam or the National
plus one vote.
macy, gav e that advice to 15 Liberation Front and wants there
McConnell said that the specstudents and instnictors gathered to be no
ial election was called in order
question of the legiti-fo- r
a lunch of rice and tea Wed- - ,nacy of his government during
to give more students the chance
to vote and in hopes of getting
nesciay, the tirst day ot a national or after negotiations.
"fast for peace."
Continued on Page 7
an even bigger margin in favor
Replying to a question from
In Ash Wednesday Services
the Rev. Douglas Sanders, the
Southeast Asian specialist said
he had no quarrel with pointing
By

"Actually it hasn't passed
yet," McConnell added, "as it
has to be approved by the faculty." If they accept the code,
it will be
to the
students for a final vote to determine whether to put the code
into effect next September.

" It's a coerision deal,
buddy.''
were the reactions of MikeKoval-eski- ,
first year law student,

toward the reopening of the election Wednesday. According to
Kovaleski, "I voted for the constitution in the last election but
I don't think I will this time
and I know a few others who
feel the same way."
"Its a gcM)d thing to have
an honor code and I think we
need it. But I don't think it
will make any dilTeieiice one
way or another in what it says.
I mean how does it look for a
Continued On Page

7

1,600

out the moral implications of
the war the fast's aim, which
"is not done enough times or
in enough places." But while
the fast might serve individual
needs, Dr. Butw ell said he doubted it would have the same effect on Washington as would
"the appearance of a number of
letters ov er a consistent period of
time in The Lexington Herald
and Leader, The
or on Congressmen's desks."
Courier-Journa-

Dr.

Butwell

l,

was not advo-

cating protest. He said five recent world developments indicate to him "a basis for optimism" concerning peace efforts,
and that besides criticizing the
Administration, there should be
a recording "of gratitude for
peace overtures."
The developments Prof.
spoke of are:
An
"almost
complete
about-face- "
in Marshall Nguyen
Cao Ky regarding the early likelihood of a civilian South Vietnamese government.
y Cataclysmic events weakening mainland China.
The revelation that twice
as many U.S. planes 1,172 have
been lost in the Asian conflict
as prev iously acknowledged.
President Johnson's announcement of contingenc y planning to cushion the impact on
the economy of a possible "precipitous end to the war.
U Thant's proposed vacation trip to his Bunna homeland at approximately the same
time U.S. Ambassador to the
U.N., Arthur Cohlberg is making a "fact finding" trip to the
Far Fast
Dr. Butwell thinks the speedup in elections from August or
September to July means that

'Ashes To Ashes
By LINDA CHANDLER
Ash Wednesday-mark- ed
Yesterday
the beginning of Lent.

Approximately 1,600 Catholic
and Episcopal Students participated in Ash Wednesday services
at the Newman Center and Canterbury House.
The sacramental rite of imposing ashes on the forehead in
the sign of a cross is a reminder
of the Christian's death and a
sign of his commitment to penance. The ritual reads, "Remember man that you are dust
and to dust you shall returneth."
The ashes used are burnt residue of the Palms from the previous Palm Sunday. The Rev.
Ronald Ketteler of the Catholic
Newman Center said on "Palm

But-we- ll

...

Dust To Dust9

Sunday the palms are green
boughs signs of triumph and
now they become signs of penitence as one prepares for Fas-

ter."

The Rev. Dudley Barksdale
of the Canterbury House quoted

the Lenten Bulletin, concerning
the purpose and explanation of
Ash
Wednesday "Remember,
with these words and the imposition of ashes, generation after
generation of Christians have
been reminded of one of the most
obvious and one of the most
avoided facts of human living.
Try as we may to forget or to
gloss over it with pretty phrases,
the one thing of which we can
be certain, as we live, is that
we are going to die. Ash Wednes

c
tti

-

ft
ill

,

'

L-

ft

40-da- y

Continued On Page

n

m

7

n

iPv;: A
Ff""

t

day puts this fact squarely before us. We are going to die
and we are going to have to face
God. Lent gives us, each year,
time for evaluating our liv es and
for recentering them on God."
Father Barksdale said that the
use of ashes derives from the
finity of man, "ashes to ashes,
dust to dust." The ashes symbolize death and the influence
of time on man.
Ash Wednesday begins the
fast period of Lent. The
period for fasting began as a
ceremony for those who were to
be baptized on Easter Eve. Later
it was lengthened to one week,
from Palm Sunday to Easter Sunday and held for all members

I

J U,

i

rt

7

'

..v Wv viu.iiiu; Jiuuuiu miiu luiuny ai- - Luuiey Durksuaie intones the rite ...
are
tended Ash Wednesday sen ices at the Catholic dust and to dust you shall returneth you as
..."
Newman Center, left, and at Canterbury House, he places ashes on the forehead of a
penitent
the Episcopal Center. At Cantcbury, the Rev.
Ktfriwl lhoUw Uy Rlck

* Till: Kr.NTl'CKY KERNEL. Thuisd.iv.

J --

IY1.

.

l!Mi7.

Kentucky 3rd In Increase Of Higher Education Aid
appropriations hae
abled the uimcrsity to provide
for an enrollment increase of 9,233
to 13,660 on the Lexington camp.
us from
During thsame
period, community college enrollment increased from 1,721 to
3,32.). Graduate scliool enrollment during this period climbed
from 1,125 to about 1,900- -a 6S
percent increase.
In 1963, the total number of
degrees issued was 1,416 as compared with 2,023 in 1966. The
number of Ph.D.'s grantedjump-e- d

tii

Such

improe faculty recruitment
The effect of increased appropriations is reflected in the
following statistics compiled by
Dr. John E. Barrows, adminis- -

HELD
OVER!

171

t

i

ft

V AWARD
V.WINNER

7j

tj

tio.n

4

6

Timeral-Berli- n

8:00 p.m.

-

SKATING

Fri. and Sat. nights

for Students and Faculty

7:30 'til 10;

Rose Lane

Friday and Saturday
1:00 a.m.

"OPEN STAGE'

Alpha Fpsilon Delta,
honorary, is accepting applications now available in the Zoology Department office in
All who have completed
at least three semesters in either
cr
with a 3.0 overall are
pre-me-

pre-me-

All men and women living
in residence halls (except Complex 5 and Men's Cooperstown)
must make appointments immediately for Kentuckian sittings by
calling 2S25 or going to the Photographer's Service in Room 214,
Journalism Building.

pre-dent- al

d,

Sunday night
Yb
7:30 'til

ROLL-AREN- A

NORTHERN

Omi-cro- n

The final session (Advanced
Test) of the Institutional GRE
will be Saturday. Examinees
should report to the following
rooms according to last name
with ticket of admission, pencils, social security number, identification, and GRE number if
they were tested last Saturday:
Room 108 Commerce;
Dietrich-Lee- ,
Howard, Room 200
Funkhouser; Lee, Patricia-NicholaRoom 148, CP;
Patricia, Room 153, CP; Smith,
Ruth-Z- ,
Room 155, CP.

The

SCOTT'S

Guest Artists
Welcome

Application forms for
Delta Kappa, national honorary for junior and senior college men, may be obtained
Dr.
Maurice Clay,
Alumni Gym, by Feb. 15. A 2.8
overall standing is required.

10 'til Midnight

BELTLINE

Fireplace
Cosmo &

The Counts

s,

Noe-Smit-

FEB. 8, 9

Introducing

NA

NS.
W

:

and THURSDAY

.

.

--

fe

.

.

KS

.

drugs

WAVE
331

SOUTH LIMESTONE
PHONE
Opposite Girls' Dorms

a

254-966- 0

NAVE'S

iU.
3
o

h,

The
are room
following
changes for the Law School Admission Test at 8:30 a.m. Saturday. Report according to last
name: A-Room 320 CP; OS,
Room 317 CP; T-Room 387
CP.

.

Torn Wallace

-- i

Only 164 Steps U
LIMESTONE

r5

-

SO. LIMESTONE

Holmes

A'

W

Patt.

Boyd

Blazer

THE STUDENT'S FRIEND
If you're majoring in classics,

these brown and white saddle
oxfords are a sure way of
stepping to the head of the
class. See it
try it on . . .
and you'll know why.
Sizes 4i, to 9. 12.00
.

V

SHOES

.

.

r.

eligible.

THE SHADES

-

d

Funk-house-

5

Featuring Nightly

,;:

percent).

Interviews for those going on
the YMCA summer project to
Bogota will be held
p.m.,
Feb. 9 and 10, in the Y office.

WEDNESDAY

II
II

six-ye-

Circle K will have brunch with
the Town Girls 10:30 a.m. Saturday at Nexus. All Town Girls
are invited.

X
4,

The largest
percentage gain was registered by
Hawaii (310 percent), followed
bv New York (276 percent), Kentucky (221 percent), Alaska (215
percent), andPennsylvania(2l0'2

7

paiuvisim s suH'iii

Nexus
313

going on to college.

UK Bulletin Board

.

Compared with 11 other re
gional "bench mark" institutions
with similar programs and funcranked at
tions, UK in 1963-6the bottom in all four faculty
salary categories, according to
Dr. Barrows' report. In 1965-6UK ranked above the median in
the three lower categories and
at the median for full professors.
On the basis of incomplete 1966-6returns, it appears that UK
will have improved even more
with respect to its sister institute ns.

t-

oklllElfMIE.

A Coffee House

e

7,

2nd WEEK!

t',"""'J3

Nationwide, the picture for
state support of higher education
is much the same as in Kentucky,
except that gains on a percentage basis arc not quite as substantial. State legislatures have
increased their support by more
than $1 billion, or 44 percent,
in the past two years, according
to Prof. Chambers' report. Dr.
Chambers warns, liowcver, that
these gains though impressive,
are not as phenomenal as they
may seem when measured alongside the increase in total population, the bulge in the population of college age, and the upward movement of the proportion of high school graduates

4,

fBBBB&BIl

TtCHNicoioft

Dr.

ian of $17.72.

5,

now-bein-

'

to

According

with an estimated national med

Advances made in theareasof
faculty salaries and benefits are
especially important with respect
to the quality of instruction and
research personnel.
"This rating puts us in a ery

7,

Elizabethtown,
Prestonsburg,
and Hopkinsville.
Somerset,
Three more colleges are
planned for Maysville,
Jefferson County, and Hazard.
Since 1963, the. faculty, has!
'
i

to 250.

full-tim-

ar

li

e

Albright, the faculty-studecompetitive position nationally.
ratio has been maintained alIt reflects an important trend
most constant at 1:17. The
in the institution which enables
faculty in the community us to recruit and retain able
college system was expanded faculty. It is the president's infrom 74 to 172; the parttimc
tention to further improve this
faculty size rose from 99 to 135. competitive position," Dr. HarIn addition, salaries havebeen rows said.
increased, and a faculty funded
Significant progress has been
retirement program has been es- made on a statewide basis as
tablished. The improvement in well. For example, in 1936-5faculty salaries is reflected in state aid to higher education on
the rating given each institution a per capita basis was $3.66,
by the American Association of far below the national median
University Profesvns. This rat- of $5.72 and the $5.44 median
for the 15 southern states. In
ing is a scale of salaries offered
at various academic levels in 1964-6the per capita figures
each institution.
rose to S10.6S, $10.56, and S12.9J
In 1963-6the AAUP rated for Kentucky, the Southern
UK salaries as follows:
states, and the nation, respective(scale-AA. 13, C, D, and F)
ly. This year Kentucky has jumpfull professors
D ed its per capita aid to higher
D
associate professors
education to $19.95, compared
C
assistant professors
B
instructors
the rating was
In 1966-6B, A, A A for the above posi- -

from 2S in 1963 to 61 in 1966,
an increase of 117 percent. It
is expected that about SO Ph.D.'s
will be granted in 1967, an additional 31 percent increase. The
number of first professional degrees (law and dentistry) rose
from 75 to 173 in the same three-yeperiod.
Other advances made include
the construction of four community colleges since 1963 at

2nd
Week!

full-tim-

These figures
personnel
do not include graduate assiscenttants. The
er staff has been enlarged from
to 723.

en-

1963-66-

6.

VWT

been enlarged from 581

trath c assistant to Dr. Albright.

Continued From !v,e I
Mi ss in tin1 following ways:
1. meet undergraduate enroll-nit'ii- t
im reaves
2. iiK reave graduate enrollment and I'h. I), output
3. extend the eomtnunity college system
4. raise fatuity salaries
5. establish a faculty fringe
benefit program
fi'i

DANCING every FRIDAY

& SATURDAY,

2

Carnally

708 E. MAIN St.,
opposite Henry Cloy High School

THIRD FLOOR

Sat.

Friday
Mag 7

&

Mag 7
The Torques

* M.MUM

.1111.

I

Ioclurk iii's

tmwu mn

rrraBfcttHCRh

tsrcrv

unmsmn

M.K.M.L, llllllsiLlV,

&mMU3aim3L fuiuvratrxwi

vuiutm?A

Ki

By DICK KIMMINS

Doctors meeting at the National Cancer Institute in Hethes-la- ,
Md. recently announced that
Hodnkin's Disease, a type of
cancer once thought to be incurable, can now be cured in
most cases.

Improved diagnostic
techniques have made it possible to detect cancerous growth
almost anywhere in the body,
according to Dr. Charles Zub-rodirector of intermural research at the Institute. "Today,"
he said, "there is more hope
than is generally appreciated."
The disease affects the body's
lympatic system. Often the first
recognizable sign is a lumb in
the lymph nodes in the neck.
Dr. William M. Winternitz,
director of clinical research at
UK's Medical Center, said he
agrees with Dr. Zubrod that
Hodgkin's Disease is now curable. "If the disease is localized, if it hasn't spread to all
of the body, we can, in many
cases, wipe out the cancer."
The National Cancer Advisory
Council, a group recommending
treatheavier dosages of
ment of the disease, says about
40 percent of the patients in whom
the disease is found in early stages
can be cured.
"Our percentage is considerably less than that," said Dr.
Winternitz. "We have many
cases; they naturally come to us
if they are detected east of here."
Dr. Winternitz emphasized
that the cure for Hodgkin's Disease is no instant thing. "We
are talking about 10 years in
some cases, if the disease is localized."
Despite the advances in treatment and cure, knowledge of the
possibilities for treating the disease are not widely known. This
is due partly because of the relative rareness of the disease.
The National Cancer Institute
estimates 3,200 Americans die
each year of the disease.
y

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d,

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Vacation Includes:

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...

The Kentucky Kernel

The Kentucky Kernel, University
Station, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506. Second class
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Published live times weekly during
the school year except holidays and
exam periods.
Published bv the Doard of Student
Publications, UK Post Office Box 49K6.
Nick Pope, chairman, and Patricia
Ann Nickell, secretary.
lU'Kun as the Cadet in 1894 and
published continuously as the Kernel
since 1915.
Advertising published herein Is Intended to help the reader buy. Any
lalse or misleading advertising should
be reported to The Editors.
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The nation's largest group of apparel shops catering exclusively

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I!

* The Kentucky Kernel
The South' Outstanding CoZrgr Daihi
I'MUliMlY OK Kl.MlCkY

ITU

L.

TiHKI) 184

THURSDAY.

l.ihtrritils represent

tin-

-

e'inicTiv

the V.ttaors.

rif

of t)ir

I

FF.H.

9. 19G7

nit i rvify.

bolisli Mouseniolhers
the
maternal
saidTues

Kleven housemothers
da they want the women's hours
system "tightened up." We offer
a better suggestion.
The University should tighten
up its student relations system, and
eliminate its housemothers.
The housemother system at the
University is but one more dreg
not yet siphoned away from the
in loco parentis concept, which
incidentally is being cast aside by
the Faculty Senate and has been
publicly degraded by Vice President for Student Affairs Robert
Johnson.
the statements
Throughout
made Tuesday by the housemothers
is the old saw that certain "irresponsible" women "abuse the privileges" of staying out late and
that thereby the women's safety is
endangered.
Two problems arise immediately.
First, we agree that it is unfair, and perhaps somewhat "irresponsible," for a coed to say she
will be in at 3 a.m. and not show
up until 4:30 a.m., for example.
This poses an unnecessary inconvenience for the roommate or whoever must wait up to let the coed
into the dorm. But, nevertheless,
it is absurd that adult women must
structure their evening plans to conform to a predecided time of returning to the dorm.
Furthermore, as one Pi Beta Phi
coed stated, her housemother does
not hesitate to deny what she considers
unreasonable
requests.
Strange it is that what may be
reasonable on Rose Street may not
be so on Columbia Avenue.
The second problem is the irrationality of thinking UK's frail
females are more vulnerable at 2:30
a.m. than at 10:15 p.m. Streets are
just as well lighted, almost as
heavily populated, and should certain Southern belles desire promiscuity, it is just as easy at 10
p.m. as it is at 2 a.m.
Something then seems to be seriously amiss with the housemothers; that something is logic
and consistency. Far more important than the inconsistencies they
seem to create, however, is the
fact of their presence at all.
Women at the University already have the right to govern their
nocturnal living conditions and
supposedly can change them should
they so desire. They make their
own rules. Vet, in effect, the enforcement of student-createrules
is left to housemothers.
There is no reason, then, why
a more effective, if imperfect, system already used in the men's
residence halls should not be initiated for the women. That is to
choose carefully screened and experienced students to run the living units. To a limited degree Women's Residence Halls use the student system, but they persist in
choosing elderly women as "head
residents" or housemothers, lend
d

care. Careair of
chosen students arc undeniably closer to the problems
faced by their charges and are more
flexible. Furthermore, support is
system
given to the student-ruthe fact that the women's male
by
counterparts run a far more efficient and effective system than
the housemothers do.
Certainly there must be lingering and nostalgic feelings for the
dear housemothers who commandeer maiden sanctity, and we do
not advocate dismissing them all
immediately. Rather, we would suggest that the University phase them
out quickly and remove any decisive or disciplinary powers from
them.
If the University women doper-sis- t
in bringing their protective
d
baby-beracks to school with them,
at least there is no reason why
the
administration
University
should continue as a party to the
infancy.
ing
fully

n

We've Got To Get The

Fat Off Of You"

Letters To The Editor:
To

Citizens Wanted Firing Of CaVs Kerr
a
their interests

the Editor of the Kernel:

Recent articles in the Kernel
have carried statements that said,
"The regents betraved the people's
trut in dismissing Dr. Kerr." .We
have only been citizens of this
country tor the last 20 years, and
although we haven't followed even
state election in California, we
can't remember Dr. Clark Kerr ever
being elected president of UC in a
popular election.
We very clearly remember the
fall of 1066 when Ronald Reagan
ran tor gov ernor, and ue remember
that one ot the major campaign
issues was the management ot UC
by Dr. Clark Kerr. This was a c lear
and distinct test of Dr. Kerr's policies because Gov. Pat Brown
the policies of Dr. Kerr
betore the citizens of California.
On Nov. 2 the citizens of California were given the chance to
express whose side of the story
they believed, and we all know
how that election came out.
There were several factors that
contributed to the Reagan landslide victory, and one of these most
certainly was Gov. Reagan's outspoken criticism of UC management.
Contrary to the opinion of some
de-tend-

educational

ex-

perts, a university does not exist
tor the expressed benefit of the
faculty and neither does it exist
tor the sole benefit of the students.
A university exists for the benefit
ot the people ot that particular
state. When these people speak it
is the duty of the educators to can
out the ikoplc's wishes (a public
servant is there to serve, not to
be waited upon).
It is clear from the election
that the people of California are
dissatisfied with the handling of

r
school in the area.
Can President Oswald ignore
this group's findings as well as
the overwhelming evidence supporting such action? The present
proposals must be revised to meet
the urgent needs of Northern Kenfour-yea-

:::

are completelv
action because
out the er:r
ifornia citize:

c

their

earn ing
Cal- Be.'!

tucky.
Vincent Fall is
Ft. Mitchell, Ky.

en

ere

I

Northern Community
College Student

llt Nerd

n'r

r resi- Unive:s::y
dent J:hr: Or-th- e
r.di sta'rd that
Universirv
N:
Cormunity G: liege nel errand its
it will
building facilities h':t
two-yeColremain a
or

Just Slop

rrli-rrr-

ar

""J-ru-

lege."

Lack of foresight has caused the
overcrowded condition experienced
now by the Northern Center. University officials are about to duplicate these blunders by ignoring the
need for a four-yea- r
college in
Northern Kentucky.
Dr. Oswald's reasoning is that
the Community College must continue to act as a feeder to the
main campus in Lexington. This
is a worthy objective but it is
being pursued at the expense of
students who are being deprived
of the final two years of their
college education. Which is the
greater good?
The financial burden ol attending the Lexington campus prohibits many students from doing so.
Therefore, their education is terminated alter the two years offered
at the Community (College.
Northern Kentucky is the state's
second most densely populated
area, yet it is the onlv major area

without a

four-yea- r

state-support- ed

school. Even the study group for
the Council of Higher Education
recommended the establishment of

I

riJitin

want to congratulate the Ker-

staff for publishing what I
think was the finest editorial on
the Vietnam war that I have read
in a Kentucky newspaper.
However, it seemed that everything brought out in the editorial
indicated that our nation should
not be in Vietnam. Vet, there was
no assertion that our armed forces
should leave that war-torcountry.
nel

n

I'd like to suggest Nobel

Prize-

winner Bertrand Russell's formula
for ending war: "stop fighting."
To those who say, "Rut we
can't afford to just pull out," I
would ask, "Can we afford to keep
our poverty, our stagnated cities,
our poorly educated?"
If the war was a mistake, as
and a seeminglv increasing number
of Americans feel it was (and is),
the logical thing to do would be
1

to end it and return our men to
their homeland to perform some
useful service to ieople. You don't
correct mistakes by making them
bigger, as the Johnson Administration seems bent on conv incing us.
Confucius said, "If a man makes
a mistake and does not correct it,
he makes two mistakes."
Kenneth C. Vance
in

Graduate student
Communications

* Till' KIATl

South Vietnam Education
System Crippled By War
(c) Nfw Vork

rimra

Nfs

Srrvcr

an opportunity

eo ng.

than

two-third-

s

KI.RM.1., Tlmisd.iv,

I

.

,

lM.7

-

LITTLE MAN ON CAMPUS

t

to

practice the

new system. Two such schools,
at Thuduc, near Saigon, and at
Hue, are already in operation.
The education program in

of

South Vietnamese children have
an opixut unity to receive any
education at all and the percentage shrinks rapidly as one

ascends the ladder through
secondary school, college and
tx)stgraduate studies.
Yet the educational story of
the year in Vietnam involved
not the provision of new facilities but the elimination of old
ones as soon as possible.
At issue are the 13 primary
and secondary schools operated group of dissident ministers from
by the French government in the Delta who felt that Premier
South Vietnam and the 52 priNguyen Cao Ky was too partial
vate schools where the French to refugees from North Vietnam
like himself. The minister of edsystem of education is used. More
than 40,000 Vietnamese children ucation chose to broach the issue
e
tenat a time when
study at these
sion was at its height, in the
institutions, which are considered the country's best.
hope of embarrassing the govLast Oct. 4, the then miniernment.
ster of education, Prof. Nguyen
Subsequently, Ky decided to
Van Truong, proposed to the close all primary schools next
fall and to phase out French
cabinet a plan for phasing out
in the name of nationalism the secondary schools by 1973 when
French schools. In short, he prothe last of the students now enposed that ik) more students be rolled are graduated.
allowed to enter the schools and
It is one of the most painful
that they be closed after the of South Vietnam's paradoxes
that nationalism is often a hindcurrent students had all graduand the
rance to
ated.
French school issue is perhaps
Dr. Tniong also urged that
new emphasis be given to the the clearest example yet.
On a more positive level, one
teaching of Vietnamese history
of the major developments of
and culture. (Some young Vietnamese kixnv more about the the year has been the acceptance
Chateaux of the Loire and the by the Vietnamese of the Americommerce of Marseilles than
can concept of "comprehensive
about the palaces of Hue and education" an idea that has
the cultivation of rice in the been pressed for many years by
the Agency for International DeMekong Delta.)
Closing the French schools
velopment mission in Saigon.
Beginning this year, the
undeniably had, and has, wide
secondary school curriculum
popular support, particularly
among those parents wlio cannot (heretofore largely confined to
afford to send their children to
"academic" subjects) will be exthem. But the issue immediately panded to include vocational and
became embroiled in politics. In agricultural education, drama
fact, politics was the principal art, music, physical education
and civic behavior. It is hoped
precipitating circumstance.
that this will make it possible
Prof. Truong was one of a
North-Sout-

French-languag-

nation-buildin-

Pi
GSV UVD
THE FEW

IVNZRMRMT
REMAINING

XLKRVH
COPIES

g,

h

Vietnam, part of the over-al- l process of "revolutionary development" that was accelerated alter
the Honolulu conference in
reaches down to hamlet
Fel-ruar-

y,

level.

However, aid officials say privately that it will not bepossible
to make a final assault on illiteracy in Vietnam (which may
run as high as 40 percent) until
the war is over and the drain
on resources ends.

W

VYHA

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FOOTBALL? "
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HAVE TO STUDY1

Hue University In Trouble
J
By R.W.

APPLE JR.

c) New York Time

News Service
Vietnam-T- he