xt7s7h1dnf4w https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7s7h1dnf4w/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19630523  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, May 23, 1963 text The Kentucky Kernel, May 23, 1963 1963 2015 true xt7s7h1dnf4w section xt7s7h1dnf4w Alumni Seminar Set:
Communism Is Topic
Wave of the Future or of the Past?"
the sixth an:. mil UK Aluiniii Seminar Ma

form- of

aii

31

l ni

Juflje 1.

1

for the seminar will

Dr. Walter H. Judd,
Ifajov speakers
anci medical missionary,
who will
farmMinnesota Congressman
-The World Amflict Moves to a Climax." in Room MM Ml
apeak
f the Medical Center Tidi-.- at 30 a.m.; and Dr. Philip E. Mo-lefee:ct fellow for the Council of Foreign Relations, who will speali
to America?"
tilt "Khrushchev'.- - N'jv 3t ratify: The Challenge
BntaKUetop.
Saturday a? 10 a.m.
be

uc UK faculty member
.hi speak on various a;ti-- i t
vtet I'nion during tlie : fternoon meeting .
"J:i
ill in the
Hospital Auditorium

the

i

Uai-ei- it

Socio-Politic-

Pram

to Underdeveloped'! Areas."
The opening se.s.-ioof the seminar will be Friday at 9:30 a.m.
the Medical School Auditorium, Room mn 603. Following lunch-M- a,
dkt second session will be beM at 2 p.m. in the auditorium.

Saturday's schedule begins with a legist rat ion and coffee at
piv.dlejop Hall from 10 a.m. to 12. The final msaton will be held
M ''me with Dr. Moaely delivering the major address. President
Fiv.i. G. Dickey will deliver closing remarks.
t 12'.!0 p.m. the Annua; Remriea fir ait will be beM at Spindle
I
Hall followed li 'lie
u.it utinnni mectim;. t he lteunie.il I. in-- t
e held at 0 p.m. in the Bluer Hall Cafeteria.
will
Reservations for the picnic lunch and the alumni banquet must
b made before 5 p.m. Friday. May 31. All reservations most be
i 'ranteed. Reservations may ne made
by calling University exten-- I
i n 2153 or 2154.
lea lure ol tht Alumni Banquet will he the presentation i.t
BeMen tuiiiie CeilMhalti to meaaben si the IP13 M rear) !.- -.
c I Hm presentation of MMfBgaMMi Service Awards to aa4slaadhl
I
mini or citizens.
ill

Mis

UK Extended Programs, is chairman of the
at the sessions and open forums- will be Mis.
Dr. Max Wasaerman, visit tag professor in the Patterson

ar.nar. Piesiding
CMfford;

ir

-

Vv'ilh.. in Jaiiseii. associate

professor .t English and SSSOC- iof the Benkneky Research Foundation; and Dr. Amrv
:.ienbo.sch. Director of the Patterson School of Diplomacy
i

V

.0'--

Mracaar

Capital Punishment
Sah feel Of Debute
if the Student
Tie champtotisl ip ih liat.
Forum, an
ranizatiou of intranMaral speaki is. ill 1),- held at i p. m
the Laboratory Theatre of tin- Fine Arts Building
i

.'

The contestants are finalists
the contest held Tuesday
'J.rt? subject mi the debate
i

CdMTMtMMI
Tw.i name:'

reputtd

were improperly

i.

esterdys

'.ic.r

WBKY radio presenS.ee '
Von:
ers. N. . .. aai Rtehard Roof. Patera, received VtBKY Mike
Aaards at a I'ariio Arts Ocparl-arn- !
hmeheen held Taeada;
afcoiit

ts nn

th'-

kiciiard

Vol. LIV, No.

Kr?;

Resolved: Capital Punishment Be
Abolish d."
the affiraaative
Speak'is
are Howell Brad'., freshman prelaw major from May-fieldand
Robert Green, junior prelaw major from Hhxtman. negative de-brs are Ann Gahbard, sophomore speech major from Roone-vill- e;
and Ring Bush, soph mare
prelaw major horn Salem. Ind.
The content will be Judged by
Varsity debate mm; a is and the
winner- - will receive certificates!

11

1

of

rrs

ity
LEXINGTON, KY. THI
v

Kentucky

KSDVV. MAY

2.5, 1943

1

iM Paget
MM

Villa Madonna President
Is Baccalaureate Speaker
Msgr. John F.
t Villa
president
Madonna College, Covington,
will deliver the baccalaureate
address at the University
June 2.
R1

t)r. Max Milam, assistant professor of Political Science will speak
al
gat "Marxism a.- - a
Theory;" Dr. Stanley Zyzniewski,
s.an. professor of history, on "Evolution of the Soviet Union;"
Or. John T. Masten. professor of economics, on "Soviet Ec nomk
fc!cm: ' and Dr. Robert M Rodes, instructor in the Pattei
School of Diplomacy and Internationa Commerce, on "Soviet Aid

lac

ICE RN"E

will

Cogangamhwn:

tip tL

Rev.

Murphj

Msgr. Murphy, a Lexingtonian,

has been president of Villa Madonna College since 1953. When
he took office at the aiie of 30
he was the youngest college presiof
dent in the Commonwealth
Kentucky. In I960 he was named
a Domestic Prelate by Pope John
XXIII and gtvcn the title of
Right Reverend Monsigmr.
Msgr. Murphy was graduated
from St. Catherine's Academy
uio-jLexington Catholic High

are Chosen
To At lend
orkshop
Dick Ware. University

photog-

rapher, lias been selected to participate in the Second Annual

Syracuse Workshop in Color Photography.
The workshop will be held June
at the Syracuse School of
Journalism in New York.
Participating in the program
will be Arthur Rothstem. technical director ol Look magazine
and Gordon P:irk a free lance
photographer formerly with Life.
The program is open to 30 professional photographers in the
public tield and advanced students planning to enter the field.
It consists of a short course in
color photography and seminars
on the subject.
The area around Syracuse will
serve as background for the pho-

tography.

The workshop is reccommend-e- d
by the National Pleas Photogand
the
raphers Association
American Society ot Magnetae

Photographers.
Tuition for the program

is

1M

which includes room, board and
print processing.

School'. He was ordained to the
Catholic priesthood
in 1U47 in
St Feter's Church. Lrjdngtoa. In
1948 he joined the facultv ol Villa Madonna College and has been
associated with the college successively as instructor, acting
dean and dean, and president.
A
priest and educator. Mon- rignnr Murphy has been particularly in i erected in youth and he
has given his time freely to their
service. A? Villa Madonna College
he has served as chaplain lor the
college and hiah school Young
Christian Student croups and for
the Pamily Relations club. He is
also past chaplain ol the Christian Family Movement and former Family Life Director for the
doicese of Covington, v.hich covers 57 counties in the eastern
area of Kentucky.
From 1957 to 1962 he was on
the advisory board of the Family
I ife
Bureau
oi the National
Catholic Welfare Conference.
Msgr. Murphy has been the
guest of the faculty and students
of the University of Kentucky
Mr Religious Emphasis Week programs.
A chief administrator
t Villa
Madonna College. Msgr. Murphy
ha served with variou professional and educational organizations. He is a trustee of the Ken-tueIndependent oRage Foun-

the Covington Dioees.i

..i-

-l

f

Education. He is alsv . i
r
president of the Rfaeaaaa I 'Ideational Association.
Under the adantntati
D of
Msgr. Murphy. Villa :.:
.4
College has made grea'
He inaugurated an Even.
C
Dtrfetau in 1954.
a Commerce Divi.
1955 and a cooperathe double degree engineering
protran. with
the l'n: er.siiies of Notre Dame,
Detroit, and Dayton. Enri
at Villa Madonna has mort til a
doubled during this tenure. F :.- time faculty members have
doubled.
received
Msgr. Murphy
Bachelor of Arts degree frc.n -Meinrad's Seminary, Indiana
received his Licentiate in Sa :
Theoiouv iST.L.i and Docto:
in Sacred Theology S.T D .1 fn
the Catholic University of Ame: -lea, Washington, DC.

dation.
He has servfd

n term on the
Commission on Colleses and UniversitiesKentucky Association of
Colleges, Secondary and Elemen-tar- v
Schools. He is past chairman
of the College and University Department of Southern Regional
Unit, National Catholic Educational Association and a former
member of international execn-ti-'.
c committee of the college rind
university department.
Al present he is a
of

fbet

) ommc

ii it raw

!i.

Bpwtocrafj

Brew th itt L ea ding

In Student Foil
P.

1

imiii ni

l

Kernel

l ill

EdRea

lii a pcccnf poll
Univei itv students conducted
t. j
Young Democrats Club, conce rning preferences in the IV
ubernatorial prhruwy t)l perci nt favi d. Eda u i
ocratic
T. Ned Hrcatliitt. !S p rcenl fawogi d V i;. Uappj i md
It r. ;.'!! 21
percent w re undi cided.
--

'

(

percent who were un-percent did not state
w
they leaned toward
Chandler or Breathitt. 21 percent
leaned toward Chandler, and 62
percent leaned toward Breathitt.
In a breakdown by numbers.
361 students were undecided. 74
Icannm toward Chandler and 25:
toward Breathitt: 325 favored
1060
favored
Chandler. and
Ot the
cided.

21

17

hither

Breathitt.

Ep$Uon

The new ett'ifer ot Alpha EgaMaa Helta, a pre- medical hanarary. fram the left are. first row.
Mar
Ratcbff. eereiAr. Prisiiia Lymi, presj- -

Dilti

dent; second row. Joy Mason.
reporter,
Don; Kinnegan. treasurer, and Ibwmv Ma. vice
president.

The poll was conducted
nmng
1.746 registered
Democrats enrolled at the University.
Chris (.orman. president al :!!'
l'aiing Dei c rata Utah, iaM that
no attempt had been made on his
part to interpret the poll hut
merely to present its resaits,
The followina students were
polled :
All Kentucky
residents in
all the women's and men's residence halls, sorority and fraternity houses.
a All Kentuckv residents living in Cooper-town- ,
except those
residine in Buildings F and G.
All Kentucky resident- - living in Buildings A and F in
Shaa nee! own.

All the Kentucky
residents
in the Colleue of Law.
01 mi (heal and d m
Samph
tal students .elected at random
lrom the Sttident Directory.
students
nampli poll
ing oft campus selected a' ran
dom from the Student DtrectorJ
Gorman srti(i the students t olled were asked theft Dame, home-'ow-n.

party affiliation, whethgf
d'
and
whether they wen und :v-- x lot
Breathitt, or lor Chandler.
(.orman said seitr i! o. the
;o!l(l uere a ed to Kive
their reasons for their prefer-

'.

they were

ence bat they have not been released because they aright be
construed as tamment by hidi
nun-- ;
and the
rat ( lub.
In a further breakdown of the
result-- , of the 489 students polled
halls 38
in the women's
percent were undecided. 13 percent favored Chandler and 54
percent favored Breathitt.
Three hundred and thirty .he
dents were polled in the mend
residence unit- - O: these 17 per
hi

Certaawad

1

an

Pae f

!cer

* f

THE WPVTt f K

KERNEL. Thursday,

f;.

l

23,

Students For Breathitt

Farullx Members On Subbatical
To IJecoive Supplementary Pay
Etih
mm:;

i

i

Mt

will n vriw m.;;)I

tar

:.'.'!

mt"j"

UK
tee.

'. I".;:,.

H.

the

Charles W.
education,
of Joseph
history, to

nlt

!.

';

I

'

tli
Commit-

total ol

S20.000 is to bring
to
.(., '):i;ic.il
if 80

the
a bujk::1;::.
.r

Mgadai

i

Th e ro

Fiedn ic

be grant

riving

Ttlur.sz
ar's

Art. tot

;

are

-

;

in Paris

..

Backensmith, pin

oe
A LI

ktrta cvMi
a
Ph'i
FOP SAL
- if
tWI

JOB

Purpose of the fellowships
to encourage research achieve-me- n'
in larger projects where
substantial periods of undisturbed time are essential. In most
cases faculty members on sabbatical 'cave receive
rdy half of
their regular salary.
Award- - were based on the qualifications of the applicant.-- - and
on th merit of the research
projects they win undertake.
ts also are eligible
Th
search grants tor
1. assistance
and
aids no", provided

2261.

-

as

Call 2"f

a

Bn

OPPORTUNITIES

Da

rut.

Mil

l.

SUMMED
FOP

S

ml sell b;

u

i

t

Uii
far-

Vt..r.

i

p
VAWlgf)

V

Ma,

31

males
me

4

j

I

.

.

ISM21

ii.tr

to

IU

'
FOR If MT

CMl H

lrac

ihare bath

Dn'rl

Knfttt i or.
ba
nwda
New lacatioa Sll
well. MUdred Cobeti.

J57

i.ioc

TRAVEL Three nale eolit Eiatei piai
nine a I'acttie eMaanoj via rut le-- ir
tetnate caaapanaaM with lailane e
8H2.
23M2
aataiiate. Phone

di'1.'..

tM nontMy. teeaatei atili- -

a

aeteaat.
htlie Rr.: .. ''it
entrance nanr Med school.

4

nana
e

-

taking

-

CM";

Crtevy
F.-

-.

SAT

"Pace's

Delict

Condiicr."

JACKIE GLEASON and
GLYNNS iOHN:

PLUS

Inside was the purse. The letter read: "My husband operates
the ferris wheel. Your purse was
So I n

Avnu

'The

12

KIRK

Hoc!'
I

'

DOUGLAS

tifU Tie;..

i.'Tf

Imc

t.

ir

that are
not free
pnd the

t

Sit- - tf-

Handsome

4.

22 year old Sky Diver

from 1,000 fogfl ard
JIM ARENDER will Free-Famake an actual spo landing inside the pAMllY
DRIVE-Itonight at 7:45. . . . See and mc?- him
in person!
il

FREE
A?

.

.

PLUS

.

AUTOGRAPHED

PHOTOS

the concession stand after the jams
1st RUM SCREEN ACTION.'

ore thing
that

l
I

v

JIM A8EN0ES

here...

in life

per month.

...
3 I1

d;7fe..

sake

rn

5

Mf gaJLuff

definitely
is!

...

r:cE

MiaaMfff

I

SOUTH

oiMaM
GBm

!

i

v

'.

Hope

Fond Lange

t

Boyer
gajgghM

3Wrt(Wni W

TECHNICOLOR

I HATE

ipve
isa

,

NacetkntHHf

raWT'

PAKAYISIOH

HFT

i

2nd Feature

ALSO

CARROLL BAKER

.

O

JTr.

or

rou

Ufesf

eraTrw"

ttr

ocnrerl

WW

Price $1

T.

.SO 68

DRIVE-I-

gvfNT

IjaaW

j?1
"

THEATRE

4 UTILE DEATH EACH
MEMORIAL
HOLIDAY

SALCED0

STUPGE0NJ

AND

PLUS

?-

TONITE-SA-

PARSQNS

DAY

A

-

,

sec

aaaaaaaaaTrTMrTr"-"laL-

LOT GF LOVE EVERY NIGHT!

ADDED

SI IRFRISI
I IM

"LI VI"
c

i

.iag

tat mi

anstv

THURS

BUCKEYE, Ariz. V
Pat
Harve of Buckeye lost her purse
al 8 carnival. A few day- - later
a package and letter arrived.

ADM. 90c
STARTS

rhe
hilariously
mad story
of all the
best things

Call

avallahli
M

poliiaal arganizatioi
Breathitt fo- - O

Nobody Loses

there.

-

tea

IK.

8:10

..." .v--

TUCSON. A::z. 41 When fire
engines answered an alarm tn
downtown Tucson, Arizona Daily
Star staffers Ted Craig and
Chark - Borkhart offered i quick
explanation for the false call.
They had seen a young w jtran.
letter- - In hand, reach up and pttB
the alarm, thinking that would
allow her to deposit the letters m
mail
what she th Nflght was
box.

a spot

7lini-i:VlMi- !

s.

4

s2"!

Mistake

Alarming

iir

SHOWING'

I1M4I

w

-

ieri
and Inst m
li
sponsored b- -

icrubatwj..

239
gftVMKR ROOMS FOR RENT
awM Lime;;
n,nilte room-- , and
22M3t
au.sk aaaaaa. Pteanc

gSJ'tW

lk--

!

CANDIDATE"

MBW.T17TTr7uTLT.

igr mdanl

tmm

ue,
BOOV-S-

aa. V turti 4a. KateK as

Leigh
tn

'THE MANCHUFUArs!

AREA

FIRST

naom.

WaSUng
An-Park

milt be
interrupted for a sons bv a
stuc: in f
tfrs.
srou;
...... s t
the
Breathitt .'..
viewing audience for th oi- quarter ;:ot:: of thl riaSOh
The pro.: :r.

87.

Ft.lr.k

NNt'

,

dis-.--:- .s

-

SK-fM-

iteafMaW

Linda

.:n'-fe-

Wood-all-

King. The

and Kahtn

p.m.

Cliff

of
it.i

altered.

6.

It
hHai

FOR WENT

-

and

-

teeata I
?
u

ir

.

i

r.

wvt::
CTot

tunnel

consisting,

ntfldt-r..- ;
.ivr-.n-

KENTUCKY

HI

K

I

(

WKVT-TV-

4

a,

wsl ini luilr
be arograsa
!
the isaiaging, gsaewssiaa
sue-,
a talk by Mr. Breathanil
tli- - aaaaaa
i
itt.
the bssan
will be lor.duiletl by a panel of

found

PART-- 1

I

teleision

from

students

pru- -

1

la

part-- l
WANTED
this summer Mu-- t be aIUinn t work
entire MMHMf leim. Apply . t dr- Mlation Deafc. Iiarg
' Kl

U

i)er

India.

BOYS

a

r

graai taaugM
.

and

goals

personal

to write
biography
Neef; Roes A. WcW,
write a biography of
Benjamin Ifehrin Briatow; Mary
Ellen Rickey, English, to research
the form and imagery in the work
of George Hei bert
Shelby i. licClay, history, to
hisstudy in Ranee and write
tory of the Negro in the French
We-Indie.-- : Albert T. Lott, psychology, to study the effects of
changing social conditions on the
and expression of
development

SALE

.
o

m

values in
Japan; John W. Dona hoe psychology, to study stimulation effects on hooded rats, and Prasad
K Kadaba, electrical engineering, to study infrared spectroscopy and the Reman spectra in

c

CLASSIFIED ADS
FO

The I' Diversity of Kesrtaekj
student fat Breathitt uill put

IN?

* THE KENTl

Kernel
: ia fast growing to a
Ti.'
clct and with it the social
sea-K- D

has- come to an end. Every

mesas

Ot.e

--

that

to have

!ck1c which
expression
that cnange v ith each passing
:
b,U2 :.
ran slightly
ptlffckfd to parahzed with tear.
UnLruunt'eh the Kernel will not
k ti
ome
be hi. Bad M Kt 1
:.- -.
with its cheery
cf Tfiu:
we
:.. ttM morning
gccd if-.t- h.-- .t
!
i!
Jut in o .io m tr Baasanaag or.
in oi nset mIwoI ll knew
I
.
N .i
ol

fc accompanied

by

tp,

it lou. hj!
!

v.

H

i

hppT
tog
!

It
pm

1

'

'ii'

MMKt

iw

in thi
months.

a

live

I

cam- -

:

.

Page

buck up it does have its advantages. The o.uiet allows you to
get heap.- - of study done, and
those hours, it you study, can
esreally help the old over-a- O
pecially .1 you're hanuing m col-lethread of a standby only
ing.
Seriously if vou an- - planning
to come t'.' summer school try to
find which of your friends an'
planning to come also because
Lexington is pretty quiet during
the summer unci the campus
doe !.'t offer much in til'' m y

Ice p yon occugaappus event
pied. XUoQ will definitely be cut- :!
t
the grass ...
grfatding gar- the class hours.
dtarfns,
A: ernooni wfB be filled with
iurmabg on the c;o:m roofl and
visiting lucky friends rooming in
Blaaei Kail In the evening the
Dinvexsrrj offers excellent opportunities for dating. There is the
E tanical Garden- - for quiet
strolls, and the Sports Center
in qmfet talks. Tov. arris the end
of the summer a Watermelon
Feast and the Summer Opera
W:
production to help you
reheVf the boredom of study
is if you're lucky enough
(that
tc find an unattached male-typ- e
. The
in tie: 'he age of thirty-fiv- e
reason h that the campus i
with teachers studying on
r. chanced degrees.
If yc clan to venture
the
and the
ivy covered buildings
me-hne- d
walks into the great
thriving metropolitan area you
will find a great variety of amuse-BMB- ti
to delight you. Vou tan to
' Um rerunc in the local tk.n- -

t

tm

MEETING
Alpha Zeta
Alpha Zeta will meet at 7 p.m.
today m the Student Room of
the Agriculture Building'. There
will be an initiation ot officers.
s'.x ial Work ( lub
Sue Franklin was recently
elected president of the Sot ial
Work Chib Other officers are
patty ninth, vice pn agent;
Shelbj Hollings worth, secretary;
Betty Crook, treasurer; and Vic
chairman.
Puller, pubttcit

M. IGEM1 NT
eaame Narhsatsi a graduate
... horn
it
Daaamck
Bremen, and a memo r of Alpha
D Ita Pi,
iiiii TFw V ingtan, a
.'.

ma jor

;

I
t

!

a're

v

ii

I

ainy LoMghridge
Kditor
Woman's

town theaters, splash with nine
million other- - in the two public
Is, play miniature golf at the
pi
umpteen coursei surroundtng the
Ilea and take long d:ive.- - in the
cool of the evening. You'll need
the drives to get fresh air since
It lightly warm lit re. It you're
really daring you can go to the
reservoir and sit along us cool
bar.!-.- and disc ill the fate of
man or go to a drive-i- n
movie.
Y till probably do the lattermost
!
have all the
often hrrmst
I.
t
;! PaovjH and jpou can go
-- i ub. 1 hi
area frowns
i ronton
o the rainged look, burmudas
t ft a
hacky i mgb to
'
fin J sc.it poor u.isi pectin!
wiih either a
cabin at the
!k' ur country clnb member-thi- p,
cnfctf ate this per
n. They
will he
"ir biggest .. lul
while you're here.

find anywhere. The Junior League
Hi rse Show which take.s over i
weiA early m July - all things
to all horse lover.-- and a real
must for the student. For the
town iolk it is the high spot of
the summer season's activities.
By now you're muttering to
.
yourself, I'm dying to come
the fun is unbelievable, the social
opportunities immonse. and the
educational advancement unsurpassed. True. true, and the Kernel, your faithful friend, even
appears once a week in an attempt to keep you informed on
the myriad of goings on on campus. You'll be out of your mind
trying to decide what to do next.
It's no wonder, you'll run your-seragged trying to think of
to do. period.
But
something

..

aforehead State
.

trident

ba.

In rses and slso ponserg that most
vital of summer
commodities,
money end a car, the horse shows
. ffer the
best in show- and fain
line! horse fle-- h vou van
man-hj- p

kY KERNEL.

TIuiimI.iv.

:

(aMtaamSi

;.'

--

e.

freshman

a
'

and

a mAmHwr ..i Chi Cmega. to
Davis, a so homore commerce major
the University ot

and the look will
woman's pa
campus wide which will include (acuity, their families, the
activities ot our often forgotten
married student populous. Information on the nine thousand
and nine organization.- - we advertise meetings lor out have no
idea who they are latter all you
might want to join if you only
knew what they were tori and
features on some interesting fob
on campus with age and occupation being no barrier So if you
have any suggestions concerning
things you would be interested
in seeing next fall, aside from
abolishing the pane, please jot
down and mail to the society
editor. I would really appreciate
it since this is your pane and
your interests unci tastes should
be reflected here.
Good luck during exams and
have .i 'ire tt unci profitable summer. See s . o the i ..ll.
be

Alabama from Louisville, and
member of Delta Tau Delta.
Katie t ;h'iami.
to;. a i commerce education major from
and a member of Chi Omega,
Murto Jim iiaau. a graduate
ray sta'e College from Louisville
a meuibi i oi pi Kapp , Alpha.
and
Caeatag Jwsmtaaga, a wphorm
elementary education major ironi
Bt t ea and a member
of Chi
sophoOmega, to Carl Hurst,
more political scienee major from

fed

Jif

i--

:

X

Ccfee

Shop

500 Hoic St

Emma Land's

Beauty Salon
STUDENTS
287

S.

WELCOME
Limestone

Corner of Lime and Maxwell
$15.00 PERMANENT for $8.50

will

make on

to receive TOP CASH for your

f

PftjjKtfi

Alpha Ep.silon.
SWLi I Ml K I
: t lrt
Recently at the anu
m
formal at Rough River,
hat
Alpha Epsilon announced
Bobbie Vincent la tin
AS
Sweetheart for 19'5o- - 14
?
from Louisville and
Chi Omega.
FORM V
.
r
The Chi Oai
annual Spri.n- I cms
da v. 'I he dance waa held at
to, rin Valley Country Club,
daf the Chi O's and their datea
had a cabin party at Sunset
Lcdue on Rerrington Lake.
HKMA1
Kctny BvaSBBj a junior educa
tion majm from Tampa, Ha. ami
: of
:.
:.
Alpha X. Delta. .3
Charles
urat. a senior engjta
neering major from Buchanan.
Dim., ami a mfmbW oi Alpha
Tau Omega.

your final exams, but you can be sure

5P, -

J

t'-'-

What kind of grades you

r.

JS--

Fulton and a member of

You

V?

1xv 2

Social Activities

Social Forecast
B

(

2012 JAN 69
M.P. 23

* Congratulations To IFC
La

(

the

ti'eek,

h

I

ul

to continn. t!i
rush system lif t year. We
t

Si?'

de-- 1

:i

ap-- j

deferred pledging

Hie

mm

fore the defer
t
i n Jiry

Interfrateniity

IkJ decided

s;

i

mm

Me.

c:

tin ittfu

r

n c.

l-

(i
tt

si

i

(

t

-

itffa

i i:if

re

v

s

i

!.KI

s

i!

Is

KM

s

i

i

I

-

ho

I

''
tun.'
!

S

Ill

tit
v
provi
t o tla braterait
sv stem.
inestef, i frat mity
During out
pit dg d 1" men and not om mack his
:i.u!i v aaothei fratenn'tj pledged 23
2.,;
hi. and our) two ittained
rage.
.
do ml want t. see an ov r-emphasis ot the gpeefc systi m, but we

We also would like to urge the
a

J'ist

tb

r

ITU

und hall t
mp
at u
days, tb- u
in was pfc .

m

v

st m fo

pledging

w

each sera ster. !.i thus' and
untrue fresl

s- -i

ited, tli.' , holastii
i,v rage ti t!k' fratt rnities has conthi-italb- y
risen. This semester, then are
two groups on probation. The
Irate rnity m u has iu-i
Bsrased; the fraternity system at the
lT?ivTsity is one l tbi most
ctl in tin nation.
m

nt

i

i

I

T

J

i

t

I

!

'

l

.

I

i

i

'

V.

Id ' t

I

i

.

I

!

it is

due.
The greek system hen at thi Uni-- .
iti '.i il part in
;s i dot s pi
t'.c i tmpus community. There an

tin in.

i

tin IFC li.s
'ii
ft
it. ( iMWfiutfc e lot tu
bo- n qui Aing the
f'
last ic requirement Iw dropped from
t;
average, hack down t.
i

2

t

in. ;i housed ii mam different unit s.
e,
w!ii..?
living undei democratic

.

lli:

administer to tin ii own af-tirs nut take a big load ofl of tin'
University administrators.
We are glad to sic the continuance
of tits' deferred pledging plan and
iioiiv 1. if he qeailtv and ()li.i!itit ot
tin. irateruitv Mian will continue to he
an asset to our college life.

avenge.

request continnalh bounces
v
nimittec to the voting U
fclty, back to the tsaaaaittee, etc. a
trA effective way of veto.
We rememlier a few years ago. he- "i

University Stxipbox

Views On Birmingham

To The Editor:
No one can read reports of the
l
violence m
laost recent
Birmingham, Alabama without feeling
personal shame and umlt. Birmingham must not Ik' considered an
city surrounded h the deep
touth and. for that reason different
I m areas outside the south The vio-1- ',n there is merer) a local example
c: tin national confusion over iute- -

Council and the Mack Muslims, who
have whipped up passions without
regard to the consequences, deserve
unmitigated censure.
Yet another very lame an nip is
to blame as well. It is the mass of
apathetic people who have allow ul
events to get out of hand. These are
the damnable complacents who will
not move until jolted bj violent acts.
When progress has been made after
spectacular Incidents, it has been acmoderate members ot
complished
both sides. But where were fh responsible Negro leaders in Albany
when negotiations
were wrecked?
Where were white modi rates in Misno tb ( He Miss inckb tl
sissippi
It is imperative that responsibU men
L a.! in areas
confront itkm, so thai
progress can be made vtih mutual
understanding and without violence.
have been speaking of th South
because the situation there represents
a veritable powder-keHowever, the
lack ot inter-racicooperation is a
national problem and puMtalitv ol
rights must be secured IpfXJhicago
and New Rochdle and Lexington, as
well as in Birmingham.
No one can honestly deny that
integration and equal access to rights
will come. The trend of recent events
has been in that direction, and it
will continue. The question is. how
long will it take and in what way
will it come about. Will it be pushed
loo last by radical integrations so that
the result is disruption ol the social
structure in the south.' Or will it be
checked to the point (hit Negro
claim! must be expressed periodically
by vi.iletit means? We must .ill reexamine our own position with the
purpose of eliminating the national
shame which is resulting iro n interracial conflict. We all share this
shame, and we must all work to le- -

inter-racia-

isc-lat-

t

it

h

sai

ii

antagoni

ii.tti-

t

I

t ii

too

U.

!.

w

-

U

st

n'

i

1

;

deep-roote-

g.

al

1

d

tl'

1 i Is.

I

-

I.

I

V

A

.

'

-

MEAN

so

NOT

Study Of

Lexington Integration

EDITOR'S NOTE: This i the
ihtrd in a series ot articles dealing
with the prubfenM ol integral ion in
Lexington.
I EE

R

l

irration ilit
loo man) la
matt) h
inabued by indoctrin nm. The
ata ,i n of nation.;! seutiaaaat to
vt ,.!! contributi om attrtu
choked with preiudice, and tlu result
hat
is nusery to countless persons.
Occurretl in Birmingham w.t
riereb
a M'ltex m lilt large stream. It i.s
ecessaiy to torn to the total problem.
Hie blame for conflict over
can easily be placed
the
teet of leaders on loth sides who have
been unwilling to compromise. Leaders of the integration movement at
social
tiims disregard
nastems which cannot be changed
too quickly. On occasions, they have
been unwilling to accept partial
and violence has resulted. Oh
tTie )t!ier hand, ardent segrtgationists
I ive disregarded
fact that Xegroes
t!? nut
to be forc
to
lain in
ol inferiority
a pofeHioii
am more
A
'
tu U fur
to
t ii
rid Wat
ixst-Wc
'
gem
groes, and especialb t!
1954 b
i ig inaturitj iim
I
hi Ii th
ul
r I ' t'
!
! fn
x
b
erpial rig
onomii
rducatii
voting uid
'social advancement; they arc in
ent f. v changi t eaders ou both
must be realistic.
Sw h gn ups the Stn.it nt No
ii .:

msr t0 YOU

ST1NN

I

TT

per uuil than Negroes.

'(
The South' Ontsawrfaig
UxrvERsm of Kentucky

atttw- post offic

FfcHJavi

Unt

5

I

::,J-

-

Meek

Si.

I K :i
rinc tlx

"

s.
A.I.S

IH'l.l
Jack H.

ui 3
u Kkool
A

dUm
.r

iCHCKiL

Gctkri,

Doily

BUttef under the Ait of March 3. 1878.
.tvt during holidayi and exttm.

ltAI

Eiiifi.r

whites

e

lilMH
m

id social

egro ol his
position.

U

tynes' Famous lines, "ft
tumble, tb re's no place
are ludicrous w h
replaced h "substantb

.J

gr
"lillSO
o!

Tb

iit.

!

Kern

la

;

ti

till

m

j

lowest (oiwhti

D

tb

i

I

t

!

lapidate

lh Urhan Kem'wal program will
relieve much ot the pressing housing
mdred
problem of the Negro F
will be razed in a predombuildings
inantly Negro section located north
and northeast ot the central business
district.
Urban Renewal plans to build 473
units, and displaces will have top
to these and also to Federal
Housing Commission apartments.
pri-orit- v

Urban Renewal, however, waH not
solve the Negro hanging problem.
New housing will lie available lor 4T3
lamilii s. But 1,856 Negro families miH
still In !ivmg in unsoe.nJ housmj.

'IT. prkk ot Lexington St gtm
however, is St. Martins Village.
in tb northwest side ci lowjn.
cat)
This Negro subdivisitm w.
a 2e
201 bonaes.
ev

!

!

tiui

1

bt i

futi
iogtoti

Url

was a privati
tpartment building.

There

--

c

while.

vi

it

1.

i

.

'.in ther

of honsing

;it

Forty fous
the Negro o upied units
into this catrgnry, 2'J perceat of

was
egroes live mostb in
Lexington
the older sections "I (own where the
houses were original!) ot poor construction and were crowded together.
Crime is higher in Negro sections,
to the police department.
choice or b)
Negroes, either !
economic force, live mostlv in ;til
Negro areas. There are lew "mixed
areas, Third Stree t and Maple Street
being exceptions.
Negroes are concentrated in the
citv area and tow live outside the city
limits. The I960 census shows that
si percent ol Fayette Count) NeOn the other
groes live ii the
hand. 73 percent ol Fayette County
whites live outside the citv limits.
The c itv s population is 2o percent
Negro, while outskli th citv limits
it is 3 percent.
The general condition ol Negro
housing can be seen from the I960
ct iisus ol housing compili
b) the

of housing
wan
condition
iwei lor the Negm Ot the
fitted miitv 78 percent were
.1
rompaaed to 29 prm.nl

Lome-

we re not tnanv mon

or an

b

il

a

is unch r di vi

whites

w

ant to

is

e

nt t

lewal will

in

i

.,'

!as

i

nt

The Kentucky Kernel
'
t

The-

uiimtMred 3.2 JXTSosis per dwelling
unit. Negroes averaged 3.4. How-ev- ii
the report does not show the
iHunbes of rooms i"r unit. l !:us a
wild be 12 moms or a single
unit

i

theat.

..

new
lopment fen

MUbi

e

i

tan if

in

13f

Sf. .1 trfias.

N

m

grit who

burnt s

* THE

kETl(

kY KERNEL,

Thur

Xfinr

1

ra

lUiission pktys on

k

.

important role in student life.

tyt ffiliulr anttit

Although many students have a rural bad
ground, the Grwek system does mneh to ten
an air of sophistieation.

Br DAVID HAVVFL. Kernel Associate Daily Kditor
You may or may not be familiar with the lovely brochures published by tlic
Vnrversitv to entice ptospective students. The picturesque scenes depicting
horse farms, students stroll ii iiz leisurely across a leafy campus, and crowds
of people actually cheering or watching the action at a football game, arc nice
for effect. Of course they aren't true
These illustrations probably lead many to investigate UK as a future university home.
However, as someone recently remarked, "We could really he an elite
cImm
bene, with limited enrollment and all the advantages of the IVY school
it on! we had a more limited enrollment.
Herewith the kernel suggests one method to limit the enrollment: tell the
lrOi alwwt our school to prospective students.

J

Precision and exactness are the tuulitics thi
the I nii ersity attempts to deveiom in stntlen

Students are never too busy for a little reereation

Students at the I niversity are eneoui tiited to
think creatively, and to be original.

...
i.
Traditionul buildings set in a lovely eanijnis setting provide u no..'
derful atmosphere for study.

tH.

* THE KENTUCKY

6

KERNEL,

Mu

Thursday,

23, 1963

Top Campus Happenings Reviewed

Peterson Dismissal Is Top News Story

B MLfTHE RUNSDOBF, Kernel
latl Writer
The top stories in the Kernel this year c!i;l not invi lv
student body. The dismissal of Dr. Frank D. P
son. ice president for business administration, after an i:
Gov.
at
tensive investigation of the
arsje
one K mi
tsitit hi
Bert Po In, holds trx mim
stories.
He was charged v ith usin his position at the University tc
ge followed an investigation
further his personal gain. The
?

which was begun in March. It shi wed Peterson h