xt7s7h1dnf7n https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7s7h1dnf7n/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19660420  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, April 20, 1966 text The Kentucky Kernel, April 20, 1966 1966 2015 true xt7s7h1dnf7n section xt7s7h1dnf7n Inside Today's Kernel

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University of Kentucky

Vol. LVII, No. 123 LEXINGTON, KY., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 20, I960

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Eight Pages

UK receives grant for
gram: Poge Two.

work-stud- y

Student art awards presented:

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Editor

discusses nepotism

rule: Poge

oil again

Graduation procedure announced: Poge

Four- -

Seven.

Medite rranean Tour
Slated For Wildcats,
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Basketball: The
sport: Page Six.

Poge

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By HENRY ROSENTHAL

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The hilHolk live in a world ol their
own: Poge Five.

pro-

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Kernel Sports Editor
Further reports although unofficialindicate that the University's varsity basketball team
will make a Mediterranean tour
this summer. The Kernel has
learned that the itinerary calls
for a departure date of July 23
and a return date of August 28.
Apparently, any conflict with
Coach Adolph Rupp's schedule
of coaching clinics has been
settled. One of the stipulations
of the trip was that Rupp would
accompany the team.
Among the countries that
could probably be involved will
be Cypress, Greece, Iran, Iraq,,
and Morocco. The University
would play teams equivalent to
these country's Olympic representatives, if not the represen-

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tatives.

There is also the possibility

that the team will be involved
in a tournament, in Tel Aviv,
a large city and port in Israel.
If the tour is taken it will

be with the sponsorship and sanction of the State Department.
A State Department spokes-

man said no official announcement would be released at the
present time. Apparently, the
complete plans have not been
drawn.
The State Department official
said a joint announcement would
Elegant from head to toe is Joyce Robinson in this dinner gown probably be released in several
weeks. Both the University and
of imported Damask. She designed the gown in flat patterns class.
the State Department probably
Cold designs are accented by the black background.
will issue information concerning
the proposed tour at that time.
UK Athletic Director Bernie
Shively also said there was no
announcement forthcoming at the
present time.
By CAROLYN WILLIAMS
Should the team go, the squad
Kernel Feature Editor
would be limited to 10 men.
It's not often we hear much about fashion shows where the These will
probably include
models make and design their own clothes. Perhaps that's too bad Louie Dam
pier, Jim Lcmaster,
because in these type style shows, women can get ideas about de- Bob
Tallcnt, Tommy Porter,
signing their own wardrobe and making outfits on a shoestring. Steve Clevenger, Larry Conley,
This Friday UK coeds will be
The theme of the program is Pat Riley, Cliff Berger, Cary
.
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vlivcii iiic uuuuuuuiiy iu lake au- i
i.
Gamble, and Thad Jaracz.
for
"g
vantage of such a show. The clolh
m
aJL
The only starter off this year's
.
Home Economics department
led The
team which was named National
will present its annual Spring wear). It sca
Kentucky-mercChampion by the wire services
Style Show at 4 p.m. in the Com-- Way
Continued On PaCe 7
and finished second in the Na- Building Auditorium.

Fashion Show Set
V.l hltefr
e

UK President John W. Oswald welcomes Coach Adolph Rupp back
to Lexington after "Rupp's Runts" placed second in the NCAA
basketball tournament at College Park, Md. in March.

tional Collegiate Athletic Assch
ciation's basketball tournament
and possibly will not make the
tour is guard Tommy Kron.
Kron plans to be married
during the summer and also entertains thoughts of playing
professional basketball. Freshmen would not be taken on the
trip. Therefore, Phil Argento, who
set several scoring records as a
Kitten will not make the trip.
By going on the trip, UK
will not violate any rules of the
NCAA, which sanctions such
trips. Last year, St. Joseph's participated in a foreign basketball
tour.
UK has had its shareof games
against foreign competition. In
1948, the Wildcats went to the
Olympics as part of the United
States representation. While at
where the Olympic
London,
games were held, the United
States led by the University's
Fabulous Fiv e raced to the w orld
amateur championship. In the
final game the U.S. won over

France,

65-2- 1.

None of the European teams
will get a chance at the Wildcats. According to reports, the
closest UK will get to Western
Europe will be Greece.
The University also made a
tour to Puerto Rico after the
conclusion of the 1950-5- 1 season.
Once again UK went unbeaten
and was not seriously challenged
as it raced through five teams.
A sixth game was called at the
end of the first half with UK
leading the U.S. Navy
The Puerto Rican All Stars,
a team that was pointed at the
6
Wildcats, was overwhelmed
by the Wildcats.
Including exhibition games,
UK won 39V2 games and lost
UK was 36-two. In 1917-4- 8
also centers about
Speculation
a possible tour for another Kentucky school. Western Kentucky
may be headed for a trip to
South
America
during the
summer.
If this were true it would
be the first trip for that school.
52-2- 3.

75-4-

3.

SDX Names Shain
j

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'Prominent Senior'

4 Mi rev

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New members of Sigma Delta Chi, professional
journalistic society, were initiated Tuesday night.
They are, from left, John Ringo, David Salyers,
Larry Fox, John Zeh, Ralph Cherry (partially

hidden by Zeh), Cary West, Bert Rohrer, Frank
Browning, Gene Clabes, Charles Dzicdzie and
John Burnett. Seated is Kenneth Crcen, vice
president of Sigma Delta Chi.

Russell Shain, a senior journalism major from Lexington, was
named Sigma Delta Chi Journalism Society's Outstanding Senior
at UK Tuesday night.
Shain, a sports writer for the Lexington Herald, will graduate
this spring. He has been awarded a graduate fellowship at the
University of Illinois School of Journalism next fall.
The award is presented annually to a senior society member
demonstrating outstanding ability in the field of journalism.
Ken Hoskins, a junior journalism major from Louisville, was
elected president of the society. He will succeed Shain.
Other officers elected were Rick Stephens, a junior economics
major from Frankfort, Ky., vice president; Phil Straw, a junior
journalism major from Athens, Ohio, secretary; anil Terence Hunt,
a junior journalism major from Covington, treasurer.
Eleven men were initiated into Sigma Delta Chi. They are:
Charles Dziedzic, Fulton, N.Y.; Dave Salyers, Louisville; John
Ringo, Lexington; Ralph Cherry, Falls Church, Va.; John Burnett,
Cov ington; John Zeh, Erlanger.
Frank Browning, Willingford; Gene Clabes, Henderson; Bert
Rohrer, Nicholsville; Larry Fox, Louisville; and Gary West,

Elizabethtown.

* 2

-- THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, April 20, 1966

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UK Receives Funds For
The University recently received $512,550 from the U.S.
Department of Health, Education and Welfare for the second
year of its participation in the
student work-stud- y
program.
This sum represents 90 percent
of a fund which will provide
more than 500 part-tim- e
jobs to
students at the University's Lexington campus and its nine community colleges. The University
will add the remaining 10 percent
from its own sources.
"Hopefully half of these jobs
will be on the Lexington campus," said Blakely Tanner, administrator of the work-stud- y
plan in the Student Financial
Aid office. Mr. Tanner explained

-

much as they please up to a
maximum of 15 hours a week
during the regular fall and spring
terms and 40 hours a week during
the summer months if they are
not in school, Mr. Ingle said.
fall."
Also, these students may work
in summer months
"The purpose of the work-stud- y only part-tim- e
program is to provide part-tim- e if they are attending summer
e
school.
work opportunities and
The work-stud- y
summer jobs for students
plan is part
from
families," said of President Johnson's
James E. Ingle, director of the
program and it is through
UK Office of Student Financial
the U.S. Office of Education.
Aid. The students must be regisThe program began on the Lexe
tered
students, and the ington "campus Feb. 15, 1965,
need is based on income, family when $100,568 was granted "for
the final semester of the 1964-6- 5
illness, or other financial problems of the family.
term. During the first full
The students may work as year of UK's participation in
1965-6a similar federal grant
of $318,411 put 300 students to
work.
Mr. Tanner said that students
may work on the various UK
campuses or in projects sponFOR SENT
sored by agencies which are apROOMS For RENT Summer and fall.
under the
Kitchen privileges, private entrance. proved
Call after 5:30 p.m., phone
program of the Economic Op123 State Street.
18A5t
portunity Act of 1964. These
FOR RENT Available May 1 spacious
it
priagencies include
apartment for two girls. $80. All vate
bills paid. Close to Student Center.
organizations.
Call
19AM
Mr. Ingle said his office is
planning a project with the LexFOB SALE
ington Recreational Department,
full-tim-

low-inco-

anti-pover- ty

full-tim-

-

Classified advertisements, 5 cents per
word (S1.00 minimum).
Deadline for acceptance of classified
copy is 3 p.m. the day preceding publication. To place classified ad come to
Room 111 or 113. Journalism Bldg.
Advertisers of rooms and apartments listed In The Kentucky Kernel
have agreed that they will not Include,
as. a qualifying consideration in deciding whether or not to rent to an
applicant, his race, color, religious
preference or national origin.
-

TYPING

MANUSCRIPTS TYPED
IBM, Pica,
Carbon Ribbon, 50c pp. 5c per carbon.
9 a.m.-l- O
Givens, 255-01p.m. daily.

6,

Open 1pm

time during the summer months
can earn $1,200 to $1,500," Mr.
Tanner said, "and this is reasonably close to the student's annual
financial needs."
He said students who wish to
participate in the 1966-6- 7 programs should contact his office
not later than August 1.

but the only
project
in operation now is the one in
eastern Kentucky. This project,
which is in Morgan County, involves those students attending
the Prestonburg community college.
In all programs the idea is
to relate the student's work program to his study or major class
area. "Many of the students work
with faculty members on research
projects. Others work in offices,
on the UK farms, or wherever
they are needed," said Mr. Ingle.
Mr. Tanner said, "The backbone of the program is that it
presents increased opportunities
in academic related fields."
"A student working part-tim- e
during the school year, and full- -

3rd BIG WEEK!
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DARING!...

non-prof-

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1960 Fiat 1200 Spider
FOR SALE
roadster. New top, fired, print, $773.
Jim Floyd, 266-50after 5 p.m. 18A5t

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FOR SALE 1960 Austin Healy Sprite.
Good condition. Must sell. Call 278-29after 5 p.m.
19A3t

EXCLUSIVE

Program

Work-Stud- y

that at present the community
colleges use a larger percentage
of the jobs, but "many of those
working there (the community
colleges) will transfer to the University campus in Lexington next

CLASSIFIED

a

color in the 1966 Kentuckian. Becky
junior from Madisonville, will be printed in
a junior education major from Owcnsboro, is "Miss Lexington" and Patsy
Snyder,
Thomas, a sophomore education major from Owensboro, is wearing the "Riding
Habit." Both are Kernel photographs.

"Inlcrludc", left, "Miss Lexington", center, and "Riding Habit", right
olographs
by Dick Wa re received Court of Honor Awards at the 22nd Annual Convention of
the Kentucky Professional Photographers Association in Louisville, April 16, 17, and
18. Ware is the chief photographer for University student publications and a part-timinstructor in the School of Journalism. "Interlude", featuring Julia Wilkey, an A&S

AS

II

that devours!

10th BIG WEEK!

WANTED

Student familiar
with transit and level, minor survey
or with surveying experience.
ing,
Full time lob for summer. Call
19A2t
after 5 p.m.

HELP

WANTED

W

278-28-

Girl to share completely
furnished efficiency apartment, one
block from campus, for the summer.
0
between
Rent $57. Call

WANTED

254-84-

BIAKE EDWARDS'

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STARTS 7:30

Adm. $1.00

Kentucky Kernel, University
Station, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, 40506. Second-clas- s
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Published five times weekly during
the school year except during holidays
and exam periods, and weekly during
the summer semester.
Published for the students of the
University of Kentucky by the Board
of Student Publications. Prof. Paul
Oberst. chairman and Linda Cassaway,
secretary.
Begun as the Cadet In IBM. be.
came the Kecord in 1900, and the Idea.
In 1808. Published continuously as the
Kernel since 11J.

PMCM

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TELEPHONES

Editor, Executive Editor, Managing
Editor
Mil
News Desk, Sports, Women's Editor,
1130
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Advertising, Business, Circulation XJlt

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The

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Lexington, JCy

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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, April 20, l0-- .l

J. D. Crowe To Sing In Festival

Kernel Photo by Rick Bell

I wonder if it bites, speculates a young
spectator at the opening
of the student art show Sunday in the Fine Arts
Gallery. The
show was highlighted by the presentation of the Anne Callihan
Book Awards and the explosion of a
piece of mechanical sculpture.

Henry, Pattie Receive
Student Art Awards

department in years past. She
was greatly concerned with the
personal welfare of her students.
The award consists of books
on art with memorial plates
inside. The winners are chosen
on the basis of a submitted work
of art and two papers on art
history or criticism. It is felt
that the outstanding student

should be equally proficient in
theory and the studio.
The topic of one of Francis
Pattie's papers was the durability
of material in contemporary art.
This seemed more than appropriate when an electric assembly
entitled "Jack Acid 25" broke
down with a slight bang during

the presentations.

OK Grill
at

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HAVE FOOD
WILL TRAVEL

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Phone
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VINE ST.

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Southland (Across from Post Office)
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Join in the most adventurous experiment of our time. Operation Match. Let the IBM 7090 Computer (the world's most perfect
matchmaker) stamp out blind dates for you.
Two Harvard juniors started it. 100,000 students have done it.
Now you and 3,400,000 college students in 1500 colleges in 50
cities can sign up and join in!
Just send us the coupon. We'll send you the Operation Match
Quantitative Personality Projection Test pronto!
Then return the questionnaire with $3.00. What you're like
and what you like will be translated into our 7090's memory file.
It will scan the qualifications of every member of the opposite sex
from this geographic area. Then it will select the five or more

matches best for you.
You'll receive your names, addresses and telephone numbers
within three weeks. You'll be what your date is looking for. Your
date will be what you are looking for. In other words: the matches
will be mutual.
Dear IBM 7090,
I am 17 or over (and 27 or under) and I want to help stamp
out blind dates. So mail me my questionnaire. Quick!
School

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The concert is being sponsored locally by the
U.K. Students for a Democratic Society. Tickets
are on sale at the bookstores, Palmer's Pharmacy,
Nexus Coffee House, and at the door.

is

a fairly good charcoal exhibited
by Michael McGee. A series of
heavy central diagonals bear
down on everything beneath
them and reinforce the oppressed
mood of the piece. The heavy
strokes and even shading add to
the depression.
There are also a couple of
very good pencil sketches, an
untitled one by Paula Troth and
one titled "With The Roots" by
Elizabeth Oexmann.
The show will be on display
until May 5. The Fine Arts
Gallery is open from noon until
4 p.m. Monday through Friday,
from 7 until 9 p.m. Tuesday
and Thursday, from 10 a.m. until
3 p.m. Saturday, and on Sunday
from 3 to 5 p.m.

There were several op art
pieces in the exhibit. "One Week
Until 3 in the Morning," a black
and white work by Pamela
Sievert, was interesting in its
divergence from the customary
mechanical precision and neatness of op art. Surprisingly, the
coarse execution added greatly
to the visual effect.
A four panel cruciform displayed by Ann Coleman made
excellent use of simplicity and
contrast. The balance of the external form and of the weight

well-know-

University Students and Faculty Only!

Kernel Staff Writer
The first Anne Worthington Callihan Annual Book Awards were
presented to John Henry and Francis Pattie at the opening of the
new student art exhibit Sunday in the Fine Arts Gallery.
ine award was initiated to
recognize outstanding art stu
given to the areas of the two
dents and to honor the memory colors was well countered by an
of Anne Callihan. Anne Callihan assymetry of internal form and
was a central figure in the art color contrast.

A Review

Another Kentucky native on the program is
Edna Ritchie of the
Ritchie family
of Viper, Ky. Miss Ritchie, who now lives in
Winchester, sings traditional mountain ballads
and accompanies herself on a Ledford Dulcimer.
The rest of the troupe will conclude a tour
throughout 12 Southern states with their Lexington
appearance.
The performers will also conduct folklore workshops from 3 to 5 p.m. Saturday in Room 245
of the Student Center. Discussions will include
the history of the music and the relationship
between folk music and the social movements of
the South in this country.
There will also be a workshop on the musical
techniques involved in performing as well as
writing songs. Participants may bring their musical
instruments. The workshops are open to the public
without charge.

Dry Cleaning Specia

By VAN MILLER

"Sunday Morning Studio"

The Festival of Southern Folk Music to be
presented Saturday at UK will be highlighted
by the appearance of J. D. Crowe and the Kentucky Mountain Boys, a local bluegrass group.
They will perform along with previously announced
singers at the 8 p.m. concert in Memorial Hall.
Admission is $1.
J. D. Crowe, a native of Lexington, has performed professionally for 13 years, during which
he has traveled widely. He played with Jimmy
Martin in Shreveport, La. for five years, and then
spent a year in Nashville with the Crand Old
Opry.
He has also appeared at the Philadelphia Folk
Festival. He plays banjo with the group, and
sings baritone.
The other players, all Kentucky natives, include
Bob Sloane, a bass singer, playing fiddle. Sloane
performed previously with the Kentucky Colonels.
Ed Stacey, the lead singer, plays the guitar.
And Cordon Scott, a tenor, plays the mandolin.
Scott is a recent UK graduate in English. The
group has been playing together for about 7
months.

Address

City

State

Zip Code

(DpeirattiioiiD IRHattclh)
Compatability Research, Inc.

671 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts

* "Do You Find Yourself

Antiquated Rule
Hopes are rising that the University may be able to leave one more
archaic link to its first century behind in elimination of the nepotism
rule. This rule now prohibits related
teachers from being hired into the
University's higher academic ranks.
As the rule stands no person related by blood or by marriage to
another faculty member may be
hired by the University to the rank
of assistant professor or higher. A
proposal now before President
Oswald seeks to restrict the limitation to prevention of the hiring
of relatives within a single academic
department and prevention of one
relative holding a supervisory position over another. A further stipulation would deny tenure to more
than one of the relatives.
Although provision is made for
the Board of Trustees to lift the
regulations in individual cases, the
proposed revision itself deserves

A Spark?
We commend the heretofore provincial Student Congress for raising
its head from the sand, joining
with such a worldly organization
as the American Association of
University Professors and sponsoring such a widely noted consultant
as Prof. William Van Alstyne, legal
expert on academic freedom for the

student.
It is encouraging to note that
Congress, which has seen its role
primarily as a doler of petty services, realizes it has some link to
this vital issue in higher education
today.
We hope Congress will continue
to undertake such ventures, and
encourage discussion of meaningful
topics both on the Congress floor
and off.

careful consideration before receiving the traditional stamp of approval from the Board of Trustees.
The proposal rule is an improv-meabover the
of hiring two
solute prohibition
relatives at assistant professor or
above ranks, but it does not go far
hiring
enough in liberalizing
practices.
If the University really is intent
upon becoming a great university it
must allow itself more than the opportunity to first quality scholars on
a campuswide basis. Indeed it must
lift the family fetters everywhere-ev- en
within individual units.
Recruitment and keeping the
best quality professors available is
a major administrative concern. Recruitment abilities are limited by
the arbitrary exclusion of persons
who may be related toother faculty
members. The claim that power
blocks would be set up within a department in which two relatives
taught is hard to defend, since
indication of this tendency in their
backgrounds should eliminate both
from consideration.
Perhaps the key criterion for
consideration has been raised by
law professor Paul Oberst, faculty
member of the Board of Trustees,
who suggests that departmental
chairmen consider first if the prospective teacher would have been
hired were he not related to another
faculty member or applicant for a
faculty post.
The provision that no faculty
member should be placed in a
supervisory position over another
has merit as this would produce an
obvious conflict of interest. A
blanket prohibition of related faculty members in the same department is not, however, the solution.

is moving massively
one of mankind's oldest
against
Presiand crudest
that the
dent Johnson's proposal
United States extend a billion
dollars' worth of emergency aid to
India during the current year is a
gigantic but seemingly necessary
step in that land's present dire
state. We hope that the other
y
nations
fortunate,
around the globe will take up the
President's bid to also dig into their
wealth and surplus and match
America's action.
foes-hun- ger.

have-plent-

now-enforc-

so) clearly calls for congressional
understanding and goodwill.
The very size and importance
of this American gesture (Canada
has also announced that it is sending one million tons of relief grain)
underlines many major issues. The
first is the need to speed up world
efforts to help India solve its own
food problem through more efficient
farming, greater production of
fertilizer, population limitation and
the increase in other products which
can be exchanged for food.
India's terrible crisis is also a
warning to the
nations that even their
tremendous output may not
present
meet the world's needs only a few
years hence.
Again, the decisiveness of the
American action stresses, as few
other acts could, the oneness of
today's world. Asian famine was
once sighed over and then forgotten.
Today it calls forth immediate and
all-oaction. This bespeaks not
a sharper conscience but a
only
shrewder political realization that
all men's fortunes are now inextricably interwoven. Despite setbacks and shortcomings, the world
is a better, kindlier, hopefuller and
more Christian place because of
such acts as this.
The Christian Science Monitor
surplus-food-produci-

Although technically these shipments will not be a gift from
America, practically this will be
the case. India will pay for them
in rupees. But, since the United
States
already has what is
apparently an unusable rupee surplus, much of this rupee fund will
be used to finance further and
American
other types of
aid to India.
Although the administration believes that it already has stand-bauthority to extend this aid to
India, it is seeking congressional
endorsement. This is right and wise.
A billion dollars' worth of extra
aid (other aid to India programs
already in the works will come to
dollars or
an additional
ot

y

half-billio- n

.

nt

Hungry Future?
America

.y

Dit..rlc

ut

Letters To The Editor :

A Kiss Is Not A Kiss
Has anyone ever considered the
many types of those affectionate
caresses, familiarly known as
kisses? Some common varieties are
the parental smooch, the library
touch (with a lot of volume), the
hurried peck, and the fish (does
not come up for air). While the
Italians kiss with their eyes
(occasionally with their hands), the
Eskimos use the ever popular nose
bit. With the Orientals the neck
is the thing (a lot of necking
around in this case), and even
the French have their own peculiar
method.
What the world needs is a universal osculation! This would end
cultural barriers, would cease confusion in mixed families, and would
stop the eternal strife between
lovers (have you ever dated an
outsider only to spend the evening
fighting on how to make out?).
The American Way is, of course,
the best the melting pot of all
romances. The U.S.A. combines
the French without the slobber,

the Italian minus the bruises, and
the fish with a fresh supply of air.
So Kissers for Reform (and some

do need it), protect your lips. Universalize and consolidate the kiss!
HONI MARLEEN GOLDMAN
A&S Freshman

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The Kernel welcomes letters from readers wishing to comment on any topic. Because of space
limitations, letters should be limited to 200 words. We reserve the right to edit letters received.
Longer manuscripts will be accepted at the editor's discretion.
leter ubmitted should be signed as follows: for students, name, college and class and
local7e.
for alumni,
telephone number; or faculty members, name, department and academic
name, hometown and class; for University staff members, name, department rank; position; for
and
other readers, name, hometown and hometown telephone number. Unsigned letters cannot be considered for publications. All letters should be typewritten and double spaced.
Letters should be addressed to: the Editor, the
Building.
of Kentucky, or they may be left In the editor's Kentucky Kernel. Journalism Journalism University
of the
Building.
office, Room 113-A

The Kentucky Kernel
The South's Outstanding College Daily

ESTABLISHED

University of Kentucky

1894

WEDNESDAY,

Walter Grant,

APRIL

20. 1966

Editor-in-Chi-

Linda Mills, Executive Editor

Terence Hunt. Managing Editor
John Zeh, News Editor
Judy Crisiiam, Associate News Editor
Henry Rosenthal, Sports Editor
Carolyn Williams, Feature Editor
Margaret Bailey, Arts Editor
William Knapp,

Business Staff
Advertising

Manager

Marvin Huncate, Circulation Manager

* 1900- -5

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, April 20,

A HOLLOW PLACE
llilljolk Live In A World Of Their Own
Where Poverty Is A Password And Home Is Home
By JUDY GRISIIAM
Associate New s Editor
SOUTH EASTERN
is only a
password in the remote hollows of these southeastern Kentucky hills; hut that password opens
d(K)rs that anyone, save the hillfolk who call it
home, shudder to enter.
One could hardly believe that nestled ut the foot
of the scenic, beautifully-green- ,
rolling hills, are the
dwelling places which tell a part of the tragic story
of people w ho exist there.
They are a people who live in a world of their
own a world consisting of themselves and the
neighbor just over the hill. They know nothing else.
Nor do they seem to care.
As one rides two miles into the hollows on a
watery ereekbed the hillfolk call a road, one almost
understands why they go to town just "once a
yerc.
In spite of their remoteness, however, they are
a friendly people or perhaps just fearful of "outsiders." Their greetings are quick and sincere, but
few smile, and none laugh.
The outsider, who is, without exception, invited
to enter their homes, is sickened by the unspeakable
stench and the unbelieveable filth. In one typical
hill home, I, an outsider, was invited to sit in the
kitchen. I entered, taking care not to step on the
cackling hens who pecked at a sack of grain in one
corner. My eye roamed about the room, noting a
small wood cookstove at it's center, and a small
eating table to the right. There was no other furniture. On the table was the meal for the day:
beans. I gasped as
moldy cornbread and week-ol- d
and
d
son spat indiscriminately
the
on the filthy floor.
persistently
The woman, who looked 90, but claimed to
KY.-Pov-

seven-year-ol-

erty

be 50, stared unmercifully at the outsider who had
dared, even for a day, to enter her world. She
mumbled shyly, but only when spoken to. The
ensuing conversation was a
one, but,
determined as I was to sec for myself the truth
about these people, I persisted.
"Wouldn't you live someplace else if you
could."" I asked offhandedly.
The woman looked up, the wrinkles at her
temples growing deeper. She spoke softly, and
I reckon a body
slowly, "Well
jus' liks tuh
stay whar he was raised up . . . Thar ain't no
place lik home, I reckon."
"I guess not." I smiled. "But wouldn't you
like your children to go to school?"
"Well, I reckon I wouldn't," she drawled. "I
guess they jus' don't lam em nothin . "
But her children did go to school to one of
those "legendary"
schx)l houses at the
head of the creek. What grade? She didn't know.
How often does she go to town? "Onct a yere."
What town? She didn't know.
After asking her if she was really happy here, I
watched her almost expressionless face as she
replied in a whisper, "Nope, I reckon not
She unknowingly voiced the opinion of all the
hollow folk. For they all replied the same to the
same questions.
No one knew anything about the world outside
their hollow. They were born here and they hoped
to die here. They are resigned, but not content.
They can't laugh, but they don't cry. They live,
but not really.
Their story is pathetic, tragic, and disgusting.
Pathetic because they live so. Tragic because they
know nothing better. And disgusting because
we let them.
one-side- d

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World Unto Themselves

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Story and Pictures
By Judy Grisham

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Tragedy Of The Hills: The Children Stay

Place Like Home

A Creek:

-

Expressway To The Hollows

* f

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, April 20, 19fif

Baseball: That

fair name of the University before
the baseball public, started out
"nervously," losing its first three